Words whose 4th letter is B

Alabaster (n.) A box or vessel for holding odoriferous ointments, etc.; -- so called from the stone of which it was originally made.

Arable (a.) Fit for plowing or tillage; -- hence, often applied to land which has been plowed or tilled.

Barb (n.) A southern name for the kingfishes of the eastern and southeastern coasts of the United States; -- also improperly called whiting.

Barbaic (a.) Of, or from, barbarian nations; foreign; -- often with reference to barbarous nations of east.

Barbecue (n.) A floor, on which coffee beans are sun-dried.

Barbed (a.) Accoutered with defensive armor; -- said of a horse. See Barded ( which is the proper form.)

Barbel (n.) A large fresh-water fish ( Barbus vulgaris) found in many European rivers. Its upper jaw is furnished with four barbels.

Barbiers (n.) A variety of paralysis, peculiar to India and the Malabar coast; -- considered by many to be the same as beriberi in chronic form.

Bayberry (n.) The fruit of Myrica cerifera (wax myrtle); the shrub itself; -- called also candleberry tree.

Barber (n.) A storm accompanied by driving ice spicules formed from sea water, esp. one occurring on the Gulf of St. Lawrence; -- so named from the cutting ice spicules.

Berber (n.) A member of a race somewhat resembling the Arabs, but often classed as Hamitic, who were formerly the inhabitants of the whole of North Africa from the Mediterranean southward into the Sahara, and who still occupy a large part of that region; -- called also Kabyles. Also, the language spoken by this people.

Bibber (n.) One given to drinking alcoholic beverages too freely; a tippler; -- chiefly used in composition; as, winebibber.

Blob (n.) A small fresh-water fish (Uranidea Richardsoni); the miller's thumb.

Blubber (v. t.) To give vent to (tears) or utter (broken words or cries); -- with forth or out.

Bobbin (n.) A cylindrical or spool-shaped coil or insulated wire, usually containing a core of soft iron which becomes magnetic when the wire is traversed by an electrical current.

Bobby (n.) A nickname for a policeman; -- from Sir Robert Peel, who remodeled the police force. See Peeler.

Bombardon (n.) Originally, a deep-toned instrument of the oboe or bassoon family; thence, a bass reed stop on the organ. The name bombardon is now given to a brass instrument, the lowest of the saxhorns, in tone resembling the ophicleide.

Bombast (n.) Fig.: High-sounding words; an inflated style; language above the dignity of the occasion; fustian.

Bombast (a.) High-sounding; inflated; big without meaning; magniloquent; bombastic.

Bombastical (a.) Characterized by bombast; high-sounding; inflated.

Booby (n.) A swimming bird (Sula fiber or S. sula) related to the common gannet, and found in the West Indies, nesting on the bare rocks. It is so called on account of its apparent stupidity. The name is also sometimes applied to other species of gannets; as, S. piscator, the red-footed booby.

Bowbell (n.) One born within hearing distance of Bow-bells; a cockney.

Brob (n.) A peculiar brad-shaped spike, to be driven alongside the end of an abutting timber to prevent its slipping.

Bulbil (n.) A small or secondary bulb; hence, now almost exclusively: An aerial bulb or deciduous bud, produced in the leaf axils, as in the tiger lily, or relpacing the flowers, as in some onions, and capable, when separated, of propagating the plant; -- called also bulblet and brood bud.

Bubbler (n.) A fish of the Ohio river; -- so called from the noise it makes.

Bubby (n.) Bub; -- a term of familiar or affectionate address to a small boy.

Bugbane (n.) A perennial white-flowered herb of the order Ranunculaceae and genus Cimiciguga; bugwort. There are several species.

Bulbed (a.) Having a bulb; round-headed.

Bumblebee (n.) A large bee of the genus Bombus, sometimes called humblebee; -- so named from its sound.

Burbot (n.) A fresh-water fish of the genus Lota, having on the nose two very small barbels, and a larger one on the chin.

Cabbiri (n. pl.) Certain deities originally worshiped with mystical rites by the Pelasgians in Lemnos and Samothrace and afterwards throughout Greece; -- also called sons of Hephaestus (or Vulcan), as being masters of the art of working metals.

Carborundum () A beautiful crystalCarburettor (n.) One that carburets; specif., an apparatus in which air or gas is carbureted, as by passing it through a light petroleum oil. The carburetor for a gasoCamberkeeled (a.) Having the keel arched upwards, but not actually hogged; -- said of a ship.

Cambrian (a.) Of or pertaining to the lowest subdivision of the rocks of the Silurian or Molluscan age; -- sometimes described as inferior to the Silurian. It is named from its development in Cambria or Wales. See the Diagram under Geology.

Cambric (n.) A fabric made, in imitation of Carbide (n.) A binary compound of carbon with some other element or radical, in which the carbon plays the part of a negative; -- formerly termed carburet.

Carbinol (n.) Methyl alcohol, CH3OH; -- also, by extension, any one in the homologous series of paraffine alcohols of which methyl alcohol is the type.

Carboxyl (n.) The complex radical, CO.OH, regarded as the essential and characteristic constituent which all oxygen acids of carbon (as formic, acetic, benzoic acids, etc.) have in common; -- called also oxatyl.

Carboy (n.) A large, globular glass bottle, esp. one of green glass, inclosed in basket work or in a box, for protection; -- used commonly for carrying corrosive liquids; as sulphuric acid, etc.

Carburize (v. t.) To combine with carbon or a carbon compound; -- said esp. of a process for conferring a higher degree of illuminating power on combustible gases by mingling them with a vapor of volatile hydrocarbons.

Cerberus (n.) A monster, in the shape of a three-headed dog, guarding the entrance into the infernal regions, Hence: Any vigilant custodian or guardian, esp. if surly.

Chab (n.) The red-bellied wood pecker (Melanerpes Carolinus).

Chebacco (n.) A narrow-sterned boat formerly much used in the Newfoundland fisheries; -- called also pinkstern and chebec.

Chub (n.) A species to fresh-water fish of the Cyprinidae or Carp family. The common European species is Leuciscus cephalus; the cheven. In America the name is applied to various fishes of the same family, of the genera Semotilus, Squalius, Ceratichthys, etc., and locally to several very different fishes, as the tautog, black bass, etc.

Cobbing (a.) Haughty; purse-proud. See Cob, n., 2.

Cobblestone (n.) A large pebble; a rounded stone not too large to be handled; a small boulder; -- used for paving streets and for other purposes.

Comb (n.) A former, commonly cone-shaped, used in hat manufacturing for hardening the soft fiber into a bat.

Combattant (a.) In the position of fighting; -- said of two lions set face to face, each rampant.

Combination (n.) The result of combining or uniting; union of persons or things; esp. a union or alliance of persons or states to effect some purpose; -- usually in a bad sense.

Comboloio (n.) A Mohammedan rosary, consisting of ninety-nine beads.

Corbiestep (n.) One of the steps in which a gable wall is often finished in place of a continuous slope; -- also called crowstep.

Cowberry (n.) A species of Vaccinium (V. Vitis-idaea), which bears acid red berries which are sometimes used in cookery; -- locally called mountain cranberry.

Cowbird (n.) The cow blackbird (Molothrus ater), an American starling. Like the European cuckoo, it builds no nest, but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds; -- so called because frequently associated with cattle.

Crab (a.) A crab apple; -- so named from its harsh taste.

Crabbed (n.) Characterized by or manifesting, sourness, peevishness, or moroseness; harsh; cross; cynical; -- applied to feelings, disposition, or manners.

Crabbed (n.) Characterized by harshness or roughness; unpleasant; -- applied to things; as, a crabbed taste.

Crib (n.) A structure of logs to be anchored with stones; -- used for docks, pier, dams, etc.

Crib (v. i.) To seize the manger or other solid object with the teeth and draw in wind; -- said of a horse.

Criber (n.) Alt. of Crib-biter

Cribbing (n.) A vicious habit of a horse; crib-biting. The horse lays hold of the crib or manger with his teeth and draws air into the stomach with a grunting sound.

Cymbal (n.) A musical instrument of brass, shaped like a circular dish or a flat plate, with a handle at the back; -- used in pairs to produce a sharp ringing sound by clashing them together.

Dabb (n.) A large, spine-tailed lizard (Uromastix spinipes), found in Egypt, Arabia, and Palestine; -- called also dhobb, and dhabb.

Darby (n.) A plasterer's float, having two handles; -- used in smoothing ceilings, etc.

Darbyite (n.) One of the Plymouth Brethren, or of a sect among them; -- so called from John N. Darby, one of the leaders of the Brethren.

Daubing (n.) A rough coat of mortar put upon a wall to give it the appearance of stone; rough-cast.

Daubing (n.) In currying, a mixture of fish oil and tallow worked into leather; -- called also dubbing.

Derby (n.) A race for three-old horses, run annually at Epsom (near London), for the Derby stakes. It was instituted by the 12th Earl of Derby, in 1780.

Derby (n.) A stiff felt hat with a dome-shaped crown.

Diabase (n.) A basic, dark-colored, holocrystalDiabolo (n.) An old game or sport (revived under this name) consisting in whirling on a string, fastened to two sticks, a small somewhat spool-shaped object (called the diabolo) so as to balance it on a string, toss it in the air and catch it, etc.

Disburse (v. t.) To pay out; to expend; -- usually from a public fund or treasury.

Dogberry (n.) The berry of the dogwood; -- called also dogcherry.

Dogbolt (n.) The bolt of the cap-square over the trunnion of a cannon.

Dobby (n.) An apparatus resembling a Jacquard for weaving small figures (usually about 12 - 16 threads, seldom more than 36 - 40 threads).

Double (n.) A person or thing that is the counterpart of another; a duplicate; copy; (Obs.) transcript; -- now chiefly used of persons. Hence, a wraith.

Double (a.) To make of two thicknesses or folds by turning or bending together in the middle; to fold one part upon another part of; as, to double the leaf of a book, and the like; to clinch, as the fist; -- often followed by up; as, to double up a sheet of paper or cloth.

Doublet (a.) A close-fitting garment for men, covering the body from the neck to the waist or a little below. It was worn in Western Europe from the 15th to the 17th century.

Doublethreaded (a.) Having two screw threads instead of one; -- said of a screw in which the pitch is equal to twice the distance between the centers of adjacent threads.

Drab (n.) A kind of thick woolen cloth of a dun, or dull brownish yellow, or dull gray, color; -- called also drabcloth.

Dunbird (n.) The pochard; -- called also dunair, and dunker, or dun-curre.

Ekaboron (n.) The name given by Mendelejeff in accordance with the periodic law, and by prediction, to a hypothetical element then unknown, but since discovered and named scandium; -- so called because it was a missing analogue of the boron group. See Scandium.

Fimbriated (a.) Having a very narrow border of another tincture; -- said esp. of an ordinary or subordinary.

Flabelliform (a.) Having the form of a fan; fan-shaped; flabellate.

FlabelFlobert (n.) A small cartridge designed for target shooting; -- sometimes called ball cap.

Foible (n.) The half of a sword blade or foil blade nearest the point; -- opposed to forte.

Forbear (n.) An ancestor; a forefather; -- usually in the plural.

Forbearance (n.) The quality of being forbearing; indulgence toward offenders or enemies; long-suffering.

Forbearing (a.) Disposed or accustomed to forbear; patient; long-suffering.

Gamble (v. t.) To lose or squander by gaming; -- usually with away.

Gamboge (n.) A concrete juice, or gum resin, produced by several species of trees in Siam, Ceylon, and Malabar. It is brought in masses, or cylindrical rolls, from Cambodia, or Cambogia, -- whence its name. The best kind is of a dense, compact texture, and of a beatiful reddish yellow. Taking internally, it is a strong and harsh cathartic and emetic.

Gambrel (n.) A stick crooked like a horse's hind leg; -- used by butchers in suspending slaughtered animals.

Gibbartas (n.) One of several finback whales of the North Atlantic; -- called also Jupiter whale.

Gibbose (a.) Humped; protuberant; -- said of a surface which presents one or more large elevations.

Gibbous (a.) Swelling by a regular curve or surface; protuberant; convex; as, the moon is gibbous between the half-moon and the full moon.

Gibbous (a.) Hunched; hump-backed.

Globe (n.) The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article.

Globe (n.) A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe.

Globe (n.) A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square.

Globeflower (n.) A plant of the genus Trollius (T. Europaeus), found in the mountainous parts of Europe, and producing handsome globe-shaped flowers.

Globular (a.) Globe-shaped; having the form of a ball or sphere; spherical, or nearly so; as, globular atoms.

Grab (n.) An instrument for clutching objects for the purpose of raising them; -- specially applied to devices for withdrawing drills, etc., from artesian and other wells that are drilled, bored, or driven.

Grub (v. t.) To dig; to dig up by the roots; to root out by digging; -- followed by up; as, to grub up trees, rushes, or sedge.

Grub (n.) The larva of an insect, especially of a beetle; -- called also grubworm. See Illust. of Goldsmith beetle, under Goldsmith.

Guib (n.) A West African antelope (Tragelaphus scriptus), curiously marked with white stripes and spots on a reddish fawn ground, and hence called harnessed antelope; -- called also guiba.

Herborize (v. t.) To form the figures of plants in; -- said in reference to minerals. See Arborized.

Hobbism (n.) The philosophical system of Thomas Hobbes, an English materialist (1588-1679); esp., his political theory that the most perfect form of civil government is an absolute monarchy with despotic control over everything relating to law, morals, and religion.

Hobble (n. i.) To move roughly or irregularly; -- said of style in writing.

Hobby (n.) A small, strong-winged European falcon (Falco subbuteo), formerly trained for hawking.

Hobbyhorse (n.) A subject or plan upon which one is constantly setting off; a favorite and ever-recurring theme of discourse, thought, or effort; that which occupies one's attention unduly, or to the weariness of others; a ruling passion.

Hogback (n.) An upward curve or very obtuse angle in the upper surface of any member, as of a timber laid horizontally; -- the opposite of camber.

Humble (superl.) Thinking lowly of one's self; claiming little for one's self; not proud, arrogant, or assuming; thinking one's self ill-deserving or unworthy, when judged by the demands of God; lowly; waek; modest.

Humble (v. t.) To make humble or lowly in mind; to abase the pride or arrogance of; to reduce the self-sufficiently of; to make meek and submissive; -- often used rexlexively.

Husband (n.) A married man; a man who has a wife; -- the correlative to wife.

Jamb (n.) The vertical side of any opening, as a door or fireplace; hence, less properly, any narrow vertical surface of wall, as the of a chimney-breast or of a pier, as distinguished from its face.

Jumble (v. t.) To mix in a confused mass; to put or throw together without order; -- often followed by together or up.

Jumble (n.) A small, thin, sugared cake, usually ring-shaped.

Larboard (n.) The left-hand side of a ship to one on board facing toward the bow; port; -- opposed to starboard.

Larboard (a.) On or pertaining to the left-hand side of a vessel; port; as, the larboard quarter.

Lambkill (n.) A small American ericaceous shrub (Kalmia angustifolia); -- called also calfkill, sheepkill, sheep laurel, etc. It is supposed to poison sheep and other animals that eat it at times when the snow is deep and they cannot find other food.

Liability (n.) the sum of one's pecuniary obligations; -- opposed to assets.

Liable (v. t.) Exposed to a certain contingency or casualty, more or less probable; -- with to and an infinitive or noun; as, liable to slip; liable to accident.

Lieberkuhn (n.) A concave metallic mirror attached to the object-glass end of a microscope, to throw down light on opaque objects; a reflector.

Limbous (a.) With slightly overlapping borders; -- said of a suture.

Lisbon (n.) A sweet, light-colored species of wine, produced in the province of Estremadura, and so called as being shipped from Lisbon, in Portugal.

Lowboy (n.) A chest of drawers not more than four feet high; -- applied commonly to the lower half of a tallboy from which the upper half has been removed.

Lobby (n.) An apartment or passageway in the fore part of an old-fashioned cabin under the quarter-deck.

Lowborn (a.) Born in a low condition or rank; -- opposed to highborn.

Mabby (n.) A spirituous liquor or drink distilled from potatoes; -- used in the Barbadoes.

Madbrain (a.) Hot-headed; rash.

Madbrain (n.) A rash or hot-headed person.

Madbrained (a.) Disordered in mind; hot-headed.

Marbrinus (n.) A cloth woven so as to imitate the appearance of marble; -- much used in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Maybird (n.) The whimbrel; -- called also May fowl, May curlew, and May whaap.

Membered (a.) Having limbs; -- chiefly used in composition.

Membered (a.) Having legs of a different tincture from that of the body; -- said of a bird in heraldic representations.

Misbehave (v. t. & i.) To behave ill; to conduct one's self improperly; -- often used with a reciprocal pronoun.

Moebles (n. pl.) Movables; furniture; -- also used in the singular (moeble).

Nombril (n.) A point halfway between the fess point and the middle base point of an escutcheon; -- called also navel point. See Escutcheon.

Number (n.) That which is regulated by count; poetic measure, as divisions of time or number of syllables; hence, poetry, verse; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Olibene (n.) A colorless mobile liquid of a pleasant aromatic odor obtained by the distillation of olibanum, or frankincense, and regarded as a terpene; -- called also conimene.

Outboard (a. & adv.) Beyond or outside of the Papboat (n.) A large spiral East Indian marine shell (Turbinella rapha); -- so called because used by native priests to hold the oil for anointing.

Peabird (n.) The wryneck; -- so called from its note.

Pebble (n.) Transparent and colorless rock crystal; as, Brazilian pebble; -- so called by opticians.

Plebs (n.) The commonalty of ancient Rome who were citizens without the usual political rights; the plebeians; -- distinguished from the patricians.

Plebs (n.) Hence, the common people; the populace; -- construed as a pl.

Porbeagle (n.) A species of shark (Lamna cornubica), about eight feet long, having a pointed nose and a crescent-shaped tail; -- called also mackerel shark.

Prebronchial (a.) Situated in front of the bronchus; -- applied especially to an air sac on either side of the esophagus of birds.

Proboscidifera (n. pl.) A subdivision of the taenioglossate gastropods, including the fig-shells (Pyrula), the helmet shells (Cassis), the tritons, and allied genera.

Purblind (a.) Nearsighted, or dim-sighted; seeing obscurely; as, a purblind eye; a purblind mole.

Quebracho (n.) A Chilian apocynaceous tree (Aspidosperma Quebracho); also, its bark, which is used as a febrifuge, and for dyspn/a of the lung, or bronchial diseases; -- called also white quebracho, to distinguish it from the red quebracho, a Mexican anacardiaceous tree (Loxopterygium Lorentzii) whose bark is said to have similar properties.

Rabbi (n.) Master; lord; teacher; -- a Jewish title of respect or honor for a teacher or doctor of the law.

Reabsorb (v. t.) To absorb again; to draw in, or imbibe, again what has been effused, extravasated, or thrown off; to swallow up again; as, to reabsorb chyle, lymph, etc.; -- used esp. of fluids.

Redbreast (n.) The knot, or red-breasted snipe; -- called also robin breast, and robin snipe. See Knot.

Redbreast (n.) The long-eared pondfish. See Pondfish.

Relbun (n.) The roots of the Chilian plant Calceolaria arachnoidea, -- used for dyeing crimson.

Rhabdolith (n.) A minute calcareous rodlike structure found both at the surface and the bottom of the ocean; -- supposed by some to be a calcareous alga.

Ribbed (a.) Intercalated with slate; -- said of a seam of coal.

Ribbon (n.) Same as Rib-band.

Roxburgh (n.) A style of bookbinding in which the back is plain leather, the sides paper or cloth, the top gilt-edged, but the front and bottom left uncut.

Rudbeckia (n.) A genus of composite plants, the coneflowers, consisting of perennial herbs with showy pedunculate heads, having a hemispherical involucre, sterile ray flowers, and a conical chaffy receptacle. There are about thirty species, exclusively North American. Rudbeckia hirta, the black-eyed Susan, is a common weed in meadows.

Rubble (n.) Water-worn or rough broken stones; broken bricks, etc., used in coarse masonry, or to fill up between the facing courses of walls.

Sabbaton (n.) A round-toed, armed covering for the feet, worn during a part of the sixteenth century in both military and civil dress.

Saibling (n.) A European mountain trout (Salvelinus alpinus); -- called also Bavarian charr.

Sanbenito (n.) A garnment or cap, or sometimes both, painted with flames, figures, etc., and worn by persons who had been examined by the Inquisition and were brought forth for punishment at the auto-da-fe.

Sambo (n.) In Central America, an Indian and negro half-breed, or mixed blood.

Scab (n.) Any one of various more or less destructive fungus diseases attacking cultivated plants, and usually forming dark-colored crustlike spots.

Semble (a.) It seems; -- chiefly used impersonally in reports and judgments to express an opinion in reference to the law on some point not necessary to be decided, and not intended to be definitely settled in the cause.

Slub (v. t.) To draw out and twist slightly; -- said of slivers of wool.

Sombrero (n.) A kind of broad-brimmed hat, worn in Spain and in Spanish America.

Sorbin (n.) An unfermentable sugar, isomeric with glucose, found in the ripe berries of the rowan tree, or sorb, and extracted as a sweet white crystalSowbane (n.) The red goosefoot (Chenopodium rubrum), -- said to be fatal to swine.

Stab (n.) A wound with a sharp-pointed weapon; as, to fall by the stab an assassin.

Stability (a.) Fixedness; -- as opposed to fluidity.

Stibic (a.) Antimonic; -- used with reference to certain compounds of antimony.

Stibnite (n.) A mineral of a lead-gray color and brilliant metallic luster, occurring in prismatic crystals; sulphide of antimony; -- called also antimony glance, and gray antimony.

Stibonium (n.) The hypothetical radical SbH4, analogous to ammonium; -- called also antimonium.

Stub (n.) The stump of a tree; that part of a tree or plant which remains fixed in the earth when the stem is cut down; -- applied especially to the stump of a small tree, or shrub.

Stubborn (a.) Firm as a stub or stump; stiff; unbending; unyielding; persistent; hence, unreasonably obstinate in will or opinion; not yielding to reason or persuasion; refractory; harsh; -- said of persons and things; as, stubborn wills; stubborn ore; a stubborn oak; as stubborn as a mule.

Stable (a.) So placed as to resist forces tending to cause motion; of such structure as to resist distortion or molecular or chemical disturbance; -- said of any body or substance.

Subbrachiales (n. pl.) A division of soft-finned fishes in which the ventral fins are situated beneath the pectorial fins, or nearly so.

Sunbonnet (n.) A bonnet, generally made of some thin or light fabric, projecting beyond the face, and commonly having a cape, -- worn by women as a protection against the sun.

Surbased (a.) Having the vertical height from springing Swab (n.) A kind of mop for cleaning floors, the desks of vessels, etc., esp. one made of rope-yarns or threads.

Swab (n.) A bit of sponge, cloth, or the like, fastened to a handle, for cleansing the mouth of a sick person, applying medicaments to deep-seated parts, etc.

Symbolics (n.) that branch of historic theology which treats of creeds and confessions of faith; symbolism; -- called also symbolic.

Symbranchii (n. pl.) An order of slender eel-like fishes having the gill openings confluent beneath the neck. The pectoral arch is generally attached to the skull, and the entire margin of the upper jaw is formed by the premaxillary. Called also Symbranchia.

Tambour (n.) A small frame, commonly circular, and somewhat resembling a tambourine, used for stretching, and firmly holding, a portion of cloth that is to be embroidered; also, the embroidery done upon such a frame; -- called also, in the latter sense, tambour work.

Tambourine (n.) A South American wild dove (Tympanistria tympanistria), mostly white, with black-tiped wings and tail. Its resonant note is said to be ventriloquous.

Timbale (n.) A seasoned preparation, as of chicken, lobster, cheese, or fish, cooked in a drum-shaped mold; also, a pastry case, usually small, filled with a cooked mixture.

Tilbury (n.) A kind of gig or two-wheeled carriage, without a top or cover.

Timber (n.) A certain quantity of fur skins, as of martens, ermines, sables, etc., packed between boards; being in some cases forty skins, in others one hundred and twenty; -- called also timmer.

Timber (n.) That sort of wood which is proper for buildings or for tools, utensils, furniture, carriages, fences, ships, and the like; -- usually said of felled trees, but sometimes of those standing. Cf. Lumber, 3.

Timber (v. t.) To furnish with timber; -- chiefly used in the past participle.

Timbered (a.) Furnished with timber; -- often compounded; as, a well-timbered house; a low-timbered house.

Timbered (a.) Covered with growth timber; wooden; as, well-timbered land.

Timberhead (n.) The top end of a timber, rising above the gunwale, and serving for belaying ropes, etc.; -- called also kevel head.

Tombac (n.) An alloy of copper and zinc, resembling brass, and containing about 84 per cent of copper; -- called also German, / Dutch, brass. It is very malleable and ductile, and when beaten into thin leaves is sometimes called Dutch metal. The addition of arsenic makes white tombac.

Torbernite (n.) A mineral occurring in emerald-green tabular crystals having a micaceous structure. It is a hydrous phosphate of uranium and copper. Called also copper uranite, and chalcolite.

Trabea (n.) A toga of purple, or ornamented with purple horizontal stripes. -- worn by kings, consuls, and augurs.

Tribasic (a.) Capable of neutralizing three molecules of a monacid base, or their equivalent; having three hydrogen atoms capable of replacement by basic elements on radicals; -- said of certain acids; thus, citric acid is a tribasic acid.

Tubbing (n.) A lining of timber or metal around the shaft of a mine; especially, a series of cast-iron cylinders bolted together, used to enable those who sink a shaft to penetrate quicksand, water, etc., with safety.

Tumble (v. t.) To turn over; to turn or throw about, as for examination or search; to roll or move in a rough, coarse, or unceremonious manner; to throw down or headlong; to precipitate; -- sometimes with over, about, etc.; as, to tumble books or papers.

Turbid (a.) Having the lees or sediment disturbed; roiled; muddy; thick; not clear; -- used of liquids of any kind; as, turbid water; turbid wine.

Turbinal (a.) Rolled in a spiral; scroll-like; turbinate; -- applied to the thin, plicated, bony or cartilaginous plates which support the olfactory and mucous membranes of the nasal chambers.

Turbinated (a.) Spiral with the whorls decreasing rapidly from a large base to a pointed apex; -- said of certain shells.

Turbine (n.) A water wheel, commonly horizontal, variously constructed, but usually having a series of curved floats or buckets, against which the water acts by its impulse or reaction in flowing either outward from a central chamber, inward from an external casing, or from above downward, etc.; -- also called turbine wheel.

Turbot (n.) The filefish; -- so called in Bermuda.

Turbine (n.) A form of steam engine analogous in construction and action to the water turbine. There are practically only two distinct kinds, and they are typified in the de Laval and the Parsons and Curtis turbines. The de Laval turbine is an impulse turbine, in which steam impinges upon revolving blades from a flared nozzle. The flare of the nozzle causes expansion of the steam, and hence changes its pressure energy into kinetic energy. An enormous velocity (30,000 revolutions per minute in > Unable (a.) Not able; not having sufficient strength, means, knowledge, skill, or the like; impotent' weak; helpless; incapable; -- now usually followed by an infinitive or an adverbial phrase; as, unable for work; unable to bear fatigue.

Viable (a.) Capable of living; born alive and with such form and development of organs as to be capable of living; -- said of a newborn, or a prematurely born, infant.

Volborthite (n.) A mineral occurring in small six-sided tabular crystals of a green or yellow color. It is a hydrous vanadate of copper and lime.

Wabble (v. i.) To move staggeringly or unsteadily from one side to the other; to vacillate; to move the manner of a rotating disk when the axis of rotation is incWarbler (n.) Any one of numerous species of small Old World singing birds belonging to the family Sylviidae, many of which are noted songsters. The bluethroat, blackcap, reed warbler (see under Reed), and sedge warbler (see under Sedge) are well-known species.

Waxberry (n.) The wax-covered fruit of the wax myrtle, or bayberry. See Bayberry, and Candleberry tree.

Zimb (n.) A large, venomous, two-winged fly, native of Abyssinia. It is allied to the tsetse fly, and, like the latter, is destructive to cattle.

Zumbooruk (n.) A small cannon supported by a swiveled rest on the back of a camel, whence it is fired, -- used in the East.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.