6 letter words

Accent (n.) A superior force of voice or of articulative effort upon some particular syllable of a word or a phrase, distinguishing it from the others.

Accent (n.) A special emphasis of a tone, even in the weaker part of the measure.

Accent (n.) The rhythmical accent, which marks phrases and sections of a period.

Accent (n.) The expressive emphasis and shading of a passage.

Accent (v. t.) To mark emphatically; to emphasize.

Active (a.) Quick in physical movement; of an agile and vigorous body; nimble; as, an active child or animal.

Adonis (n.) A genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae, containing the pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis); -- named from Adonis, whose blood was fabled to have stained the flower.

Aerial (a.) Of or pertaining to the air, or atmosphere; inhabiting or frequenting the air; produced by or found in the air; performed in the air; as, aerial regions or currents.

Albino (n.) A person, whether negro, Indian, or white, in whom by some defect of organization the substance which gives color to the skin, hair, and eyes is deficient or in a morbid state. An albino has a skin of a milky hue, with hair of the same color, and eyes with deep red pupil and pink or blue iris. The term is also used of the lower animals, as white mice, elephants, etc.; and of plants in a whitish condition from the absence of chlorophyll.

Aldine (a.) An epithet applied to editions (chiefly of the classics) which proceeded from the press of Aldus Manitius, and his family, of Venice, for the most part in the 16th century and known by the sign of the anchor and the dolphin. The term has also been applied to certain elegant editions of English works.

Amphid (n.) A salt of the class formed by the combination of an acid and a base, or by the union of two oxides, two sulphides, selenides, or tellurides, as distinguished from a haloid compound.

Angler (n.) A fish (Lophius piscatorius), of Europe and America, having a large, broad, and depressed head, with the mouth very large. Peculiar appendages on the head are said to be used to entice fishes within reach. Called also fishing frog, frogfish, toadfish, goosefish, allmouth, monkfish, etc.

Aoudad (n.) An African sheeplike quadruped (the Ammotragus tragelaphus) having a long mane on the breast and fore legs. It is, perhaps, the chamois of the Old Testament.

Aphasy (n.) Loss of the power of speech, or of the appropriate use of words, the vocal organs remaining intact, and the intelligence being preserved. It is dependent on injury or disease of the brain.

Aphony (n.) Loss of voice or vocal utterance.

Aphtha (n.) One of the whitish specks called aphthae.

Aphtha (n.) The disease, also called thrush.

Apollo (n.) A deity among the Greeks and Romans. He was the god of light and day (the "sun god"), of archery, prophecy, medicine, poetry, and music, etc., and was represented as the model of manly grace and beauty; -- called also Phebus.

Appeal (v. t.) Resort to physical means; recourse.

Aquila (n.) A northern constellation southerly from Lyra and Cygnus and preceding the Dolphin; the Eagle.

Arabin (n.) A carbohydrate, isomeric with cane sugar, contained in gum arabic, from which it is extracted as a white, amorphous substance.

Arrest (v. t.) Any seizure by power, physical or moral.

Asylum (n.) An institution for the protection or relief of some class of destitute, unfortunate, or afflicted persons; as, an asylum for the aged, for the blind, or for the insane; a lunatic asylum; an orphan asylum.

Attack (v. t.) To assail with unfriendly speech or writing; to begin a controversy with; to attempt to overthrow or bring into disrepute, by criticism or satire; to censure; as, to attack a man, or his opinions, in a pamphlet.

Attend (v. t.) To go or stay with, as a companion, nurse, or servant; to visit professionally, as a physician; to accompany or follow in order to do service; to escort; to wait on; to serve.

Auriga (n.) The Charioteer, or Wagoner, a constellation in the northern hemisphere, situated between Perseus and Gemini. It contains the bright star Capella.

Avaunt (interj.) Begone; depart; -- a word of contempt or abhorrence, equivalent to the phrase "Get thee gone."

Baboon (n.) One of the Old World Quadrumana, of the genera Cynocephalus and Papio; the dog-faced ape. Baboons have dog-like muzzles and large canine teeth, cheek pouches, a short tail, and naked callosities on the buttocks. They are mostly African. See Mandrill, and Chacma, and Drill an ape.

Balaam (n.) A paragraph describing something wonderful, used to fill out a newspaper column; -- an allusion to the miracle of Balaam's ass speaking.

Barbet (n.) A larva that feeds on aphides.

Barite (n.) Native sulphate of barium, a mineral occurring in transparent, colorless, white to yellow crystals (generally tabular), also in granular form, and in compact massive forms resembling marble. It has a high specific gravity, and hence is often called heavy spar. It is a common mineral in metallic veins.

Bayard (a.) Properly, a bay horse, but often any horse. Commonly in the phrase blind bayard, an old blind horse.

Beaten (a.) Become common or trite; as, a beaten phrase.

Beaver (n.) An amphibious rodent, of the genus Castor.

Becuna (n.) A fish of the Mediterranean (Sphyraena spet). See Barracuda.

Beluga (n.) A cetacean allied to the dolphins.

Berlin (n.) Fine worsted for fancy-work; zephyr worsted; -- called also Berlin wool.

Better (a.) Having good qualities in a greater degree than another; as, a better man; a better physician; a better house; a better air.

Better (a.) To improve the condition of, morally, physically, financially, socially, or otherwise.

Beyond (prep.) Past, out of the reach or sphere of; further than; greater than; as, the patient was beyond medical aid; beyond one's strength.

Blende (n.) A mineral, called also sphalerite, and by miners mock lead, false galena, and black-jack. It is a zinc sulphide, but often contains some iron. Its color is usually yellow, brown, or black, and its luster resinous.

Blende (n.) A general term for some minerals, chiefly metallic sulphides which have a somewhat brilliant but nonmetallic luster.

Blight (n.) Mildew; decay; anything nipping or blasting; -- applied as a general name to various injuries or diseases of plants, causing the whole or a part to wither, whether occasioned by insects, fungi, or atmospheric influences.

Blight (n.) A downy species of aphis, or plant louse, destructive to fruit trees, infesting both the roots and branches; -- also applied to several other injurious insects.

Bloody (a.) Infamous; contemptible; -- variously used for mere emphasis or as a low epithet.

Bodily (a.) Having a body or material form; physical; corporeal; consisting of matter.

Borage (n.) A mucilaginous plant of the genus Borago (B. officinalis), which is used, esp. in France, as a demulcent and diaphoretic.

Botfly (n.) A dipterous insect of the family (Estridae, of many different species, some of which are particularly troublesome to domestic animals, as the horse, ox, and sheep, on which they deposit their eggs. A common species is one of the botflies of the horse (Gastrophilus equi), the larvae of which (bots) are taken into the stomach of the animal, where they live several months and pass through their larval states. I

Boothy (n.) A wooden hut or humble cot, esp. a rude hut or barrack for unmarried farm servants; a shepherd's or hunter's hut; a booth.

Bubale (n.) A large antelope (Alcelaphus bubalis) of Egypt and the Desert of Sahara, supposed by some to be the fallow deer of the Bible.

Cabala (n.) A kind of occult theosophy or traditional interpretation of the Scriptures among Jewish rabbis and certain mediaeval Christians, which treats of the nature of god and the mystery of human existence. It assumes that every letter, word, number, and accent of Scripture contains a hidden sense; and it teaches the methods of interpretation for ascertaining these occult meanings. The cabalists pretend even to foretell events by this means.

Cadmic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, cadmium; as, cadmic sulphide.

Caliph (n.) Successor or vicar; -- a title of the successors of Mohammed both as temporal and spiritual rulers, now used by the sultans of Turkey.

Camera (n.) A chamber, or instrument having a chamber. Specifically: The camera obscura when used in photography. See Camera, and Camera obscura.

Carbon (n.) An elementary substance, not metallic in its nature, which is present in all organic compounds. Atomic weight 11.97. Symbol C. it is combustible, and forms the base of lampblack and charcoal, and enters largely into mineral coals. In its pure crystallized state it constitutes the diamond, the hardest of known substances, occuring in monometric crystals like the octahedron, etc.

Carboy (n.) A large, globular glass bottle, esp. one of green glass, inclosed in basket work or in a box, for protection; -- used commonly for carrying corrosive liquids; as sulphuric acid, etc.

Cardia (n.) The anterior or cardiac orifice of the stomach, where the esophagus enters it.

Carmot (n.) The matter of which the philosopher's stone was believed to be composed.

Castle (n.) A small tower, as on a ship, or an elephant's back.

Ceriph (n.) One of the fine lines of a letter, esp. one of the fine cross strokes at the top and bottom of letters.

Cestus (n.) A girdle; particularly that of Aphrodite (or Venus) which gave the wearer the power of exciting love.

Cestus (n.) A genus of Ctenophora. The typical species (Cestus Veneris) is remarkable for its brilliant iridescent colors, and its long, girdlelike form.

Chacma (n.) A large species of African baboon (Cynocephalus porcarius); -- called also ursine baboon. [See Illust. of Baboon.]

Change (v. i.) To pass from one phase to another; as, the moon changes to-morrow night.

Change (v. t.) A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon.

Cherub (n.) One of a order of angels, variously represented in art. In European painting the cherubim have been shown as blue, to denote knowledge, as distinguished from the seraphim (see Seraph), and in later art the children's heads with wings are generally called cherubs.

Chitin (n.) A white amorphous horny substance forming the harder part of the outer integument of insects, crustacea, and various other invertebrates; entomolin.

Chiton (n.) One of a group of gastropod mollusks, with a shell composed of eight movable dorsal plates. See Polyplacophora.

Chromo (n.) A chromolithograph.

Cipher (n.) A character 0 which, standing by itself, expresses nothing, but when placed at the right hand of a whole number, increases its value tenfold.

Cipher (n.) One who, or that which, has no weight or influence.

Cipher (n.) A character in general, as a figure or letter.

Cipher (n.) A combination or interweaving of letters, as the initials of a name; a device; a monogram; as, a painter's cipher, an engraver's cipher, etc. The cut represents the initials N. W.

Cipher (n.) A private alphabet, system of characters, or other mode of writing, contrived for the safe transmission of secrets; also, a writing in such characters.

Cipher (a.) Of the nature of a cipher; of no weight or influence.

Cipher (v. i.) To use figures in a mathematical process; to do sums in arithmetic.

Cipher (v. t.) To write in occult characters.

Cipher (v. t.) To get by ciphering; as, to cipher out the answer.

Cipher (v. t.) To decipher.

Cipher (v. t.) To designate by characters.

Circle (n.) A round body; a sphere; an orb.

Clause (n.) A separate portion of a written paper, paragraph, or sentence; an article, stipulation, or proviso, in a legal document.

Climax (v. i.) A figure in which the parts of a sentence or paragraph are so arranged that each succeeding one rises above its predecessor in impressiveness.

Cloaca (n.) The common chamber into which the intestinal, urinary, and generative canals discharge in birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes.

Cogent (p. a.) Compelling, in a physical sense; powerful.

Cohosh (n.) A perennial American herb (Caulophyllum thalictroides), whose rootstock is used in medicine; -- also called pappoose root. The name is sometimes also given to the Cimicifuga racemosa, and to two species of Actaea, plants of the Crowfoot family.

Collar (n.) A ringlike part of a mollusk in connection with esophagus.

Collie (n.) The Scotch shepherd dog. There are two breeds, the rough-haired and smooth-haired. It is remarkable for its intelligence, displayed especially in caring for flocks.

Compel (v. t.) To drive or urge with force, or irresistibly; to force; to constrain; to oblige; to necessitate, either by physical or moral force.

Condor (n.) A very large bird of the Vulture family (Sarcorhamphus gryphus), found in the most elevated parts of the Andes.

Convex (a.) Rising or swelling into a spherical or rounded form; regularly protuberant or bulging; -- said of a spherical surface or curved

Corona (n.) A circle, usually colored, seen in peculiar states of the atmosphere around and close to a luminous body, as the sun or moon.

Corona (n.) A peculiar phase of the aurora borealis, formed by the concentration or convergence of luminous beams around the point in the heavens indicated by the direction of the dipping needle.

Crasis (n.) A contraction of two vowels (as the final and initial vowels of united words) into one long vowel, or into a diphthong; synaeresis; as, cogo for coago.

Crater (n.) A constellation of the southen hemisphere; -- called also the Cup.

Crenel (n.) An embrasure or indentation in a battlement; a loophole in a fortress; an indentation; a notch. See Merlon, and Illust. of Battlement.

Cresol (n.) Any one of three metameric substances, CH3.C6H4.OH, homologous with and resembling phenol. They are obtained from coal tar and wood tar, and are colorless, oily liquids or solids. [Called also cresylic acid.]

Croton (n.) A genus of euphorbiaceous plants belonging to tropical countries.

Cupola (n.) A roof having a rounded form, hemispherical or nearly so; also, a ceiling having the same form. When on a large scale it is usually called dome.

Cygnus (n.) A constellation of the northern hemisphere east of, or following, Lyra; the Swan.

Cymene (n.) A colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon, CH3.C6H4.C3H7, of pleasant odor, obtained from oil of cumin, oil of caraway, carvacrol, camphor, etc.; -- called also paracymene, and formerly camphogen.

Cypher (n. & v.) See Cipher.

Cytoid (a.) Cell-like; -- applied to the corpuscles of lymph, blood, chyle, etc.

Daniel (n.) A Hebrew prophet distinguished for sagacity and ripeness of judgment in youth; hence, a sagacious and upright judge.

Daphne (n.) A genus of diminutive Shrubs, mostly evergreen, and with fragrant blossoms.

Daphne (n.) A nymph of Diana, fabled to have been changed into a laurel tree.

Davyne (n.) A variety of nephelite from Vesuvius.

Dayfly (n.) A neuropterous insect of the genus Ephemera and related genera, of many species, and inhabiting fresh water in the larval state; the ephemeral fly; -- so called because it commonly lives but one day in the winged or adult state. See Ephemeral fly, under Ephemeral.

Defect (n.) Failing; fault; imperfection, whether physical or moral; blemish; as, a defect in the ear or eye; a defect in timber or iron; a defect of memory or judgment.

Defend (v. t.) To repel danger or harm from; to protect; to secure against; attack; to maintain against force or argument; to uphold; to guard; as, to defend a town; to defend a cause; to defend character; to defend the absent; -- sometimes followed by from or against; as, to defend one's self from, or against, one's enemies.

Define (v. t.) To determine the precise signification of; to fix the meaning of; to describe accurately; to explain; to expound or interpret; as, to define a word, a phrase, or a scientific term.

Desman (n.) An amphibious, insectivorous mammal found in Russia (Myogale moschata). It is allied to the moles, but is called muskrat by some English writers.

Digram (n.) A digraph.

Dimera (n. pl.) A division of the Hemiptera, including the aphids.

Dipnoi (n. pl.) A group of ganoid fishes, including the living genera Ceratodus and Lepidosiren, which present the closest approximation to the Amphibia. The air bladder acts as a lung, and the nostrils open inside the mouth. See Ceratodus, and Illustration in Appendix.

Dipyre (n.) A mineral of the scapolite group; -- so called from the double effect of fire upon it, in fusing it, and rendering it phosphorescent.

Dirige (n.) A service for the dead, in the Roman Catholic Church, being the first antiphon of Matins for the dead, of which Dirige is the first word; a dirge.

Disorb (v. t.) To throw out of the proper orbit; to unsphere.

Divers (a.) Several; sundry; various; more than one, but not a great number; as, divers philosophers. Also used substantively or pronominally.

Doctor (n.) An academical title, originally meaning a men so well versed in his department as to be qualified to teach it. Hence: One who has taken the highest degree conferred by a university or college, or has received a diploma of the highest degree; as, a doctor of divinity, of law, of medicine, of music, or of philosophy. Such diplomas may confer an honorary title only.

Doctor (n.) One duly licensed to practice medicine; a member of the medical profession; a physician.

Doctor (v. t.) To treat as a physician does; to apply remedies to; to repair; as, to doctor a sick man or a broken cart.

Doctor (v. i.) To practice physic.

Dorado (n.) A southern constellation, within which is the south pole of the ecliptic; -- called also sometimes Xiphias, or the Swordfish.

Dorado (n.) A large, oceanic fish of the genus Coryphaena.

Dorism (n.) A Doric phrase or idiom.

Double (n.) A feast in which the antiphon is doubled, hat is, said twice, before and after the Psalms, instead of only half being said, as in simple feasts.

Dragon (n.) A constellation of the northern hemisphere figured as a dragon; Draco.

Drench (v. t.) To cause to drink; especially, to dose by force; to put a potion down the throat of, as of a horse; hence. to purge violently by physic.

Durene (n.) A colorless, crystalline, aromatic hydrocarbon, C6H2(CH3)4, off artificial production, with an odor like camphor.

Duress (n.) The state of compulsion or necessity in which a person is influenced, whether by the unlawful restrain of his liberty or by actual or threatened physical violence, to incur a civil liability or to commit an offense.

Earwig (n.) In America, any small chilopodous myriapod, esp. of the genus Geophilus.

Effort (n.) An exertion of strength or power, whether physical or mental, in performing an act or aiming at an object; more or less strenuous endeavor; struggle directed to the accomplishment of an object; as, an effort to scale a wall.

Ehlite (n.) A mineral of a green color and pearly luster; a hydrous phosphate of copper.

Either (conj. Either) precedes two, or more, coordinate words or phrases, and is introductory to an alternative. It is correlative to or.

Elench (n.) A specious but fallacious argument; a sophism.

Elison (n.) The cutting off or suppression of a vowel or syllable, for the sake of meter or euphony; esp., in poetry, the dropping of a final vowel standing before an initial vowel in the following word, when the two words are drawn together.

Employ (v. t.) To use; to have in service; to cause to be engaged in doing something; -- often followed by in, about, on, or upon, and sometimes by to; as: (a) To make use of, as an instrument, a means, a material, etc., for a specific purpose; to apply; as, to employ the pen in writing, bricks in building, words and phrases in speaking; to employ the mind; to employ one's energies.

Empuse (n.) A phantom or specter.

Engine (n.) A compound machine by which any physical power is applied to produce a given physical effect.

Ephors (pl. ) of Ephor

Ephori (pl. ) of Ephor

Ephyra (n.) A stage in the development of discophorous medusae, when they first begin to swim about after being detached from the strobila. See Strobila.

Escape (n.) An apophyge.

Eureka () The exclamation attributed to Archimedes, who is said to have cried out "Eureka! eureka!" (I have found it! I have found it!), upon suddenly discovering a method of finding out how much the gold of King Hiero's crown had been alloyed. Hence, an expression of triumph concerning a discovery.

Excuss (v. t.) To inspect; to investigate; to decipher.

Expand (v. t.) To cause the particles or parts of to spread themselves or stand apart, thus increasing bulk without addition of substance; to make to occupy more space; to dilate; to distend; to extend every way; to enlarge; -- opposed to contract; as, to expand the chest; heat expands all bodies; to expand the sphere of benevolence.

Extend (v. t.) To enlarge; to widen; to carry out further; as, to extend the capacities, the sphere of usefulness, or commerce; to extend power or influence; to continue, as time; to lengthen; to prolong; as, to extend the time of payment or a season of trail.

Extort (v. t.) To wrest from an unwilling person by physical force, menace, duress, torture, or any undue or illegal exercise of power or ingenuity; to wrench away (from); to tear away; to wring (from); to exact; as, to extort contributions from the vanquished; to extort confessions of guilt; to extort a promise; to extort payment of a debt.

Fauces (n.pl.) The narrow passage from the mouth to the pharynx, situated between the soft palate and the base of the tongue; -- called also the isthmus of the fauces. On either side of the passage two membranous folds, called the pillars of the fauces, inclose the tonsils.

Fawner (n.) One who fawns; a sycophant.

Fecula (n.) The green matter of plants; chlorophyll.

Feeble (superl.) Deficient in physical strength; weak; infirm; debilitated.

Fidget (n.) A general nervous restlessness, manifested by incessant changes of position; dysphoria.

Figure (n.) A mode of expressing abstract or immaterial ideas by words which suggest pictures or images from the physical world; pictorial language; a trope; hence, any deviation from the plainest form of statement.

Figure (n.) To represent by a metaphor; to signify or symbolize.

Finale (n.) The last movement of a symphony, sonata, concerto, or any instrumental composition.

Flower (n.) A substance in the form of a powder, especially when condensed from sublimation; as, the flowers of sulphur.

Frieze (n.) That part of the entablature of an order which is between the architrave and cornice. It is a flat member or face, either uniform or broken by triglyphs, and often enriched with figures and other ornaments of sculpture.

Fungus (n.) Any one of the Fungi, a large and very complex group of thallophytes of low organization, -- the molds, mildews, rusts, smuts, mushrooms, toadstools, puff balls, and the allies of each.

Gabbro (n.) A name originally given by the Italians to a kind of serpentine, later to the rock called euphotide, and now generally used for a coarsely crystalline, igneous rock consisting of lamellar pyroxene (diallage) and labradorite, with sometimes chrysolite (olivine gabbro).

Gaduin (n.) A yellow or brown amorphous substance, of indifferent nature, found in cod-liver oil.

Galena (n.) Lead sulphide; the principal ore of lead. It is of a bluish gray color and metallic luster, and is cubic in crystallization and cleavage.

Gelose (n.) An amorphous, gummy carbohydrate, found in Gelidium, agar-agar, and other seaweeds.

Glance (n.) A name given to some sulphides, mostly dark-colored, which have a brilliant metallic luster, as the sulphide of copper, called copper glance.

Goblin (n.) An evil or mischievous spirit; a playful or malicious elf; a frightful phantom; a gnome.

Gonoph (n.) A pickpocket or thief.

Gopher (n.) One of several North American burrowing rodents of the genera Geomys and Thomomys, of the family Geomyidae; -- called also pocket gopher and pouched rat. See Pocket gopher, and Tucan.

Gopher (n.) One of several western American species of the genus Spermophilus, of the family Sciuridae; as, the gray gopher (Spermophilus Franklini) and the striped gopher (S. tridecemlineatus); -- called also striped prairie squirrel, leopard marmot, and leopard spermophile. See Spermophile.

Gopher (n.) A large land tortoise (Testudo Carilina) of the Southern United States, which makes extensive burrows.

Gopher (n.) A large burrowing snake (Spilotes Couperi) of the Southern United States.

Gospel (v.) Any system of religious doctrine; sometimes, any system of political doctrine or social philosophy; as, this political gospel.

Grimme (n.) A West African antelope (Cephalophus rufilotus) of a deep bay color, with a broad dorsal stripe of black; -- called also conquetoon.

Guelph (n.) Alt. of Guelf

Gue'vi (n.) One of several very small species and varieties of African antelopes, of the genus Cephalophus, as the Cape guevi or kleeneboc (Cephalophus pygmaea); -- called also pygmy antelope.

Gullet (n.) The tube by which food and drink are carried from the pharynx to the stomach; the esophagus.

Gypsum (n.) A mineral consisting of the hydrous sulphate of lime (calcium). When calcined, it forms plaster of Paris. Selenite is a transparent, crystal

Hamite (n.) A fossil cephalopod of the genus Hamites, related to the ammonites, but having the last whorl bent into a hooklike form.

Health (n.) The state of being hale, sound, or whole, in body, mind, or soul; especially, the state of being free from physical disease or pain.

Helium (n.) A gaseous element found in the atmospheres of the sun and earth and in some rare minerals.

Heresy (n.) An opinion held in opposition to the established or commonly received doctrine, and tending to promote a division or party, as in politics, literature, philosophy, etc.; -- usually, but not necessarily, said in reproach.

Heyday (n.) The time of triumph and exultation; hence, joy, high spirits, frolicsomeness; wildness.

Hither (adv.) To this point, source, conclusion, design, etc.; -- in a sense not physical.

Hollow (a.) Having an empty space or cavity, natural or artificial, within a solid substance; not solid; excavated in the interior; as, a hollow tree; a hollow sphere.

Holmos (n.) A closed vessel of nearly spherical form on a high stem or pedestal.

Horary (a.) Occurring once an hour; continuing an hour; hourly; ephemeral.

Howdah (n.) A seat or pavilion, generally covered, fastened on the back of an elephant, for the rider or riders.

Hydrus (n.) A constellation of the southern hemisphere, near the south pole.

Hyphae (n. pl.) The long, branching filaments of which the mycelium (and the greater part of the plant) of a fungus is formed. They are also found enveloping the gonidia of lichens, making up a large part of their structure.

Hyphen (n.) A mark or short dash, thus [-], placed at the end of a Hyphen (v. t.) To connect with, or separate by, a hyphen, as two words or the parts of a word.

Imphee (n.) The African sugar cane (Holcus saccharatus), -- resembling the sorghum, or Chinese sugar cane.

Import (n.) That which a word, phrase, or document contains as its signification or intention or interpretation of a word, action, event, and the like.

Indeed (adv.) In reality; in truth; in fact; verily; truly; -- used in a variety of sense. Esp.: (a) Denoting emphasis; as, indeed it is so. (b) Denoting concession or admission; as, indeed, you are right. (c) Denoting surprise; as, indeed, is it you? Its meaning is not intrinsic or fixed, but depends largely on the form of expression which it accompanies.

Indent (v. t.)

Inject (v. t.) To throw in; to dart in; to force in; as, to inject cold water into a condenser; to inject a medicinal liquid into a cavity of the body; to inject morphine with a hypodermic syringe.

Insect (a.) Like an insect; small; mean; ephemeral.

Iodize (v. t.) To treat or impregnate with iodine or its compounds; as, to iodize a plate for photography.

Isobar (n.) The quality or state of being equal in weight, especially in atmospheric pressure. Also, the theory, method, or application of isobaric science.

Italic (n.) An Italic letter, character, or type (see Italic, a., 2.); -- often in the plural; as, the Italics are the author's. Italic letters are used to distinguish words for emphasis, importance, antithesis, etc. Also, collectively, Italic letters.

Jorden (n.) A pot or vessel with a large neck, formerly used by physicians and alchemists.

Joseph (n.) An outer garment worn in the 18th century; esp., a woman's riding habit, buttoned down the front.

Jujube (n.) The sweet and edible drupes (fruits) of several Mediterranean and African species of small trees, of the genus Zizyphus, especially the Z. jujuba, Z. vulgaris, Z. mucronata, and Z. Lotus. The last named is thought to have furnished the lotus of the ancient Libyan Lotophagi, or lotus eaters.

Kerite (n.) A compound in which tar or asphaltum combined with animal or vegetable oils is vulcanized by sulphur, the product closely resembling rubber; -- used principally as an insulating material in telegraphy.

Kitcat (a.) Designating a club in London, to which Addison and Steele belonged; -- so called from Christopher Cat, a pastry cook, who served the club with mutton pies.

Laccin (n.) A yellow amorphous substance obtained from lac.

Lagena (n.) The terminal part of the cochlea in birds and most reptiles; an appendage of the sacculus, corresponding to the cochlea, in fishes and amphibians.

Langya (n.) One of several species of East Indian and Asiatic fresh-water fishes of the genus Ophiocephalus, remarkable for their power of living out of water, and for their tenacity of life; -- called also walking fishes.

Larynx (n.) The expanded upper end of the windpipe or trachea, connected with the hyoid bone or cartilage. It contains the vocal cords, which produce the voice by their vibrations, when they are stretched and a current of air passes between them. The larynx is connected with the pharynx by an opening, the glottis, which, in mammals, is protected by a lidlike epiglottis.

Launch (n.) The boat of the largest size belonging to a ship of war; also, an open boat of any size driven by steam, naphtha, electricity, or the like.

Laurus (n.) A genus of trees including, according to modern authors, only the true laurel (Laurus nobilis), and the larger L. Canariensis of Madeira and the Canary Islands. Formerly the sassafras, the camphor tree, the cinnamon tree, and several other aromatic trees and shrubs, were also referred to the genus Laurus.

Lazuli (n.) A mineral of a fine azure-blue color, usually in small rounded masses. It is essentially a silicate of alumina, lime, and soda, with some sodium sulphide, is often marked by yellow spots or veins of sulphide of iron, and is much valued for ornamental work. Called also lapis lazuli, and Armenian stone.

Leader (n.) a row of dots, periods, or hyphens, used in tables of contents, etc., to lead the eye across a space to the right word or number.

League (n.) A measure of length or distance, varying in different countries from about 2.4 to 4.6 English statute miles of 5.280 feet each, and used (as a land measure) chiefly on the continent of Europe, and in the Spanish parts of America. The marine league of England and the United States is equal to three marine, or geographical, miles of 6080 feet each.

Legacy (n.) A business with which one is intrusted by another; a commission; -- obsolete, except in the phrases last legacy, dying legacy, and the like.

Leipoa (n.) A genus of Australian gallinaceous birds including but a single species (Leipoa ocellata), about the size of a turkey. Its color is variegated, brown, black, white, and gray. Called also native pheasant.

Leucin (n.) A white, crystalline, nitrogenous substance formed in the decomposition of albuminous matter by pancreatic digestion, by the action of boiling dilute sulphuric acid, and by putrefaction. It is also found as a constituent of various tissues and organs, as the spleen, pancreas, etc., and likewise in the vegetable kingdom. Chemically it is to be considered as amido-caproic acid.

Limpet (n.) Any species of Siphonaria, a genus of limpet-shaped Pulmonifera, living between tides, on rocks.

Lingam (n.) The phallic symbol under which Siva is principally worshiped in his character of the creative and reproductive power.

Litchi (n.) The fruit of a tree native to China (Nephelium Litchi). It is nutlike, having a rough but tender shell, containing an aromatic pulp, and a single large seed. In the dried fruit which is exported the pulp somewhat resembles a raisin in color and form.

Litmus (n.) A dyestuff extracted from certain lichens (Roccella tinctoria, Lecanora tartarea, etc.), as a blue amorphous mass which consists of a compound

Locust (n.) The locust tree. See Locust Tree (definition, note, and phrases).

Loligo (n.) A genus of cephalopods, including numerous species of squids, common on the coasts of America and Europe. They are much used for fish bait.

Longan (n.) A pulpy fruit related to the litchi, and produced by an evergreen East Indian tree (Nephelium Longan).

Luteic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid resembling luteolin, but obtained from the flowers of Euphorbia cyparissias.

Lyceum (n.) A place of exercise with covered walks, in the suburbs of Athens, where Aristotle taught philosophy.

Lymphy (a.) Containing, or like, lymph.

Magilp (n.) Alt. of Magilph

Mahout (n.) The keeper and driver of an elephant.

Mantic (a.) Of or pertaining to divination, or to the condition of one inspired, or supposed to be inspired, by a deity; prophetic.

Marble (n.) A massive, compact limestone; a variety of calcite, capable of being polished and used for architectural and ornamental purposes. The color varies from white to black, being sometimes yellow, red, and green, and frequently beautifully veined or clouded. The name is also given to other rocks of like use and appearance, as serpentine or verd antique marble, and less properly to polished porphyry, granite, etc.

Marmot (n.) Any one of several species of ground squirrels or gophers of the genus Spermophilus; also, the prairie dog.

Marram (n.) A coarse grass found on sandy beaches (Ammophila arundinacea). See Beach grass, under Beach.

Martyr (n.) One who, by his death, bears witness to the truth of the gospel; one who is put to death for his religion; as, Stephen was the first Christian martyr.

Mastax (n.) The pharynx of a rotifer. It usually contains four horny pieces. The two central ones form the incus, against which the mallei, or lateral ones, work so as to crush the food.

Matter (n.) Affair worthy of account; thing of consequence; importance; significance; moment; -- chiefly in the phrases what matter 0 d h p u z no matter, and the like.

Matter (n.) That which is permanent, or is supposed to be given, and in or upon which changes are effected by psychological or physical processes and relations; -- opposed to form.

Medusa (n.) Any free swimming acaleph; a jellyfish.

Megilp (n.) Alt. of Megilph

Menace (n.) The show of an intention to inflict evil; a threat or threatening; indication of a probable evil or catastrophe to come.

Meteor (n.) Any phenomenon or appearance in the atmosphere, as clouds, rain, hail, snow, etc.

Meteor (n.) Specif.: A transient luminous body or appearance seen in the atmosphere, or in a more elevated region.

Method (n.) Classification; a mode or system of classifying natural objects according to certain common characteristics; as, the method of Theophrastus; the method of Ray; the Linnaean method.

Metope (n.) The space between two triglyphs of the Doric frieze, which, among the ancients, was often adorned with carved work. See Illust. of Entablature.

Minnow (n.) A small European fresh-water cyprinoid fish (Phoxinus laevis, formerly Leuciscus phoxinus); sometimes applied also to the young of larger kinds; -- called also minim and minny. The name is also applied to several allied American species, of the genera Phoxinus, Notropis, or Minnilus, and Rhinichthys.

Minuet (n.) A tune or air to regulate the movements of the dance so called; a movement in suites, sonatas, symphonies, etc., having the dance form, and commonly in 3-4, sometimes 3-8, measure.

Minute (n.) A nautical or a geographic mile.

Monism (n.) That doctrine which refers all phenomena to a single ultimate constituent or agent; -- the opposite of dualism.

Moreen (n.) A thick woolen fabric, watered or with embossed figures; -- used in upholstery, for curtains, etc.

Mormon (n.) One of a sect in the United States, followers of Joseph Smith, who professed to have found an addition to the Bible, engraved on golden plates, called the Book of Mormon, first published in 1830. The Mormons believe in polygamy, and their hierarchy of apostles, etc., has control of civil and religious matters.

Morpho (n.) Any one of numerous species of large, handsome, tropical American butterflies, of the genus Morpho. They are noted for the very brilliant metallic luster and bright colors (often blue) of the upper surface of the wings. The lower surface is usually brown or gray, with eyelike spots.

Morula (n.) The sphere or globular mass of cells (blastomeres), formed by the clevage of the ovum or egg in the first stages of its development; -- called also mulberry mass, segmentation sphere, and blastosphere. See Segmentation.

Motive (n.) The theme or subject; a leading phrase or passage which is reproduced and varied through the course of a comor a movement; a short figure, or melodic germ, out of which a whole movement is develpoed. See also Leading motive, under Leading.

Mourne (n.) The armed or feruled end of a staff; in a sheephook, the end of the staff to which the hook is attached.

Mullet (n.) Any one of numerous fishes of the genus Mugil; -- called also gray mullets. They are found on the coasts of both continents, and are highly esteemed as food. Among the most valuable species are Mugil capito of Europe, and M. cephalus which occurs both on the European and American coasts.

Murphy (n.) A potato.

Myelin (n.) One of a group of phosphorized principles occurring in nerve tissue, both in the brain and nerve fibers.

Myself (pron.) I or me in person; -- used for emphasis, my own self or person; as I myself will do it; I have done it myself; -- used also instead of me, as the object of the first person of a reflexive verb, without emphasis; as, I will defend myself.

Naphew (n.) See Navew.

Narrow (superl.) Formed (as a vowel) by a close position of some part of the tongue in relation to the palate; or (according to Bell) by a tense condition of the pharynx; -- distinguished from wide; as e (eve) and / (f/d), etc., from i (ill) and / (f/t), etc. See Guide to Pronunciation, / 13.

Narrow (v. t.) To contract the reach or sphere of; to make less liberal or more selfish; to limit; to confine; to restrict; as, to narrow one's views or knowledge; to narrow a question in discussion.

Nation (n.) A great number; a great deal; -- by way of emphasis; as, a nation of herbs.

Nature (n.) The personified sum and order of causes and effects; the powers which produce existing phenomena, whether in the total or in detail; the agencies which carry on the processes of creation or of being; -- often conceived of as a single and separate entity, embodying the total of all finite agencies and forces as disconnected from a creating or ordering intelligence.

Naught (adv.) The arithmetical character 0; a cipher. See Cipher.

Nephew (n.) A grandson or grandchild, or remoter lineal descendant.

Nephew (n.) A cousin.

Nephew (n.) The son of a brother or a sister, or of a brother-in-law or sister-in-law.

Nereid (n.) A sea nymph, one of the daughters of Nereus, who were attendants upon Neptune, and were represented as riding on sea horses, sometimes with the human form entire, and sometimes with the tail of a fish.

Nereis (n.) A genus, including numerous species, of marine chaetopod annelids, having a well-formed head, with two pairs of eyes, antennae, four pairs of tentacles, and a protrusile pharynx, armed with a pair of hooked jaws.

Neuron (n.) The brain and spinal cord; the cerebro-spinal axis; myelencephalon.

Nickel (n.) A bright silver-white metallic element. It is of the iron group, and is hard, malleable, and ductile. It occurs combined with sulphur in millerite, with arsenic in the mineral niccolite, and with arsenic and sulphur in nickel glance. Symbol Ni. Atomic weight 58.6.

Normal (a.) Denoting certain hypothetical compounds, as acids from which the real acids are obtained by dehydration; thus, normal sulphuric acid and normal nitric acid are respectively S(OH)6, and N(OH)5.

Nuphar (n.) A genus of plants found in the fresh-water ponds or lakes of Europe, Asia, and North America; the yellow water lily. Cf. Nymphaea.

Nylgau (n.) A large Asiatic antelope (Boselaphus, / Portax, tragocamelus), found in Northern India. It has short horns, a black mane, and a bunch of long hair on the throat. The general color is grayish brown.

Nymph/ (pl. ) of Nympha

Nympha (n.) Same as Nymph, 3.

Nympha (n.) Two folds of mucous membrane, within the labia, at the opening of the vulva.

Alalia (n.) Inability to utter articulate sounds, due either to paralysis of the larynx or to that form of aphasia, called motor, or ataxis, aphasia, due to loss of control of the muscles of speech.

Alphol (n.) A crystal

Amidol (n.) A salt of a diamino phenol, C6H3(OH)(NH2)2, used as a developer.

Anisol (n.) Methyl phenyl ether, C6H5OCH3, got by distilling anisic acid or by the action of methide on potassium phenolate.

Astral (a.) Of or pertaining to an aster; as, astral rays; astral sphere.

Atrium (n.) A cavity, entrance, or passage; as, the atrium, or atrial cavity, in the body wall of the amphioxus; an atrium of the infundibula of the lungs, etc.

school () A French school of the middle of the 19th century centering in the village of Barbizon near the forest of Fontainebleau. Its members went straight to nature in disregard of academic tradition, treating their subjects faithfully and with poetic feeling for color, light, and atmosphere. It is exemplified, esp. in landscapes, by Corot, Rousseau, Daubigny, Jules Dupre, and Diaz. Associated with them are certain painters of animals, as Troyon and Jaque, and of peasant life

Bromol (n.) A crystal

Cubism (n.) A movement or phase in post-impressionism (which see, below).

Cuscus (n.) A soft grass (Pennisetum typhoideum) found in all tropical regions, used as food for men and cattle in Central Africa.

Duplex (a.) To arrange, as a telegraph line, so that two messages may be transmitted simultaneously; to equip with a duplex telegraphic outfit.

Gamete (n.) A sexual cell or germ cell; a conjugating cell which unites with another of like or unlike character to form a new individual. In Bot., gamete designates esp. the similar sex cells of the lower thallophytes which unite by conjugation, forming a zygospore. The gametes of higher plants are of two sorts, sperm (male) and egg (female); their union is called fertilization, and the resulting zygote an oospore. In Zool., gamete is most commonly used of the sexual cells of certain Protozoa

Hammer (n.) A spherical weight attached to a flexible handle and hurled from a mark or ring. The weight of head and handle is usually not less than 16 pounds.

Helium (n.) An inert, monoatomic, gaseous element occurring in the atmosphere of the sun and stars, and in small quantities in the earth's atmosphere, in several minerals and in certain mineral waters. Symbol, He; at. wt., 4. Helium was first detected spectroscopically in the sun by Lockyer in 1868; it was first prepared by Ramsay in 1895. Helium has a density of 1.98 compared with hydrogen, and is more difficult to liquefy than the latter. Chemically, it belongs to the argon group

Hyksos (n.) A dynasty of Egyptian kings, often called the Shepherd kings, of foreign origin, who, according to the narrative of Manetho, ruled for about 500 years, forming the XVth and XVIth dynasties. It is now considered that the XVIth is merely a double of the XVth dynasty, and that the total period of the six Hyksos kings was little more than 100 years. It is supposed that they were Asiatic Semites.

Idolon (n.) Appearance or image; a phantasm; a spectral image; also, a mental image or idea.

Keddah (n.) An inclosure constructed to entrap wild elephants; an elephant trap.

Ladino (n.) The mixed Spanish and Hebrew language spoken by Sephardim.

Letter (n.) A telegram longer than an ordinary message sent at rates lower than the standard message rate in consideration of its being sent and delivered subject to priority in service of regular messages. Such telegrams are called by the Western Union Company day, / night, letters according to the time of sending, and by The Postal Telegraph Company day, / night, lettergrams.

Litchi (n.) A genus of East Indian sapindaceous trees consisting of a single species (Litchi Chinensis, syn. Nephelium Litchi) which bears the litchi nut.

Ophism (n.) Doctrines and rites of the Ophites.

Ophism (n.) Serpent worship or the use of serpents as magical agencies.

Phanar (n.) A quarter of Constantinople which, after the Turkish conquest of the city, became the chief Greek quarter; hence, the Greek officials of Turkey, or phanariots, as a class.

Plenum (n.) A condition, as in an occupied room, in which the pressure of the air is greater than that of the outside atmosphere; as, a plenum may exist in a hall ventilated by a fan blower.

Radium (n.) An intensely radioactive metallic element found (combined) in minute quantities in pitchblende, and various other uranium minerals. Symbol, Ra; atomic weight, 226.4. Radium was discovered by M. and Mme. Curie, of Paris, who in 1902 separated compounds of it by a tedious process from pitchblende. Its compounds color flames carmine and give a characteristic spectrum. It resembles barium chemically. Radium preparations are remarkable for maintaining themselves at a higher temperature

Reseau (n.) A system of lines forming small squares of standard size, which is photographed, by a separate exposure, on the same plate with star images to facilitate measurements, detect changes of the film, etc.

Series (n.) In Engler's system of plant classification, a group of families showing certain structural or morphological relationships. It corresponds to the cohort of some writers, and to the order of many modern systematists.

Stress (v. t.) To subject to phonetic stress; to accent.

Stress (v. t.) To place emphasis on; to make emphatic; emphasize.

Stylus (n.) In a photograph, a pointed piece which is moved by the vibrations given to the diaphragm by a sound, and produces the indented record; also, a pointed piece which follows the indented record, vibrates the diaphragm, and reproduces the sound.

Ticker (n.) A telegraphic receiving instrument that automatically prints off stock quotations (stock ticker) and other news on a paper ribbon or "tape."

Trojan (n.) One who shows the pluck, endurance, determined energy, or the like, attributed to the defenders of Troy; -- used chiefly or only in the phrase like a Trojan; as, he endured the pain like a Trojan; he studies like a Trojan.

Tundra (n.) One of the level or undulating treeless plains characteristic of northern arctic regions in both hemispheres. The tundras mark the limit of arborescent vegetation; they consist of black mucky soil with a permanently frozen subsoil, but support a dense growth of mosses and lichens, and dwarf herbs and shrubs, often showy-flowered.

Object (v. t.) A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb.

Oblate (a.) Flattened or depressed at the poles; as, the earth is an oblate spheroid.

Oblige (v. t.) To constrain by physical, moral, or legal force; to put under obligation to do or forbear something.

Oillet (n.) A small opening or loophole, sometimes circular, used in mediaeval fortifications.

Ophite (a.) Of or pertaining to a serpent.

Ophite (n.) A greenish spotted porphyry, being a diabase whose pyroxene has been altered to uralite; -- first found in the Pyreness. So called from the colored spots which give it a mottled appearance.

Ophite (a.) A mamber of a Gnostic serpent-worshiping sect of the second century.

Oppose (n.) To resist or antagonize by physical means, or by arguments, etc.; to contend against; to confront; to resist; to withstand; as, to oppose the king in battle; to oppose a bill in Congress.

Optics (n.) That branch of physical science which treats of the nature and properties of light, the laws of its modification by opaque and transparent bodies, and the phenomena of vision.

Oracle (n.) The communications, revelations, or messages delivered by God to the prophets; also, the entire sacred Scriptures -- usually in the plural.

Oracle (n.) One who communicates a divine command; an angel; a prophet.

Orcein (n.) A reddish brown amorphous dyestuff, /, obtained from orcin, and forming the essential coloring matter of cudbear and archil. It is closely related to litmus.

Orphan (n.) A child bereaved of both father and mother; sometimes, also, a child who has but one parent living.

Orphan (a.) Bereaved of parents, or (sometimes) of one parent.

Orphan (v. t.) To cause to become an orphan; to deprive of parents.

Orphic (a.) Pertaining to Orpheus; Orphean; as, Orphic hymns.

Orpine (n.) A low plant with fleshy leaves (Sedum telephium), having clusters of purple flowers. It is found on dry, sandy places, and on old walls, in England, and has become naturalized in America. Called also stonecrop, and live-forever.

Ortho- () A combining form signifying straight, right, upright, correct, regular; as, orthodromy, orthodiagonal, orthodox, orthographic.

Ortho- () The one of several acids of the same element (as the phosphoric acids), which actually occurs with the greatest number of hydroxyl groups; as, orthophosphoric acid. Cf. Normal.

Ouphen (a.) Elfish.

Oxbane (n.) A poisonous bulbous plant (Buphane toxicaria) of the Cape of Good Hope.

Oxygen (n.) A colorless, tasteless, odorless, gaseous element occurring in the free state in the atmosphere, of which it forms about 23 per cent by weight and about 21 per cent by volume, being slightly heavier than nitrogen. Symbol O. Atomic weight 15.96.

Paleo- () A combining form meaning old, ancient; as, palearctic, paleontology, paleothere, paleography.

Pallet (n.) One of a pair of shelly plates that protect the siphon tubes of certain bivalves, as the Teredo. See Illust. of Teredo.

Panto- () Combining forms signifying all, every; as, panorama, pantheism, pantagraph, pantograph. Pan- becomes pam- before b or p, as pamprodactylous.

Papion (n.) A West African baboon (Cynocephalus sphinx), allied to the chacma. Its color is generally chestnut, varying in tint.

Papula (n.) A pimple; a small, usually conical, elevation of the cuticle, produced by congestion, accumulated secretion, or hypertrophy of tissue; a papule.

Paramo (n.) A high, bleak plateau or district, with stunted trees, and cold, damp atmosphere, as in the Andes, in South America.

Paraph (n.) A flourish made with the pen at the end of a signature. In the Middle Ages, this formed a sort of rude safeguard against forgery.

Paraph (v. t.) To add a paraph to; to sign, esp. with the initials.

Parcel (a. & adv.) Part or half; in part; partially. Shak. [Sometimes hyphened with the word following.]

Parrot (n.) Any species of Psittacus, Chrysotis, Pionus, and other genera of the family Psittacidae, as distinguished from the parrakeets, macaws, and lories. They have a short rounded or even tail, and often a naked space on the cheeks. The gray parrot, or jako (P. erithacus) of Africa (see Jako), and the species of Amazon, or green, parrots (Chrysotis) of America, are examples. Many species, as cage birds, readily learn to imitate sounds, and to repeat words and phrases.

Pastor (n.) A shepherd; one who has the care of flocks and herds.

Pectic (a.) Of or pertaining to pectin; specifically, designating an acid obtained from ordinary vegetable jelly (pectin) as an amorphous substance, tough and horny when dry, but gelatinous when moist.

Pencil (n.) A slender cylinder or strip of black lead, colored chalk, slate etc., or such a cylinder or strip inserted in a small wooden rod intended to be pointed, or in a case, which forms a handle, -- used for drawing or writing. See Graphite.

Penman (n.) One who uses the pen; a writer; esp., one skilled in the use of the pen; a calligrapher; a writing master.

Period (n.) A portion of time as limited and determined by some recurring phenomenon, as by the completion of a revolution of one of the heavenly bodies; a division of time, as a series of years, months, or days, in which something is completed, and ready to recommence and go on in the same order; as, the period of the sun, or the earth, or a comet.

Petro- () A combining form from Gr. / a rock, / a stone; as, petrology, petroglyphic.

Peucil (n.) A liquid resembling camphene, obtained by treating turpentine hydrochloride with lime.

Phasma (n.) An apparition; a phantom; an appearance.

Phenic (a.) Of, pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, phenyl or phenol.

Phenol (n.) Any one of the series of hydroxyl derivatives of which phenol proper is the type.

Philip (n.) The house sparrow. Called also phip.

Philo- () A combining form from Gr. fi`los loving, fond of, attached to; as, philosophy, philotechnic.

Phonal (a.) Of or relating to the voice; as, phonal structure.

Phono- () A combining form from Gr. / sound, tone; as, phonograph, phonology.

Photo- () A combining form from Gr. fw^s, fwto`s, light; as, photography, phototype, photometer.

Phrase (n.) A brief expression, sometimes a single word, but usually two or more words forming an expression by themselves, or being a portion of a sentence; as, an adverbial phrase.

Phrase (v. i.) To use proper or fine phrases.

Phrase (v. i.) To group notes into phrases; as, he phrases well. See Phrase, n., 4.

Physic (n.) A physician.

Physic (v. t.) To treat with physic or medicine; to administer medicine to, esp. a cathartic; to operate on as a cathartic; to purge.

Phyto- () A combining form from Gr. fyto`n a plant; as, phytochemistry, phytography.

Phyton (n.) One of the parts which by their repetition make up a flowering plant, each being a single joint of a stem with its leaf or leaves; a phytomer.

Pickle (v. t.) A bath of dilute sulphuric or nitric acid, etc., to remove burnt sand, scale rust, etc., from the surface of castings, or other articles of metal, or to brighten them or improve their color.

Picryl (n.) The hypothetical radical of picric acid, analogous to phenyl.

Pinion (n.) A moth of the genus Lithophane, as L. antennata, whose larva bores large holes in young peaches and apples.

Platy- () A combining form from Gr. platy`s broad, wide, flat; as, platypus, platycephalous.

Podium (n.) The dwarf wall surrounding the arena of an amphitheater, from the top of which the seats began.

Poison (n.) Any agent which, when introduced into the animal organism, is capable of producing a morbid, noxious, or deadly effect upon it; as, morphine is a deadly poison; the poison of pestilential diseases.

Poling (n.) One of the poles or planks used in upholding the side earth in excavating a tunnel, ditch, etc.

Potent (a.) Producing great physical effects; forcible; powerful' efficacious; as, a potent medicine.

Prelal (a.) Of or pertaining to printing; typographical.

Pretty (adv.) In some degree; moderately; considerably; rather; almost; -- less emphatic than very; as, I am pretty sure of the fact; pretty cold weather.

Pteron (n.) The region of the skull, in the temporal fossa back of the orbit, where the great wing of the sphenoid, the temporal, the parietal, and the frontal hones approach each other.

Purity (n.) Freedom from foreign idioms, or from barbarous or improper words or phrases; as, purity of style.

Pyrite (n.) A common mineral of a pale brass-yellow color and brilliant metallic luster, crystallizing in the isometric system; iron pyrites; iron disulphide.

Rabies (n.) Same as Hydrophobia (b); canine madness.

Radish (n.) The pungent fleshy root of a well-known cruciferous plant (Raphanus sativus); also, the whole plant.

Radius (n.)

Radula (n.) The chitinous ribbon bearing the teeth of mollusks; -- called also lingual ribbon, and tongue. See Odontophore.

Raffia (n.) A fibrous material used for tying plants, said to come from the leaves of a palm tree of the genus Raphia.

Ramist (n.) A follower of Pierre Rame, better known as Ramus, a celebrated French scholar, who was professor of rhetoric and philosophy at Paris in the reign of Henry II., and opposed the Aristotelians.

Ramoon (n.) A small West Indian tree (Trophis Americana) of the Mulberry family, whose leaves and twigs are used as fodder for cattle.

Random (n.) A roving motion; course without definite direction; want of direction, rule, or method; hazard; chance; -- commonly used in the phrase at random, that is, without a settled point of direction; at hazard.

Random (a.) Going at random or by chance; done or made at hazard, or without settled direction, aim, or purpose; hazarded without previous calculation; left to chance; haphazard; as, a random guess.

Reason (n.) A thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; a just ground for a conclusion or an action; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation; the efficient cause of an occurrence or a phenomenon; a motive for an action or a determination; proof, more or less decisive, for an opinion or a conclusion; principle; efficient cause; final cause; ground of argument.

Regian (n.) An upholder of kingly authority; a royalist.

Region (n.) Tract, part, or space, lying about and including anything; neighborhood; vicinity; sphere.

Report (v. t.) To give an account of; to relate; to tell; to circulate publicly, as a story; as, in the common phrase, it is reported.

Revert (v. i.) To change back, as from a soluble to an insoluble state or the reverse; thus, phosphoric acid in certain fertilizers reverts.

Rhaphe (n.) The continuation of the seed stalk along the side of an anatropous ovule or seed, forming a ridge or seam.

Rhusma (n.) A mixtire of caustic lime and orpiment, or tersulphide of arsenic, -- used in the depilation of hides.

Rocket (n.) An artificial firework consisting of a cylindrical case of paper or metal filled with a composition of combustible ingredients, as niter, charcoal, and sulphur, and fastened to a guiding stick. The rocket is projected through the air by the force arising from the expansion of the gases liberated by combustion of the composition. Rockets are used as projectiles for various purposes, for signals, and also for pyrotechnic display.

Rotund (a.) Round; circular; spherical.

Rubric (n.) That part of any work in the early manuscripts and typography which was colored red, to distinguish it from other portions.

Rugged (n.) Vigorous; robust; hardy; -- said of health, physique, etc.

Rugosa (n. pl.) An extinct tribe of fossil corals, including numerous species, many of them of large size. They are characteristic of the Paleozoic formations. The radiating septs, when present, are usually in multiples of four. See Cyathophylloid.

Samson (n.) An Israelite of Bible record (see Judges xiii.), distinguished for his great strength; hence, a man of extraordinary physical strength.

Sappho (n.) Any one of several species of brilliant South American humming birds of the genus Sappho, having very bright-colored and deeply forked tails; -- called also firetail.

Sarco- () A combining form from Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh; as, sarcophagous, flesh-eating; sarcology.

Saying (n.) That which is said; a declaration; a statement, especially a proverbial one; an aphorism; a proverb.

School (n.) A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.

School (n.) One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning.

School (n.) The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc.

Scypha (n.) See Scyphus, 2 (b).

Scyphi (pl. ) of Scyphus

Seckel (n.) A small reddish brown sweet and juicy pear. It originated on a farm near Philadelphia, afterwards owned by a Mr. Seckel.

Senior (n.) One in the fourth or final year of his collegiate course at an American college; -- originally called senior sophister; also, one in the last year of the course at a professional schools or at a seminary.

Sephen (n.) A large sting ray of the genus Trygon, especially T. sephen of the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. The skin is an article of commerce.

Seraph (n.) One of an order of celestial beings, each having three pairs of wings. In ecclesiastical art and in poetry, a seraph is represented as one of a class of angels.

Serine (n.) A white crystal

Seriph (n.) See Ceriph.

Shadow (n.) A spirit; a ghost; a shade; a phantom.

Shanny (n.) The European smooth blenny (Blennius pholis). It is olive-green with irregular black spots, and without appendages on the head.

Shrimp (v.) In a loose sense, any small crustacean, including some amphipods and even certain entomostracans; as, the fairy shrimp, and brine shrimp. See under Fairy, and Brine.

Shroud (n.) One of the two annular plates at the periphery of a water wheel, which form the sides of the buckets; a shroud plate.

Silene (n.) A genus of caryophyllaceous plants, usually covered with a viscid secretion by which insects are caught; catchfly.

Silver (n.) A soft white metallic element, sonorous, ductile, very malleable, and capable of a high degree of polish. It is found native, and also combined with sulphur, arsenic, antimony, chlorine, etc., in the minerals argentite, proustite, pyrargyrite, ceragyrite, etc. Silver is one of the "noble" metals, so-called, not being easily oxidized, and is used for coin, jewelry, plate, and a great variety of articles. Symbol Ag (Argentum). Atomic weight 107.7. Specific gravity 10.5.

Simile (n.) A word or phrase by which anything is likened, in one or more of its aspects, to something else; a similitude; a poetical or imaginative comparison.

Simpai (n.) A long-tailed monkey (Semnopitchecus melalophus) native of Sumatra. It has a crest of black hair. The forehead and cheeks are fawn color, the upper parts tawny and red, the under parts white. Called also black-crested monkey, and sinpae.

Sindon (n.) A small rag or pledget introduced into the hole in the cranium made by a trephine.

Siphon (n.) A device, consisting of a pipe or tube bent so as to form two branches or legs of unequal length, by which a liquid can be transferred to a lower level, as from one vessel to another, over an intermediate elevation, by the action of the pressure of the atmosphere in forcing the liquid up the shorter branch of the pipe immersed in it

Siphon (n.) One of the tubes or folds of the mantle border of a bivalve or gastropod mollusk by which water is conducted into the gill cavity. See Illust. under Mya, and Lamellibranchiata.

Siphon (n.) The anterior prolongation of the margin of any gastropod shell for the protection of the soft siphon.

Siphon (n.) The tubular organ through which water is ejected from the gill cavity of a cephaloid. It serves as a locomotive organ, by guiding and confining the jet of water. Called also siphuncle. See Illust. under Loligo, and Dibranchiata.

Siphon (n.) The siphuncle of a cephalopod shell.

Siphon (n.) The sucking proboscis of certain parasitic insects and crustaceans.

Siphon (n.) A sproutlike prolongation in front of the mouth of many gephyreans.

Siphon (n.) A tubular organ connected both with the esophagus and the intestine of certain sea urchins and annelids.

Siphon (n.) A siphon bottle.

Siphon (v. t.) To convey, or draw off, by means of a siphon, as a liquid from one vessel to another at a lower level.

Slepez (n.) A burrowing rodent (Spalax typhlus), native of Russia and Asia Minor. It has the general appearance of a mole, and is destitute of eyes. Called also mole rat.

Smilax (n.) A delicate trailing plant (Myrsiphyllum asparagoides) much used for decoration. It is a native of the Cape of Good Hope.

Soosoo (n.) A kind of dolphin (Platanista Gangeticus) native of the river Ganges; the Gangetic dolphin. It has a long, slender, somewhat spatulate beak.

Sophis (pl. ) of Sophi

Sophic (a.) Alt. of Sophical

Sophta (n.) See Softa.

Specie () abl. of L. species sort, kind. Used in the phrase in specie, that is, in sort, in kind, in (its own) form.

Sphene (n.) A mineral found usually in thin, wedge-shaped crystals of a yellow or green to black color. It is a silicate of titanium and calcium; titanite.

Sphere (n.) A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center.

Sphere (n.) Hence, any globe or globular body, especially a celestial one, as the sun, a planet, or the earth.

Sphere (n.) The apparent surface of the heavens, which is assumed to be spherical and everywhere equally distant, in which the heavenly bodies appear to have their places, and on which the various astronomical circles, as of right ascension and declination, the equator, ecliptic, etc., are conceived to be drawn; an ideal geometrical sphere, with the astronomical and geographical circles in their proper positions on it.

Sphere (n.) In ancient astronomy, one of the concentric and eccentric revolving spherical transparent shells in which the stars, sun, planets, and moon were supposed to be set, and by which they were carried, in such a manner as to produce their apparent motions.

Sphere (n.) The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied.

Sphere (n.) Circuit or range of action, knowledge, or influence; compass; province; employment; place of existence.

Sphere (n.) Rank; order of society; social positions.

Sphere (n.) An orbit, as of a star; a socket.

Sphere (v. t.) To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to insphere.

Sphere (v. t.) To form into roundness; to make spherical, or spheral; to perfect.

Sphery (a.) Round; spherical; starlike.

Sphery (a.) Of or pertaining to the spheres.

Sphinx (n.) In Egyptian art, an image of granite or porphyry, having a human head, or the head of a ram or of a hawk, upon the wingless body of a lion.

Sphinx (n.) On Greek art and mythology, a she-monster, usually represented as having the winged body of a lion, and the face and breast of a young woman.

Sphinx (n.) Hence: A person of enigmatical character and purposes, especially in politics and diplomacy.

Sphinx (n.) Any one of numerous species of large moths of the family Sphingidae; -- called also hawk moth.

Sphinx (n.) The Guinea, or sphinx, baboon (Cynocephalus sphinx).

Spider (n.) Any one of numerous species of arachnids comprising the order Araneina. Spiders have the mandibles converted into poison fangs, or falcers. The abdomen is large and not segmented, with two or three pairs of spinnerets near the end, by means of which they spin threads of silk to form cocoons, or nests, to protect their eggs and young. Many species spin also complex webs to entrap the insects upon which they prey.

Spirit (n.) Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter.

Spirit (n.) Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment).

Sprawl (v. i.) To spread irregularly, as vines, plants, or tress; to spread ungracefully, as chirography.

Spring (v. t.) To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant.

Spurge (n.) Any plant of the genus Euphorbia. See Euphorbia.

Stasis (n.) A slackening or arrest of the blood current in the vessels, due not to a lessening of the heart's beat, but presumably to some abnormal resistance of the capillary walls. It is one of the phenomena observed in the capillaries in inflammation.

Stayer (n.) One who upholds or supports that which props; one who, or that which, stays, stops, or restrains; also, colloquially, a horse, man, etc., that has endurance, an a race.

Stigma (v. t.) One of the apertures of the gill of an ascidian, and of Amphioxus.

Stitch (v. t.) To sew, or unite together by stitches; as, to stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet.

Stolon (n.) An extension of the integument of the body, or of the body wall, from which buds are developed, giving rise to new zooids, and thus forming a compound animal in which the zooids usually remain united by the stolons. Such stolons are often present in Anthozoa, Hydroidea, Bryozoa, and social ascidians. See Illust. under Scyphistoma.

Stress (n.) Force of utterance expended upon words or syllables. Stress is in English the chief element in accent and is one of the most important in emphasis. See Guide to pronunciation, // 31-35.

Strife (n.) Exertion or contention for superiority; contest of emulation, either by intellectual or physical efforts.

Strong (superl.) Having active physical power, or great physical power to act; having a power of exerting great bodily force; vigorous.

Strong (superl.) Having passive physical power; having ability to bear or endure; firm; hale; sound; robust; as, a strong constitution; strong health.

Sturdy (superl.) Characterized by physical strength or force; strong; lusty; violent; as, a sturdy lout.

Stylus (n.) That needle-shaped part at the tip of the playing arm of phonograph which sits in the groove of a phonograph record while it is turning, to detect the undulations in the phonograph groove and convert them into vibrations which are transmitted to a system (since 1920 electronic) which converts the signal into sound; also called needle. The stylus is frequently composed of metal or diamond.

Stylus (n.) The needle-like device used to cut the grooves which record the sound on the original disc during recording of a phonograph record.

Stylus (n.) A pen-shaped pointing device used to specify the cursor position on a graphics tablet.

Subway (n.) An underground way or gallery; especially, a passage under a street, in which water mains, gas mains, telegraph wires, etc., are conducted.

Sucker (n.) A small piece of leather, usually round, having a string attached to the center, which, when saturated with water and pressed upon a stone or other body having a smooth surface, adheres, by reason of the atmospheric pressure, with such force as to enable a considerable weight to be thus lifted by the string; -- used by children as a plaything.

Surfle (v. t.) To wash, as the face, with a cosmetic water, said by some to be prepared from the sulphur.

Surrey (n.) A four-wheeled pleasure carriage, (commonly two-seated) somewhat like a phaeton, but having a straight bottom.

Suslik (n.) A ground squirrel (Spermophilus citillus) of Europe and Asia. It has large cheek pouches.

Sweeny (n.) An atrophy of the muscles of the shoulder in horses; also, atrophy of any muscle in horses.

Syphon (n.) See Syphon.

System (n.) An assemblage of objects arranged in regular subordination, or after some distinct method, usually logical or scientific; a complete whole of objects related by some common law, principle, or end; a complete exhibition of essential principles or facts, arranged in a rational dependence or connection; a regular union of principles or parts forming one entire thing; as, a system of philosophy; a system of government; a system of divinity; a system of botany or chemistry;

Targum (n.) A translation or paraphrase of some portion of the Old Testament Scriptures in the Chaldee or Aramaic language or dialect.

Tartar (n.) A correction which often incrusts the teeth, consisting of salivary mucus, animal matter, and phosphate of lime.

Taster (n.) One of a peculiar kind of zooids situated on the polyp-stem of certain Siphonophora. They somewhat resemble the feeding zooids, but are destitute of mouths. See Siphonophora.

Temper (n.) Constitution of body; temperament; in old writers, the mixture or relative proportion of the four humors, blood, choler, phlegm, and melancholy.

Teraph (n.) See Teraphim.

Terrel (n.) A spherical magnet so placed that its poles, equator, etc., correspond to those of the earth.

Tethys (n.) A genus of a large naked mollusks having a very large, broad, fringed cephalic disk, and branched dorsal gills. Some of the species become a foot long and are brilliantly colored.

Theory (n.) The philosophical explanation of phenomena, either physical or moral; as, Lavoisier's theory of combustion; Adam Smith's theory of moral sentiments.

Thirst (n.) A sensation of dryness in the throat associated with a craving for liquids, produced by deprivation of drink, or by some other cause (as fear, excitement, etc.) which arrests the secretion of the pharyngeal mucous membrane; hence, the condition producing this sensation.

Throat (n.) Hence, the passage through it to the stomach and lungs; the pharynx; -- sometimes restricted to the fauces.

Thrush (n.) An affection of the mouth, fauces, etc., common in newly born children, characterized by minute ulcers called aphthae. See Aphthae.

Thymol (n.) A phenol derivative of cymene, C10H13.OH, isomeric with carvacrol, found in oil of thyme, and extracted as a white crystalTicker (n.) One who, or that which, ticks, or produces a ticking sound, as a watch or clock, a telegraphic sounder, etc.

Tolane (n.) A hydrocarbon, C14H10, related both to the acetylene and the aromatic series, and produced artificially as a white crystalTompon (n.) An inking pad used in lithographic printing.

Tongue (n.) The lingual ribbon, or odontophore, of a mollusk.

Tophet (n.) A place lying east or southeast of Jerusalem, in the valley of Hinnom.

Tophin (n.) Same as Toph.

Tophus (n.) One of the mineral concretions about the joints, and in other situations, occurring chiefly in gouty persons. They consist usually of urate of sodium; when occurring in the internal organs they are also composed of phosphate of calcium.

Tophus (n.) Calcareous tufa.

Toucan (n.) Any one of numerous species of fruit-eating birds of tropical America belonging to Ramphastos, Pteroglossus, and allied genera of the family Ramphastidae. They have a very large, but light and thin, beak, often nearly as long as the body itself. Most of the species are brilliantly colored with red, yellow, white, and black in striking contrast.

Toucan (n.) A modern constellation of the southern hemisphere.

Trepan (n.) A crown-saw or cylindrical saw for perforating the skull, turned, when used, like a bit or gimlet. See Trephine.

Triton (n.) A fabled sea demigod, the son of Neptune and Amphitrite, and the trumpeter of Neptune. He is represented by poets and painters as having the upper part of his body like that of a man, and the lower part like that of a fish. He often has a trumpet made of a shell.

Trophi (n. pl.) The mouth parts of an insect, collectively, including the labrum, labium, maxillae, mandibles, and lingua, with their appendages.

Trophy (n.) A sign or memorial of a victory raised on the field of battle, or, in case of a naval victory, on the nearest land. Sometimes trophies were erected in the chief city of the conquered people.

Trophy (n.) The representation of such a memorial, as on a medal; esp. (Arch.), an ornament representing a group of arms and military weapons, offensive and defensive.

Trophy (n.) Anything taken from an enemy and preserved as a memorial of victory, as arms, flags, standards, etc.

Trophy (n.) Any evidence or memorial of victory or conquest; as, every redeemed soul is a trophy of grace.

Tropic (n.) One of the two small circles of the celestial sphere, situated on each side of the equator, at a distance of 23? 28/, and parallel to it, which the sun just reaches at its greatest declination north or south, and from which it turns again toward the equator, the northern circle being called the Tropic of Cancer, and the southern the Tropic of Capricorn, from the names of the two signs at which they touch the ecliptic.

Turnix (n.) Any one of numerous species of birds belonging to Turnix or Hemipodius and allied genera of the family Turnicidae. These birds resemble quails and partridges in general appearance and in some of their habits, but differ in important anatomical characteristics. The hind toe is usually lacking. They are found in Asia, Africa, Southern Europe, the East Indian Islands, and esp. in Australia and adjacent islands, where they are called quails (see Quail, n., 3.). See Turnicimorphae.

Tusker (n.) An elephant having large tusks.

Tyfoon (n.) See Typhoon.

Typhon (n.) According to Hesiod, the son of Typhoeus, and father of the winds, but later identified with him.

Typhon (n.) A violent whirlwind; a typhoon.

Typhos (n.) Typhus.

Typhus (n.) A contagious continued fever lasting from two to three weeks, attended with great prostration and cerebral disorder, and marked by a copious eruption of red spots upon the body. Also called jail fever, famine fever, putrid fever, spottled fever, etc. See Jail fever, under Jail.

Umlaut (n.) The euphonic modification of a root vowel sound by the influence of a, u, or especially i, in the syllable which formerly followed.

Unable (a.) Not able; not having sufficient strength, means, knowledge, skill, or the like; impotent' weak; helpless; incapable; -- now usually followed by an infinitive or an adverbial phrase; as, unable for work; unable to bear fatigue.

Uphand (a.) Lifted by the hand, or by both hands; as, the uphand sledge.

Uphang (v. t.) To hang up.

Uphasp (v. t.) To hasp or faster up; to close; as, sleep uphasps the eyes.

Upheld () imp. & p. p. of Uphold.

Uphill (adv.) Upwards on, or as on, a hillside; as, to walk uphill.

Uphill (a.) Ascending; going up; as, an uphill road.

Uphill (a.) Attended with labor; difficult; as, uphill work.

Uphilt (v. t.) To thrust in up to the hilt; as, to uphilt one's sword into an enemy.

Uphold (v. t.) To hold up; to lift on high; to elevate.

Uphold (v. t.) To keep erect; to support; to sustain; to keep from falling; to maintain.

Uphold (v. t.) To aid by approval or encouragement; to countenance; as, to uphold a person in wrongdoing.

Uphroe (n.) Same as Euphroe.

Uplift (n.) A raising or upheaval of strata so as to disturb their regularity and uniformity, and to occasion folds, dislocations, and the like.

Uterus (n.) A receptacle, or pouch, connected with the oviducts of many invertebrates in which the eggs are retained until they hatch or until the embryos develop more or less. See Illust. of Hermaphrodite in Append.

Vacuum (n.) The condition of rarefaction, or reduction of pressure below that of the atmosphere, in a vessel, as the condenser of a steam engine, which is nearly exhausted of air or steam, etc.; as, a vacuum of 26 inches of mercury, or 13 pounds per square inch.

Vellon (n.) A word occurring in the phrase real vellon. See the Note under Its Real.

Verine (n.) An alkaloid obtained as a yellow amorphous substance by the decomposition of veratrine.

Vessel (n.) Any tube or canal in which the blood or other fluids are contained, secreted, or circulated, as the arteries, veins, lymphatics, etc.

Virial (n.) A certain function relating to a system of forces and their points of application, -- first used by Clausius in the investigation of problems in molecular physics.

Vision (v.) The faculty of seeing; sight; one of the five senses, by which colors and the physical qualities of external objects are appreciated as a result of the stimulating action of light on the sensitive retina, an expansion of the optic nerve.

Vision (v.) Especially, that which is seen otherwise than by the ordinary sight, or the rational eye; a supernatural, prophetic, or imaginary sight; an apparition; a phantom; a specter; as, the visions of Isaiah.

Volume (n.) Dimensions; compass; space occupied, as measured by cubic units, that is, cubic inches, feet, yards, etc.; mass; bulk; as, the volume of an elephant's body; a volume of gas.

Vulcan (n.) The god of fire, who presided over the working of metals; -- answering to the Greek Hephaestus.

Wanion (n.) A word of uncertain signification, used only in the phrase with a wanion, apparently equivalent to with a vengeance, with a plague, or with misfortune.

Warren (n.) A place privileged, by prescription or grant the king, for keeping certain animals (as hares, conies, partridges, pheasants, etc.) called beasts and fowls of warren.

Warsaw (n.) The black grouper (Epinephelus nigritus) of the southern coasts of the United States.

Weevil (n.) Any one of numerous species of snout beetles, or Rhynchophora, in which the head is elongated and usually curved downward. Many of the species are very injurious to cultivated plants. The larvae of some of the species live in nuts, fruit, and grain by eating out the interior, as the plum weevil, or curculio, the nut weevils, and the grain weevil (see under Plum, Nut, and Grain). The larvae of other species bore under the bark and into the pith of trees and various other plants

Willet (n.) A large North American snipe (Symphemia semipalmata); -- called also pill-willet, will-willet, semipalmated tattler, or snipe, duck snipe, and stone curlew.

Witily (adv.) In a witty manner; wisely; ingeniously; artfully; with it; with a delicate turn or phrase, or with an ingenious association of ideas.

Zamang (n.) An immense leguminous tree (Pithecolobium Saman) of Venezuela. Its branches form a hemispherical mass, often one hundred and eighty feet across. The sweet pulpy pods are used commonly for feeding cattle. Also called rain tree.

Zenith (n.) That point in the visible celestial hemisphere which is vertical to the spectator; the point of the heavens directly overhead; -- opposed to nadir.

Zephyr (n.) The west wind; poetically, any soft, gentle breeze.





Copyright © 2011 by Mark McCracken, All Rights Reserved.