Words whose 12th letter is A

Acciaccatura (n.) A short grace note, one semitone below the note to which it is prefixed; -- used especially in organ music. Now used as equivalent to the short appoggiatura.

Acroceraunian (a.) Of or pertaining to the high mountain range of "thunder-smitten" peaks (now Kimara), between Epirus and Macedonia.

Amphidromical (a.) Pertaining to an Attic festival at the naming of a child; -- so called because the friends of the parents carried the child around the hearth and then named it.

Anaglyptography (n.) The art of copying works in relief, or of engraving as to give the subject an embossed or raised appearance; -- used in representing coins, bas-reliefs, etc.

Antibacterial (a.) Inimical to bacteria; -- applied esp. to serum for protection against bacterial diseases.

Anarthropoda (n. pl.) One of the divisions of Articulata in which there are no jointed legs, as the annelids; -- opposed to Arthropoda.

Appoggiatura (n.) A passing tone preceding an essential tone, and borrowing the time it occupies from that; a short auxiliary or grace note one degree above or below the principal note unless it be of the same harmony; -- generally indicated by a note of smaller size, as in the illustration above. It forms no essential part of the harmony.

Arthropleura (n.) The side or limb-bearing portion of an arthromere.

Artiodactyla (n. pl.) One of the divisions of the ungulate animals. The functional toes of the hind foot are even in number, and the third digit of each foot (corresponding to the middle finger in man) is asymmetrical and paired with the fourth digit, as in the hog, the sheep, and the ox; -- opposed to Perissodactyla.

Axminster carpet () A variety of Turkey carpet, woven by machine or, when more than 27 inches wide, on a hand loom, and consisting of strips of worsted chenille so colored as to produce a pattern on a stout jute backing. It has a fine soft pile. So called from Axminster, England, where it was formerly (1755 -- 1835) made.

Axminster carpet () A similar but cheaper machine-made carpet, resembling moquette in construction and appearance, but finer and of better material.

Branchiopoda (n. pl.) An order of Entomostraca; -- so named from the feet of branchiopods having been supposed to perform the function of gills. It includes the fresh-water genera Branchipus, Apus, and Limnadia, and the genus Artemia found in salt lakes. It is also called Phyllopoda. See Phyllopoda, Cladocera. It is sometimes used in a broader sense.

Campanularian (n.) A hydroid of the family ampanularidae, characterized by having the polyps or zooids inclosed in bell-shaped calicles or hydrothecae.

Chaetognatha (n. pl.) An order of free-swimming marine worms, of which the genus Sagitta is the type. They have groups of curved spines on each side of the head.

Conferruminated (a.) Closely united by the coalescence, or sticking together, of contiguous faces, as in the case of the cotyledons of the live-oak acorn.

Consequential (a.) Assuming or exhibiting an air of consequence; pretending to importance; pompous; self-important; as, a consequential man. See Consequence, n., 4.

Counterpassant (a.) Passant in opposite directions; -- said of two animals.

CryptocrystalDolichocephalous (a.) Having the cranium, or skull, long to its breadth; long-headed; -- opposed to brachycephalic.

Epiperipheral (a.) Connected with, or having its origin upon, the external surface of the body; -- especially applied to the feelings which originate at the extremities of nerves distributed on the outer surface, as the sensation produced by touching an object with the finger; -- opposed to entoperipheral.

Extravascular (a.) Outside the vessels; -- said of the substance of all the tissues.

Extravascular (a.) Destitute of vessels; non-vascular.

Fibrovascular (a.) Containing woody fiber and ducts, as the stems of all flowering plants and ferns; -- opposed to cellular.

Gymnoblastea (n. pl.) The Athecata; -- so called because the medusoid buds are not inclosed in a capsule.

Halichondriae (n. pl.) An order of sponges, having simple siliceous spicules and keratose fibers; -- called also Keratosilicoidea.

Hematotherma (n. pl.) The warm-blooded vertebrates, comprising the mammals and birds; -- the antithesis to hematocrya.

Hematothermal (a.) Warm-blooded.

Homoiothermal (a.) Maintaining a uniform temperature; haematothermal; homothermic; -- applied to warm-bodied animals, because they maintain a nearly uniform temperature in spite of the great variations in the surrounding air; in distinct from the cold-blooded (poikilothermal) animals, whose body temperature follows the variations in temperature of the surrounding medium.

Hyalospongia (n. pl.) An order of vitreous sponges, having glassy six-rayed, siliceous spicules; -- called also Hexactinellinae.

Iatromathematician (n.) One of a school of physicians in Italy, about the middle of the 17th century, who tried to apply the laws of mechanics and mathematics to the human body, and hence were eager student of anatomy; -- opposed to the iatrochemists.

Inequilateral (a.) Having unequal sides; unsymmetrical; unequal-sided.

Interglobular (a.) Between globules; -- applied esp. to certain small spaces, surrounded by minute globules, in dentine.

Intrapetiolar (a.) Situated between the petiole and the stem; -- said of the pair of stipules at the base of a petiole when united by those margins next the petiole, thus seeming to form a single stipule between the petiole and the stem or branch; -- often confounded with interpetiolar, from which it differs essentially in meaning.

Macroscopical (a.) Visible to the unassisted eye; -- as opposed to microscopic.

Melanorrhoea (n.) An East Indian genus of large trees. Melanorrh/a usitatissima is the lignum-vitae of Pegu, and yelds a valuable black varnish.

Metadiscoidal (a.) Discoidal by derivation; -- applied especially to the placenta of man and apes, because it is supposed to have been derived from a diffused placenta.

Misericordia (n.) A thin-bladed dagger; so called, in the Middle Ages, because used to give the death wound or "mercy" stroke to a fallen adversary.

Molluscoidea (n. pl.) A division of Invertebrata which includes the classes Brachiopoda and Bryozoa; -- called also Anthoid Mollusca.

Multivalvular (a.) Many-valved; having more than two valves; -- said of certain shells, as the chitons.

Musculospiral (a.) Of or pertaining to the muscles, and taking a spiral course; -- applied esp. to a large nerve of the arm.

Myoepithelial (a.) Derived from epithelial cells and destined to become a part of the muscular system; -- applied to structural elements in certain embryonic forms.

Necessitarian (a.) Of or pertaining to the doctrine of philosophical necessity in regard to the origin and existence of things, especially as applied to the actings or choices of the will; -- opposed to libertarian.

Necroscopical (a.) Or or relating to post-mortem examinations.

Parallelogram (n.) A right-lined quadrilateral figure, whose opposite sides are parallel, and consequently equal; -- sometimes restricted in popular usage to a rectangle, or quadrilateral figure which is longer than it is broad, and with right angles.

Persulphocyanogen (n.) An orange-yellow substance, produced by the action of chlorine or boiling dilute nitric acid and sulphocyanate of potassium; -- called also pseudosulphocyanogen, perthiocyanogen, and formerly sulphocyanogen.

Phalangoidea (n. pl.) A division of Arachnoidea, including the daddy longlegs or harvestman (Phalangium) and many similar kinds. They have long, slender, many-jointed legs; usually a rounded, segmented abdomen; and chelate jaws. They breathe by tracheae. Called also Phalangides, Phalangidea, Phalangiida, and Opilionea.

Philadelphian (n.) One of a society of mystics of the seventeenth century, -- called also the Family of Love.

Plesiosauria (n. pl.) An extinct order of Mesozoic marine reptiles including the genera Plesiosaurus, and allied forms; -- called also Sauropterygia.

Polycarpellary (a.) Composed of several or numerous carpels; -- said of such fruits as the orange.

Prestidigital (a.) Nimble-fingered; having fingers fit for prestidigitation, or juggling.

Quadragesimals (n. pl.) Offerings formerly made to the mother church of a diocese on Mid-Lent Sunday.

Quinquedentated (a.) Five-toothed; as, a quinquedentate leaf.

Radiotelegraphy (n.) Telegraphy using the radiant energy of electrical (Hertzian) waves; wireless telegraphy; -- the term adopted for use by the Radiotelegraphic Convention of 1912.

Scrophulariaceous (a.) Of or pertaining to a very large natural order of gamopetalous plants (Scrophulariaceae, or Scrophularineae), usually having irregular didynamous flowers and a two-celled pod. The order includes the mullein, foxglove, snapdragon, figwort, painted cup, yellow rattle, and some exotic trees, as the Paulownia.

Septuagesima (n.) The third Sunday before Lent; -- so called because it is about seventy days before Easter.

Siphonophora (n. pl.) An order of pelagic Hydrozoa including species which form complex free-swimming communities composed of numerous zooids of various kinds, some of which act as floats or as swimming organs, others as feeding or nutritive zooids, and others as reproductive zooids. See Illust. under Physallia, and Porpita.

Siphonostomatous (a.) Having the front edge of the aperture of the shell prolonged in the shape of a channel for the protection of the siphon; -- said of certain gastropods.

Spatangoidea (n. pl.) An order of irregular sea urchins, usually having a more or less heart-shaped shell with four or five petal-like ambulacra above. The mouth is edentulous and situated anteriorly, on the under side.

Squamozygomatic (a.) Of or pertaining to both the squamosal and zygomatic bones; -- applied to a bone, or a center of ossification, in some fetal skulls.

Strepsiptera (n. pl.) A group of small insects having the anterior wings rudimentary, and in the form of short and slender twisted appendages, while the posterior ones are large and membranous. They are parasitic in the larval state on bees, wasps, and the like; -- called also Rhipiptera. See Illust. under Rhipipter.

Taenioglossa (n. pl.) An extensive division of gastropod mollusks in which the odontophore is long and narrow, and usually bears seven rows of teeth. It includes a large number of families both marine and fresh-water.

Toreumatography (n.) A description of sculpture such as bas-relief in metal.

Umbellularia (n.) A genus of deep-sea alcyonaria consisting of a cluster of large flowerlike polyps situated at the summit of a long, slender stem which stands upright in the mud, supported by a bulbous base.

Vermilinguia (n. pl.) A tribe of edentates comprising the South American ant-eaters. The tongue is long, slender, exsertile, and very flexible, whence the name.





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Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

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