Words whose 4th letter is L

Abalone (n.) A univalve mollusk of the genus Haliotis. The shell is Abelmosk (n.) An evergreen shrub (Hibiscus -- formerly Abelmoschus -- moschatus), of the East and West Indies and Northern Africa, whose musky seeds are used in perfumery and to flavor coffee; -- sometimes called musk mallow.

Ability (n.) The quality or state of being able; power to perform, whether physical, moral, intellectual, conventional, or legal; capacity; skill or competence in doing; sufficiency of strength, skill, resources, etc.; -- in the plural, faculty, talent.

Abolish (v. t.) To do away with wholly; to annul; to make void; -- said of laws, customs, institutions, governments, etc.; as, to abolish slavery, to abolish folly.

Acalephae (n. pl.) A group of Coelenterata, including the Medusae or jellyfishes, and hydroids; -- so called from the stinging power they possess. Sometimes called sea nettles.

Acclivous (a.) Sloping upward; rising as a hillside; -- opposed to declivous.

Achlamydate (a.) Not possessing a mantle; -- said of certain gastropods.

Adelocodonic (a.) Applied to sexual zooids of hydroids, that have a saclike form and do not become free; -- opposed to phanerocodonic.

Adelphia (n.) A "brotherhood," or collection of stamens in a bundle; -- used in composition, as in the class names, Monadelphia, Diadelphia, etc.

Adelphous (a.) Having coalescent or clustered filaments; -- said of stamens; as, adelphous stamens. Usually in composition; as, monadelphous.

Adolescence (n.) The state of growing up from childhood to manhood or womanhood; youth, or the period of life between puberty and maturity, generally considered to be, in the male sex, from fourteen to twenty-one. Sometimes used with reference to the lower animals.

Adularia (n.) A transparent or translucent variety of common feldspar, or orthoclase, which often shows pearly opalescent reflections; -- called by lapidaries moonstone.

Afflicting (a.) Grievously painful; distressing; afflictive; as, an afflicting event. -- Af*flict"ing*ly, adv.

Agglomerate (n.) A mass of angular volcanic fragments united by heat; -- distinguished from conglomerate.

Ahull (adv.) With the sails furled, and the helm lashed alee; -- applied to ships in a storm. See Hull, n.

Aisle (n.) Improperly used also for the have; -- as in the phrases, a church with three aisles, the middle aisle.

Amylogenic (a.) Forming starch; -- applied specif. to leucoplasts.

Amyloplastic (a.) Starch-forming; amylogenic.

Amalgamation (n.) The act or operation of compounding mercury with another metal; -- applied particularly to the process of separating gold and silver from their ores by mixing them with mercury.

Amble (v. i.) To go at the easy gait called an amble; -- applied to the horse or to its rider.

Amblygon (n.) An obtuse-angled figure, esp. and obtuse-angled triangle.

Amblygonal (a.) Obtuse-angled.

Amelcorn (n.) A variety of wheat from which starch is produced; -- called also French rice.

Ampliation (n.) A postponement of the decision of a cause, for further consideration or re-argument.

Amplify (v. t.) To render larger, more extended, or more intense, and the like; -- used especially of telescopes, microscopes, etc.

Amplify (v. i.) To speak largely or copiously; to be diffuse in argument or description; to dilate; to expatiate; -- often with on or upon.

Amplitude (n.) The extent of a movement measured from the starting point or position of equilibrium; -- applied especially to vibratory movements.

Amplitude (n.) An angle upon which the value of some function depends; -- a term used more especially in connection with elliptic functions.

Amyloid (n.) A non-nitrogenous starchy food; a starchlike substance.

Analcime (n.) A white or flesh-red mineral, of the zeolite family, occurring in isometric crystals. By friction, it acquires a weak electricity; hence its name.

Analemma (n.) An instrument of wood or brass, on which this projection of the sphere is made, having a movable horizon or cursor; -- formerly much used in solving some common astronomical problems.

Analogous (a.) Having analogy; corresponding to something else; bearing some resemblance or proportion; -- often followed by to.

Analytical (a.) Of or pertaining to analysis; resolving into elements or constituent parts; as, an analytical experiment; analytic reasoning; -- opposed to synthetic.

Anelectric (a.) Not becoming electrified by friction; -- opposed to idioelectric.

Angled (a.) Having an angle or angles; -- used in compounds; as, right-angled, many-angled, etc.

Angles (n. pl.) An ancient Low German tribe, that settled in Britain, which came to be called Engla-land (Angleland or England). The Angles probably came from the district of Angeln (now within the limits of Schleswig), and the country now Lower Hanover, etc.

Anglicanism (n.) The principles of the established church of England; also, in a restricted sense, the doctrines held by the high-church party.

Anile (a.) Old-womanish; imbecile.

Anilic (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, anil; indigotic; -- applied to an acid formed by the action of nitric acid on indigo.

Anility (n.) The state of being and old woman; old-womanishness; dotage.

Ankled (a.) Having ankles; -- used in composition; as, well-ankled.

Apolar (a.) Having no radiating processes; -- applied particularly to certain nerve cells.

Apollo (n.) A deity among the Greeks and Romans. He was the god of light and day (the "sun god"), of archery, prophecy, medicine, poetry, and music, etc., and was represented as the model of manly grace and beauty; -- called also Phebus.

Apollyon (n.) The Destroyer; -- a name used (Rev. ix. 11) for the angel of the bottomless pit, answering to the Hebrew Abaddon.

Apologize (v. i.) To make an apology or excuse; to make acknowledgment of some fault or offense, with expression of regret for it, by way of amends; -- with for; as, my correspondent apologized for not answering my letter.

Apply (v. t.) To lay or place; to put or adjust (one thing to another); -- with to; as, to apply the hand to the breast; to apply medicaments to a diseased part of the body.

Apply (v. t.) To betake; to address; to refer; -- used reflexively.

Asilus (n.) A genus of large and voracious two-winged flies, including the bee killer and robber fly.

Awkly (adv.) In an unlucky (left-handed) or perverse manner.

Azole (n.) Any of a large class of compounds characterized by a five-membered ring which contains an atom of nitrogen and at least one other noncarbon atom (nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur). The prefixes furo-, thio, and pyrro- are used to distinguish three subclasses of azoles, which may be regarded as derived respectively from furfuran, thiophene, and pyrrol by replacement of the CH group by nitrogen; as, furo-monazole. Names exactly analogous to those for the azines are also used; as, oxazole, di> Bablah (n.) The ring of the fruit of several East Indian species of acacia; neb-neb. It contains gallic acid and tannin, and is used for dyeing drab.

Bail (v. t.) To lade; to dip and throw; -- usually with out; as, to bail water out of a boat.

Bail (v. t.) To dip or lade water from; -- often with out to express completeness; as, to bail a boat.

Bailable (a.) Having the right or privilege of being admitted to bail, upon bond with sureties; -- used of persons.

Bailey (n.) A prison or court of justice; -- used in certain proper names; as, the Old Bailey in London; the New Bailey in Manchester.

Ball (n.) Any solid spherical, cylindrical, or conical projectile of lead or iron, to be discharged from a firearm; as, a cannon ball; a rifle ball; -- often used collectively; as, powder and ball. Spherical balls for the smaller firearms are commonly called bullets.

Ball (n.) A leather-covered cushion, fastened to a handle called a ballstock; -- formerly used by printers for inking the form, but now superseded by the roller.

Ballahou (n.) A fast-sailing schooner, used in the Bermudas and West Indies.

Ballet (n.) A light part song, or madrigal, with a fa la burden or chorus, -- most common with the Elizabethan madrigal composers.

Batlet (n.) A short bat for beating clothes in washing them; -- called also batler, batling staff, batting staff.

Bawl (v. t.) To proclaim with a loud voice, or by outcry, as a hawker or town-crier does.

Bell (v. t.) To make bell-mouthed; as, to bell a tube.

Belladonna (n.) An herbaceous European plant (Atropa belladonna) with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries. The whole plant and its fruit are very poisonous, and the root and leaves are used as powerful medicinal agents. Its properties are largely due to the alkaloid atropine which it contains. Called also deadly nightshade.

Belletristical (a.) Occupied with, or pertaining to, belles-lettres.

Bellflower (n.) A plant of the genus Campanula; -- so named from its bell-shaped flowers.

Bellied (a.) Having (such) a belly; puffed out; -- used in composition; as, pot-bellied; shad-bellied.

Bellow (v. t.) To emit with a loud voice; to shout; -- used with out.

Bellows fish () A European fish (Centriscus scolopax), distinguished by a long tubular snout, like the pipe of a bellows; -- called also trumpet fish, and snipe fish.

Bellwort (n.) A genus of plants (Uvularia) with yellowish bell-shaped flowers.

Berlin (n.) A four-wheeled carriage, having a sheltered seat behind the body and separate from it, invented in the 17th century, at Berlin.

Berlin (n.) Fine worsted for fancy-work; zephyr worsted; -- called also Berlin wool.

Bellarmine (n.) A stoneware jug of a pattern originated in the neighborhood of Cologne, Germany, in the 16th century. It has a bearded face or mask supposed to represent Cardinal Bellarmine, a leader in the Roman Catholic Counter Reformation, following the Reformation; -- called also graybeard, longbeard.

Bible (n.) The Book by way of eminence, -- that is, the book which is made up of the writings accepted by Christians as of divine origin and authority, whether such writings be in the original language, or translated; the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments; -- sometimes in a restricted sense, the Old Testament; as, King James's Bible; Douay Bible; Luther's Bible. Also, the book which is made up of writings similarly accepted by the Jews; as, a rabbinical Bible.

Billabong (n.) In Australia, a blind channel leading out from a river; -- sometimes called an anabranch. This is the sense of the word as used in the Public Works Department; but the term has also been locally applied to mere back-waters forming stagnant pools and to certain water channels arising from a source.

Bibliolatry (n.) Book worship, esp. of the Bible; -- applied by Roman Catholic divines to the exaltation of the authority of the Bible over that of the pope or the church, and by Protestants to an excessive regard to the letter of the Scriptures.

Biflorous (a.) Bearing two flowers; two-flowered.

Bill (n.) A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle; -- used in pruning, etc.; a billhook. When short, called a hand bill, when long, a hedge bill.

Bill (n.) A weapon of infantry, in the 14th and 15th centuries. A common form of bill consisted of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, having a short pike at the back and another at the top, and attached to the end of a long staff.

Billed (a.) Furnished with, or having, a bill, as a bird; -- used in composition; as, broad-billed.

Billfish (n.) The American fresh-water garpike (Lepidosteus osseus).

Billiards (n.) A game played with ivory balls o a cloth-covered, rectangular table, bounded by elastic cushions. The player seeks to impel his ball with his cue so that it shall either strike (carom upon) two other balls, or drive another ball into one of the pockets with which the table sometimes is furnished.

Billyboy (n.) A flat-bottomed river barge or coasting vessel.

Birlaw (n.) A law made by husbandmen respecting rural affairs; a rustic or local law or by-law.

Blolly (n.) A shrub or small tree of southern Florida and the West Indies (Pisonia obtusata) with smooth oval leaves and a hard, 10-ribbed fruit.

Blolly (n.) A shrub or small tree of southern Florida and the West Indies (Pisonia obtusata) with smooth oval leaves and a hard, 10-ribbed fruit.

Bollandists (n. pl.) The Jesuit editors of the "Acta Sanctorum", or Lives of the Saints; -- named from John Bolland, who began the work.

Brill (n.) A fish allied to the turbot (Rhombus levis), much esteemed in England for food; -- called also bret, pearl, prill. See Bret.

Bugle (n.) A copper instrument of the horn quality of tone, shorter and more conical that the trumpet, sometimes keyed; formerly much used in military bands, very rarely in the orchestra; now superseded by the cornet; -- called also the Kent bugle.

Build (v. t.) To increase and strengthen; to increase the power and stability of; to settle, or establish, and preserve; -- frequently with up; as, to build up one's constitution.

Built (a.) Formed; shaped; constructed; made; -- often used in composition and preceded by the word denoting the form; as, frigate-built, clipper-built, etc.

Bulldog (n.) A variety of dog, of remarkable ferocity, courage, and tenacity of grip; -- so named, probably, from being formerly employed in baiting bulls.

Bulldoze (v. t.) To intimidate; to restrain or coerce by intimidation or violence; -- used originally of the intimidation of negro voters, in Louisiana.

Bullfighting (n.) A barbarous sport, of great antiquity, in which men torment, and fight with, a bull or bulls in an arena, for public amusement, -- still popular in Spain.

Bullfrog (n.) A very large species of frog (Rana Catesbiana), found in North America; -- so named from its loud bellowing in spring.

Bullhead (n.) A fresh-water fish of many species, of the genus Uranidea, esp. U. gobio of Europe, and U. Richardsoni of the United States; -- called also miller's thumb.

Bullhead (n.) In America, several species of Amiurus; -- called also catfish, horned pout, and bullpout.

Bullhead (n.) The black-bellied plover (Squatarola helvetica); -- called also beetlehead.

Bullwort (n.) See Bishop's-weed.

Burly (a.) Having a large, strong, or gross body; stout; lusty; -- now used chiefly of human beings, but formerly of animals, in the sense of stately or beautiful, and of inanimate things that were huge and bulky.

Butlerage (n.) A duty of two shillings on every tun of wine imported into England by merchant strangers; -- so called because paid to the king's butler for the king.

Cable (n.) A molding, shaft of a column, or any other member of convex, rounded section, made to resemble the spiral twist of a rope; -- called also cable molding.

Cablelaid (a.) Composed of three three-stranded ropes, or hawsers, twisted together to form a cable.

Cablelaid (a.) Twisted after the manner of a cable; as, a cable-laid gold chain.

Call (v. t.) To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; -- often used of a divine summons; as, to be called to the ministry; sometimes, to invite; as, to call a minister to be the pastor of a church.

Call (v. t.) To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; as, the President called Congress together; to appoint and summon; as, to call a meeting of the Board of Aldermen.

Call (v. t.) To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Call (v. i.) To speak in loud voice; to cry out; to address by name; -- sometimes with to.

Call (n.) The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call.

Callisection (n.) Painless vivisection; -- opposed to sentisection.

Callyciflorous (a.) Having the petals and stamens adnate to the calyx; -- applied to a subclass of dicotyledonous plants in the system of the French botanist Candolle.

Carl (n.) Large stalks of hemp which bear the seed; -- called also carl hemp.

Carling (n.) A short timber running lengthwise of a ship, from one transverse desk beam to another; also, one of the cross timbers that strengthen a hath; -- usually in pl.

Catling (n.) A double-edged, sharp-pointed dismembering knife.

Caulicle (n.) A short caulis or stem, esp. the rudimentary stem seen in the embryo of seed; -- otherwise called a radicle.

Celluloid (n.) A substance composed essentially of gun cotton and camphor, and when pure resembling ivory in texture and color, but variously colored to imitate coral, tortoise shell, amber, malachite, etc. It is used in the manufacture of jewelry and many small articles, as combs, brushes, collars, and cuffs; -- originally called xylonite.

Chaldean (n.) A learned man, esp. an astrologer; -- so called among the Eastern nations, because astrology and the kindred arts were much cultivated by the Chaldeans.

Chaliced (a.) Having a calyx or cup; cup-shaped.

Chalybean (a.) Of superior quality and temper; -- applied to steel.

Chalybite (n.) Native iron carbonate; -- usually called siderite.

Chelidonius (n.) A small stone taken from the gizzard of a young swallow. -- anciently worn as a medicinal charm.

Chelone (n.) A genus of hardy perennial flowering plants, of the order Scrophulariaceae, natives of North America; -- called also snakehead, turtlehead, shellflower, etc.

Child (n.) A son or a daughter; a male or female descendant, in the first degree; the immediate progeny of human parents; -- in law, legitimate offspring. Used also of animals and plants.

Child (n.) A descendant, however remote; -- used esp. in the plural; as, the children of Israel; the children of Edom.

Chill (v. i.) To become surface-hardened by sudden cooling while solidifying; as, some kinds of cast iron chill to a greater depth than others.

Choler (n.) The bile; -- formerly supposed to be the seat and cause of irascibility.

Chylaqueous (a.) Consisting of chyle much diluted with water; -- said of a liquid which forms the circulating fluid of some inferior animals.

Chylifaction (n.) The act or process by which chyle is formed from food in animal bodies; chylification, -- a digestive process.

Coalfish (n.) The pollock; -- called also, coalsey, colemie, colmey, coal whiting, etc. See Pollock.

Coalgoose (n.) The cormorant; -- so called from its black color.

Couleur (n.) Color; -- chiefly used in a few French phrases, as couler de rose, color of rose; and hence, adjectively, rose-colored; roseate.

Couleur (n.) A suit of cards, as hearts or clubs; -- used in some French games.

Coble (n.) A flat-floored fishing boat with a lug sail, and a drop rudder extending from two to four feet below the keel. It was originally used on the stormy coast of Yorkshire, England.

Cocleariform (a.) Spoon-shaped.

Coelodont (a.) Having hollow teeth; -- said of a group lizards.

Coelospermous (a.) Hollow-seeded; having the ventral face of the seedlike carpels incurved at the ends, as in coriander seed.

Coil (v. i.) To wind itself cylindrically or spirally; to form a coil; to wind; -- often with about or around.

Coaltit (n.) A small European titmouse (Parus ater), so named from its black color; -- called also coalmouse and colemouse.

Collar (n.) An eye formed in the bight or bend of a shroud or stay to go over the masthead; also, a rope to which certain parts of rigging, as dead-eyes, are secured.

Collared (a.) Wearing a collar; -- said of a man or beast used as a bearing when a collar is represented as worn around the neck or loins.

Collate (v. t.) To present and institute in a benefice, when the person presenting is both the patron and the ordinary; -- followed by to.

Collateral (a.) Descending from the same stock or ancestor, but not in the same Collation (v. t.) A light repast or luncheon; as, a cold collation; -- first applied to the refreshment on fast days that accompanied the reading of the collation in monasteries.

Collative (a.) Passing or held by collation; -- said of livings of which the bishop and the patron are the same person.

Collected (a.) Self-possessed; calm; composed.

Collectedness (n.) A collected state of the mind; self-possession.

Collie (n.) The Scotch shepherd dog. There are two breeds, the rough-haired and smooth-haired. It is remarkable for its intelligence, displayed especially in caring for flocks.

Colloid (n.) A substance (as albumin, gum, gelatin, etc.) which is of a gelatinous rather than a crystalCool (superl.) Not ardent, warm, fond, or passionate; not hasty; deliberate; exercising self-control; self-possessed; dispassionate; indifferent; as, a cool lover; a cool debater.

Cool (n.) A moderate state of cold; coolness; -- said of the temperature of the air between hot and cold; as, the cool of the day; the cool of the morning or evening.

Coolness (n.) Calm impudence; self-possession.

Coulomb (n.) The standard unit of quantity in electrical measurements. It is the quantity of electricity conveyed in one second by the current produced by an electro-motive force of one volt acting in a circuit having a resistance of one ohm, or the quantity transferred by one ampere in one second. Formerly called weber.

Cowl (n.) A monk's hood; -- usually attached to the gown. The name was also applied to the hood and garment together.

Cowl (n.) A cowl-shaped cap, commonly turning with the wind, used to improve the draft of a chimney, ventilating shaft, etc.

Cyclone (n.) In general, a condition of the atmosphere characterized by a central area of pressure much lower than that of surrounding areas, and a system of winds blowing inward and around (clockwise in the southern hemisphere and counter-clockwise in the northern); -- called also a low-area storm. It is attended by high temperature, moist air, abundant precipitation, and clouded sky. The term includes the hurricane, typhoon, and tropical storms; it should not be applied to the moderate distu> Deal (n.) An arrangement to attain a desired result by a combination of interested parties; -- applied to stock speculations and political bargains.

Deal (n.) To divide; to separate in portions; hence, to give in portions; to distribute; to bestow successively; -- sometimes with out.

Deal (v. i.) To act as an intermediary in business or any affairs; to manage; to make arrangements; -- followed by between or with.

Declare (v. i.) To make a declaration, or an open and explicit avowal; to proclaim one's self; -- often with for or against; as, victory declares against the allies.

DecDeclivity (n.) Deviation from a horizontal Defluxion (n.) A discharge or flowing of humors or fluid matter, as from the nose in catarrh; -- sometimes used synonymously with inflammation.

Deil (n.) Devil; -- spelt also deel.

Deploy (v. t. & i.) To open out; to unfold; to spread out (a body of troops) in such a way that they shall display a wider front and less depth; -- the reverse of ploy; as, to deploy a column of troops into Diallage (n.) A dark green or bronze-colored laminated variety of pyroxene, common in certain igneous rocks.

Diallel (a.) Meeting and intersecting, as Dill (n.) An herb (Peucedanum graveolens), the seeds of which are moderately warming, pungent, and aromatic, and were formerly used as a soothing medicine for children; -- called also dillseed.

Diploid (n.) A solid bounded by twenty-four similar quadrilateral faces. It is a hemihedral form of the hexoctahedron.

Dislike (n.) A feeling of positive and usually permanent aversion to something unpleasant, uncongenial, or offensive; disapprobation; repugnance; displeasure; disfavor; -- the opposite of liking or fondness.

Dollardee (n.) A species of sunfish (Lepomis pallidus), common in the United States; -- called also blue sunfish, and copper-nosed bream.

Dolly (n.) A compact, narrow-gauge locomotive used for moving construction trains, switching, etc.

Dowle (n.) Feathery or wool-like down; filament of a feather.

Drill (v. t.) To entice; to allure from step; to decoy; -- with on.

Droll (n.) One whose practice it is to raise mirth by odd tricks; a jester; a buffoon; a merry-andrew.

Dunlin (n.) A species of sandpiper (Tringa alpina); -- called also churr, dorbie, grass bird, and red-backed sandpiper. It is found both in Europe and America.

Dyslogistic (a.) Unfavorable; not commendatory; -- opposed to eulogistic.

Dyslysin (n.) A resinous substance formed in the decomposition of cholic acid of bile; -- so called because it is difficult to solve.

Earlduck (n.) The red-breasted merganser (Merganser serrator).

Early (adv.) In advance of the usual or appointed time; in good season; prior in time; among or near the first; -- opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit.

Eccle (n.) The European green woodpecker; -- also called ecall, eaquall, yaffle.

Efflower (v. t.) To remove the epidermis of (a skin) with a concave knife, blunt in its middle part, -- as in making chamois leather.

Ekaluminium (n.) The name given to a hypothetical element, -- later discovered and called gallium. See Gallium, and cf. Ekabor.

Emblazon (v. t.) To depict or represent; -- said of heraldic bearings. See Blazon.

Emblement (n.) The growing crop, or profits of a crop which has been sown or planted; -- used especially in the plural. The produce of grass, trees, and the like, is not emblement.

Employ (v. t.) To use; to have in service; to cause to be engaged in doing something; -- often followed by in, about, on, or upon, and sometimes by to; as: (a) To make use of, as an instrument, a means, a material, etc., for a specific purpose; to apply; as, to employ the pen in writing, bricks in building, words and phrases in speaking; to employ the mind; to employ one's energies.

Emulous (a.) Ambitiously desirous to equal or even to excel another; eager to emulate or vie with another; desirous of like excellence with another; -- with of; as, emulous of another's example or virtues.

Enclitical (v. i.) Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Endless (a.) Without end; having no end or conclusion; perpetual; interminable; -- applied to length, and to duration; as, an endless Englishry (n.) A body of English or people of English descent; -- commonly applied to English people in Ireland.

Epileptogenous (a.) Producing epilepsy or epileptoid convulsions; -- applied to areas of the body or of the nervous system, stimulation of which produces convulsions.

Euplectella (n.) A genus of elegant, glassy sponges, consisting of interwoven siliceous fibers, and growing in the form of a cornucopia; -- called also Venus's flower-basket.

Evil (n.) Anything which impairs the happiness of a being or deprives a being of any good; anything which causes suffering of any kind to sentient beings; injury; mischief; harm; -- opposed to good.

Evolutility (n.) The faculty possessed by all substances capable of self-nourishment of manifesting the nutritive acts by changes of form, of volume, or of structure.

Evolution (n.) The extraction of roots; -- the reverse of involution.

Evolution (n.) That theory of generation which supposes the germ to preexist in the parent, and its parts to be developed, but not actually formed, by the procreative act; -- opposed to epigenesis.

Exalbuminous (a.) Having no albumen about the embryo; -- said of certain seeds.

Exaltate (a.) Exercising its highest influence; -- said of a planet.

Exaltation (n.) An abnormal sense of personal well-being, power, or importance, -- a symptom observed in various forms of insanity.

Exclamation (n.) A mark or sign by which outcry or emphatic utterance is marked; thus [!]; -- called also exclamation point.

Exclude (v. t.) To shut out; to hinder from entrance or admission; to debar from participation or enjoyment; to deprive of; to except; -- the opposite to admit; as, to exclude a crowd from a room or house; to exclude the light; to exclude one nation from the ports of another; to exclude a taxpayer from the privilege of voting.

Exclusionist (n.) One who would exclude another from some right or privilege; esp., one of the anti-popish politicians of the time of Charles II.

Exclusive (a.) Not taking into the account; excluding from consideration; -- opposed to inclusive; as, five thousand troops, exclusive of artillery.

Explicit (a.) Having no disguised meaning or reservation; unreserved; outspoken; -- applied to persons; as, he was earnest and explicit in his statement.

Explosive (n.) An explosive agent; a compound or mixture susceptible of a rapid chemical reaction, as gunpowder, or nitro-glycerine.

Explosive (n.) A sound produced by an explosive impulse of the breath; (Phonetics) one of consonants p, b, t, d, k, g, which are sounded with a sort of explosive power of voice. [See Guide to Pronunciation, ? 155-7, 184.]

Eyelash (n.) The fringe of hair that edges the eyelid; -- usually in the pl.

Eyelet (n.) A metal ring or grommet, or short metallic tube, the ends of which can be bent outward and over to fasten it in place; -- used to Eyeleteer (n.) A small, sharp-pointed instrument used in piercing eyelet holes; a stiletto.

Eyen (n.) Plural of eye; -- now obsolete, or used only in poetry.

Fail (v. i.) To be affected with want; to come short; to lack; to be deficient or unprovided; -- used with of.

Fail (v. i.) To perish; to die; -- used of a person.

Fail (v. i.) Miscarriage; failure; deficiency; fault; -- mostly superseded by failure or failing, except in the phrase without fail.

Fall (v. t.) To find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; -- with into; as, the river Rhone falls into the Mediterranean.

Fall (v. t.) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; -- said of the young of certain animals.

Fall (v. t.) To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; -- said of the countenance.

Fall (n.) Descent of water; a cascade; a cataract; a rush of water down a precipice or steep; -- usually in the plural, sometimes in the singular; as, the falls of Niagara.

Fallfish (n.) A fresh-water fish of the United States (Semotilus bullaris); -- called also silver chub, and Shiner. The name is also applied to other allied species.

Fault (v. t.) To interrupt the continuity of (rock strata) by displacement along a plane of fracture; -- chiefly used in the p. p.; as, the coal beds are badly faulted.

Feel (v. i.) To be conscious of an inward impression, state of mind, persuasion, physical condition, etc.; to perceive one's self to be; -- followed by an adjective describing the state, etc.; as, to feel assured, grieved, persuaded.

Feel (v. i.) To appear to the touch; to give a perception; to produce an impression by the nerves of sensation; -- followed by an adjective describing the kind of sensation.

Fell (n.) A skin or hide of a beast with the wool or hair on; a pelt; -- used chiefly in composition, as woolfell.

Fell (v. t.) To sew or hem; -- said of seams.

Fellowship (n.) The rule for dividing profit and loss among partners; -- called also partnership, company, and distributive proportion.

Fellowship (n.) The rule for dividing profit and loss among partners; -- called also partnership, company, and distributive proportion.

Field (n.) That part of the grounds reserved for the players which is outside of the diamond; -- called also outfield.

Fieldfare (n.) a small thrush (Turdus pilaris) which breeds in northern Europe and winters in Great Britain. The head, nape, and lower part of the back are ash-colored; the upper part of the back and wing coverts, chestnut; -- called also fellfare.

Fieldpiece (n.) A cannon mounted on wheels, for the use of a marching army; a piece of field artillery; -- called also field gun.

Fieldwork (n.) Any temporary fortification thrown up by an army in the field; -- commonly in the plural.

Filling (n.) That which is used to fill a cavity or any empty space, or to supply a deficiency; as, filling for a cavity in a tooth, a depression in a roadbed, the space between exterior and interior walls of masonry, the pores of open-grained wood, the space between the outer and inner planks of a vessel, etc.

Foal (v.t.) To bring forth (a colt); -- said of a mare or a she ass.

Foil (n.) A thin leaf of sheet copper silvered and burnished, and afterwards coated with transparent colors mixed with isinglass; -- employed by jewelers to give color or brilliancy to pastes and inferior stones.

Foil (n.) A thin coat of tin, with quicksilver, laid on the back of a looking-glass, to cause reflection.

Follow (v. i.) To go or come after; -- used in the various senses of the transitive verb: To pursue; to attend; to accompany; to be a result; to imitate.

Folly (n.) A foolish act; an inconsiderate or thoughtless procedure; weak or light-minded conduct; foolery.

Fool (n.) A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly called gooseberry fool.

Foul (superl.) Not favorable; unpropitious; not fair or advantageous; as, a foul wind; a foul road; cloudy or rainy; stormy; not fair; -- said of the weather, sky, etc.

Foul (superl.) Having freedom of motion interfered with by collision or entanglement; entangled; -- opposed to clear; as, a rope or cable may get foul while paying it out.

Frill (v. i.) To wrinkle; -- said of the gelatin film.

Full (Compar.) Filled up, having within its limits all that it can contain; supplied; not empty or vacant; -- said primarily of hollow vessels, and hence of anything else; as, a cup full of water; a house full of people.

Fuller (a.) A die; a half-round set hammer, used for forming grooves and spreading iron; -- called also a creaser.

Gablet (n.) A small gable, or gable-shaped canopy, formed over a tabernacle, niche, etc.

Gallium (n.) A rare metallic element, found combined in certain zinc ores. It is white, hard, and malleable, resembling aluminium, and remarkable for its low melting point (86? F., 30? C.). Symbol, Ga; at. wt., 69.9. Gallium is chiefly trivalent, resembling aluminium and indium. It was predicted with most of its properties, under the name eka-aluminium, by Mendelyeev on the basis of the periodic law. This prediction was verified in its discovery (in 1875) by its characteristic spectrum (two vi> Gallant (a.) Showy; splendid; magnificent; gay; well-dressed.

Gallant (a.) Noble in bearing or spirit; brave; high-spirited; courageous; heroic; magnanimous; as, a gallant youth; a gallant officer.

Gallery (a.) A long and narrow platform attached to one or more sides of public hall or the interior of a church, and supported by brackets or columns; -- sometimes intended to be occupied by musicians or spectators, sometimes designed merely to increase the capacity of the hall.

Gallery (a.) A frame, like a balcony, projecting from the stern or quarter of a ship, and hence called stern gallery or quarter gallery, -- seldom found in vessels built since 1850.

Galley (n.) A large vessel for war and national purposes; -- common in the Middle Ages, and down to the 17th century.

Galley (n.) One of the small boats carried by a man-of-war.

Galley (n.) The cookroom or kitchen and cooking apparatus of a vessel; -- sometimes on merchant vessels called the caboose.

Gallinae (n.) An order of birds, including the common domestic fowls, pheasants, grouse, quails, and allied forms; -- sometimes called Rasores.

Gallivat (n.) A small armed vessel, with sails and oars, -- used on the Malabar coast.

Gallon (n.) A measure of capacity, containing four quarts; -- used, for the most part, in liquid measure, but sometimes in dry measure.

Galloon (n.) A narrow tapelike fabric used for binding hats, shoes, etc., -- sometimes made ornamental.

Galloway (n.) A small horse of a breed raised at Galloway, Scotland; -- called also garran, and garron.

Gallowglass (n.) A heavy-armed foot soldier from Ireland and the Western Isles in the time of Edward /

Gill (n.) The radiating, gill-shaped plates forming the under surface of a mushroom.

Gill (n.) A two-wheeled frame for transporting timber.

Gill (n.) The ground ivy (Nepeta Glechoma); -- called also gill over the ground, and other like names.

GobGoolde (n.) An old English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), according to Dr. Prior, but in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.

Grallae (n. pl.) An order of birds which formerly included all the waders. By later writers it is usually restricted to the sandpipers, plovers, and allied forms; -- called also Grallatores.

Grolier (n.) The name by which Jean Grolier de Servier (1479-1565), a French bibliophile, is commonly known; -- used in naming a certain style of binding, a design, etc.

Guelderrose' (n.) A cultivated variety of a species of Viburnum (V. Opulus), bearing large bunches of white flowers; -- called also snowball tree.

Guilder (n.) A Dutch silver coin worth about forty cents; -- called also florin and gulden.

Guilloched (a.) Waved or engine-turned.

Guilty (superl.) Having incurred guilt; criminal; morally delinquent; wicked; chargeable with, or responsible for, something censurable; justly exposed to penalty; -- used with of, and usually followed by the crime, sometimes by the punishment.

Gull (n.) One of many species of long-winged sea birds of the genus Larus and allied genera.

Hail (v. i.) To declare, by hailing, the port from which a vessel sails or where she is registered; hence, to sail; to come; -- used with from; as, the steamer hails from New York.

Hail (v. i.) To report as one's home or the place from whence one comes; to come; -- with from.

Hall (n.) Cleared passageway in a crowd; -- formerly an exclamation.

Hallelujah (n. & interj.) Praise ye Jehovah; praise ye the Lord; -- an exclamation used chiefly in songs of praise or thanksgiving to God, and as an expression of gratitude or adoration.

Hallucinate (v. i.) To wander; to go astray; to err; to blunder; -- used of mental processes.

Harl (n.) A barb, or barbs, of a fine large feather, as of a peacock or ostrich, -- used in dressing artificial flies.

Harle (n.) The red-breasted merganser.

Harlequin (n.) A buffoon, dressed in party-colored clothes, who plays tricks, often without speaking, to divert the bystanders or an audience; a merry-andrew; originally, a droll rogue of Italian comedy.

Heal (v. t.) To remove or subdue; to cause to pass away; to cure; -- said of a disease or a wound.

Heal (v. i.) To grow sound; to return to a sound state; as, the limb heals, or the wound heals; -- sometimes with up or over; as, it will heal up, or over.

Healthful (a.) Well-disposed; favorable.

Heel (n.) The hinder part of the foot; sometimes, the whole foot; -- in man or quadrupeds.

Heel (n.) A cyma reversa; -- so called by workmen.

Heeler (n.) A dependent and subservient hanger-on of a political patron.

Hell (v. t.) The place of the dead, or of souls after death; the grave; -- called in Hebrew sheol, and by the Greeks hades.

Helleborin (n.) A poisonous glucoside found in several species of hellebore, and extracted as a white crystalHellenism (n.) The type of character of the ancient Greeks, who aimed at culture, grace, and amenity, as the chief elements in human well-being and perfection.

Hollander (n.) A very hard, semi-glazed, green or dark brown brick, which will not absorb water; -- called also, Dutch clinker.

Hollow (adv.) Wholly; completely; utterly; -- chiefly after the verb to beat, and often with all; as, this story beats the other all hollow. See All, adv.

Hollyhock (n.) A species of Althaea (A. rosea), bearing flowers of various colors; -- called also rose mallow.

Hoplite (n.) A heavy-armed infantry soldier.

Hurl (n.) Tumult; riot; hurly-burly.

Hyalite (n.) A pellucid variety of opal in globules looking like colorless gum or resin; -- called also Muller's glass.

Hyalonema (n.) A genus of hexactinelHyalospongia (n. pl.) An order of vitreous sponges, having glassy six-rayed, siliceous spicules; -- called also Hexactinellinae.

Implicate (v. t.) To bring into connection with; to involve; to connect; -- applied to persons, in an unfavorable sense; as, the evidence implicates many in this conspiracy; to be implicated in a crime, a discreditable transaction, a fault, etc.

Implied (a.) Virtually involved or included; involved in substance; inferential; tacitly conceded; -- the correlative of express, or expressed. See Imply.

Implore (v. t.) To call upon, or for, in supplication; to beseech; to prey to, or for, earnestly; to petition with urency; to entreat; to beg; -- followed directly by the word expressing the thing sought, or the person from whom it is sought.

Implosion (n.) A burstion inwards, as of a vessel from which the air has been exhausted; -- contrasted with explosion.

Inclave (a.) Resembling a series of dovetails; -- said of a IncInclinnometer (n.) An apparatus to determine the inclination of the earth's magnetic force to the plane of the horizon; -- called also inclination compass, and dip circle.

Include (v. t.) To comprehend or comprise, as a genus the species, the whole a part, an argument or reason the inference; to contain; to embrace; as, this volume of Shakespeare includes his sonnets; he was included in the invitation to the family; to and including page twenty-five.

Inclusive (a.) Comprehending the stated limit or extremes; as, from Monday to Saturday inclusive, that is, taking in both Monday and Saturday; -- opposed to exclusive.

Inflation (n.) Undue expansion or increase, from overissue; -- said of currency.

Inglobate (a.) In the form of a globe or sphere; -- applied to nebulous matter collected into a sphere by the force of gravitation.

Isologous (a.) Having similar proportions, similar relations, or similar differences of composition; -- said specifically of groups or series which differ by a constant difference; as, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene, or their analogous compounds, form an isologous series.

Italic (a.) Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; -- so called because dedicated to the States of Italy by the inventor, Aldus Manutius, about the year 1500.

Italic (n.) An Italic letter, character, or type (see Italic, a., 2.); -- often in the plural; as, the Italics are the author's. Italic letters are used to distinguish words for emphasis, importance, antithesis, etc. Also, collectively, Italic letters.

Jaal goat () A species of wild goat (Capra Nubiana) found in the mountains of Abyssinia, Upper Egypt, and Arabia; -- called also beden, and jaela.

Jelly (n.) The juice of fruits or meats boiled with sugar to an elastic consistence; as, currant jelly; calf's-foot jelly.

Jolly (v. t.) To cause to be jolly; to make good-natured; to encourage to feel pleasant or cheerful; -- often implying an insincere or bantering spirit; hence, to poke fun at.

Juglone (n.) A yellow crystalKeel (n.) A barge or lighter, used on the Type for carrying coal from Newcastle; also, a barge load of coal, twenty-one tons, four cwt.

Keeled (a.) Keel-shaped; having a longitudinal prominence on the back; as, a keeled leaf.

Keeler (n.) One employed in managing a Newcastle keel; -- called also keelman.

Keelivine (n.) A pencil of black or red lead; -- called also keelyvine pen.

Kill (n.) A channel or arm of the sea; a river; a stream; as, the channel between Staten Island and Bergen Neck is the Kill van Kull, or the Kills; -- used also in composition; as, Schuylkill, Catskill, etc.

Koulan (n.) A wild horse (Equus, / Asinus, onager) inhabiting the plants of Central Asia; -- called also gour, khur, and onager.

Kuklux (n.) The name adopted in the southern part of the United States by a secret political organization, active for several years after the close of the Civil War, and having for its aim the repression of the political power of the freedmen; -- called also Kuklux Klan.

Ladle (v. t.) The float of a mill wheel; -- called also ladle board.

Laplander (n.) A native or inhabitant of Lapland; -- called also Lapp.

Lapling (n.) One who has been fondled to excess; one fond of ease and sensual delights; -- a term of contempt.

Loblolly (n.) Gruel; porridge; -- so called among seamen.

Loellingite (n.) A tin-white arsenide of iron, isomorphous with arsenopyrite.

Lowland (n.) Land which is low with respect to the neighboring country; a low or level country; -- opposed to highland.

Lozenge (n.) A diamond-shaped figure usually with the upper and lower angles slightly acute, borne upon a shield or escutcheon. Cf. Fusil.

lullaby (v. t.) Hence: Good night; good-by.

Macle (n.) Chiastolite; -- so called from the tessellated appearance of a cross section. See Chiastolite.

Mail (n.) A small piece of money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V.

Mall (n.) An old game played with malls or mallets and balls. See Pall-mall.

Malleability (n.) The quality or state of being malleable; -- opposed to friability and brittleness.

Malleable (a.) Capable of being extended or shaped by beating with a hammer, or by the pressure of rollers; -- applied to metals.

Mallet (n.) A small maul with a short handle, -- used esp. for driving a tool, as a chisel or the like; also, a light beetle with a long handle, -- used in playing croquet.

Mallophaga (n. pl.) An extensive group of insects which are parasitic on birds and mammals, and feed on the feathers and hair; -- called also bird lice. See Bird louse, under Bird.

Maple (n.) A tree of the genus Acer, including about fifty species. A. saccharinum is the rock maple, or sugar maple, from the sap of which sugar is made, in the United States, in great quantities, by evaporation; the red or swamp maple is A. rubrum; the silver maple, A. dasycarpum, having fruit wooly when young; the striped maple, A. Pennsylvanium, called also moosewood. The common maple of Europe is A. campestre, the sycamore maple is A. Pseudo-platanus, and the Norway maple is A. platanoide> Marlin (n.) The American great marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa). Applied also to the red-breasted godwit (Limosa haematica).

Mealies (n. pl.) Maize or Indian corn; -- the common name in South Africa.

Medley (n.) A mixture; a mingled and confused mass of ingredients, usually inharmonious; a jumble; a hodgepodge; -- often used contemptuously.

Mellow (superl.) Not coarse, rough, or harsh; subdued; soft; rich; delicate; -- said of sound, color, flavor, style, etc.

Merluce (n.) The European hake; -- called also herring hake and sea pike.

Mill (v. i.) To swim suddenly in a new direction; -- said of whales.

Millimicron (n.) The thousandish part of a micron or the millionth part of a millimeter; -- a unit of length used in measuring light waves, etc.

Midland (n.) The interior or central region of a country; -- usually in the plural.

Mill (v. i.) To swim under water; -- said of air-breathing creatures.

Miller (n.) A moth or lepidopterous insect; -- so called because the wings appear as if covered with white dust or powder, like a miller's clothes. Called also moth miller.

Millerite (n.) A sulphide of nickel, commonly occurring in delicate capillary crystals, also in incrustations of a bronze yellow; -- sometimes called hair pyrites.

Milliard (n.) A thousand millions; -- called also billion. See Billion.

Million (n.) The number of ten hundred thousand, or a thousand thousand, -- written 1,000, 000. See the Note under Hundred.

Million (n.) The mass of common people; -- with the article the.

Molluscoidea (n. pl.) A division of Invertebrata which includes the classes Brachiopoda and Bryozoa; -- called also Anthoid Mollusca.

Molluscum (n.) A cutaneous disease characterized by numerous tumors, of various forms, filled with a thick matter; -- so called from the resemblance of the tumors to some molluscous animals.

Motley (a.) Variegated in color; consisting of different colors; dappled; party-colored; as, a motley coat.

Motley (a.) Wearing motley or party-colored clothing. See Motley, n., 1.

Motley (n.) A combination of distinct colors; esp., the party-colored cloth, or clothing, worn by the professional fool.

Mull (v. i.) To work (over) mentally; to cogitate; to ruminate; -- usually with over; as, to mull over a thought or a problem.

Mullet (n.) Any one of numerous fishes of the genus Mugil; -- called also gray mullets. They are found on the coasts of both continents, and are highly esteemed as food. Among the most valuable species are Mugil capito of Europe, and M. cephalus which occurs both on the European and American coasts.

Mullet (n.) A star, usually five pointed and pierced; -- when used as a difference it indicates the third son.

Myelencephalic (a.) Of or pertaining to the myelencephalon; cerebro-spinal.

Myelencephalon (n.) The brain and spinal cord; the cerebro-spinal axis; the neuron. Sometimes abbreviated to myelencephal.

Neologist (n.) An innovator in any doctrine or system of belief, especially in theology; one who introduces or holds doctrines subversive of supernatural or revealed religion; a rationalist, so-called.

Nucleoplasmic (a.) Of or pertaining to nucleoplasm; -- esp. applied to a body formed in the developing ovum from the plasma of the nucleus of the germinal vesicle.

Nucleus (n.) A kernel; hence, a central mass or point about which matter is gathered, or to which accretion is made; the central or material portion; -- used both literally and figuratively.

Nullifidian (a.) Of no faith; also, not trusting to faith for salvation; -- opposed to solifidian.

Nullah (n.) A water course, esp. a dry one; a gully; a gorge; -- orig. an East Indian term.

Obelisk (n.) An upright, four-sided pillar, gradually tapering as it rises, and terminating in a pyramid called pyramidion. It is ordinarily monolithic. Egyptian obelisks are commonly covered with hieroglyphic writing from top to bottom.

Obelisk (n.) A mark of reference; -- called also dagger [/]. See Dagger, n., 2.

Obelus (n.) A mark [thus /, or ? ]; -- so called as resembling a needle. In old MSS. or editions of the classics, it marks suspected passages or readings.

Occlude (v. t.) To take in and retain; to absorb; -- said especially with respect to gases; as iron, platinum, and palladium occlude large volumes of hydrogen.

Oculinacea (n.pl.) A suborder of corals including many reef-building species, having round, starlike calicles.

Opelet (n.) A bright-colored European actinian (Anemonia, / Anthea, sulcata); -- so called because it does not retract its tentacles.

Orillon (n.) A semicircular projection made at the shoulder of a bastion for the purpose of covering the retired flank, -- found in old fortresses.

Ovalbumen (n.) The albumin from white of eggs; egg albumin; -- in distinction from serum albumin. See Albumin.

Owelty (n.) Equality; -- sometimes written ovelty and ovealty.

Oxalan (n.) A complex nitrogenous substance C3N3H5O3 obtained from alloxan (or when urea is fused with ethyl oxamate), as a stable white crystalOxalantin (n.) A white crystalOxalis (n.) A genus of plants, mostly herbs, with acid-tasting trifoliolate or multifoliolate leaves; -- called also wood sorrel.

Padlock (n.) A portable lock with a bow which is usually jointed or pivoted at one end so that it can be opened, the other end being fastened by the bolt, -- used for fastening by passing the bow through a staple over a hasp or through the links of a chain, etc.

Pail (n.) A vessel of wood or tin, etc., usually cylindrical and having a bail, -- used esp. for carrying liquids, as water or milk, etc.; a bucket. It may, or may not, have a cover.

Pailmall (n. & a.) See Pall-mall.

Pall (n.) A piece of cardboard, covered with Palladic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, palladium; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which the element has a higher valence as contrasted with palladious compounds.

Palladious (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, palladium; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which palladium has a lower valence as compared with palladic compounds.

Palladium (n.) A rare metallic element of the light platinum group, found native, and also alloyed with platinum and gold. It is a silver-white metal resembling platinum, and like it permanent and untarnished in the air, but is more easily fusible. It is unique in its power of occluding hydrogen, which it does to the extent of nearly a thousand volumes, forming the alloy Pd2H. It is used for graduated circles and verniers, for plating certain silver goods, and somewhat in dentistry. It was so > Pallbearer (n.) One of those who attend the coffin at a funeral; -- so called from the pall being formerly carried by them.

Pallet (n.) One of the pieces or levers connected with the pendulum of a clock, or the balance of a watch, which receive the immediate impulse of the scape-wheel, or balance wheel.

Pallet (n.) A cup containing three ounces, -- /ormerly used by surgeons.

Parlor (n.) In large private houses, a sitting room for the family and for familiar guests, -- a room for less formal uses than the drawing-room. Esp., in modern times, the dining room of a house having few apartments, as a London house, where the dining parlor is usually on the ground floor.

Parlor (n.) Commonly, in the United States, a drawing-room, or the room where visitors are received and entertained.

Peel (n.) A spadelike implement, variously used, as for removing loaves of bread from a baker's oven; also, a T-shaped implement used by printers and bookbinders for hanging wet sheets of paper on Peel (v. i.) To lose the skin, bark, or rind; to come off, as the skin, bark, or rind does; -- often used with an adverb; as, the bark peels easily or readily.

Peele (n.) A graceful and swift South African antelope (Pelea capreola). The hair is woolly, and ash-gray on the back and sides. The horns are black, long, slender, straight, nearly smooth, and very sharp. Called also rheeboc, and rehboc.

Peeler (n.) A nickname for a policeman; -- so called from Sir Robert Peel.

Pellile (n.) The redshank; -- so called from its note.

Pellitory (n.) The common name of the several species of the genus Parietaria, low, harmless weeds of the Nettle family; -- also called wall pellitory, and lichwort.

Pellitory (n.) The feverfew (Chrysanthemum Parthenium); -- so called because it resembles the above.

Phalangoidea (n. pl.) A division of Arachnoidea, including the daddy longlegs or harvestman (Phalangium) and many similar kinds. They have long, slender, many-jointed legs; usually a rounded, segmented abdomen; and chelate jaws. They breathe by tracheae. Called also Phalangides, Phalangidea, Phalangiida, and Opilionea.

Phalanx (n.) A body of heavy-armed infantry formed in ranks and files close and deep. There were several different arrangements, the phalanx varying in depth from four to twenty-five or more ranks of men.

Philadelphian (n.) One of a society of mystics of the seventeenth century, -- called also the Family of Love.

Philanthropinism (n.) A system of education on so-called natural principles, attempted in Germany in the last century by Basedow, of Dessau.

Philanthropy (n.) Love to mankind; benevolence toward the whole human family; universal good will; desire and readiness to do good to all men; -- opposed to misanthropy.

Philauty (n.) Self-love; selfishness.

Philister (n.) A Philistine; -- a cant name given to townsmen by students in German universities.

Phillipsite (n.) A hydrous silicate of aluminia, lime, and soda, a zeolitic mineral commonly occurring in complex twin crystals, often cruciform in shape; -- called also christianite.

Philogyny (n.) Fondness for women; uxoriousness; -- opposed to misogyny.

Phylactery (n.) A small square box, made either of parchment or of black calfskin, containing slips of parchment or vellum on which are written the scriptural passages Exodus xiii. 2-10, and 11-17, Deut. vi. 4-9, 13-22. They are worn by Jews on the head and left arm, on week-day mornings, during the time of prayer.

Phylactolaemata (n. pl.) An order of fresh-water Bryozoa in which the tentacles are arranged on a horseshoe-shaped lophophore, and the mouth is covered by an epistome. Called also Lophopoda, and hippocrepians.

Phyllophorous (a.) Leaf-bearing; producing leaves.

Phyllosoma (n.) The larva of the spiny lobsters (Palinurus and allied genera). Its body is remarkably thin, flat, and transparent; the legs are very long. Called also glass-crab, and glass-shrimp.

Phyllostome (n.) Any bat of the genus Phyllostoma, or allied genera, having large membranes around the mouth and nose; a nose-leaf bat.

Pillwort (n.) Any plant of the genus Pilularia; minute aquatic cryptograms, with small pill-shaped fruit; -- sometimes called peppergrass.

Poll (n.) A parrot; -- familiarly so called.

Poll (v. t.) To cut off; to remove by clipping, shearing, etc.; to mow or crop; -- sometimes with off; as, to poll the hair; to poll wool; to poll grass.

Polled (a.) Deprived of a poll, or of something belonging to the poll. Specifically: (a) Lopped; -- said of trees having their tops cut off. (b) Cropped; hence, bald; -- said of a person. "The polled bachelor." Beau. & Fl. (c) Having cast the antlers; -- said of a stag. (d) Without horns; as, polled cattle; polled sheep.

Pollicate (a.) Having a curved projection or spine on the inner side of a leg joint; -- said of insects.

Polliwog (n.) A tadpole; -- called also purwiggy and porwigle.

Pollute (v. t.) To make foul, impure, or unclean; to defile; to taint; to soil; to desecrate; -- used of physical or moral defilement.

Poplar (n.) The timber of the tulip tree; -- called also white poplar.

Poplin (n.) A fabric of many varieties, usually made of silk and worsted, -- used especially for women's dresses.

Pralltriller (n.) A melodic embellishment consisting of the quick alternation of a principal tone with an auxiliary tone above it, usually the next of the scale; -- called also the inverted mordente.

Prelatist (n.) One who supports of advocates prelacy, or the government of the church by prelates; hence, a high-churchman.

Prelude (v. t.) An introductory performance, preceding and preparing for the principal matter; a preliminary part, movement, strain, etc.; especially (Mus.), a strain introducing the theme or chief subject; a movement introductory to a fugue, yet independent; -- with recent composers often synonymous with overture.

Prelumbar (a.) Situated immediately in front of the loins; -- applied to the dorsal part of the abdomen.

Prolate (a.) Stretched out; extended; especially, elongated in the direction of a Proleptical (a.) Anticipating the usual time; -- applied to a periodical disease whose paroxysms return at an earlier hour at every repetition.

Proliferous (a.) Bearing offspring; -- applied to a flower from within which another is produced, or to a branch or frond from which another rises, or to a plant which is reproduced by buds or gemmae.

Proliferous (a.) Producing sexual zooids by budding; -- said of the blastostyle of a hydroid.

Proliferous (a.) Producing a cluster of branchlets from a larger branch; -- said of corals.

Prolific (a.) Having the quality of generating; producing young or fruit; generative; fruitful; productive; -- applied to plants producing fruit, animals producing young, etc.; -- usually with the implied idea of frequent or numerous production; as, a prolific tree, female, and the like.

Prolix (a.) Extending to a great length; unnecessarily long; minute in narration or argument; excessively particular in detail; -- rarely used except with reference to discourse written or spoken; as, a prolix oration; a prolix poem; a prolix sermon.

Prolix (a.) Indulging in protracted discourse; tedious; wearisome; -- applied to a speaker or writer.

Psalmist (n.) A writer or composer of sacred songs; -- a title particularly applied to David and the other authors of the Scriptural psalms.

Psalter (n.) The Book of Psalms; -- often applied to a book containing the Psalms separately printed.

Psilomelane (n.) A hydrous oxide of manganese, occurring in smooth, botryoidal forms, and massive, and having an iron-black or steel-gray color.

Psilopaedes (n. pl.) birds whose young at first have down on the pterylae only; -- called also Gymnopaedes.

Psilopaedic (a.) Having down upon the pterylae only; -- said of the young of certain birds.

Ptilopaedic (a.) Having nearly the whole surface of the skin covered with down; dasypaedic; -- said of the young of certain birds.

Public (a.) Of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; -- opposed to private; as, the public treasury.

Pull (v. t.) To take or make, as a proof or impression; -- hand presses being worked by pulling a lever.

Putlog (n.) One of the short pieces of timber on which the planks forming the floor of a scaffold are laid, -- one end resting on the ledger of the scaffold, and the other in a hole left in the wall temporarily for the purpose.

Qualify (v. t.) To soothe; to cure; -- said of persons.

Quillback (n.) An American fresh-water fish (Ictiobus, / Carpiodes, cyprinus); -- called also carp sucker, sailfish, spearfish, and skimback.

Quillwort (n.) Any plant or species of the genus Isoetes, cryptogamous plants with a cluster of elongated four-tubed rushlike leaves, rising from a corm, and containing spores in their enlarged and excavated bases. There are about seventeen American species, usually growing in the mud under still, shallow water. So called from the shape of the shape of the leaves.

Raglan (n.) A loose overcoat with large sleeves; -- named from Lord Raglan, an English general.

Rail (v. i.) To use insolent and reproachful language; to utter reproaches; to scoff; -- followed by at or against, formerly by on.

Rally (v. i.) To recover strength after a decRally (n.) Good-humored raillery.

Realty (n.) Immobility, or the fixed, permanent nature of real property; as, chattels which savor of the realty; -- so written in legal language for reality.

Reclaim (v. t.) To reduce from a wild to a tamed state; to bring under discipReclaim (v. t.) To correct; to reform; -- said of things.

Reel (n.) A lively dance of the Highlanders of Scotland; also, the music to the dance; -- often called Scotch reel.

Reel (n.) A machine on which yarn is wound and measured into lays and hanks, -- for cotton or Reeler (n.) The grasshopper warbler; -- so called from its note.

Reflexive (a.) Having for its direct object a pronoun which refers to the agent or subject as its antecedent; -- said of certain verbs; as, the witness perjured himself; I bethought myself. Applied also to pronouns of this class; reciprocal; reflective.

Reglet (n.) A strip of wood or metal of the height of a quadrat, used for regulating the space between pages in a chase, and also for spacing out title-pages and other open matter. It is graded to different sizes, and designated by the name of the type that it matches; as, nonpareil reglet, pica reglet, and the like.

Reflet (n.) Luster; special brilliancy of surface; -- used esp. in ceramics to denote the peculiar metallic brilliancy seen in lustered pottery such as majolica; as, silver reflet; gold reflet.

Roll (n.) To bind or involve by winding, as in a bandage; to inwrap; -- often with up; as, to roll up a parcel.

Roll (n.) To utter copiously, esp. with sounding words; to utter with a deep sound; -- often with forth, or out; as, to roll forth some one's praises; to roll out sentences.

Roll (v. i.) To fall or tumble; -- with over; as, a stream rolls over a precipice.

Roll (v. i.) To spread under a roller or rolling-pin; as, the paste rolls well.

Roller (n.) A long, belt-formed towel, to be suspended on a rolling cylinder; -- called also roller towel.

Sable (n.) A carnivorous animal of the Weasel family (Mustela zibellina) native of the northern latitudes of Europe, Asia, and America, -- noted for its fine, soft, and valuable fur.

Sable (n.) A mourning garment; a funeral robe; -- generally in the plural.

Sable (n.) The tincture black; -- represented by vertical and horizontal Sable (a.) Of the color of the sable's fur; dark; black; -- used chiefly in poetry.

Sailer (n.) A ship or other vessel; -- with qualifying words descriptive of speed or manner of sailing; as, a heavy sailer; a fast sailer.

Sallyman (n.) The velella; -- called also saleeman.

Scalar (n.) In the quaternion analysis, a quantity that has magnitude, but not direction; -- distinguished from a vector, which has both magnitude and direction.

Scaldfish (n.) A European flounder (Arnoglossus laterna, or Psetta arnoglossa); -- called also megrim, and smooth sole.

Scale (n.) The dish of a balance; hence, the balance itself; an instrument or machine for weighing; as, to turn the scale; -- chiefly used in the plural when applied to the whole instrument or apparatus for weighing. Also used figuratively.

Scale (n.) The graduated series of all the tones, ascending or descending, from the keynote to its octave; -- called also the gamut. It may be repeated through any number of octaves. See Chromatic scale, Diatonic scale, Major scale, and Minor scale, under Chromatic, Diatonic, Major, and Minor.

Scaled (a.) Covered with scales, or scalelike structures; -- said of a fish, a reptile, a moth, etc.

Scalene (a.) Having the sides and angles unequal; -- said of a triangle.

Scalp (v. i.) To make a small, quick profit by slight fluctuations of the market; -- said of brokers who operate in this way on their own account.

Scalpel (n.) A small knife with a thin, keen blade, -- used by surgeons, and in dissecting.

Scilicet (adv.) To wit; namely; videlicet; -- often abbreviated to sc., or ss.

Scold (v. i.) To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or coarsely; -- often with at; as, to scold at a servant.

Scolder (n.) The oyster catcher; -- so called from its shrill cries.

Scolytid (n.) Any one of numerous species of small bark-boring beetles of the genus Scolytus and allied genera. Also used adjectively.

Sculpin (n.) A large cottoid market fish of California (Scorpaenichthys marmoratus); -- called also bighead, cabezon, scorpion, salpa.

Scylla (n.) A dangerous rock on the Italian coast opposite the whirpool Charybdis on the coast of Sicily, -- both personified in classical literature as ravenous monsters. The passage between them was formerly considered perilous; hence, the saying "Between Scylla and Charybdis," signifying a great peril on either hand.

Sexlocular (a.) Having six cells for seeds; six-celled; as, a sexlocular pericarp.

Shell (n.) A concave rough cast-iron tool in which a convex lens is ground to shape.

Shale (n.) A fine-grained sedimentary rock of a thin, laminated, and often friable, structure.

Shallon (n.) An evergreen shrub (Gaultheria Shallon) of Northwest America; also, its fruit. See Salal-berry.

Shilfa (n.) The chaffinch; -- so named from its call note.

Shell (n.) An instrument of music, as a lyre, -- the first lyre having been made, it is said, by drawing strings over a tortoise shell.

Shelter (v. t.) To betake to cover, or to a safe place; -- used reflexively.

Shillelah (n.) An oaken sapling or cudgel; any cudgel; -- so called from Shillelagh, a place in Ireland of that name famous for its oaks.

Shilling (n.) A silver coin, and money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency.

Shilling (n.) The Spanish real, of the value of one eight of a dollar, or 12/ cets; -- formerly so called in New York and some other States. See Note under 2.

Skeletonizer (n.) Any small moth whose larva eats the parenchyma of leaves, leaving the skeleton; as, the apple-leaf skeletonizer.

Skelp (n.) A wrought-iron plate from which a gun barrel or pipe is made by bending and welding the edges together, and drawing the thick tube thus formed.

Skelter (v. i.) To run off helter-skelter; to hurry; to scurry; -- with away or off.

Skill (v. i.) To make a difference; to signify; to matter; -- used impersonally.

Skilled (a.) Having familiar knowledge united with readiness and dexterity in its application; familiarly acquainted with; expert; skillful; -- often followed by in; as, a person skilled in drawing or geometry.

Skillful (a.) Possessed of, or displaying, skill; knowing and ready; expert; well-versed; able in management; as, a skillful mechanic; -- often followed by at, in, or of; as, skillful at the organ; skillful in drawing.

Skylark (n.) A lark that mounts and sings as it files, especially the common species (Alauda arvensis) found in Europe and in some parts of Asia, and celebrated for its melodious song; -- called also sky laverock. See under Lark.

Small (superl.) Envincing little worth or ability; not large-minded; -- sometimes, in reproach, paltry; mean.

Smaltite (n.) A tin-white or gray mineral of metallic luster. It is an arsenide of cobalt, nickel, and iron. Called also speiskobalt.

Smell (n.) To detect or perceive, as if by the sense of smell; to scent out; -- often with out.

Smell (v. i.) To affect the olfactory nerves; to have an odor or scent; -- often followed by of; as, to smell of smoke, or of musk.

Smile (v. i.) To be propitious or favorable; to favor; to countenance; -- often with on; as, to smile on one's labors.

Smile (v. i.) The act of smiling; a peculiar change or brightening of the face, which expresses pleasure, moderate joy, mirth, approbation, or kindness; -- opposed to frown.

Smilodon (n.) An extinct genus of saber-toothed tigers. See Mach/rodus.

Soul (n.) The spiritual, rational, and immortal part in man; that part of man which enables him to think, and which renders him a subject of moral government; -- sometimes, in distinction from the higher nature, or spirit, of man, the so-called animal soul, that is, the seat of life, the sensitive affections and phantasy, exclusive of the voluntary and rational powers; -- sometimes, in distinction from the mind, the moral and emotional part of man's nature, the seat of feeling, in distinction > Soul (n.) A human being; a person; -- a familiar appellation, usually with a qualifying epithet; as, poor soul.

Souled (a.) Furnished with a soul; possessing soul and feeling; -- used chiefly in composition; as, great-souled Hector.

Soulili (n.) A long-tailed, crested Javan monkey (Semnopithecus mitratus). The head, the crest, and the upper surface of the tail, are black.

Spall (n.) A chip or fragment, especially a chip of stone as struck off the block by the hammer, having at least one feather-edge.

Spall (v. i.) To give off spalls, or wedge-shaped chips; -- said of stone, as when badly set, with the weight thrown too much on the outer surface.

Spalpeen (n.) A scamp; an Irish term for a good-for-nothing fellow; -- often used in good-humored contempt or ridicule.

Spelding (n.) A haddock or other small fish split open and dried in the sun; -- called also speldron.

Spell (v. t.) To discover by characters or marks; to read with difficulty; -- usually with out; as, to spell out the sense of an author; to spell out a verse in the Bible.

Spelt (n.) A species of grain (Triticum Spelta) much cultivated for food in Germany and Switzerland; -- called also German wheat.

Spelter (n.) Zinc; -- especially so called in commerce and arts.

Spill (v. t.) To suffer to fall or run out of a vessel; to lose, or suffer to be scattered; -- applied to fluids and to substances whose particles are small and loose; as, to spill water from a pail; to spill quicksilver from a vessel; to spill powder from a paper; to spill sand or flour.

Stale (a.) To make water; to discharge urine; -- said especially of horses and cattle.

Stale (v. t.) A stalking-horse.

Stalk (v. i.) To walk slowly and cautiously; to walk in a stealthy, noiseless manner; -- sometimes used with a reflexive pronoun.

Steller (n.) The rytina; -- called also stellerine.

Stelliform (a.) Like a star; star-shaped; radiated.

Stellion (n.) A lizard (Stellio vulgaris), common about the Eastern Mediterranean among ruins. In color it is olive-green, shaded with black, with small stellate spots. Called also hardim, and star lizard.

Stellionate (n.) Any fraud not distinguished by a more special name; -- chiefly applied to sales of the same property to two different persons, or selling that for one's own which belongs to another, etc.

Stilbene (n.) A hydrocarbon, C14H12, produced artificially in large, fine crystals; -- called also diphenyl ethylene, toluylene, etc.

Still (a.) In an increasing or additional degree; even more; -- much used with comparatives.

Still (a.) Notwithstanding what has been said or done; in spite of what has occured; nevertheless; -- sometimes used as a conjunction. See Synonym of But.

Stilpnomelane (n.) A black or greenish black mineral occurring in foliated flates, also in velvety bronze-colored incrustations. It is a hydrous silicate of iron and alumina.

Style (v. t.) A sharp-pointed tool used in engraving; a graver.

Style (v. t.) A kind of blunt-pointed surgical instrument.

Stylet (n.) An instrument for examining wounds and fistulas, and for passing setons, and the like; a probe, -- called also specillum.

Stylite (n.) One of a sect of anchorites in the early church, who lived on the tops of pillars for the exercise of their patience; -- called also pillarist and pillar saint.

Stylobate (n.) The uninterrupted and continuous flat band, coping, or pavement upon which the bases of a row of columns are supported. See Sub-base.

Stylus (n.) That needle-shaped part at the tip of the playing arm of phonograph which sits in the groove of a phonograph record while it is turning, to detect the undulations in the phonograph groove and convert them into vibrations which are transmitted to a system (since 1920 electronic) which converts the signal into sound; also called needle. The stylus is frequently composed of metal or diamond.

Stylus (n.) The needle-like device used to cut the grooves which record the sound on the original disc during recording of a phonograph record.

Stylus (n.) A pen-shaped pointing device used to specify the cursor position on a graphics tablet.

Stilton (n.) A peculiarly flavored unpressed cheese made from milk with cream added; -- so called from the village or parish of Stilton, England, where it was originally made. It is very rich in fat.

Sublime (superl.) Distinguished by lofty or noble traits; eminent; -- said of persons.

Sublime (superl.) Awakening or expressing the emotion of awe, adoration, veneration, heroic resolve, etc.; dignified; grand; solemn; stately; -- said of an impressive object in nature, of an action, of a discourse, of a work of art, of a spectacle, etc.; as, sublime scenery; a sublime deed.

Sublime (n.) That which is sublime; -- with the definite article

Sublime (v. i.) To pass off in vapor, with immediate condensation; specifically, to evaporate or volatilize from the solid state without apparent melting; -- said of those substances, like arsenic, benzoic acid, etc., which do not exhibit a liquid form on heating, except under increased pressure.

Sully (v. t.) To soil; to dirty; to spot; to tarnish; to stain; to darken; -- used literally and figuratively; as, to sully a sword; to sully a person's reputation.

Surly (a.) Gloomily morose; ill-natured, abrupt, and rude; severe; sour; crabbed; rough; sullen; gloomy; as, a surly groom; a surly dog; surly language; a surly look.

Swallet (n.) Water breaking in upon the miners at their work; -- so called among tin miners.

Swallow (v. t.) To draw into an abyss or gulf; to ingulf; to absorb -- usually followed by up.

Swallow (v. t.) To engross; to appropriate; -- usually with up.

Swallowtail (n.) An outwork with converging sides, its head or front forming a reentrant angle; -- so called from its form. Called also priestcap.

Swallowtail (n.) A swallow-tailed coat.

Swallowwort (n.) A poisonous plant (Vincetoxicum officinale) of the Milkweed family, at one time used in medicine; -- also called white swallowwort.

Swell (n.) A gradual increase and decrease of the volume of sound; the crescendo and diminuendo combined; -- generally indicated by the sign.

Swill (n.) The wash, or mixture of liquid substances, given to swine; hogwash; -- called also swillings.

Table (n.) One of the divisions of a backgammon board; as, to play into the right-hand table.

Table (n.) A plane surface, supposed to be transparent and perpendicular to the horizon; -- called also perspective plane.

Tablespoon (n.) A spoon of the largest size commonly used at the table; -- distinguished from teaspoon, dessert spoon, etc.

Tablet (n.) A solid kind of electuary or confection, commonly made of dry ingredients with sugar, and usually formed into little flat squares; -- called also lozenge, and troche, especially when of a round or rounded form.

Taglioni (n.) A kind of outer coat, or overcoat; -- said to be so named after a celebrated Italian family of professional dancers.

Tail (n.) Hence, the back, last, lower, or inferior part of anything, -- as opposed to the head, or the superior part.

Tail (n.) The side of a coin opposite to that which bears the head, effigy, or date; the reverse; -- rarely used except in the expression "heads or tails," employed when a coin is thrown up for the purpose of deciding some point by its fall.

Tail (n.) A portion of an incision, at its beginning or end, which does not go through the whole thickness of the skin, and is more painful than a complete incision; -- called also tailing.

Tail (v. i.) To hold by the end; -- said of a timber when it rests upon a wall or other support; -- with in or into.

Tail (v. i.) To swing with the stern in a certain direction; -- said of a vessel at anchor; as, this vessel tails down stream.

Tailor (n.) The mattowacca; -- called also tailor herring.

Tail (n.) In some forms of rope-laying machine, pieces of rope attached to the iron bar passing through the grooven wooden top containing the strands, for wrapping around the rope to be laid.

Tallboy (n.) A kind of long-stemmed wineglass or cup.

Tallboy (n.) A piece of household furniture common in the eighteenth century, usually in two separate parts, with larger drawers above and smaller ones below and raised on legs fifteen inches or more in height; -- called also highboy.

Tallboy (n.) A long sheet-metal pipe for a chimney top.

Teal (n.) Any one of several species of small fresh-water ducks of the genus Anas and the subgenera Querquedula and Nettion. The male is handsomely colored, and has a bright green or blue speculum on the wings.

Telluride (n.) A compound of tellurium with a more positive element or radical; -- formerly called telluret.

Tellurium (n.) A rare nonmetallic element, analogous to sulphur and selenium, occasionally found native as a substance of a silver-white metallic luster, but usually combined with metals, as with gold and silver in the mineral sylvanite, with mercury in Coloradoite, etc. Symbol Te. Atomic weight 125.2.

Tellurize (v. t.) To impregnate with, or to subject to the action of, tellurium; -- chiefly used adjectively in the past participle; as, tellurized ores.

Thalamiflorous (a.) Bearing the stamens directly on the receptacle; -- said of a subclass of polypetalous dicotyledonous plants in the system of De Candolle.

Thalamus (n.) A mass of nervous matter on either side of the third ventricle of the brain; -- called also optic thalamus.

Thalassic (a.) Of or pertaining to the sea; -- sometimes applied to rocks formed from sediments deposited upon the sea bottom.

Thaliacea (n. pl.) A division of Tunicata comprising the free-swimming species, such as Salpa and Doliolum.

Thallene (n.) A hydrocarbon obtained from coal-tar residues, and remarkable for its intense yellowish green fluorescence.

ThalThallium (n.) A rare metallic element of the aluminium group found in some minerals, as certain pyrites, and also in the lead-chamber deposit in the manufacture of sulphuric acid. It is isolated as a heavy, soft, bluish white metal, easily oxidized in moist air, but preserved by keeping under water. Symbol Tl. Atomic weight 203.7.

Thelphusian (n.) One of a tribe of fresh-water crabs which live in or on the banks of rivers in tropical countries.

Thelytokous (a.) Producing females only; -- said of certain female insects.

Thiller (n.) The horse which goes between the thills, or shafts, and supports them; also, the last horse in a team; -- called also thill horse.

Thallophyta (n. pl.) A phylum of plants of very diverse habit and structure, including the algae, fungi, and lichens. The simpler forms, as many blue-green algae, yeasts, etc., are unicellular and reproduce vegetatively or by means of asexual spores; in the higher forms the plant body is a thallus, which may be filamentous or may consist of plates of cells; it is commonly undifferentiated into stem, leaves, and roots, and shows no distinct tissue systems; the fronds of many algae, however, are> Till (n.) A deposit of clay, sand, and gravel, without lamination, formed in a glacier valley by means of the waters derived from the melting glaciers; -- sometimes applied to alluvium of an upper river terrace, when not laminated, and appearing as if formed in the same manner.

Till (v. t.) To; unto; up to; as far as; until; -- now used only in respect to time, but formerly, also, of place, degree, etc., and still so used in Scotland and in parts of England and Ireland; as, I worked till four o'clock; I will wait till next week.

Titling (n.) The hedge sparrow; -- called also titlene. Its nest often chosen by the cuckoo as a place for depositing its own eggs.

Titling (n.) Stockfish; -- formerly so called in customhouses.

Toil (v. t.) To labor; to work; -- often with out.

ToiTool (n.) An instrument such as a hammer, saw, plane, file, and the like, used in the manual arts, to facilitate mechanical operations; any instrument used by a craftsman or laborer at his work; an implement; as, the tools of a joiner, smith, shoe-maker, etc.; also, a cutter, chisel, or other part of an instrument or machine that dresses work.

Tool (n.) A machine for cutting or shaping materials; -- also called machine tool.

Tool (n.) A person used as an instrument by another person; -- a word of reproach; as, men of intrigue have their tools, by whose agency they accomplish their purposes.

Trilateral (a.) Having three sides; being three-sided; as, a trilateral triangle.

Trill (n.) A sound, of consonantal character, made with a rapid succession of partial or entire intermissions, by the vibration of some one part of the organs in the mouth -- tongue, uvula, epiglottis, or lip -- against another part; as, the r is a trill in most languages.

Trillium (n.) A genus of liliaceous plants; the three-leaved nightshade; -- so called because all the parts of the plant are in threes.

Tullibee (n.) A whitefish (Coregonus tullibee) found in the Great Lakes of North America; -- called also mongrel whitefish.

Turlupin (n.) One of the precursors of the Reformation; -- a nickname corresponding to Lollard, etc.

Twelfth (a.) Next in order after the eleventh; coming after eleven others; -- the ordinal of twelve.

Twelfthtide (n.) The twelfth day after Christmas; Epiphany; -- called also Twelfth-day.

Twelvepence (n.) A shilling sterling, being about twenty-four cents.

Twilly (n.) A machine for cleansing or loosening wool by the action of a revolving cylinder covered with long iron spikes or teeth; a willy or willying machine; -- called also twilly devil, and devil. See Devil, n., 6, and Willy.

Udal (a.) Allodial; -- a term used in Finland, Shetland, and Orkney. See Allodial.

Uncle (n.) An eldery man; -- used chiefly as a kindly or familiar appellation, esp. (Southern U. S.) for a worthy old negro; as, "Uncle Remus."

Unalist (n.) An ecclesiastical who holds but one benefice; -- distinguished from pluralist.

Uncle (n.) The brother of one's father or mother; also applied to an aunt's husband; -- the correlative of aunt in sex, and of nephew and niece in relationship.

Unilateral (a.) Being on one side only; affecting but one side; one-sided.

Unilateral (a.) Pertaining to one side; one-sided; as, a unilateral raceme, in which the flowers grow only on one side of a common axis, or are all turned to one side.

Utility (n.) Happiness; the greatest good, or happiness, of the greatest number, -- the foundation of utilitarianism.

Vail (n.) Money given to servants by visitors; a gratuity; -- usually in the plural.

Veil (n.) A membrane connecting the margin of the pileus of a mushroom with the stalk; -- called also velum.

Vellum (n.) A fine kind of parchment, usually made from calfskin, and rendered clear and white, -- used as for writing upon, and for binding books.

Vielle (n.) An old stringed instrument played upon with a wheel; a hurdy-gurdy.

Villainous (a.) Sorry; mean; mischievous; -- in a familiar sense.

Villiform (a.) Having the form or appearance of villi; like close-set fibers, either hard or soft; as, the teeth of perch are villiform.

ViolaniViolet (n.) Any one of numerous species of small violet-colored butterflies belonging to Lycaena, or Rusticus, and allied genera.

Violone (n.) The largest instrument of the bass-viol kind, having strings tuned an octave below those of the violoncello; the contrabasso; -- called also double bass.

Wall (n.) An inclosing part of a receptacle or vessel; as, the walls of a steam-engine cylinder.

Wallah (n.) A black variety of the jaguar; -- called also tapir tiger.

Warling (n.) One often quarreled with; -- / word coined, perhaps, to rhyme with darling.

Wallflower (n.) In Australia, the desert poison bush (Gastrolobium grandiflorum); -- called also native wallflower.

Weald (n.) A wood or forest; a wooded land or region; also, an open country; -- often used in place names.

Well (v. i.) A depressed space in the after part of the deck; -- often called the cockpit.

Well (v. t.) Fully or about; -- used with numbers.

Whall (n.) A light color of the iris in horses; wall-eye.

Whally (a.) Having the iris of light color; -- said of horses.

Whelp (n.) A child; a youth; -- jocosely or in contempt.

Whelp (n.) One of the longitudinal ribs or ridges on the barrel of a capstan or a windless; -- usually in the plural; as, the whelps of a windlass.

Whelp (v. i.) To bring forth young; -- said of the female of the dog and some beasts of prey.

While (v. t.) To cause to pass away pleasantly or without irksomeness or disgust; to spend or pass; -- usually followed by away.

Wieldy (a.) Capable of being wielded; manageable; wieldable; -- opposed to unwieldy.

Willet (n.) A large North American snipe (Symphemia semipalmata); -- called also pill-willet, will-willet, semipalmated tattler, or snipe, duck snipe, and stone curlew.

Willful (a.) Of set purpose; self-determined; voluntary; as, willful murder.

Willing (v. t.) Spontaneous; self-moved.

Willow (n.) A machine in which cotton or wool is opened and cleansed by the action of long spikes projecting from a drum which revolves within a box studded with similar spikes; -- probably so called from having been originally a cylindrical cage made of willow rods, though some derive the term from winnow, as denoting the winnowing, or cleansing, action of the machine. Called also willy, twilly, twilly devil, and devil.

Wool (n.) The soft and curled, or crisped, species of hair which grows on sheep and some other animals, and which in fineness sometimes approaches to fur; -- chiefly applied to the fleecy coat of the sheep, which constitutes a most essential material of clothing in all cold and temperate climates.

Wooled (a.) Having (such) wool; as, a fine-wooled sheep.

Woolsey (n.) Linsey-woolsey.

WorldYellowammer (n.) See Yellow-hammer.

Yellowbird (n.) The common yellow warbler; -- called also summer yellowbird. See Illust. of Yellow warbler, under Yellow, a.

Yellowfish (n.) A rock trout (Pleurogrammus monopterygius) found on the coast of Alaska; -- called also striped fish, and Atka mackerel.

Yellowlegs (n.) Any one of several species of long-legged sandpipers of the genus Totanus, in which the legs are bright yellow; -- called also stone snipe, tattler, telltale, yellowshanks; and yellowshins. See Tattler, 2.

Yellowtail (n.) Any one of several species of marine carangoid fishes of the genus Seriola; especially, the large California species (S. dorsalis) which sometimes weighs thirty or forty pounds, and is highly esteemed as a food fish; -- called also cavasina, and white salmon.

Yellowwort (n.) A European yellow-flowered, gentianaceous (Chlora perfoliata). The whole plant is intensely bitter, and is sometimes used as a tonic, and also in dyeing yellow.

Yellow (a.) Sensational; -- said of some newspapers, their makers, etc.; as, yellow journal, journalism, etc.

Yield (n.) Amount yielded; product; -- applied especially to products resulting from growth or cultivation.

Yowley (n.) The European yellow-hammer.

About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.