Words whose 4th letter is C

Abaca (n.) The Manila-hemp plant (Musa textilis); also, its fiber. See Manila hemp under Manila.

Abacinate (v. t.) To blind by a red-hot metal plate held before the eyes.

Aback (adv.) Backward against the mast; -- said of the sails when pressed by the wind.

Abactinal (a.) Pertaining to the surface or end opposite to the mouth in a radiate animal; -- opposed to actinal.

Abscission (n.) A figure of speech employed when a speaker having begun to say a thing stops abruptly: thus, "He is a man of so much honor and candor, and of such generosity -- but I need say no more."

Abscond (v. i.) To depart clandestinely; to steal off and secrete one's self; -- used especially of persons who withdraw to avoid a legal process; as, an absconding debtor.

Acacia (n.) The inspissated juice of several species of acacia; -- called also gum acacia, and gum arabic.

Acyclic (a.) Having an open-chain structure; aliphatic.

Acicular (a.) Needle-shaped; slender like a needle or bristle, as some leaves or crystals; also, having sharp points like needless.

Aciculiform (a.) Needle-shaped; acicular.

Adscript (a.) Held to service as attached to the soil; -- said of feudal serfs.

Alicant (n.) A kind of wine, formerly much esteemed; -- said to have been made near Alicant, in Spain.

Amic (a.) Related to, or derived, ammonia; -- used chiefly as a suffix; as, amic acid; phosphamic acid.

Amice (n.) A hood, or cape with a hood, made of Anacanths (n. pl.) A group of teleostean fishes destitute of spiny fin-rays, as the cod.

Anacharis (n.) A fresh-water weed of the frog's-bit family (Hydrocharidaceae), native to America. Transferred to England it became an obstruction to navigation. Called also waterweed and water thyme.

Anaclastics (n.) That part of optics which treats of the refraction of light; -- commonly called dioptrics.

Apochromatic (a.) Free from chromatic and spherical aberration; -- said esp. of a lens in which rays of three or more colors are brought to the same focus, the degree of achromatism thus obtained being more complete than where two rays only are thus focused, as in the ordinary achromatic objective.

ArecoApocarpous (a.) Either entirely or partially separate, as the carpels of a compound pistil; -- opposed to syncarpous.

Apocrypha (n. pl.) Something, as a writing, that is of doubtful authorship or authority; -- formerly used also adjectively.

Atacamite (n.) An oxychloride of copper, usually in emerald-green prismatic crystals.

Avicula (n.) A genus of marine bivalves, having a pearly interior, allied to the pearl oyster; -- so called from a supposed resemblance of the typical species to a bird.

Avocado (n.) The pulpy fruit of Persea gratissima, a tree of tropical America. It is about the size and shape of a large pear; -- called also avocado pear, alligator pear, midshipman's butter.

Baccate (a.) Pulpy throughout, like a berry; -- said of fruits.

Bacchant (a.) Bacchanalian; fond of drunken revelry; wine-loving; reveling; carousing.

Barcon (n.) A vessel for freight; -- used in Mediterranean.

Bawcock (n.) A fine fellow; -- a term of endearment.

Belch (n.) Malt liquor; -- vulgarly so called as causing eructation.

Bench (n.) A collection or group of dogs exhibited to the public; -- so named because the animals are usually placed on benches or raised platforms.

Biacid (a.) Having two hydrogen atoms which can be replaced by negative atoms or radicals to form salts; -- said of bases. See Diacid.

Biocellate (a.) Having two ocelli (eyelike spots); -- said of a wing, etc.

Birch (n.) A birch-bark canoe.

Blackball (n.) A ball of black color, esp. one used as a negative in voting; -- in this sense usually two words.

Blackband (n.) An earthy carbonate of iron containing considerable carbonaceous matter; -- valuable as an iron ore.

Blackbird (n.) In England, a species of thrush (Turdus merula), a singing bird with a fin note; the merle. In America the name is given to several birds, as the Quiscalus versicolor, or crow blackbird; the Agelaeus phoeniceus, or red-winged blackbird; the cowbird; the rusty grackle, etc. See Redwing.

Blackcoat (n.) A clergyman; -- familiarly so called, as a soldier is sometimes called a redcoat or a bluecoat.

Blackcock (n.) The male of the European black grouse (Tetrao tetrix, Linn.); -- so called by sportsmen. The female is called gray hen. See Heath grouse.

Blackfish (n.) The black sea bass (Centropristis atrarius) of the Atlantic coast. It is excellent food fish; -- locally called also black Harry.

Blackguard (n.) The scullions and lower menials of a court, or of a nobleman's household, who, in a removal from one residence to another, had charge of the kitchen utensils, and being smutted by them, were jocularly called the "black guard"; also, the servants and hangers-on of an army.

Blackheart (n.) A heart-shaped cherry with a very dark-colored skin.

Blacklist (v. t.) To put in a black list as deserving of suspicion, censure, or punishment; esp. to put in a list of persons stigmatized as insolvent or untrustworthy, -- as tradesmen and employers do for mutual protection; as, to blacklist a workman who has been discharged. See Black list, under Black, a.

Blackstrap (n.) Bad port wine; any common wine of the Mediterranean; -- so called by sailors.

Blackstrap (n.) Bad port wine; any common wine of the Mediterranean; -- so called by sailors.

Blacktail (n.) The black-tailed deer (Cervus / Cariacus Columbianus) of California and Oregon; also, the mule deer of the Rocky Mountains. See Mule deer.

Blackwork (n.) Work wrought by blacksmiths; -- so called in distinction from that wrought by whitesmiths.

Blackbird (n.) A native of any of the islands near Queensland; -- called also Kanaka.

Blackbird (n.) A native of any of the islands near Queensland; -- called also Kanaka.

Block (v. t.) A grooved pulley or sheave incased in a frame or shell which is provided with a hook, eye, or strap, by which it may be attached to an object. It is used to change the direction of motion, as in raising a heavy object that can not be conveniently reached, and also, when two or more such sheaves are compounded, to change the rate of motion, or to exert increased force; -- used especially in the rigging of ships, and in tackles.

Block (n.) To obstruct so as to prevent passage or progress; to prevent passage from, through, or into, by obstructing the way; -- used both of persons and things; -- often followed by up; as, to block up a road or harbor.

Blockhouse (n.) An edifice or structure of heavy timbers or logs for military defense, having its sides loopholed for musketry, and often an upper story projecting over the lower, or so placed upon it as to have its sides make an angle wit the sides of the lower story, thus enabling the defenders to fire downward, and in all directions; -- formerly much used in America and Germany.

Botch (n.) To repair; to mend; esp. to patch in a clumsy or imperfect manner, as a garment; -- sometimes with up.

Brace (v. i.) To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; -- with up.

Brachycephalous (a.) Having the skull short in proportion to its breadth; shortheaded; -- in distinction from dolichocephalic.

Brachyura (n. pl.) A group of decapod Crustacea, including the common crabs, characterized by a small and short abdomen, which is bent up beneath the large cephalo-thorax. [Also spelt Brachyoura.] See Crab, and Illustration in Appendix.

Bracket (n.) One of two characters [], used to inclose a reference, explanation, or note, or a part to be excluded from a sentence, to indicate an interpolation, to rectify a mistake, or to supply an omission, and for certain other purposes; -- called also crotchet.

Brick (n.) A block or clay tempered with water, sand, etc., molded into a regular form, usually rectangular, and sun-dried, or burnt in a kiln, or in a heap or stack called a clamp.

Brocade (n.) Silk stuff, woven with gold and silver threads, or ornamented with raised flowers, foliage, etc.; -- also applied to other stuffs thus wrought and enriched.

Brochantite (n.) A basic sulphate of copper, occurring in emerald-green crystals.

Brocket (n.) A male red deer two years old; -- sometimes called brock.

Bracket (n.) A figure determined by firing a projectile beyond a target and another short of it, as a basis for ascertaining the proper elevation of the piece; -- only used in the phrase, to establish a bracket. After the bracket is established shots are fired with intermediate elevations until the exact range is obtained. In the United States navy it is called fork.

Brickfielder (n.) Orig., at Sydney, a cold and violent south or southwest wind, rising suddenly, and regularly preceded by a hot wind from the north; -- now usually called southerly buster. It blew across the Brickfields, formerly so called, a district of Sydney, and carried clouds of dust into the city.

Broche (a.) Stitched; -- said of a book with no cover or only a paper one.

Buccaneer (n.) A robber upon the sea; a pirate; -- a term applied especially to the piratical adventurers who made depredations on the Spaniards in America in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Buccinator (n.) A muscle of the cheek; -- so called from its use in blowing wind instruments.

Catchy (a.) Tending to catch or insnare; entangling; -- usually used fig.; as, a catchy question.

Caecum (n.) The blind part of the large intestine beyond the entrance of the small intestine; -- called also the blind gut.

Calcaneum (n.) One of the bones of the tarsus which in man, forms the great bone of the heel; -- called also fibulare.

Calcariferous (a.) Lime-yielding; calciferous

Calcavella (n.) A sweet wine from Portugal; -- so called from the district of Carcavelhos.

Calced (a.) Wearing shoes; calceated; -- in distintion from discalced or barefooted; as the calced Carmelites.

Calceiform (a.) Shaped like a slipper, as one petal of the lady's-slipper; calceolate.

Calceolate (a.) Slipper-ahaped. See Calceiform.

Calcification (n.) The process of change into a stony or calcareous substance by the deposition of lime salt; -- normally, as in the formation of bone and of teeth; abnormally, as in calcareous degeneration of tissue.

Calcite (n.) Calcium carbonate, or carbonate of lime. It is rhombohedral in its crystallization, and thus distinguished from aragonite. It includes common limestone, chalk, and marble. Called also calc-spar and calcareous spar.

Cancelier (v. i.) To turn in flight; -- said of a hawk.

Cancriform (a.) Having the form of, or resembling, a crab; crab-shaped.

Carcajou (n.) The wolverene; -- also applied, but erroneously, to the Canada lynx, and sometimes to the American badger. See Wolverene.

Carcass (n.) The living body; -- now commonly used in contempt or ridicule.

Carcinology (n.) The department of zoology which treats of the Crustacea (lobsters, crabs, etc.); -- called also malacostracology and crustaceology.

Catchwork (n.) A work or artificial water-course for throwing water on lands that lie on the slopes of hills; a catchdrain.

Cercaria (n.) The larval form of a trematode worm having the shape of a tadpole, with its body terminated by a tail-like appendage.

Chacma (n.) A large species of African baboon (Cynocephalus porcarius); -- called also ursine baboon. [See Illust. of Baboon.]

Chaconne (n.) An old Spanish dance in moderate three-four measure, like the Passacaglia, which is slower. Both are used by classical composers as themes for variations.

Check (v. i.) To make a stop; to pause; -- with at.

Checkerboard (n.) A board with sixty-four squares of alternate color, used for playing checkers or draughts.

Checkmate (n.) The position in the game of chess when a king is in check and cannot be released, -- which ends the game.

Checkrein (n.) A short rein looped over the check hook to prevent a horse from lowering his head; -- called also a bearing rein.

Checkroll (n.) A list of servants in a household; -- called also chequer roll.

Checky (a.) Divided into small alternating squares of two tinctures; -- said of the field or of an armorial bearing.

Chicane (n.) The use of artful subterfuge, designed to draw away attention from the merits of a case or question; -- specifically applied to legal proceedings; trickery; chicanery; caviling; sophistry.

Chich (n.) The chick-pea.

Chick (n.) A child or young person; -- a term of endearment.

Chickadee (n.) A small bird, the blackcap titmouse (Parus atricapillus), of North America; -- named from its note.

Chickaree (n.) The American red squirrel (Sciurus Hudsonius); -- so called from its cry.

Chicky (n.) A chicken; -- used as a diminutive or pet name, especially in calling fowls.

Chock (n.) A heavy casting of metal, usually fixed near the gunwale. It has two short horn-shaped arms curving inward, between which ropes or hawsers may pass for towing, mooring, etc.

Chuck (n.) A small pebble; -- called also chuckstone and chuckiestone.

Cinchonidine (n.) One of the quinine group of alkaloids, found especially in red cinchona bark. It is a white crystalCinchonine (n.) One of the quinine group of alkaloids isomeric with and resembling cinchonidine; -- called also cinchonia.

Cinchonism (n.) A condition produced by the excessive or long-continued use of quinine, and marked by deafness, roaring in the ears, vertigo, etc.

Cincture (n.) A belt, a girdle, or something worn round the body, -- as by an ecclesiastic for confining the alb.

Circinate (a.) Rolled together downward, the tip occupying the center; -- a term used in reference to foliation or leafing, as in ferns.

Circulation (n.) The movement of the blood in the blood-vascular system, by which it is brought into close relations with almost every living elementary constituent. Also, the movement of the sap in the vessels and tissues of plants.

Circumflex (a.) Curved circularly; -- applied to several arteries of the hip and thigh, to arteries, veins, and a nerve of the shoulder, and to other parts.

Circumpolar (a.) About the pole; -- applied to stars that revolve around the pole without setting; as, circumpolar stars.

Circumstantial (n.) Something incidental to the main subject, but of less importance; opposed to an essential; -- generally in the plural; as, the circumstantials of religion.

Cinch (n.) A variety of auction pitch in which a draw to improve the hand is added, and the five of trumps (called right pedro) and the five of the same color (called left pedro, and ranking between the five and the four of trumps) each count five on the score. Fifty-one points make a game. Called also double pedro and high five.

Cloche (n.) An apparatus used in controlling certain kinds of aeroplanes, and consisting principally of a steering column mounted with a universal joint at the base, which is bellshaped and has attached to it the cables for controlling the wing-warping devices, elevator planes, and the like.

Clockwise (a. & adv.) Like the motion of the hands of a clock; -- said of that direction of a rotation about an axis, or about a point in a plane, which is ordinarily reckoned negative.

Cleche (a.) Charged with another bearing of the same figure, and of the color of the field, so large that only a narrow border of the first bearing remains visible; -- said of any heraldic bearing. Compare Voided.

Coach (n.) A large, closed, four-wheeled carriage, having doors in the sides, and generally a front and back seat inside, each for two persons, and an elevated outside seat in front for the driver.

Coach (n.) A cabin on the after part of the quarter-deck, usually occupied by the captain.

Coach (n.) A first-class passenger car, as distinguished from a drawing-room car, sleeping car, etc. It is sometimes loosely applied to any passenger car.

Coach (v. i.) To drive or to ride in a coach; -- sometimes used with

Coachman (n.) A tropical fish of the Atlantic ocean (Dutes auriga); -- called also charioteer. The name refers to a long, lashlike spine of the dorsal fin.

Coccolith (n.) One of a kind of minute, calcareous bodies, probably vegetable, often abundant in deep-sea mud.

Colchicine (n.) A powerful vegetable alkaloid, C17H19NO5, extracted from the Colchicum autumnale, or meadow saffron, as a white or yellowish amorphous powder, with a harsh, bitter taste; -- called also colchicia.

Colchicum (n.) A genus of bulbous-rooted plants found in many parts of Europe, including the meadow saffron.

Colcothar (n.) Polishing rouge; a reddish brown oxide of iron, used in polishing glass, and also as a pigment; -- called also crocus Martis.

Concave (a.) Hollow and curved or rounded; vaulted; -- said of the interior of a curved surface or Concaved (a.) Bowed in the form of an arch; -- called also arched.

Conceive (v. i.) To have a conception, idea, or opinion; think; -- with of.

Concentrate (v. t.) To increase the strength and diminish the bulk of, as of a liquid or an ore; to intensify, by getting rid of useless material; to condense; as, to concentrate acid by evaporation; to concentrate by washing; -- opposed to dilute.

Concertino (n.) A piece for one or more solo instruments with orchestra; -- more concise than the concerto.

Concertmeister (n.) The head violinist or leader of the strings in an orchestra; the sub-leader of the orchestra; concert master.

Conch (n.) One of the white natives of the Bahama Islands or one of their descendants in the Florida Keys; -- so called from the commonness of the conch there, or because they use it for food.

Conchiform (a.) Shaped like one half of a bivalve shell; shell-shaped.

Conchoidal (a.) Having elevations or depressions in form like one half of a bivalve shell; -- applied principally to a surface produced by fracture.

Concinnity (n.) Internal harmony or fitness; mutual adaptation of parts; elegance; -- used chiefly of style of discourse.

Concise (a.) Expressing much in a few words; condensed; brief and compacted; -- used of style in writing or speaking.

Conclude (v. t.) To reach as an end of reasoning; to infer, as from premises; to close, as an argument, by inferring; -- sometimes followed by a dependent clause.

Conclude (v. t.) To shut off; to restrain; to limit; to estop; to bar; -- generally in the passive; as, the defendant is concluded by his own plea; a judgment concludes the introduction of further evidence argument.

Concrete (a.) Standing for an object as it exists in nature, invested with all its qualities, as distinguished from standing for an attribute of an object; -- opposed to abstract.

Concrete (a.) Applied to a specific object; special; particular; -- opposed to general. See Abstract, 3.

Concurrence (n.) A meeting of minds; agreement in opinion; union in design or act; -- implying joint approbation.

Concurrent (n.) One of the supernumerary days of the year over fifty-two complete weeks; -- so called because they concur with the solar cycle, the course of which they follow.

Corchorus (n.) The common name of the Kerria Japonica or Japan globeflower, a yellow-flowered, perennial, rosaceous plant, seen in old-fashioned gardens.

Couch (v. t.) To arrange or dispose as in a bed; -- sometimes followed by the reflexive pronoun.

Couch (v. t.) To put into some form of language; to express; to phrase; -- used with in and under.

Couchant (v. t.) Lying down with the head raised, which distinguishes the posture of couchant from that of dormant, or sleeping; -- said of a lion or other beast.

Couche (v. t.) Not erect; incCowcatxjer (n.) A strong incCrack (v. t.) To cry up; to extol; -- followed by up.

Crack (v. i.) To utter vain, pompous words; to brag; to boast; -- with of.

Crack (n.) A crazy or crack-brained person.

Cracker (n.) A small firework, consisting of a little powder inclosed in a thick paper cylinder with a fuse, and exploding with a sharp noise; -- often called firecracker.

Crackled (a.) Covered with minute cracks in the glaze; -- said of some kinds of porcelain and fine earthenware.

Crackling (n.) The well-browned, crisp rind of roasted pork.

Cracovienne (n.) A lively Polish dance, in 2-4 time.

Cracowes (n. pl.) Long-toed boots or shoes formerly worn in many parts of Europe; -- so called from Cracow, in Poland, where they were first worn in the fourteenth century.

Cricoid (a.) Resembling a ring; -- said esp. of the cartilage at the larynx, and the adjoining parts.

Crocidolite (n.) A mineral occuring in silky fibers of a lavender blue color. It is related to hornblende and is essentially a silicate of iron and soda; -- called also blue asbestus. A silicified form, in which the fibers penetrating quartz are changed to oxide of iron, is the yellow brown tiger-eye of the jewelers.

Crocoite (n.) Lead chromate occuring in crystals of a bright hyacinth red color; -- called also red lead ore.

Crocus (n.) A genus of iridaceous plants, with pretty blossoms rising separately from the bulb or corm. C. vernus is one of the earliest of spring-blooming flowers; C. sativus produces the saffron, and blossoms in the autumn.

Cruciform (a.) Cross-shaped; (Bot.) having four parts arranged in the form of a cross.

Cunctipotent (a.) All-powerful; omnipotent.

Curculio (n.) One of a large group of beetles (Rhynchophora) of many genera; -- called also weevils, snout beetles, billbeetles, and billbugs. Many of the species are very destructive, as the plum curculio, the corn, grain, and rice weevils, etc.

Dabchick (n.) A small water bird (Podilymbus podiceps), allied to the grebes, remarkable for its quickness in diving; -- called also dapchick, dobchick, dipchick, didapper, dobber, devil-diver, hell-diver, and pied-billed grebe.

Deacon (v. t.) To read aloud each Deccapodous (a.) Belonging to the decapods; having ten feet; ten-footed.

Deictic (a.) Direct; proving directly; -- applied to reasoning, and opposed to elenchtic or refutative.

Descend (v. i.) To pass from a higher to a lower place; to move downwards; to come or go down in any way, as by falling, flowing, walking, etc.; to plunge; to fall; to incDescend (v. i.) To make an attack, or incursion, as if from a vantage ground; to come suddenly and with violence; -- with on or upon.

Descendant (n.) One who descends, as offspring, however remotely; -- correlative to ancestor or ascendant.

Descent (n.) Incursion; sudden attack; especially, hostile invasion from sea; -- often followed by upon or on; as, to make a descent upon the enemy.

Diacatholicon (n.) A universal remedy; -- name formerly to a purgative electuary.

Diacid (a.) Divalent; -- said of a base or radical as capable of saturating two acid monad radicals or a dibasic acid. Cf. Dibasic, a., and Biacid.

Diacoustics (n.) That branch of natural philosophy which treats of the properties of sound as affected by passing through different mediums; -- called also diaphonics. See the Note under Acoustics.

Diacritical (a.) That separates or distinguishes; -- applied to points or marks used to distinguish letters of similar form, or different sounds of the same letter, as, a, /, a, /, /, etc.

Discalced (a.) Unshod; barefooted; -- in distinction from calced.

Discerning (a.) Acute; shrewd; sagacious; sharp-sighted.

Discharge (v. t.) To free of the missile with which anything is charged or loaded; to let go the charge of; as, to discharge a bow, catapult, etc.; especially, said of firearms, -- to fire off; to shoot off; also, to relieve from a state of tension, as a Leyden jar.

Disciflorous (a.) Bearing the stamens on a discoid outgrowth of the receptacle; -- said of a subclass of plants. Cf. Calycifloral.

Disciplinarian (n.) A Puritan or Presbyterian; -- because of rigid adherence to religious or church discipDiscipDisclose (v. t.) To unclose; to open; -- applied esp. to eggs in the sense of to hatch.

Disclosed (p. a.) Represented with wings expanded; -- applied to doves and other birds not of prey.

Discoidal (a.) Disk-shaped; discoid.

Disconvenient (a.) Not convenient or congruous; unsuitable; ill-adapted.

Discord (v. i.) Want of concord or agreement; absence of unity or harmony in sentiment or action; variance leading to contention and strife; disagreement; -- applied to persons or to things, and to thoughts, feelings, or purposes.

Discourage (v. t.) To extinguish the courage of; to dishearten; to depress the spirits of; to deprive of confidence; to deject; -- the opposite of encourage; as, he was discouraged in his undertaking; he need not be discouraged from a like attempt.

Discovert (a.) Not covert; not within the bonds of matrimony; unmarried; -- applied either to a woman who has never married or to a widow.

Discredit (n.) Hence, some degree of dishonor or disesteem; ill repute; reproach; -- applied to persons or things.

Discretion (n.) The quality of being discreet; wise conduct and management; cautious discernment, especially as to matters of propriety and self-control; prudence; circumspection; wariness.

Discuss (v. t.) To break up; to disperse; to scatter; to dissipate; to drive away; -- said especially of tumors.

Discussive (a.) Doubt-dispelling; decisive.

Dogcart (n.) A light one-horse carriage, commonly two-wheeled, patterned after a cart. The original dogcarts used in England by sportsmen had a box at the back for carrying dogs.

Doucker (v. t.) A grebe or diver; -- applied also to the golden-eye, pochard, scoter, and other ducks.

Dracaena (n.) A genus of liliaceous plants with woody stems and funnel-shaped flowers.

Dracanth (n.) A kind of gum; -- called also gum tragacanth, or tragacanth. See Tragacanth.

Draconin (n.) A red resin forming the essential basis of dragon's blood; -- called also dracin.

Dulciana (n.) A sweet-toned stop of an organ.

Dyscrasia (n.) An ill habit or state of the constitution; -- formerly regarded as dependent on a morbid condition of the blood and humors.

Eject (v. t.) An object that is a conscious or living object, and hence not a direct object, but an inferred object or act of a subject, not myself; -- a term invented by W. K. Clifford.

Ejector (n.) That part of the mechanism of a breech-loading firearm which ejects the empty shell.

Election (a.) Divine choice; predestination of individuals as objects of mercy and salvation; -- one of the "five points" of Calvinism.

Electrocute (v. t.) To execute or put to death by electricity. -- E*lec`tro*cu"tion, n. [Recent; Newspaper words]

Electromotor (n.) An apparatus or machine for producing motion and mechanical effects by the action of electricity; an electro-magnetic engine.

Electrotonic (a.) Of or pertaining to electrical tension; -- said of a supposed peculiar condition of a conducting circuit during its exposure to the action of another conducting circuit traversed by a uniform electric current when both circuits remain stationary.

Electron () One of those particles, having about one thousandth the mass of a hydrogen atom, which are projected from the cathode of a vacuum tube as the cathode rays and from radioactive substances as the beta rays; -- called also corpuscle. The electron carries (or is) a natural unit of negative electricity, equal to 3.4 x 10-10 electrostatic units. It has been detected only when in rapid motion; its mass, which is electromagnetic, is practically constant at the lesser speeds, but increases > Eluctate (v. i.) To struggle out; -- with out.

Epicene (a. & n.) Common to both sexes; -- a term applied, in grammar, to such nouns as have but one form of gender, either the mascuEpichordal (a.) Upon or above the notochord; -- applied esp. to a vertebral column which develops upon the dorsal side of the notochord, as distinguished from a perichordal column, which develops around it.

Epicolic (a.) Situated upon or over the colon; -- applied to the region of the abdomen adjacent to the colon.

Erucifrom (a.) Having the form of a caterpillar; -- said of insect larvae.

Exact (a.) To demand or require authoritatively or peremptorily, as a right; to enforce the payment of, or a yielding of; to compel to yield or to furnish; hence, to wrest, as a fee or reward when none is due; -- followed by from or of before the one subjected to exaction; as, to exact tribute, fees, obedience, etc., from or of some one.

Execution (n.) That which is executed or accomplished; effect; effective work; -- usually with do.

Exocardial (a.) Situated or arising outside of the heat; as, exocardial murmurs; -- opposed to endocardiac.

Exscutellate (a.) Without, or apparently without, a scutellum; -- said of certain insects.

Eyecup (n.) A small oval porcelain or glass cup, having a rim curved to fit the orbit of the eye. it is used in the application of liquid remedies to eyes; -- called also eyeglass.

Falcated (a.) Hooked or bent like a sickle; as, a falcate leaf; a falcate claw; -- said also of the moon, or a planet, when horned or crescent-formed.

Falchion (n.) A broad-bladed sword, slightly curved, shorter and lighter than the ordinary sword; -- used in the Middle Ages.

Falcula (n.) A curved and sharp-pointed claw.

Farctate (v. t.) Stuffed; filled solid; as, a farctate leaf, stem, or pericarp; -- opposed to tubular or hollow.

Fascet (n.) A wire basket on the end of a rod to carry glass bottles, etc., to the annealing furnace; also, an iron rod to be thrust into the mouths of bottles, and used for the same purpose; -- called also pontee and punty.

Fascia (n.) A broad well-defined band of color.

Faucet (n.) A fixture for drawing a liquid, as water, molasses, oil, etc., from a pipe, cask, or other vessel, in such quantities as may be desired; -- called also tap, and cock. It consists of a tubular spout, stopped with a movable plug, spigot, valve, or slide.

Fence (n.) Self-defense by the use of the sword; the art and practice of fencing and sword play; hence, skill in debate and repartee. See Fencing.

Finchbacked (a.) Streaked or spotted on the back; -- said of cattle.

Fiscal (n.) The solicitor in Spain and Portugal; the attorney-general.

Flacket (n.) A barrel-shaped bottle; a flagon.

Flicker (n.) The golden-winged woodpecker (Colaptes aurutus); -- so called from its spring note. Called also yellow-hammer, high-holder, pigeon woodpecker, and yucca.

Floccillation (n.) A delirious picking of bedclothes by a sick person, as if to pick off flocks of wool; carphology; -- an alarming symptom in acute diseases.

Flock (n.) A company or collection of living creatures; -- especially applied to sheep and birds, rarely to persons or (except in the plural) to cattle and other large animals; as, a flock of ravenous fowl.

Force (n.) Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; -- an armament; troops; warlike array; -- often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation.

Force (n.) To impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; -- with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc.

Forceps (n.) The caudal forceps-shaped appendage of earwigs and some other insects. See Earwig.

Fracted (a.) Having a part displaced, as if broken; -- said of an ordinary.

Fraction (v. t.) To separate by means of, or to subject to, fractional distillation or crystallization; to fractionate; -- frequently used with out; as, to fraction out a certain grade of oil from pretroleum.

Fricando (n.) A ragout or fricassee of veal; a fancy dish of veal or of boned turkey, served as an entree, -- called also fricandel.

Fricative (a.) Produced by the friction or rustling of the breath, intonated or unintonated, through a narrow opening between two of the mouth organs; uttered through a close approach, but not with a complete closure, of the organs of articulation, and hence capable of being continued or prolonged; -- said of certain consonantal sounds, as f, v, s, z, etc.

Fricative (n.) A fricative consonant letter or sound. See Guide to Pronunciation, // 197-206, etc.

Fructed (a.) Bearing fruit; -- said of a tree or plant so represented upon an escutcheon.

Fructidor (n.) The twelfth month of the French republican calendar; -- commencing August 18, and ending September 16. See Vendemiaire.

Fuscine (n.) A dark-colored substance obtained from empyreumatic animal oil.

Garcon (n.) A boy; fellow; esp., a serving boy or man; a waiter; -- in Eng. chiefly applied to French waiters.

Garcinia (n.) A genus of plants, including the mangosteen tree (Garcinia Mangostana), found in the islands of the Indian Archipelago; -- so called in honor of Dr. Garcin.

Gauche (n.) Winding; twisted; warped; -- applied to curves and surfaces.

Gaucho (n.) One of the native inhabitants of the pampas, of Spanish-American descent. They live mostly by rearing cattle.

Geocentrical (a.) Having reference to the earth as center; in relation to or seen from the earth, -- usually opposed to heliocentric, as seen from the sun; as, the geocentric longitude or latitude of a planet.

Geocronite (n.) A lead-gray or grayish blue mineral with a metallic luster, consisting of sulphur, antimony, and lead, with a small proportion of arsenic.

Glacial (a.) Resembling ice; having the appearance and consistency of ice; -- said of certain solid compounds; as, glacial phosphoric or acetic acids.

Glace (a.) Coated with icing; iced; glazed; -- said of fruits, sweetmeats, cake, etc.

Glockenspiel (n.) An instrument, originally a series of bells on an iron rod, now a set of flat metal bars, diatonically tuned, giving a bell-like tone when played with a mallet; a carillon.

Glucina (n.) A white or gray tasteless powder, the oxide of the element glucinum; -- formerly called glucine.

Glycide (n.) A colorless liquid, obtained from certain derivatives of glycerin, and regarded as a partially dehydrated glycerin; -- called also glycidic alcohol.

Glycocoll (n.) A crystalGlyconic (a.) Consisting of a spondee, a choriamb, and a pyrrhic; -- applied to a kind of verse in Greek and Latin poetry.

Gorcrow (n.) The carrion crow; -- called also gercrow.

Grace (n.) Fortune; luck; -- used commonly with hard or sorry when it means misfortune.

Grackle (n.) One of several American blackbirds, of the family Icteridae; as, the rusty grackle (Scolecophagus Carolinus); the boat-tailed grackle (see Boat-tail); the purple grackle (Quiscalus quiscula, or Q. versicolor). See Crow blackbird, under Crow.

Grocery (n.) The commodities sold by grocers, as tea, coffee, spices, etc.; -- in the United States almost always in the plural form, in this sense.

Guacharo (n.) A nocturnal bird of South America and Trinidad (Steatornis Caripensis, or S. steatornis); -- called also oilbird.

Guacho (n.) One of the mixed-blood (Spanish-Indian) inhabitants of the pampas of South America; a mestizo.

Guicowar (n.) [Mahratta g/ekw/r, prop., a cowherd.] The title of the sovereign of Guzerat, in Western India; -- generally called the Guicowar of Baroda, which is the capital of the country.

Haecceity () Literally, this-ness. A scholastic term to express individuality or singleness; as, this book.

Hatch (v. i.) To produce young; -- said of eggs; to come forth from the egg; -- said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc.

Hatchel (n.) An instrument with long iron teeth set in a board, for cleansing flax or hemp from the tow, hards, or coarse part; a kind of large comb; -- called also hackle and heckle.

Hatchettite (n.) Mineral t/ low; a waxy or spermaceti-like substance, commonly of a greenish yellow color.

Hatching (n.) A mode of execution in engraving, drawing, and miniature painting, in which shading is produced by Hatchment (n.) A sort of panel, upon which the arms of a deceased person are temporarily displayed, -- usually on the walls of his dwelling. It is lozenge-shaped or square, but is hung cornerwise. It is used in England as a means of giving public notification of the death of the deceased, his or her rank, whether married, widower, widow, etc. Called also achievement.

Hircic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, mutton suet; -- applied by Chevreul to an oily acid which was obtained from mutton suet, and to which he attributed the peculiar taste and smell of that substance. The substance has also been called hircin.

Hitch (v. t.) To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; -- said of something obstructed or impeded.

Hitch (n.) A knot or noose in a rope which can be readily undone; -- intended for a temporary fastening; as, a half hitch; a clove hitch; a timber hitch, etc.

Hocco (n.) The crested curassow; -- called also royal pheasant. See Curassow.

Hoecake (n.) A cake of Indian meal, water, and salt, baked before the fire or in the ashes; -- so called because often cooked on a hoe.

Hunch (n.) A strong, intuitive impression that something will happen; -- said to be from the gambler's superstition that it brings luck to touch the hump of a hunchback.

Hyacinth (n.) The name also given to Scilla Peruviana, a Mediterranean plant, one variety of which produces white, and another blue, flowers; -- called also, from a mistake as to its origin, Hyacinth of Peru.

Inactive (a.) Not active; inert; esp., not exhibiting any action or activity on polarized light; optically neutral; -- said of isomeric forms of certain substances, in distinction from other forms which are optically active; as, racemic acid is an inactive tartaric acid.

Inocular (a.) Inserted in the corner of the eye; -- said of the antenn/ of certain insects.

Inoculate (v. t.) Fig.: To introduce into the mind; -- used especially of harmful ideas or principles; to imbue; as, to inoculate one with treason or infidelity.

Inscribable (a.) Capable of being inscribed, -- used specif. (Math.) of solids or plane figures capable of being inscribed in other solids or figures.

Isocephalism (n.) A peculiarity in the design of bas-relief by which the heads of human figures are kept at the same height from the ground, whether the personages are seated, standing, or mounted on horseback; -- called also isokephaleia.

Junco (n.) Any bird of the genus Junco, which includes several species of North American finches; -- called also snowbird, or blue snowbird.

Kerchief (n.) A square of fine Ketch (n.) An almost obsolete form of vessel, with a mainmast and a mizzenmast, -- usually from one hundred to two hundred and fifty tons burden.

Kitcat (a.) Designating a club in London, to which Addison and Steele belonged; -- so called from Christopher Cat, a pastry cook, who served the club with mutton pies.

Kitcat (a.) Designating a canvas used for portraits of a peculiar size, viz., twenty-right or twenty-nine inches by thirty-six; -- so called because that size was adopted by Sir Godfrey Kneller for the portraits he painted of the members of the Kitcat Club.

Knacker (n.) One of two or more pieces of bone or wood held loosely between the fingers, and struck together by moving the hand; -- called also clapper.

Knacker (n.) One who slaughters worn-out horses and sells their flesh for dog's meat.

Knuckle (n.) A contrivance, usually of brass or iron, and furnished with points, worn to protect the hand, to add force to a blow, and to disfigure the person struck; as, brass knuckles; -- called also knuckle duster.

Knuckle (v. i.) To yield; to submit; -- used with down, to, or under.

Knickerbocker (n.) A linsey-woolsey fabric having a rough knotted surface on the right side; used for women's dresses.

Knock (v. i.) To practice evil speaking or fault-finding; to criticize habitually or captiously.

Knockabout (n.) A small yacht, generally from fifteen to twenty-five feet in length, having a mainsail and a jib. All knockabouts have ballast and either a keel or centerboard. The original type was twenty-one feet in length. The next larger type is called a raceabout.

Knockabout (a.) That does odd jobs; -- said of a class of hands or laborers on a sheep station.

Lancepesade (n.) An assistant to a corporal; a private performing the duties of a corporal; -- called also lance corporal.

Lancet (n.) A surgical instrument of various forms, commonly sharp-pointed and two-edged, used in venesection, and in opening abscesses, etc.

Latching (n.) A loop or eye formed on the head rope of a bonnet, by which it is attached to the foot of a sail; -- called also latch and lasket.

Leach (v. t.) To dissolve out; -- often used with out; as, to leach out alkali from ashes.

Leachy (a.) Permitting liquids to pass by percolation; not capable of retaining water; porous; pervious; -- said of gravelly or sandy soils, and the like.

Leucin (n.) A white, crystalLeucitoid (n.) The trapezohedron or tetragonal trisoctahedron; -- so called as being the form of the mineral leucite.

Leucoma (n.) A white opacity in the cornea of the eye; -- called also albugo.

Leucopyrite (n.) A mineral of a color between white and steel-gray, with a metallic luster, and consisting chiefly of arsenic and iron.

Leucous (a.) White; -- applied to albinos, from the whiteness of their skin and hair.

Linch (n.) A ledge; a right-angled projection.

Loach (n.) Any one of several small, fresh-water, cyprinoid fishes of the genera Cobitis, Nemachilus, and allied genera, having six or more barbules around the mouth. They are found in Europe and Asia. The common European species (N. barbatulus) is used as a food fish.

Maccabees (n. pl.) The name given later times to the Asmonaeans, a family of Jewish patriots, who headed a religious revolt in the reign of Antiochus IV., 168-161 B. C., which led to a period of freedom for Israel.

Marcato (a.) In a marked emphatic manner; -- used adverbially as a direction.

March (n.) The third month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

March (n.) A territorial border or frontier; a region adjacent to a boundary Mascagnite (n.) Native sulphate of ammonia, found in volcanic districts; -- so named from Mascagni, who discovered it.

Mascled (a.) Composed of, or covered with, lozenge-shaped scales; having lozenge-shaped divisions.

Maucaco (n.) A lemur; -- applied to several species, as the White-fronted, the ruffed, and the ring-tailed lemurs.

Merchantman (n.) A trading vessel; a ship employed in the transportation of goods, as, distinguished from a man-of-war.

Merciless (a.) Destitute of mercy; cruel; unsparing; -- said of animate beings, and also, figuratively, of things; as, a merciless tyrant; merciless waves.

Mercurial (a.) Having the form or image of Mercury; -- applied to ancient guideposts.

Mercurial (a.) Of or pertaining to Mercury as the god of trade; hence, money-making; crafty.

Mercuric (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, mercury; containing mercury; -- said of those compounds of mercury into which this element enters in its lowest proportion.

Mercurous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, mercury; containing mercury; -- said of those compounds of mercury in which it is present in its highest proportion.

Mercury (n.) A Latin god of commerce and gain; -- treated by the poets as identical with the Greek Hermes, messenger of the gods, conductor of souls to the lower world, and god of eloquence.

Milch (a.) Giving milk; -- now applied only to beasts.

Miscellane (n.) A mixture of two or more sorts of grain; -- now called maslin and meslin.

Mischievous (a.) Causing mischief; harmful; hurtful; -- now often applied where the evil is done carelessly or in sport; as, a mischievous child.

Mulch (n.) Half-rotten straw, or any like substance strewn on the ground, as over the roots of plants, to protect from heat, drought, etc., and to preserve moisture.

Muscardin (n.) The common European dormouse; -- so named from its odor.

Muscular (a.) Well furnished with muscles; having well-developed muscles; brawny; hence, strong; powerful; vigorous; as, a muscular body or arm.

Musculospiral (a.) Of or pertaining to the muscles, and taking a spiral course; -- applied esp. to a large nerve of the arm.

Mynchery (n.) A nunnery; -- a term still applied to the ruins of certain nunneries in England.

Myochrome (n.) A colored albuminous substance in the serum from red-colored muscles. It is identical with hemoglobin.

Narcissus (n.) A genus of endogenous bulbous plants with handsome flowers, having a cup-shaped crown within the six-lobed perianth, and comprising the daffodils and jonquils of several kinds.

Narcotine (n.) An alkaloid found in opium, and extracted as a white crystalNeocriticism (n.) The form of Neo-Kantianism developed by French idealists, following C. Renouvier. It rejects the noumena of Kant, restricting knowledge to phenomena as constituted by a priori categories.

Niccolite (n.) A mineral of a copper-red color and metallic luster; an arsenide of nickel; -- called also coppernickel, kupfernickel.

Niece (n.) A daughter of one's brother or sister, or of one's brother-in-law or sister-in-law.

Nonce (n.) The one or single occasion; the present call or purpose; -- chiefly used in the phrase for the nonce.

Noncondensible (a.) Not condensible; incapable of being liquefied; -- said of gases.

Noncontent (n.) One who gives a negative vote; -- sometimes abridged into noncon. or non con.

Notchweed (n.) A foul-smelling weed, the stinking goosefoot (Chenopodium Vulvaria).

Obscene (a/) Inauspicious; ill-omened.

Oracle (n.) The communications, revelations, or messages delivered by God to the prophets; also, the entire sacred Scriptures -- usually in the plural.

Orichalch (n.) A metallic substance, resembling gold in color, but inferior in value; a mixed metal of the ancients, resembling brass; -- called also aurichalcum, orichalcum, etc.

Outcrop (v. i.) To come out to the surface of the ground; -- said of strata.

Panchway (n.) A Bengalese four-oared boat for passengers.

Pancratic (a.) Having all or many degrees of power; having a great range of power; -- said of an eyepiece made adjustable so as to give a varying magnifying power.

Pancratium (n.) A genus of Old World amaryllideous bulbous plants, having a funnel-shaped perianth with six narrow spreading lobes. The American species are now placed in the related genus Hymenocallis.

Pancreas (n.) The sweetbread, a gland connected with the intestine of nearly all vertebrates. It is usually elongated and light-colored, and its secretion, called the pancreatic juice, is discharged, often together with the bile, into the upper part of the intestines, and is a powerful aid in digestion. See Illust. of Digestive apparatus.

Parcel (v. t.) To divide and distribute by parts or portions; -- often with out or into.

Patch (v. t.) To make of pieces or patches; to repair as with patches; to arrange in a hasty or clumsy manner; -- generally with up; as, to patch up a truce.

Patchwork (n.) Work composed of pieces sewed together, esp. pieces of various colors and figures; hence, anything put together of incongruous or ill-adapted parts; something irregularly clumsily composed; a thing putched up.

Peach (n.) A well-known high-flavored juicy fruit, containing one or two seeds in a hard almond-like endocarp or stone; also, the tree which bears it (Prunus, / Amygdalus Persica). In the wild stock the fruit is hard and inedible.

Peccavi () I have sinned; -- used colloquially to express confession or acknowledgment of an offense.

Pencel (n.) A small, narrow flag or streamer borne at the top of a lance; -- called also pennoncel.

Pencil (n.) A slender cylinder or strip of black lead, colored chalk, slate etc., or such a cylinder or strip inserted in a small wooden rod intended to be pointed, or in a case, which forms a handle, -- used for drawing or writing. See Graphite.

Perca (n.) A genus of fishes, including the fresh-water perch.

Percale (n.) A fine cotton fabric, having a Perception (n.) The faculty of perceiving; the faculty, or peculiar part, of man's constitution by which he has knowledge through the medium or instrumentality of the bodily organs; the act of apperhending material objects or qualities through the senses; -- distinguished from conception.

Perch (n.) Any fresh-water fish of the genus Perca and of several other allied genera of the family Percidae, as the common American or yellow perch (Perca flavescens, / Americana), and the European perch (P. fluviatilis).

Perch (n.) Any one of numerous species of spiny-finned fishes belonging to the Percidae, Serranidae, and related families, and resembling, more or less, the true perches.

Perch (n.) In solid measure: A mass 16/ feet long, 1 foot in height, and 1/ feet in breadth, or 24/ cubic feet (in local use, from 22 to 25 cubic feet); -- used in measuring stonework.

Percheron (n.) One of a breed of draught horses originating in Perche, an old district of France; -- called also Percheron-Norman.

Perchloric (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, the highest oxygen acid (HClO4), of chlorine; -- called also hyperchloric.

Peucedanin (n.) A tasteless white crystalPeachblow (a.) Of the delicate purplish pink color likened to that of peach blooms; -- applied esp. to a Chinese porcelain, small specimens of which bring great prices in the Western countries.

PercaPhycomycetes (n. pl.) A large, important class of parasitic or saprophytic fungi, the algal or algalike fungi. The plant body ranges from an undifferentiated mass of protoplasm to a well-developed and much-branched mycelium. Reproduction is mainly sexual, by the formation of conidia or sporangia; but the group shows every form of transition from this method through simple conjugation to perfect sexual reproduction by egg and sperm in the higher forms.

Phocenic (a.) Of or pertaining to dolphin oil or porpoise oil; -- said of an acid (called also delphinic acid) subsequently found to be identical with valeric acid.

Pibcorn (n.) A wind instrument or pipe, with a horn at each end, -- used in Wales.

Piccadilly (n.) A high, stiff collar for the neck; also, a hem or band about the skirt of a garment, -- worn by men in the 17th century.

Piccalilli (n.) A pickle of various vegetables with pungent species, -- originally made in the East Indies.

Piece (n.) A coin; as, a sixpenny piece; -- formerly applied specifically to an English gold coin worth 22 shillings.

Piece (n.) An individual; -- applied to a person as being of a certain nature or quality; often, but not always, used slightingly or in contempt.

Piece (v. t.) To make, enlarge, or repair, by the addition of a piece or pieces; to patch; as, to piece a garment; -- often with out.

Pinch (n.) A lever having a projection at one end, acting as a fulcrum, -- used chiefly to roll heavy wheels, etc. Called also pinch bar.

Pinchers (n. pl.) An instrument having two handles and two grasping jaws working on a pivot; -- used for griping things to be held fast, drawing nails, etc.

Pitch (v. i.) To fix one's choise; -- with on or upon.

Pitch (n.) The distance from center to center of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch Pitchblende (n.) A pitch-black mineral consisting chiefly of the oxide of uranium; uraninite. See Uraninite.

Pitcher (n.) A wide-mouthed, deep vessel for holding liquids, with a spout or protruding lip and a handle; a water jug or jar with a large ear or handle.

Pitchy (a.) Black; pitch-dark; dismal.

Place (v. t.) To place-kick ( a goal).

Place (n.) Reception; effect; -- implying the making room for.

Place (n.) Position in the heavens, as of a heavenly body; -- usually defined by its right ascension and declination, or by its latitude and longitude.

Placket (n.) The opening or slit left in a petticoat or skirt for convenience in putting it on; -- called also placket hole.

Placoides (n. pl.) A group of fishes including the sharks and rays; the Elasmobranchii; -- called also Placoidei.

Plectognathic (a.) Alt. of Plec-tognathous

Plectospondyli (n. pl.) An extensive suborder of fresh-water physostomous fishes having the anterior vertebrae united and much modified; the Eventognathi.

Pluck (v. i.) To make a motion of pulling or twitching; -- usually with at; as, to pluck at one's gown.

Pluckless (a.) Without pluck; timid; faint-hearted.

Poachard (n.) A common European duck (Aythya ferina); -- called also goldhead, poker, and fresh-water, / red-headed, widgeon.

Poachy (a.) Wet and soft; easily penetrated by the feet of cattle; -- said of land

Poecilitic (a.) Mottled with various colors; variegated; spotted; -- said of certain rocks.

Porcelain (n.) A fine translucent or semitransculent kind of earthenware, made first in China and Japan, but now also in Europe and America; -- called also China, or China ware.

Porcelainized (a.) Baked like potter's lay; -- applied to clay shales that have been converted by heat into a substance resembling porcelain.

Porcellaneous (a.) Having a smooth, compact shell without pores; -- said of certain Foraminifera.

Porcelanite (n.) A semivitrified clay or shale, somewhat resembling jasper; -- called also porcelain jasper.

Pouch (n.) A protuberant belly; a paunch; -- so called in ridicule.

Pouch (v. t.) To swallow; -- said of fowls.

Poncelet (n.) A unit of power, being the power obtained from an expenditure of one hundred kilogram-meters of energy per second. One poncelet equals g watts, when g is the value of the acceleration of gravity in centimeters.

Practice (n.) Actual performance; application of knowledge; -- opposed to theory.

Practice (n.) Skillful or artful management; dexterity in contrivance or the use of means; art; stratagem; artifice; plot; -- usually in a bad sense.

Precede (v. t.) To cause to be preceded; to preface; to introduce; -- used with by or with before the instrumental object.

Preceding (a.) Going before; -- opposed to following.

Precentor (n.) The leader of the choir in a cathedral; -- called also the chanter or master of the choir.

Precinct (n.) The limit or exterior Precisian (n.) An overprecise person; one rigidly or ceremoniously exact in the observance of rules; a formalist; -- formerly applied to the English Puritans.

Precocious (a.) Developed more than is natural or usual at a given age; exceeding what is to be expected of one's years; too forward; -- used especially of mental forwardness; as, a precocious child; precocious talents.

Priced (a.) Rated in price; valued; as, high-priced goods; low-priced labor.

Prick (v.) A mathematical point; -- regularly used in old English translations of Euclid.

Prick (n.) To pierce slightly with a sharp-pointed instrument or substance; to make a puncture in, or to make by puncturing; to drive a fine point into; as, to prick one with a pin, needle, etc.; to prick a card; to prick holes in paper.

Prick (n.) To mark or denote by a puncture; to designate by pricking; to choose; to mark; -- sometimes with off.

Prick (n.) To ride or guide with spurs; to spur; to goad; to incite; to urge on; -- sometimes with on, or off.

Prick (n.) To make sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as something pointed; -- said especially of the ears of an animal, as a horse or dog; and usually followed by up; -- hence, to prick up the ears, to listen sharply; to have the attention and interest strongly engaged.

Prick (n.) To dress; to prink; -- usually with up.

Pricker (n.) A priming wire; a priming needle, -- used in blasting and gunnery.

Pricker (n.) A small marPrickle (n.) A kind of willow basket; -- a term still used in some branches of trade.

Prickle (n.) A sieve of filberts, -- about fifty pounds.

Pricklouse (n.) A tailor; -- so called in contempt.

Pricksong (v. t.) Music written, or noted, with dots or points; -- so called from the points or dots with which it is noted down.

Prickwood (n.) A shrub (Euonymus Europaeus); -- so named from the use of its wood for goads, skewers, and shoe pegs. Called also spindle tree.

Proceres (n. pl.) An order of large birds; the Ratitae; -- called also Proceri.

Process (n.) The whole course of proceedings in a cause real or personal, civil or criminal, from the beginning to the end of the suit; strictly, the means used for bringing the defendant into court to answer to the action; -- a generic term for writs of the class called judicial.

Prochordal (a.) Situated in front of the notochord; -- applied especially to parts of the cartilaginous rudiments in the base of the skull.

Prochronism (n.) The dating of an event before the time it happened; an antedating; -- opposed to metachronism.

Proclitic (a.) Leaning forward; -- said of certain monosyllabic words which are so closely attached to the following word as not to have a separate accent.

Procrastinate (v. t.) To put off till to-morrow, or from day to day; to defer; to postpone; to delay; as, to procrastinate repentance.

Procrustes (n.) A celebrated legendary highwayman of Attica, who tied his victims upon an iron bed, and, as the case required, either stretched or cut of their legs to adapt them to its length; -- whence the metaphorical phrase, the bed of Procrustes.

Proctorage (n.) Management by a proctor, or as by a proctor; hence, control; superintendence; -- in contempt.

Procuration (n.) A sum of money paid formerly to the bishop or archdeacon, now to the ecclesiastical commissioners, by an incumbent, as a commutation for entertainment at the time of visitation; -- called also proxy.

Psychical (a.) Of or pertaining to the mind, or its functions and diseases; mental; -- contrasted with physical.

Psychanalysis (n.) A method or process of psychotherapeutic analysis based on the work of Dr. Sigmund Freud (1856- --) of Vienna. The method rests upon the theory that hysteria is characteristically due to repression of desires consciously rejected but subconsciously persistent; it consists in a close analysis of the patient's mental history, stress being laid upon the dream life, and of treatment by means of suggestion.

Punch (n.) A beverage composed of wine or distilled liquor, water (or milk), sugar, and the juice of lemon, with spice or mint; -- specifically named from the kind of spirit used; as rum punch, claret punch, champagne punch, etc.

Punctator (n.) One who marks with points. specifically, one who writes Hebrew with points; -- applied to a Masorite.

Quick (superl.) Alive; living; animate; -- opposed to dead or inanimate.

Quick (n.) The life; the mortal point; a vital part; a part susceptible of serious injury or keen feeling; the sensitive living flesh; the part of a finger or toe to which the nail is attached; the tender emotions; as, to cut a finger nail to the quick; to thrust a sword to the quick, to taunt one to the quick; -- used figuratively.

Quicken tree () The European rowan tree; -- called also quickbeam, and quickenbeam. See Rowan tree.

Quicklime (a.) Calcium oxide; unslacked lime; -- so called because when wet it develops great heat. See 4th Lime, 2.

Quicksilver (a.) The metal mercury; -- so called from its resemblance to liquid silver.

Quicksilvering (n.) The mercury and foil on the back of a looking-glass.

Rancho (n.) A large grazing farm where horses and cattle are raised; -- distinguished from hacienda, a cultivated farm or plantation.

Rancor (n.) The deepest malignity or spite; deep-seated enmity or malice; inveterate hatred.

Rascal (v.) One of the rabble; a low, common sort of person or creature; collectively, the rabble; the common herd; also, a lean, ill-conditioned beast, esp. a deer.

Rascally (a.) Like a rascal; trickish or dishonest; base; worthless; -- often in humorous disparagement, without implication of dishonesty.

Redcoat (n.) One who wears a red coat; specifically, a red-coated British soldier.

Reactance (n.) The influence of a coil of wire upon an alternating current passing through it, tending to choke or diminish the current, or the similar influence of a condenser; inductive resistance. Reactance is measured in ohms. The reactance of a circuit is equal to the component of the impressed electro-motive force at right angles to the current divided by the current, that is, the component of the impedance due to the self-inductance or capacity of the circuit.

Rhachis (n.) The shaft of a feather. The rhachis of the after-shaft, or plumule, is called the hyporhachis.

Rotche (n.) A very small arctic sea bird (Mergulus alle, or Alle alle) common on both coasts of the Atlantic in winter; -- called also little auk, dovekie, rotch, rotchie, and sea dove.

Saccharin (n.) A bitter white crystalSaccharonic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, saccharone; specifically, designating an unstable acid which is obtained from saccharone (a) by hydration, and forms a well-known series of salts.

Saccholactate (n.) A salt of saccholactic acid; -- formerly called also saccholate.

Sacchulmic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a dark amorphous substance by the long-continued boiling of sucrose with very dilute sulphuric acid. It resembles humic acid.

Sarcelle (n.) The old squaw, or long-tailed duck.

SarcoSarcoma (n.) A tumor of fleshy consistence; -- formerly applied to many varieties of tumor, now restricted to a variety of malignant growth made up of cells resembling those of fetal development without any proper intercellular substance.

Sarcophagous (a.) Feeding on flesh; flesh-eating; carnivorous.

Sarcophagus (n.) A coffin or chest-shaped tomb of the kind of stone described above; hence, any stone coffin.

Sarcophile (n.) A flesh-eating animal, especially any one of the carnivorous marsupials.

Sarcous (a.) Fleshy; -- applied to the minute structural elements, called sarcous elements, or sarcous disks, of which striated muscular fiber is composed.

Seecatch (n.) A full-grown male fur seal.

Shuck (v. t.) To remove or take off (shucks); hence, to discard; to lay aside; -- usually with off.

Shackle (n.) A link for connecting railroad cars; -- called also drawlink, draglink, etc.

Shock (n.) A lot consisting of sixty pieces; -- a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods.

Shock (n.) A dog with long hair or shag; -- called also shockdog.

Sicca (n.) A seal; a coining die; -- used adjectively to designate the silver currency of the Mogul emperors, or the Indian rupee of 192 grains.

Since (prep.) From the time of; in or during the time subsequent to; subsequently to; after; -- usually with a past event or time for the object.

Since (conj.) Seeing that; because; considering; -- formerly followed by that.

Siscowet (n.) A large, fat variety of the namaycush found in Lake Superior; -- called also siskawet, siskiwit.

Smicket (n.) A woman's under-garment; a smock.

Smock (n.) A woman's under-garment; a shift; a chemise.

Snack (v. t.) A share; a part or portion; -- obsolete, except in the colloquial phrase, to go snacks, i. e., to share.

Space (n.) A small piece of metal cast lower than a face type, so as not to receive the ink in printing, -- used to separate words or letters.

Spectacle (n.) A spy-glass; a looking-glass.

Spectatrix (n.) A female beholder or looker-on.

Speculate (v. i.) To purchase with the expectation of a contingent advance in value, and a consequent sale at a profit; -- often, in a somewhat depreciative sense, of unsound or hazardous transactions; as, to speculate in coffee, in sugar, or in bank stock.

Speculum (n.) A mirror, or looking-glass; especially, a metal mirror, as in Greek and Roman archaeology.

Spica (n.) A kind of bandage passing, by successive turns and crosses, from an extremity to the trunk; -- so called from its resemblance to a spike of a barley.

Spiccato (a.) Detached; separated; -- a term indicating that every note is to be performed in a distinct and pointed manner.

Spicewood (n.) An American shrub (Lindera Benzoin), the bark of which has a spicy taste and odor; -- called also Benjamin, wild allspice, and fever bush.

Spiciform (a.) Spike-shaped.

Spicknel (n.) An umbelliferous herb (Meum Athamanticum) having finely divided leaves, common in Europe; -- called also baldmoney, mew, and bearwort.

Staccato (a.) Disconnected; separated; distinct; -- a direction to perform the notes of a passage in a short, distinct, and pointed manner. It is opposed to legato, and often indicated by heavy accents written over or under the notes, or by dots when the performance is to be less distinct and emphatic.

Stack (a.) A data structure within random-access memory used to simulate a hardware stack; as, a push-down stack.

Stichometry (n.) Division of the text of a book into Stick (v. i.) To be embarrassed or puzzled; to hesitate; to be deterred, as by scruples; to scruple; -- often with at.

Stock (n.) Money or capital which an individual or a firm employs in business; fund; in the United States, the capital of a bank or other company, in the form of transferable shares, each of a certain amount; money funded in government securities, called also the public funds; in the plural, property consisting of shares in joint-stock companies, or in the obligations of a government for its funded debt; -- so in the United States, but in England the latter only are called stocks, and the form> Stock (n.) Domestic animals or beasts collectively, used or raised on a farm; as, a stock of cattle or of sheep, etc.; -- called also live stock.

Stock (n.) Any cruciferous plant of the genus Matthiola; as, common stock (Matthiola incana) (see Gilly-flower); ten-weeks stock (M. annua).

Stock (n.) A liquid or jelly containing the juices and soluble parts of meat, and certain vegetables, etc., extracted by cooking; -- used in making soup, gravy, etc.

Stock (v. t.) To suffer to retain milk for twenty-four hours or more previous to sale, as cows.

Stockinet (n.) An elastic textile fabric imitating knitting, of which stockings, under-garments, etc., are made.

Stocking (n.) A close-fitting covering for the foot and leg, usually knit or woven.

Styca (n.) An anglo-Saxon copper coin of the lowest value, being worth half a farthing.

Stycerin (n.) A triacid alcohol, related to glycerin, and obtained from certain styryl derivatives as a yellow, gummy, amorphous substance; -- called also phenyl glycerin.

Stocking (n.) Any of various things resembling, or likened to, a stocking; as: (a) A broad ring of color, differing from the general color, on the lower part of the leg of a quadruped; esp., a white ring between the coronet and the hock or knee of a dark-colored horse. (b) A knitted hood of cotton thread which is eventually converted by a special process into an incandescent mantle for gas lighting.

Subconscious (a.) Occurring without the possibility or the fact of an attendant consciousness; -- said of states of the soul.

Subcontrary (a.) Having, or being in, a contrary order; -- said of a section of an oblique cone having a circular base made by a plane not parallel to the base, but so incSucceed (v. i.) To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; -- often with to.

Successor (n.) One who succeeds or follows; one who takes the place which another has left, and sustains the like part or character; -- correlative to predecessor; as, the successor of a deceased king.

Suicide (adv.) The act of taking one's own life voluntary and intentionally; self-murder; specifically (Law), the felonious killing of one's self; the deliberate and intentional destruction of one's own life by a person of years of discretion and of sound mind.

Suicide (adv.) One guilty of self-murder; a felo-de-se.

Suicidism (n.) The quality or state of being suicidal, or self-murdering.

Syncategorematic (a.) Not capable of being used as a term by itself; -- said of words, as an adverb or preposition.

Synclastic (a.) Curved toward the same side in all directions; -- said of surfaces which in all directions around any point bend away from a tangent plane toward the same side, as the surface of a sphere; -- opposed to anticlastic.

Synclinal (a.) Formed by strata dipping toward a common Tench (n.) A European fresh-water fish (Tinca tinca, or T. vulgaris) allied to the carp. It is noted for its tenacity of life.

Thecla (n.) Any one of many species of small delicately colored butterflies belonging to Thecla and allied genera; -- called also hairstreak, and elfin.

Thick (superl.) Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; -- said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick.

Thickhead (n.) A thick-headed or stupid person.

Thickhead (n.) Any one of several species of Australian singing birds of the genus Pachycephala. The males of some of the species are bright-colored. Some of the species are popularly called thrushes.

Thiller (n.) The horse which goes between the thills, or shafts, and supports them; also, the last horse in a team; -- called also thill horse.

Tomcod (n.) A small edible American fish (Microgadus tomcod) of the Codfish family, very abundant in autumn on the Atlantic coast of the Northen United States; -- called also frostfish. See Illust. under Frostfish.

Torchwort (n.) The common mullein, the stalks of which, dipped in suet, anciently served for torches. Called also torch, and hig-taper.

Toucan (n.) Any one of numerous species of fruit-eating birds of tropical America belonging to Ramphastos, Pteroglossus, and allied genera of the family Ramphastidae. They have a very large, but light and thin, beak, often nearly as long as the body itself. Most of the species are brilliantly colored with red, yellow, white, and black in striking contrast.

Touch (v. t.) To affect with insanity, especially in a slight degree; to make partially insane; -- rarely used except in the past participle.

Touch (v. i.) To treat anything in discourse, especially in a slight or casual manner; -- often with on or upon.

Touch (v.) The broadest part of a plank worked top and but (see Top and but, under Top, n.), or of one worked anchor-stock fashion (that is, tapered from the middle to both ends); also, the angles of the stern timbers at the counters.

Touchback (n.) The act of touching the football down by a player behind his own goal Touchstone (n.) Lydian stone; basanite; -- so called because used to test the purity of gold and silver by the streak which is left upon the stone when it is rubbed by the metal. See Basanite.

Touch (v. t.) To compare with; of be equal to; -- usually with a negative; as, he held that for good cheer nothing could touch an open fire.

Touch (n.) Tallow; -- a plumber's term.

Trace (n.) A connecting bar or rod, pivoted at each end to the end of another piece, for transmitting motion, esp. from one plane to another; specif., such a piece in an organ-stop action to transmit motion from the trundle to the lever actuating the stop slider.

Trace (v. t.) A very small quantity of an element or compound in a given substance, especially when so small that the amount is not quantitatively determined in an analysis; -- hence, in stating an analysis, often contracted to tr.

Trachelobranchiate (a.) Having the gills situated upon the neck; -- said of certain mollusks.

Tracheobranchia (n.) One of the gill-like breathing organs of certain aquatic insect larvae. They contain tracheal tubes somewhat similar to those of other insects.

Tracheobronchial (a.) Pertaining both to the tracheal and bronchial tubes, or to their junction; -- said of the syrinx of certain birds.

Trachycarpous (a.) Rough-fruited.

Trachyspermous (a.) Rough-seeded.

Trachystomata (n. pl.) An order of tailed aquatic amphibians, including Siren and Pseudobranchus. They have anterior legs only, are eel-like in form, and have no teeth except a small patch on the palate. The external gills are persistent through life.

Trachytoid (a.) Resembling trachyte; -- used to define the structure of certain rocks.

Track (n.) The entire lower surface of the foot; -- said of birds, etc.

Trackmaster (n.) One who has charge of the track; -- called also roadmaster.

Tract (v.) Verses of Scripture sung at Mass, instead of the Alleluia, from Septuagesima Sunday till the Saturday befor Easter; -- so called because sung tractim, or without a break, by one voice, instead of by many as in the antiphons.

Tractarian (n.) One of the writers of the Oxford tracts, called "Tracts for the Times," issued during the period 1833-1841, in which series of papers the sacramental system and authority of the Church, and the value of tradition, were brought into prominence. Also, a member of the High Church party, holding generally the principles of the Tractarian writers; a Puseyite.

Tractrix (n.) A curve such that the part of the tangent between the point of tangency and a given straight Trice (n.) A very short time; an instant; a moment; -- now used only in the phrase in a trice.

Tricentenary (n.) A period of three centuries, or three hundred years, also, the three-hundredth anniversary of any event; a tercentenary.

Trichinize (v. t.) To render trichinous; to affect with trichinae; -- chiefly used in the past participle; as, trichinized pork.

Trichomanes (n.) Any fern of the genus Trichomanes. The fronds are very delicate and often translucent, and the sporangia are borne on threadlike receptacles rising from the middle of cup-shaped marginal involucres. Several species are common in conservatories; two are native in the United States.

Trichomatose (a.) Affected with a disease which causes agglutination and matting together; -- said of the hair when affected with plica. See Plica, 1.

Trichotomous (a.) Divided into three parts, or into threes; three-forked; as, a trichotomous stem.

Trichromatic (a.) Having or existing in three different phases of color; having three distinct color varieties; -- said of certain birds and insects.

Trick (a.) A turn; specifically, the spell of a sailor at the helm, -- usually two hours.

Trick (v. t.) To dress; to decorate; to set off; to adorn fantastically; -- often followed by up, off, or out.

Tricolor (n.) Hence, any three-colored flag.

Tricostate (a.) Three-ribbed; having three ribs from the base.

Tricuspidate (a.) Three-pointed; ending in three points; as, a tricuspidate leaf.

Tricycle (n.) A three-wheeled velocipede. See Illust. under Velocipede. Cf. Bicycle.

Trochantine (n.) The second joint of the leg of an insect, -- often united with the coxa.

Trochilus (n.) An annular molding whose section is concave, like the edge of a pulley; -- called also scotia.

Trochite (n.) A wheel-like joint of the stem of a fossil crinoid.

Trochoid (a.) Admitting of rotation on an axis; -- sometimes applied to a pivot joint like that between the atlas and axis in the vertebral column.

Trochoid (a.) Top-shaped; having a flat base and conical spire; -- said of certain shells.

Troco (n.) An old English game; -- called also lawn billiards.

Truck (v. i.) A small piece of wood, usually cylindrical or disk-shaped, used for various purposes.

Truck (v. i.) A frame on low wheels or rollers; -- used for various purposes, as for a movable support for heavy bodies.

Truck (n.) The practice of paying wages in goods instead of money; -- called also truck system.

Tuscan (a.) Of or pertaining to Tuscany in Italy; -- specifically designating one of the five orders of architecture recognized and described by the Italian writers of the 16th century, or characteristic of the order. The original of this order was not used by the Greeks, but by the Romans under the Empire. See Order, and Illust. of Capital.

Unaccustomed (a.) Not used; not habituated; unfamiliar; unused; -- which to.

Unicameral (a.) Having, or consisting of, a single chamber; -- said of a legislative assembly.

Unicorn (n.) A fabulous animal with one horn; the monoceros; -- often represented in heraldry as a supporter.

Unicorn (n.) A two-horned animal of some unknown kind, so called in the Authorized Version of the Scriptures.

Unicorn (n.) The kamichi; -- called also unicorn bird.

Unicornous (a.) Having but a single horn; -- said of certain insects.

Unicostate (a.) Having a single rib or strong nerve running upward from the base; -- said of a leaf.

Unicursal (a.) That can be passed over in a single course; -- said of a curve when the coordinates of the point on the curve can be expressed as rational algebraic functions of a single parameter /.

Usucaption (n.) The acquisition of the title or right to property by the uninterrupted possession of it for a certain term prescribed by law; -- the same as prescription in common law.

Vincetoxin (n.) A glucoside extracted from the root of the white swallowwort (Vincetoxicum officinale, a plant of the Asclepias family) as a bitter yellow amorphous substance; -- called also asclepiadin, and cynanchin.

Vinculum (n.) A straight, horizontal mark placed over two or more members of a compound quantity, which are to be subjected to the same operation, as in the expression x2 + y2 - x + y.

Viscacha (n.) Alt. of Viz-cacha

Voice (n.) Sound of the kind or quality heard in speech or song in the consonants b, v, d, etc., and in the vowels; sonant, or intonated, utterance; tone; -- distinguished from mere breath sound as heard in f, s, sh, etc., and also whisper.

Voice (n.) Command; precept; -- now chiefly used in scriptural language.

Voiced (a.) Uttered with voice; pronounced with vibrations of the vocal cords; sonant; -- said of a sound uttered with the glottis narrowed.

Volcano (n.) A mountain or hill, usually more or less conical in form, from which lava, cinders, steam, sulphur gases, and the like, are ejected; -- often popularly called a burning mountain.

Vulcan (n.) The god of fire, who presided over the working of metals; -- answering to the Greek Hephaestus.

Vulcanization (n.) The act or process of imparting to caoutchouc, gutta-percha, or the like, greater elasticity, durability, or hardness by heating with sulphur under pressure.

Watch (v. i.) To serve the purpose of a watchman by floating properly in its place; -- said of a buoy.

Watchful (a.) Full of watch; vigilant; attentive; careful to observe closely; observant; cautious; -- with of before the thing to be regulated or guarded; as, to be watchful of one's behavior; and with against before the thing to be avoided; as, to be watchful against the growth of vicious habits.

Wincey (n.) Linsey-woolsey.

Witch (n.) One who practices the black art, or magic; one regarded as possessing supernatural or magical power by compact with an evil spirit, esp. with the Devil; a sorcerer or sorceress; -- now applied chiefly or only to women, but formerly used of men as well.

Witch (n.) One who exercises more than common power of attraction; a charming or bewitching person; also, one given to mischief; -- said especially of a woman or child.

Yunca (n.) An Indian of a linguistic stock of tribes of the Peruvian coast who had a developed agricultural civilization at the advent of the Spaniards, before which they had been conquered by the Incas. They constructed irrigation canals which are still in use, adorned their buildings with bas-reliefs and frescoes, and were skilled goldsmiths and silversmiths.

Zinc (n.) An abundant element of the magnesium-cadmium group, extracted principally from the minerals zinc blende, smithsonite, calamine, and franklinite, as an easily fusible bluish white metal, which is malleable, especially when heated. It is not easily oxidized in moist air, and hence is used for sheeting, coating galvanized iron, etc. It is used in making brass, britannia, and other alloys, and is also largely consumed in electric batteries. Symbol Zn. Atomic weight 64.9.

Zincite (n.) Native zinc oxide; a brittle, translucent mineral, of an orange-red color; -- called also red zinc ore, and red oxide of zinc.

Zincoid (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, zinc; -- said of the electricity of the zincous plate in connection with a copper plate in a voltaic circle; also, designating the positive pole.

Zircon (n.) A mineral occurring in tetragonal crystals, usually of a brown or gray color. It consists of silica and zirconia. A red variety, used as a gem, is called hyacinth. Colorless, pale-yellow or smoky-brown varieties from Ceylon are called jargon.

Zirconium (n.) A rare element of the carbon-silicon group, intermediate between the metals and nonmetals, obtained from the mineral zircon as a dark sooty powder, or as a gray metallic crystalZircono () See Zirco-.

Zirconoid (n.) A double eight-sided pyramid, a form common with tetragonal crystals; -- so called because this form often occurs in crystals of zircon.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.