Words whose third letter is N

Agnostic(n.) One who professes ignorance, or denies that we have any knowledge, save of phenomena; one who supports agnosticism, neither affirming nor denying the existence of a personal Deity, a future life, etc.

Agnosticism(n.) The doctrine that the existence of a personal Deity, an unseen world, etc., can be neither proved nor disproved, because of the necessary limits of the human mind (as sometimes charged upon Hamilton and Mansel), or because of the insufficiency of the evidence furnished by physical and physical data, to warrant a positive conclusion (as taught by the school of Herbert Spencer); -- opposed alike dogmatic skepticism and to dogmatic theism.

Annulata(n. pl.) A class of articulate animals, nearly equivalent to Annelida, including the marine annelids, earthworms, Gephyrea, Gymnotoma, leeches, etc. See Annelida.

Aunt(n.) The sister of one's father or mother; -- correlative to nephew or niece. Also applied to an uncle's wife.

Benedicite(n.) A canticle (the Latin version of which begins with this word) which may be used in the order for morning prayer in the Church of England. It is taken from an apocryphal addition to the third chapter of Daniel.

Benthamism(n.) That phase of the doctrine of utilitarianism taught by Jeremy Bentham; the doctrine that the morality of actions is estimated and determined by their utility; also, the theory that the sensibility to pleasure and the recoil from pain are the only motives which influence human desires and actions, and that these are the sufficient explanation of ethical and jural conceptions.

Benzene(n.) A volatile, very inflammable liquid, C6H6, contained in the naphtha produced by the destructive distillation of coal, from which it is separated by fractional distillation. The name is sometimes applied also to the impure commercial product or benzole, and also, but rarely, to a similar mixed product of petroleum.

Benzine(n.) A liquid consisting mainly of the lighter and more volatile hydrocarbons of petroleum or kerosene oil, used as a solvent and for cleansing soiled fabrics; -- called also petroleum spirit, petroleum benzine.

Bind(v. t.) To confine, restrain, or hold by physical force or influence of any kind; as, attraction binds the planets to the sun; frost binds the earth, or the streams.

Bindheimite(n.) An amorphous antimonate of lead, produced from the alteration of other ores, as from jamesonite.

Bond(n.) A unit of chemical attraction; as, oxygen has two bonds of affinity.

Bone(n.) The hard, calcified tissue of the skeleton of vertebrate animals, consisting very largely of calcic carbonate, calcic phosphate, and gelatine; as, blood and bone.

Boneset(n.) A medicinal plant, the thoroughwort (Eupatorium perfoliatum). Its properties are diaphoretic and tonic.

Bontebok(n.) The pied antelope of South Africa (Alcelaphus pygarga). Its face and rump are white. Called also nunni.

Candock(n.) A plant or weed that grows in rivers; a species of Equisetum; also, the yellow frog lily (Nuphar luteum).

Cant(n.) The use of religious phraseology without understanding or sincerity; empty, solemn speech, implying what is not felt; hypocrisy.

Cant(v. i.) To make whining pretensions to goodness; to talk with an affectation of religion, philanthropy, etc.; to practice hypocrisy; as, a canting fanatic.

Cenotaph(n.) An empty tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person who is buried elsewhere.

Cenotaphy(n.) A cenotaph.

Cincture(n.) The fillet, listel, or band next to the apophyge at the extremity of the shaft of a column.

Cinnabar(n.) Red sulphide of mercury, occurring in brilliant red crystals, and also in red or brown amorphous masses. It is used in medicine.

Cinnabar(n.) The artificial red sulphide of mercury used as a pigment; vermilion.

Concerto(n.) A composition (usually in symphonic form with three movements) in which one instrument (or two or three) stands out in bold relief against the orchestra, or accompaniment, so as to display its qualities or the performer's skill.

Concordance(n.) An alphabetical verbal index showing the places in the text of a book where each principal word may be found, with its immediate context in each place.

Condition(n.) Mode or state of being; state or situation with regard to external circumstances or influences, or to physical or mental integrity, health, strength, etc.; predicament; rank; position, estate.

Condor(n.) A very large bird of the Vulture family (Sarcorhamphus gryphus), found in the most elevated parts of the Andes.

Confucian(a.) Of, or relating to, Confucius, the great Chinese philosopher and teacher.

Conge(n.) An apophyge.

Conglobate(a.) Collected into, or forming, a rounded mass or ball; as, the conglobate h p glands; conglobate flowers.

Congo snake() An amphibian (Amphiuma means) of the order Urodela, found in the southern United States. See Amphiuma.

Conico-(a.) A combining form, meaning somewhat resembling a cone; as, conico-cylindrical, resembling a cone and a cylinder; conico-hemispherical; conico-subulate.

Conquer(v. t.) To gain or acquire by force; to take possession of by violent means; to gain dominion over; to subdue by physical means; to reduce; to overcome by force of arms; to cause to yield; to vanquish.

Conquest(n.) The act or process of conquering, or acquiring by force; the act of overcoming or subduing opposition by force, whether physical or moral; subjection; subjugation; victory.

Conquest(n.) That which is conquered; possession gained by force, physical or moral.

Consent(n.) Capable, deliberate, and voluntary assent or agreement to, or concurrence in, some act or purpose, implying physical and mental power and free action.

Consonant(n.) An articulate sound which in utterance is usually combined and sounded with an open sound called a vowel; a member of the spoken alphabet other than a vowel; also, a letter or character representing such a sound.

Consonous(a.) Agreeing in sound; symphonious.

Constitution(n.) The aggregate of all one's inherited physical qualities; the aggregate of the vital powers of an individual, with reference to ability to endure hardship, resist disease, etc.; as, a robust constitution.

Constrictor(n.) A muscle which contracts or closes an orifice, or which compresses an organ; a sphincter.

Consult(v. t.) To ask advice of; to seek the opinion of; to apply to for information or instruction; to refer to; as, to consult a physician; to consult a dictionary.

Consultation(n.) A council or conference, as of physicians, held to consider a special case, or of lawyers restained in a cause.

Consumption(n.) A progressive wasting away of the body; esp., that form of wasting, attendant upon pulmonary phthisis and associated with cough, spitting of blood, hectic fever, etc.; pulmonary phthisis; -- called also pulmonary consumption.


Contrabass(n.) Double bass; -- applied to any instrument of the same deep range as the stringed double bass; as, the contrabass ophicleide; the contrabass tuba or bombardon.

Contract(n.) To draw together or nearer; to reduce to a less compass; to shorten, narrow, or lessen; as, to contract one's sphere of action.

Contraction(n.) Something contracted or abbreviated, as a word or phrase; -- as, plenipo for plenipotentiary; crim. con. for criminal conversation, etc.

Contraversion(n.) A turning to the opposite side; antistrophe.

Conversationism(n.) A word or phrase used in conversation; a colloquialism.

Convert(v. i.) To be turned or changed in character or direction; to undergo a change, physically or morally.

Convex(a.) Rising or swelling into a spherical or rounded form; regularly protuberant or bulging; -- said of a spherical surface

Convexed(a.) Made convex; protuberant in a spherical form.

Cony(n.) An important edible West Indian fish (Epinephelus apua); the hind of Bermuda.

Cynical(a.) Belonging to the sect of philosophers called cynics; having the qualities of a cynic; pertaining to, or resembling, the doctrines of the cynics.

Cynic(n.) One of a sect or school of philosophers founded by Antisthenes, and of whom Diogenes was a disciple. The first Cynics were noted for austere lives and their scorn for social customs and current philosophical opinions. Hence the term Cynic symbolized, in the popular judgment, moroseness, and contempt for the views of others.

Danalite(n.) A mineral occuring in octahedral crystals, also massive, of a reddish color. It is a silicate of iron, zinc manganese, and glucinum, containing sulphur.

Daniel(n.) A Hebrew prophet distinguished for sagacity and ripeness of judgment in youth; hence, a sagacious and upright judge.

Denouement(n.) The unraveling or discovery of a plot; the catastrophe, especially of a drama or a romance.

Dentalium(n.) A genus of marine mollusks belonging to the Scaphopoda, having a tubular conical shell.

Denticete(n. pl.) The division of Cetacea in which the teeth are developed, including the sperm whale, dolphins, etc.

Dentiphone(n.) An instrument which, placed against the teeth, conveys sound to the auditory nerve; an audiphone.

Dinaphthyl(n.) A colorless, crystal.

Dint(n.) Force; power; -- esp. in the phrase by dint of.

Dynactinometer(n.) An instrument for measuring the intensity of the photogenic (light-producing) rays, and computing the power of object glasses.

Dynamical(a.) Relating to physical forces, effects, or laws; as, dynamical geology.

Dynamics(n.) The moving moral, as well as physical, forces of any kind, or the laws which relate to them.

Dynamist(n.) One who accounts for material phenomena by a theory of dynamics.

Dynamograph(n.) A dynamometer to which is attached a device for automatically registering muscular power.

Dyne(n.) The unit of force, in the C. G. S. (Centimeter Gram Second) system of physical units; that is, the force which, acting on a gram for a second, generates a velocity of a centimeter per second.

Fan palm() Any palm tree having fan-shaped or radiate leaves; as the Chamaerops humilis of Southern Europe; the species of Sabal and Thrinax in the West Indies, Florida, etc.; and especially the great talipot tree (Corypha umbraculifera) of Ceylon and Malaya. The leaves of the latter are often eighteen feet long and fourteen wide, and are used for umbrellas, tents, and roofs. When cut up, they are used for books and manuscripts.

Fantastic(a.) Having the nature of a phantom; unreal.

Finale(n.) The last movement of a symphony, sonata, concerto, or any instrumental composition.

Find(v. t.) To provide for; to supply; to furnish; as, to find food for workemen; he finds his nephew in money.

Font(n.) A complete assortment of printing type of one size, including a due proportion of all the letters in the alphabet, large and small, points, accents, and whatever else is necessary for printing with that variety of types; a fount.

Fungus(n.) Any one of the Fungi, a large and very complex group of thallophytes of low organization, -- the molds, mildews, rusts, smuts, mushrooms, toadstools, puff balls, and the allies of each.

Ganglion(n.) A node, or gland in the lymphatic system; as, a lymphatic ganglion.

Ganocephala(n. pl.) A group of fossil amphibians allied to the labyrinthodonts, having the head defended by bony, sculptured plates, as in some ganoid fishes.

Ganocephalous(a.) Of or pertaining to the Ganocephala.

Generality(n.) That which is general; that which lacks specificalness, practicalness, or application; a general or vague statement or phrase.

Generation(n.) The formation or production of any geometrical magnitude

Generation(n.) The aggregate of the functions and phenomene which attend reproduction.

Goniatite(n.) One of an extinct genus of fossil cephalopods, allied to the Ammonites. The earliest forms are found in the Devonian formation, the latest, in the Triassic.

Gonimous(a.) Pertaining to, or containing, gonidia or gonimia, as that part of a lichen which contains the green or chlorophyll-bearing cells.

Gonoblastid(n.) A reproductive bud of a hydroid; a simple gonophore.

Gonochorism(n.) Separation of the sexes in different individuals; -- opposed to hermaphroditism.

Gonochorism(n.) In phylogeny, the evolution of distinct sexes in species previously hermaphrodite or sexless.

Gonoph(n.) A pickpocket or thief.

Gonophore(n.) A sexual zooid produced as a medusoid bud upon a hydroid, sometimes becoming a free hydromedusa, sometimes remaining attached. See Hydroidea, and Illusts. of Athecata, Campanularian, and Gonosome.

Gonophore(n.) A lengthened receptacle, bearing the stamens and carpels in a conspicuous manner.

Gonotheca(n.) A capsule developed on certain hydroids (Thecaphora), inclosing the blastostyle upon which the medusoid buds or gonophores are developed; -- called also gonangium, and teleophore. See Hydroidea, and Illust. of Campanularian.

Gonozooid(n.) A sexual zooid, or medusoid bud of a hydroid; a gonophore. See Hydroidea, and Illust. of Campanularian.

Gunpowder(n.) A black, granular, explosive substance, consisting of an intimate mechanical mixture of niter, charcoal, and sulphur. It is used in gunnery and blasting.

Gunter's quadrant() A thin quadrant, made of brass, wood, etc., showing a stereographic projection on the plane of the equator. By it are found the hour of the day, the sun's azimuth, the altitude of objects in degrees, etc. See Gunter's scale.

Gynaecophore(n.) A ventral canal or groove, in which the males of some di/cious trematodes carry the female. See Illust. of Haematozoa.

Gynandromorph(n.) An animal affected with gynandromorphism,

Gynandromorphism(n.) An abnormal condition of certain animals, in which one side has the external characters of the male, and the other those of the female.

Gynandromorphous(a.) Affected, with gynandromorphism.

Gynephobia(n.) Hatred of women; repugnance to the society of women.

Gynodioecious(a.) Dioecious, but having some hermaphrodite or perfect flowers on an individual plant which bears mostly pistillate flowers.

Gynoecium(n.) The pistils of a flower, taken collectively. See Illust. of Carpophore.

Gynophore(n.) The pedicel raising the pistil or ovary above the stamens, as in the passion flower.

Gynophore(n.) One of the branches bearing the female gonophores, in certain Siphonophora.

Handwriting(n.) The cast or form of writing peculiar to each hand or person; chirography.

Hang(v. i.) To cover, decorate, or furnish by hanging pictures trophies, drapery, and the like, or by covering with paper hangings; -- said of a wall, a room, etc.

Hen(n.) The female of the domestic fowl; also, the female of grouse, pheasants, or any kind of birds; as, the heath hen; the gray hen.

Hind(n.) A spotted food fish of the genus Epinephelus, as E. apua of Bermuda, and E. Drummond-hayi of Florida; -- called also coney, John Paw, spotted hind.

Hindbrain(n.) The posterior of the three principal divisions of the brain, including the epencephalon and metencephalon. Sometimes restricted to the epencephalon only.

Hindleys screw() A screw cut on a solid whose sides are arcs of the periphery of a wheel into the teeth of which the screw is intended to work. It is named from the person who first used the form.

Honeydew(n.) A sweet, saccharine substance, found on the leaves of trees and other plants in small drops, like dew. Two substances have been called by this name; one exuded from the plants, and the other secreted by certain insects, esp. aphids.

Ignis fatuus() A phosphorescent light that appears, in the night, over marshy ground, supposed to be occasioned by the decomposition of animal or vegetable substances, or by some inflammable gas; -- popularly called also Will-with-the-wisp, or Will-o'-the-wisp, and Jack-with-a-lantern, or Jack-o'-lantern.

Ignoramus(n.) We are ignorant; we ignore; -- being the word formerly written on a bill of indictment by a grand jury when there was not sufficient evidence to warrant them in finding it a true bill. The phrase now used is, "No bill," "No true bill," or "Not found," though in some jurisdictions "Ignored" is still used.

Inner(a.) Further in; interior; internal; not outward; as, an spirit or its phenomena.

Innocent(n.) An unsophisticated person; hence, a child; a simpleton; an idiot.

Jonah(n.) The Hebrew prophet, who was cast overboard as one who endangered the ship; hence, any person whose presence is unpropitious.

Juniperin(n.) A yellow amorphous substance extracted from juniper berries.

Kantian(a.) Of or pertaining to Immanuel Kant, the German philosopher; conformed or relating to any or all of the philosophical doctrines of Immanuel Kant.

Kantism(n.) The doctrine or theory of Kant; the Kantian philosophy.

Kingdom(n.) The territory or country subject to a king or queen; the dominion of a monarch; the sphere in which one is king or has control.

Kinnikinic(n.) Prepared leaves or bark of certain plants; -- used by the Indians of the Northwest for smoking, either mixed with tobacco or as a substitute for it. Also, a plant so used, as the osier cornel (Cornus stolonijra), and the bearberry (Arctostaphylus Uva-ursi).

Kinology(n.) That branch of physics which treats of the laws of motion, or of moving bodies.

Konze(n.) A large African antelope (Alcelaphus Lichtensteini), allied to the hartbeest, but having shorter and flatter horns, and lacking a black patch on the face.

Lanarkite(n.) A mineral consisting of sulphate of lead, occurring either massive or in long slender prisms, of a greenish white or gray color.

Lancelet(n.) A small fishlike animal (Amphioxus lanceolatus), remarkable for the rudimentary condition of its organs. It is the type of the class Leptocardia. See Amphioxus, Leptocardia.

Langaha(n.) A curious colubriform snake of the genus Xyphorhynchus, from Madagascar. It is brownish red, and its nose is prolonged in the form of a sharp blade.

Language(n.) The vocabulary and phraseology belonging to an art or department of knowledge; as, medical language; the language of chemistry or theology.

Langya(n.) One of several species of East Indian and Asiatic fresh-water fishes of the genus Ophiocephalus, remarkable for their power of living out of water, and for their tenacity of life; -- called also walking fishes.

Lens(n.) A piece of glass, or other transparent substance, ground with two opposite regular surfaces, either both curved, or one curved and the other plane, and commonly used, either singly or combined, in optical instruments, for changing the direction of rays of light, and thus magnifying objects, or otherwise modifying vision. In practice, the curved surfaces are usually spherical, though rarely cylindrical, or of some other figure.

Linarite(n.) A hydrous sulphate of lead and copper occurring in bright blue monoclinic crystals.

Lingam(n.) The phallic symbol under which Siva is principally worshiped in his character of the creative and reproductive power.

Linnaeite(n.) A mineral of pale steel-gray color and metallic luster, occurring in isometric crystals, and also massive. It is a sulphide of cobalt containing some nickel or copper.

Linoleum(n.) Linseed oil brought to various degrees of hardness by some oxidizing process, as by exposure to heated air, or by treatment with chloride of sulphur. In this condition it is used for many of the purposes to which India rubber has been applied.

Long(n.) The longest dimension; the greatest extent; -- in the phrase, the long and the short of it, that is, the sum and substance of it.

Longan(n.) A pulpy fruit related to the litchi, and produced by an evergreen East Indian tree (Nephelium Longan).

Longbeak(n.) The American redbellied snipe (Macrorhamphus scolopaceus); -- called also long-billed dowitcher.


Lunicurrent(a.) Having relation to changes in currents that depend on the moon's phases.

Manchineel(n.) A euphorbiaceous tree (Hippomane Mancinella) of tropical America, having a poisonous and blistering milky juice, and poisonous acrid fruit somewhat resembling an apple.

Mandelic(a.) Pertaining to an acid first obtained from benzoic aldehyde (oil of better almonds), as a white crystal.

Mandrake(n.) The May apple (Podophyllum peltatum). See May apple under May, and Podophyllum.

Mandrill(n.) a large West African baboon (Cynocephalus, / Papio, mormon). The adult male has, on the sides of the nose, large, naked, grooved swellings, conspicuously striped with blue and red.

Mangrove(n.) The name of one or two trees of the genus Rhizophora (R. Mangle, and R. mucronata, the last doubtfully distinct) inhabiting muddy shores of tropical regions

Mannide(n.) A white amorphous or crystal.

Mannitan(n.) A white amorphous or crystal.

Mantic(a.) Of or pertaining to divination, or to the condition of one inspired, or supposed to be inspired, by a deity; prophetic.

Manzanita(n.) A name given to several species of Arctostaphylos, but mostly to A. glauca and A. pungens, shrubs of California, Oregon, etc., with reddish smooth bark, ovate or oval coriaceous evergreen leaves, and bearing clusters of red berries, which are said to be a favorite food of the grizzly bear.

Menace(n.) The show of an intention to inflict evil; a threat or threatening; indication of a probable evil or catastrophe to come.

Meniere's disease() A disease characterized by deafness and vertigo, resulting in incoordination of movement. It is supposed to depend upon a morbid condition of the semicircular canals of the internal ear. Named after Meniere, a French physician.

Menthol(n.) A white, crystal.

Mention(n.) A speaking or notice of anything, -- usually in a brief or cursory manner. Used especially in the phrase to make mention of.

Mineralizer(n.) An element which is combined with a metal, thus forming an ore. Thus, in galena, or lead ore, sulphur is a mineralizer; in hematite, oxygen is a mineralizer.

Minette(n.) The smallest of regular sizes of portrait photographs.

Minivet(n.) A singing bird of India of the family Campephagidae.

Minnow(n.) A small European fresh-water cyprinoid fish (Phoxinus laevis, formerly Leuciscus phoxinus); sometimes applied also to the young of larger kinds; -- called also minim and minny. The name is also applied to several allied American species, of the genera Phoxinus, Notropis, or Minnilus, and Rhinichthys.

Minuet(n.) A tune or air to regulate the movements of the dance so called; a movement in suites, sonatas, symphonies, etc., having the dance form, and commonly in 3-4, sometimes 3-8, measure.

Minute(n.) A nautical or a geographic mile.

Monad(n.) The elementary and indestructible units which were conceived of as endowed with the power to produce all the changes they undergo, and thus determine all physical and spiritual phenomena.

Monadelphia(n. pl.) A Linnaean class of plants having the stamens united into a tube, or ring, by the filaments, as in the Mallow family.

Monadelphian(a.) Alt. of Monadelphous

Monadelphous(a.) Of or pertaining to the Monadelphia; having the stamens united in one body by the filaments.

Monal(n.) Any Asiatic pheasant of the genus Lophophorus, as the Impeyan pheasant.

Monazite(n.) A mineral occurring usually in small isolated crystals, -- a phosphate of the cerium metals.

Monesia(n.) The bark, or a vegetable extract brought in solid cakes from South America and believed to be derived from the bark, of the tree Chrysophyllum glycyphloeum. It is used as an alterative and astringent.

Monism(n.) That doctrine which refers all phenomena to a single ultimate constituent or agent; -- the opposite of dualism.

Monk(n.) A South American monkey (Pithecia monachus); also applied to other species, as Cebus xanthocephalus.

Monkfish(n.) The angler (Lophius).

Mon-() A prefix signifying one, single, alone; as, monocarp, monopoly; (Chem.) indicating that a compound contains one atom, radical, or group of that to the name of which it is united; as, monoxide, monosulphide, monatomic, etc.

Monocardian(a.) Having a single heart, as fishes and amphibians.

Monocephalous(a.) Having a solitary head; -- said of unbranched composite plants.

Monoclinous(a.) Hermaphrodite, or having both stamens and pistils in every flower.

Monocrotism(n.) That condition of the pulse in which the pulse curve or sphygmogram shows but a single crest, the dicrotic elevation entirely disappearing.

Monodelph(n.) Alt. of Monodelphian

Monodelphian(n.) One of the Monodelphia.

Monodelphia(n. pl.) The group that includes all ordinary or placental mammals; the Placentalia. See Mammalia.

Monodelphic(a.) Alt. of Monodelphous

Monodelphous(a.) Of or pertaining to the Monodelphia.

Monodical(a.) For one voice; monophonic.

Monodical(a.) Homophonic; -- applied to music in which the melody is confined to one part, instead of being shared by all the parts as in the style called polyphonic.

Monoecious(a.) Having the sexes united in one individual, as when male and female flowers grow upon the same individual plant; hermaphrodite; -- opposed to dioecious.

Monogamist(n.) One who practices or upholds monogamy.

Monogamous(a.) Upholding, or practicing, monogamy.

Monogenesis(n.) The direct development of an embryo, without metamorphosis, into an organism similar to the parent organism; -- opposed to metagenesis.

Monogenetic(a.) Relating to, or involving, monogenesis; as, the monogenetic school of physiologists, who admit but one cell as the source of all beings.

Monogram(n.) A character or cipher composed of two or more letters interwoven or combined so as to represent a name, or a part of it (usually the initials). Monograms are often used on seals, ornamental pins, rings, buttons, and by painters, engravers, etc., to distinguish their works.

Monograph(n.) A written account or description of a single thing, or class of things; a special treatise on a particular subject of limited range.

Monographer(n.) A writer of a monograph.

Monographic(a.) Alt. of Monographical

Monographical(a.) Of or pertaining to a monograph, or to a monography; as, a monographic writing; a monographic picture.

Monographist(n.) One who writes a monograph.

Monographous(a.) Monographic.

Monography(n.) A monograph.

Monomorphic(a.) Alt. of Monomorphous

Monomorphous(a.) Having but a single form; retaining the same form throughout the various stages of development; of the same or of an essentially similar type of structure; -- opposed to dimorphic, trimorphic, and polymorphic.

Monomphalus(n.) A form of double monster, in which two individuals are united by a common umbilicus.

Monophanous(a.) Having one and the same appearance; having a mutual resemblance.

Monophonic(a.) Single-voiced; having but one part; as, a monophonic composition; -- opposed to polyphonic.

Monophthong(n.) A single uncompounded vowel sound.

Monophthong(n.) A combination of two written vowels pronounced as one; a digraph.

Monophthongal(a.) Consisting of, or pertaining to, a monophthong.

Monophyletic(a.) Of or pertaining to a single family or stock, or to development from a single common parent form; -- opposed to polyphyletic; as, monophyletic origin.

Monophyllous(a.) One-leaved; composed of a single leaf; as, a monophyllous involucre or calyx.

Monophyodont(a.) Having but one set of teeth; -- opposed to diphyodont.

Monophysite(n.) One of a sect, in the ancient church, who maintained that the human and divine in Jesus Christ constituted but one composite nature. Also used adjectively.

Monophysitical(a.) Of or pertaining to Monophysites, or their doctrines.

Monospherical(a.) Consisting of one sphere only.

Monostrophe(n.) A metrical composition consisting of a single strophe.

Monostrophic(a.) Having one strophe only; not varied in measure; written in unvaried measure.

Monosulphide(n.) A sulphide containing one atom of sulphur, and analogous to a monoxide; -- contrasted with a polysulphide; as, galena is a monosulphide.

Monosulphuret(n.) See Monosulphide.

Monothelite(n.) One of an ancient sect who held that Christ had but one will as he had but one nature. Cf. Monophysite.

Monotriglyph(n.) A kind of intercolumniation in an entablature, in which only one triglyph and two metopes are introduced.

Monotropa(n.) A genus of parasitic or saprophytic plants including the Indian pipe and pine sap. The name alludes to the dropping end of the stem.

Monseigneur(n.) My lord; -- a title in France of a person of high birth or rank; as, Monseigneur the Prince, or Monseigneur the Archibishop. It was given, specifically, to the dauphin, before the Revolution of 1789. (Abbrev. Mgr.)

Monsel's salt() A basic sulphate of iron; -- so named from Monsel, a Frenchman.

Monte-acid(n.) An acid elevator, as a tube through which acid is forced to some height in a sulphuric acid manufactory.

Montgolfier(n.) A balloon which ascends by the buoyancy of air heated by a fire; a fire balloon; -- so called from two brothers, Stephen and Joseph Montgolfier, of France, who first constructed and sent up a fire balloon.

Mundane(a.) Of or pertaining to the world; worldly; earthly; terrestrial; as, the mundane sphere.

Nenuphar(n.) The great white water lily of Europe; the Nymphaea alba.

Nonaerobiotic(a.) Capable of living without atmospheric oxygen; anaerobiotic.

Nonce(n.) The one or single occasion; the present call or purpose; -- chiefly used in the phrase for the nonce.

Noncondensing(a.) Not condensing; discharging the steam from the cylinder at a pressure nearly equal to or above that of the atmosphere and not into a condenser.

Nonemphatic(a.) Alt. of Nonemphatical

Nonemphatical(a.) Having no emphasis; unemphatic.

Nonillion(n.) According to the French and American notation, a thousand octillions, or a unit with thirty ciphers annexed; according to the English notation, a million octillions, or a unit with fifty-four ciphers annexed. See the Note under Numeration.

Nonmetal(n.) Any one of the set of elements which, as contrasted with the metals, possess, produce, or receive, acid rather than basic properties; a metalloid; as, oxygen, sulphur, and chlorine are nonmetals.

Nonmetallic(a.) Resembling, or possessing the properties of, a nonmetal or metalloid; as, sulphur is a nonmetallic element.

Nonphotobiotic(a.) Capable of living without light; as, nonphotobiotic plant cells, or cells which habitually live in darkness.

Benzonaphthol() Alt. of Benzonaphtol

Benzonaphtol() A white crystal.

Benzosol(n.) Guaiacol benzoate, used as an intestinal antiseptic and as a substitute for creosote in phthisis. It is a colorless crystal.

Bunsen cell() A zinc-carbon cell in which the zinc (amalgamated) is surrounded by dilute sulphuric acid, and the carbon by nitric acid or a chromic acid mixture, the two plates being separated by a porous cup.

Candlenut(n.) The fruit of a euphorbiaceous tree or shrub (Aleurites moluccana), native of some of the Pacific islands. It is used by the natives as a candle. The oil from the nut ( candlenut, / kekune, oil) has many uses.

Centrifugal filter() A filter, as for sugar, in which a cylinder with a porous or foraminous periphery is rapidly rotated so as to drive off liquid by centrifugal action.

Centrosphere(n.) The nucleus or central part of the earth, forming most of its mass; -- disting. from lithosphere, hydrosphere, etc.

Centrosphere(n.) The central mass of an aster from which the rays extend and within which the centrosome lies when present; the attraction sphere. The name has been used both as excluding and including the centrosome, and also to designate a modified mass of protoplasm about a centrosome whether aster rays are developed or not.

Cinematograph(n.) A machine, combining magic lantern and kinetoscope features, for projecting on a screen a series of pictures, moved rapidly (25 to 50 a second) and intermittently before an objective lens, and producing by persistence of vision the illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture machine; also, any of several other machines or devices producing moving pictorial effects. Other common names for the cinematograph are animatograph, biograph, bioscope, electrograph, electroscope

Cinematograph(n.) A camera for taking chronophotographs for exhibition by the instrument described above.

Cinematographer(n.) One who exhibits moving pictures or who takes chronophotographs by the cinematograph.

Cinemograph(n.) An integrating anemometer.

Congreve(n.) Short for Congreve match, an early friction match, containing sulphur, potassium chlorate, and antimony sulphide.

Control(n.) Any of the physical factors determining the climate of any particular place, as latitude,distribution of land and water, altitude, exposure, prevailing winds, permanent high- or low-barometric-pressure areas, ocean currents, mountain barriers, soil, and vegetation.

Dingdong theory() The theory which maintains that the primitive elements of language are reflex expressions induced by sensory impressions; that is, as stated by Max Muller, the creative faculty gave to each general conception as it thrilled for the first time through the brain a phonetic expression; -- jocosely so called from the analogy of the sound of a bell induced by the stroke of the clapper.

Feng-hwang(n.) A pheasantlike bird of rich plumage and graceful form and movement, fabled to appear in the land on the accession of a sage to the throne, or when right principles are about to prevail. It is often represented on porcelains and other works of art.

Fungi(n. pl.) A group of thallophytic plants of low organization, destitute of chlorophyll, in which reproduction is mainly accomplished by means of asexual spores, which are produced in a great variety of ways, though sexual reproduction is known to occur in certain Phycomycetes, or so-called algal fungi.

Fungi Imperfecti(pl.) A heterogenous group of fungi of which the complete life history is not known. Some undoubtedly represent the conidium stages of various Ascomycetes. The group is divided into the orders Sphaeropsidales, Melanconiales, and Moniliales.

Gongorism(n.) An affected elegance or euphuism of style, for which the Spanish poet Gongora y Argote (1561-1627), among others of his time, was noted.

Hanukkah(n.) The Jewish Feast of the Dedication, instituted by Judas Maccabaeus, his brothers, and the whole congregation of Israel, in 165 b. c., to commemorate the dedication of the new altar set up at the purification of the temple of Jerusalem to replace the altar which had been polluted by Antiochus Epiphanes (1 Maccabees i. 58, iv. 59).

Hunkers(n. pl.) In the phrase on one's hunkers, in a squatting or crouching position.

Ion(n.) One of the small electrified particles into which the molecules of a gas are broken up under the action of the electric current, of ultraviolet and certain other rays, and of high temperatures. To the properties and behavior of ions the phenomena of the electric discharge through rarefied gases and many other important effects are ascribed. At low pressures the negative ions appear to be electrons; the positive ions, atoms minus an electron.

Kinetograph(n.) A camera for making chronophotographs.

Kinetograph(n.) A machine for the projection of chronophotographs upon a screen for the purpose of producing the effect of an animated picture.

Kinetograph(n.) A combined animated-picture machine and phonograph in which sounds appropriate to the scene are automatically uttered by the latter instrument.

Kinetophone(n.) A machine combining a kinetoscope and a phonograph synchronized so as to reproduce a scene and its accompanying sounds.

Kinit(n.) A unit of force equal to the force which, acting for one second, will give a pound a velocity of one foot per second; -- proposed by J.D.Everett, an English physicist.

Lenard rays() Rays emanating from the outer surface of a plate composed of any material permeable by cathode rays, as aluminium, which forms a portion of a wall of a vacuum tube, or which is mounted within the tube and exposed to radiation from the cathode. Lenard rays are similar in all their known properties to cathode rays. So called from the German physicist Philipp Lenard (b. 1862), who first described them.

Long(a.) Having a supply of stocks or goods; prepared for, or depending for a profit upon, advance in prices; as, long of cotton. Hence, the phrases: to be, or go, long of the market, to be on the long side of the market, to hold products or securities for a rise in price, esp. when bought on a margin.

Manhes process() A process by which copper matte is treated by passing through it a blast of air, to oxidize and remove sulphur. It is analogous in apparatus to the Bessemer process for decarbonizing cast iron. So called from Pierre Manhes, a French metallurgist, who invented it.

Manograph(n.) An optical device for making an indicator diagram for high-speed engines. It consists of a light-tight box or camera having at one end a small convex mirror which reflects a beam of light on to the ground glass or photographic plate at the other end. The mirror is pivoted so that it can be moved in one direction by a small plunger operated by an elastic metal diaphragm which closes a tube connected with the engine cylinder.

Montessori Method() A system of training and instruction, primarily for use with normal children aged from three to six years, devised by Dr. Maria Montessori while teaching in the "Houses of Childhood" (schools in the poorest tenement districts of Rome, Italy), and first fully described by her in 1909.

Nonmoral(a.) Not moral nor immoral; having no connection with morals; not in the sphere of morals or ethics; not ethical.

Ping-pong(n.) A size of photograph a little larger than a postage stamp.

Rontgen(a.) Of or pertaining to the German physicist Wilhelm Konrad Rontgen, or the rays discovered by him; as, Rontgen apparatus.

Rontgen ray() Any of the rays produced when cathode rays strike upon surface of a solid (as the wall of the vacuum tube). Rontgen rays are noted for their penetration of many opaque substances, as wood and flesh, their action on photographic plates, and their fluorescent effects. They were called X rays by their discoverer, W. K. Rontgen. They also ionize gases, but cannot be reflected, or polarized, or deflected by a magnetic field.

Sentence method() A method of teaching reading by giving first attention to phrases and sentences and later analyzing these into their verbal and alphabetic components; -- contrasted with alphabet and word methods.

Syntonic(a.) Of or pert. to syntony; specif., designating, or pert. to, a system of wireless telegraphy in which the transmitting and receiving apparatus are in syntony with, and only with, one another.

Syntonize(v. t.) To adjust or devise so as to emit or respond to electric oscillations of a certain wave length; to tune; specif., to put (two or more instruments or systems of wireless telegraphy) in syntony with each other.

Syntonizer(n.) One that syntonizes; specif., a device consisting essentially of a variable inductance coil and condenser with a pair of adjustable spark balls, for attuning the time periods of antennae in wireless telegraphy (called also syntonizing coil).

Syntony(n.) State of being adjusted to a certain wave length; agreement or tuning between the time period of an apparatus emitting electric oscillations and that of a receiving apparatus, esp. in wireless telegraphy.

Tannigen(n.) A compound obtained as a yellowish gray powder by the action of acetyl chloride or acetic anhydride or ordinary tannic acid. It is used as an intestinal astringent, and locally in rhinitis and pharyngitis.

Tenorrhaphy(n.) Suture of a tendon.

Tundra(n.) One of the level or undulating treeless plains characteristic of northern arctic regions in both hemispheres. The tundras mark the limit of arborescent vegetation; they consist of black mucky soil with a permanently frozen subsoil, but support a dense growth of mosses and lichens, and dwarf herbs and shrubs, often showy-flowered.

Vinegar fly() Any of several fruit flies, esp. Drosophila ampelopophila, which breed in imperfectly sealed preserves and in pickles.

Vinegarroon(n.) A whip scorpion, esp. a large Mexican species (Thelyphonus giganteus) popularly supposed to be very venomous; -- from the odor that it emits when alarmed.

Wind(n.) The region of the pit of the stomach, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury; the mark.

Wen() One of the runes (/) adopted into the Anglo-Saxon, or Old English, alphabet. It had the value of modern English w, and was replaced from about a. d. 1280 at first by uu, later by w.

Xenon(n.) A very heavy, inert gaseous element occurring in the atmosphere in the proportion of one volume is about 20 millions. It was discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898. It can be condensed to a liquid boiling at -109? C., and to a solid which volatilizes without melting. Symbol Xe or X; atomic weight 130.2.

Zincograph(n.) A zinc plate prepared for printing by zincography; also, a print from such a plate.

Oenophilist(n.) A lover of wine.

Oenothionic(a.) Pertaining to an acid now called sulphovinic, / ethyl sulphuric, acid.

Omnigraph(n.) A pantograph.

Ornithodelphia(n. pl.) Same as Monotremata.

Own(a.) Belonging to; belonging exclusively or especially to; peculiar; -- most frequently following a possessive pronoun, as my, our, thy, your, his, her, its, their, in order to emphasize or intensify the idea of property, peculiar interest, or exclusive ownership; as, my own father; my own composition; my own idea; at my own price.

Panto-() Combining forms signifying all, every; as, panorama, pantheism, pantagraph, pantograph. Pan- becomes pam- before b or p, as pamprodactylous.

Pan(n.) The god of shepherds, guardian of bees, and patron of fishing and hunting. He is usually represented as having the head and trunk of a man, with the legs, horns, and tail of a goat, and as playing on the shepherd's pipe, which he is said to have invented.

Panidiomorphic(a.) Having a completely idiomorphic structure; -- said of certain rocks.

Panomphean(a.) Uttering ominous or prophetic voices; divining.

Panpharmacon(n.) A medicine for all diseases; a panacea.

Pansophical(a.) All-wise; claiming universal knowledge; as, pansophical pretenders.

Pansophy(n.) Universal wisdom; esp., a system of universal knowledge proposed by Comenius (1592 -- 1671), a Moravian educator.

Pantagraph(n.) See Pantograph.

Pantamorph(n.) That which assumes, or exists in, all forms.

Pantamorphic(a.) Taking all forms.

Pantelegraph(n.) See under Telegraph.

Pantograph(n.) An instrument for copying plans, maps, and other drawings, on the same, or on a reduced or an enlarged, scale.

Pantographic(a.) Alt. of Pantographical

Pantographical(a.) Of or pertaining to a pantograph; relating to pantography.

Pantography(n.) A general description; entire view of an object.

Pantophagist(n.) A person or an animal that has the habit of eating all kinds of food.

Pantophagous(a.) Eating all kinds of food.

Pantophagy(n.) The habit or power of eating all kinds of food.

Pencil(n.) A slender cylinder or strip of black lead, colored chalk, slate etc., or such a cylinder or strip inserted in a small wooden rod intended to be pointed, or in a case, which forms a handle, -- used for drawing or writing. See Graphite.

Pencraft(n.) Penmanship; skill in writing; chirography.

Penman(n.) One who uses the pen; a writer; esp., one skilled in the use of the pen; a calligrapher; a writing master.

Penmanship(n.) The use of the pen in writing; the art of writing; style or manner of writing; chirography; as, good or bad penmanship.

Penta-() Denoting the degree of five, either as regards quality, property, or composition; as, pentasulphide; pentoxide, etc. Also used adjectively.

Pentadelphous(a.) Having the stamens arranged in five clusters, those of each cluster having their filaments more or less united, as the flowers of the linden.

Pentagram(n.) A pentacle or a pentalpha.

Pentagraphic(a.) Alt. of Pentagraphical

Pentagraphical(a.) Pantographic. See Pantograph.

Pentalpha(n.) A five-pointed star, resembling five alphas joined at their bases; -- used as a symbol.

Pentaphyllous(a.) Having five leaves or leaflets.

Pentathionic(a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid of sulphur obtained by leading hydrogen sulphide into a solution of sulphur dioxide; -- so called because it contains five atoms of sulphur.

Pentoxide(n.) An oxide containing five atoms of oxygen in each molecule; as, phosphorus pentoxide, P2O5.

Pinesap(n.) A reddish fleshy herb of the genus Monotropa (M. hypopitys), formerly thought to be parasitic on the roots of pine trees, but more probably saprophytic.

Pin-eyed(a.) Having the stigma visible at the throad of a gamopetalous corolla, while the stamens are concealed in the tube; -- said of dimorphous flowers. The opposite of thrum-eyed.

Pinion(n.) A moth of the genus Lithophane, as L. antennata, whose larva bores large holes in young peaches and apples.

Pink(v. t.) A name given to several plants of the caryophyllaceous genus Dianthus, and to their flowers, which are sometimes very fragrant and often double in cultivated varieties.

Pintail(n.) A northern duck (Dafila acuta), native of both continents. The adult male has a long, tapering tail. Called also gray duck, piketail, piket-tail, spike-tail, split-tail, springtail, sea pheasant, and gray widgeon.

Pintail(n.) The sharp-tailed grouse of the great plains and Rocky Mountains (Pediocaetes phasianellus); -- called also pintailed grouse, pintailed chicken, springtail, and sharptail.

Pinus(n.) A large genus of evergreen coniferous trees, mostly found in the northern hemisphere. The genus formerly included the firs, spruces, larches, and hemlocks, but is now limited to those trees which have the primary leaves of the branchlets reduced to mere scales, and the secondary ones (pine needles) acicular, and usually in fascicles of two to seven. See Pine.

Ponderous(a.) Very heavy; weighty; as, a ponderous shield; a ponderous load; the ponderous elephant.

Pons(n.) A bridge; -- applied to several parts which connect others, but especially to the pons Varolii, a prominent band of nervous tissue situated on the ventral side of the medulla oblongata and connected at each side with the hemispheres of the cerebellum; the mesocephalon. See Brain.

Random(n.) A roving motion; course without definite direction; want of direction, rule, or method; hazard; chance; -- commonly used in the phrase at random, that is, without a settled point of direction; at hazard.

Random(a.) Going at random or by chance; done or made at hazard, or without settled direction, aim, or purpose; hazarded without previous calculation; left to chance; haphazard; as, a random guess.

Renne(v. t.) To plunder; -- only in the phrase "to rape and renne." See under Rap, v. t., to snatch.

Ringworm(n.) A contagious affection of the skin due to the presence of a vegetable parasite, and forming ring-shaped discolored patches covered with vesicles or powdery scales. It occurs either on the body, the face, or the scalp. Different varieties are distinguished as Tinea circinata, Tinea tonsurans, etc., but all are caused by the same parasite (a species of Trichophyton).

Run(a.) To extend; to reach; as, the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary.

Sandarac(n.) Realgar; red sulphide of arsenic.

Sandwort(n.) Any plant of the genus Arenaria, low, tufted herbs (order Caryophyllaceae.)

Sankhya(n.) A Hindoo system of philosophy which refers all things to soul and a rootless germ called prakriti, consisting of three elements, goodness, passion, and darkness.

Santalaceous(a.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Santalaceae), of which the genus Santalum is the type, and which includes the buffalo nut and a few other North American plants, and many peculiar plants of the southern hemisphere.

Senior(n.) One in the fourth or final year of his collegiate course at an American college; -- originally called senior sophister; also, one in the last year of the course at a professional schools or at a seminary.

Sensationalist(n.) An advocate of, or believer in, philosophical sensationalism.

Sense(v. t.) Meaning; import; signification; as, the true sense of words or phrases; the sense of a remark.

Sensible(a.) Having the capacity of receiving impressions from external objects; capable of perceiving by the instrumentality of the proper organs; liable to be affected physsically or mentally; impressible.

Sensist(n.) One who, in philosophy, holds to sensism.

Sensual(a.) Pertaining or peculiar to the philosophical doctrine of sensualism.

Sentence(n.) A philosophical or theological opinion; a dogma; as, Summary of the Sentences; Book of the Sentences.

Sentinel(n.) A marine crab (Podophthalmus vigil) native of the Indian Ocean, remarkable for the great length of its eyestalks; -- called also sentinel crab.

Sinapine(n.) An alkaloid occuring in the seeds of mustard. It is extracted, in combination with sulphocyanic acid, as a white crystal.

Sindon(n.) A small rag or pledget introduced into the hole in the cranium made by a trephine.

Singular(a.) Standing by itself; out of the ordinary course; unusual; uncommon; strange; as, a singular phenomenon.

Sinistrin(n.) A mucilaginous carbohydrate, resembling achroodextrin, extracted from squill as a colorless amorphous substance; -- so called because it is levorotatory.

Sunstroke(n.) Any affection produced by the action of the sun on some part of the body; especially, a sudden prostration of the physical powers, with symptoms resembling those of apoplexy, occasioned by exposure to excessive heat, and often terminating fatally; coup de soleil.

Syneresis(n.) The union, or drawing together into one syllable, of two vowels that are ordinarily separated in syllabification; synecphonesis; -- the opposite of diaeresis.

Synalepha(n.) A contraction of syllables by suppressing some vowel or diphthong at the end of a word, before another vowel or diphthong; as, th' army, for the army.

Synaloepha(n.) Same as Synalepha.

Synangium(n.) The divided part beyond the pylangium in the aortic trunk of the amphibian heart.

Synarthrosis(n.) Immovable articulation by close union, as in sutures. It sometimes includes symphysial articulations also. See the Note under Articulation, n., 1.

Synchondrotomy(n.) Symphyseotomy.

Synclastic(a.) Curved toward the same side in all directions; -- said of surfaces which in all directions around any point bend away from a tangent plane toward the same side, as the surface of a sphere; -- opposed to anticlastic.

Synclinorium(n.) A mountain range owing its origin to the progress of a geosynclinal, and ending in a catastrophe of displacement and upturning.

Syncretic(a.) Uniting and blending together different systems, as of philosophy, morals, or religion.

Syndesmography(n.) A description of the ligaments; syndesmology.

Synecphonesis(n.) A contraction of two syllables into one; synizesis.

Syngnathi(n. pl.) A suborder of lophobranch fishes which have an elongated snout and lack the ventral and first dorsal fins. The pipefishes and sea horses are examples.

Syngraph(n.) A writing signed by both or all the parties to a contract or bond.

Synizesis(n.) A contraction of two syllables into one; synecphonesis.

Synteresis(n.) Prophylaxis.

Synteretic(a.) Preserving health; prophylactic.

Synteretics(n.) That department of medicine which relates to the preservation of health; prophylaxis.

Tantalic(a.) Of or pertaining to tantalum; derived from, or containing, tantalum; specifically, designating any one of a series of acids analogous to nitric acid and the polyacid compounds of phosphorus.

Tend(v. t.) To accompany as an assistant or protector; to care for the wants of; to look after; to watch; to guard; as, shepherds tend their flocks.

Tennantite(n.) A blackish lead-gray mineral, closely related to tetrahedrite. It is essentially a sulphide of arsenic and copper.

Tentacle(n.) A more or less elongated process or organ, simple or branched, proceeding from the head or cephalic region of invertebrate animals, being either an organ of sense, prehension, or motion.

Tentaculata(n. pl.) A division of Ctenophora including those which have two long tentacles.

Tongue(n.) The lingual ribbon, or odontophore, of a mollusk.

Tonguefish(n.) A flounder (Symphurus plagiusa) native of the southern coast of the United States.

Tonic(a.) Of or relating to tones or sounds; specifically (Phon.), applied to, or distingshing, a speech sound made with tone unmixed and undimmed by obstruction, such sounds, namely, the vowels and diphthongs, being so called by Dr. James Rush (1833) " from their forming the purest and most plastic material of intonation."

Tonic(n.) A tonic element or letter; a vowel or a diphthong.

Tonophant(n.) A modification of the kaleidophon, for showing composition of acoustic vibrations. It consists of two thin slips of steel welded together, their length being adjystable by a screw socket.

Tunicata(n. pl.) A grand division of the animal kingdom, intermediate, in some respects, between the invertebrates and vertebrates, and by some writers united with the latter. They were formerly classed with acephalous mollusks. The body is usually covered with a firm external tunic, consisting in part of cellulose, and having two openings, one for the entrance and one for the exit of water. The pharynx is usually dilated in the form of a sac, pierced by several series of ciliated slits

Urn(n.) A measure of capacity for liquids, containing about three gallons and a haft, wine measure. It was haft the amphora, and four times the congius.

Vanadite(n.) A salt of vanadious acid, analogous to a nitrite or a phosphite.

Vanadium(n.) A rare element of the nitrogen-phosphorus group, found combined, in vanadates, in certain minerals, and reduced as an infusible, grayish-white metallic powder. It is intermediate between the metals and the non-metals, having both basic and acid properties. Symbol V (or Vd, rarely). Atomic weight 51.2.

Venereal(a.) Adapted to excite venereal desire; aphrodisiac.

Venereal(n.) The venereal disease; syphilis.

Venereous(a.) Venereal; exciting lust; aphrodisiac.

Venesection(n.) The act or operation of opening a vein for letting blood; bloodletting; phlebotomy.

Vent(n.) The anal opening of certain invertebrates and fishes; also, the external cloacal opening of reptiles, birds, amphibians, and many fishes.

Vincetoxin(n.) A glucoside extracted from the root of the white swallowwort (Vincetoxicum officinale, a plant of the Asclepias family) as a bitter yellow amorphous substance; -- called also asclepiadin, and cynanchin.

Vinegar(a.) Hence, anything sour; -- used also metaphorically.

Wanion(n.) A word of uncertain signification, used only in the phrase with a wanion, apparently equivalent to with a vengeance, with a plague, or with misfortune.

Wend(v. t.) To direct; to betake; -- used chiefly in the phrase to wend one's way. Also used reflexively.

Win(v. i.) To gain the victory; to be successful; to triumph; to prevail.

Wind-broken(a.) Having the power of breathing impaired by the rupture, dilatation, or running together of air cells of the lungs, so that while the inspiration is by one effort, the expiration is by two; affected with pulmonary emphysema or with heaves; -- said of a horse.

Wind-fertilized(a.) Anemophilous; fertilized by pollen borne by the wind.

Xanthin(n.) One of the gaseous or volatile decomposition products of the xanthates, and probably identical with carbon disulphide.

Xanthogen(n.) Persulphocyanogen.

Xanthophane(n.) The yellow pigment present in the inner segments of the retina in animals. See Chromophane.

Xanthophyll(n.) A yellow coloring matter found in yellow autumn leaves, and also produced artificially from chlorophyll; -- formerly called also phylloxanthin.

Xenotime(n.) A native phosphate of yttrium occurring in yellowish-brown tetragonal crystals.

Xenylic(a.) Pertaining to, derived from, designating, certain amido compounds obtained by reducing certain nitro derivatives of diphenyl.

Zenith(n.) That point in the visible celestial hemisphere which is vertical to the spectator; the point of the heavens directly overhead; -- opposed to nadir.

Zincographer(n.) An engraver on zinc.

Zincongraphic(a.) Alt. of Zincongraphical

Zincongraphical(a.) Of or pertaining to zincography; as, zincographic processes.

Zincography(n.) The art or process of engraving or etching on zinc, in which the design is left in relief in the style of a wood cut, the rest of the ground being eaten away by acid.

Zinkenite(n.) A steel-gray metallic mineral, a sulphide of antimony and lead.

Zone(n.) The portion of the surface of a sphere included between two parallel planes; the portion of a surface of revolution included between two planes perpendicular to the axis.

About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.