Words whose 4th letter is M

Abominable (a.) Excessive; large; -- used as an intensive.

Abominate (v. t.) To turn from as ill-omened; to hate in the highest degree, as if with religious dread; loathe; as, to abominate all impiety.

Agami (n.) A South American bird (Psophia crepitans), allied to the cranes, and easily domesticated; -- called also the gold-breasted trumpeter. Its body is about the size of the pheasant. See Trumpeter.

Ailment (n.) Indisposition; morbid affection of the body; -- not applied ordinarily to acute diseases.

Alamode (n.) A thin, black silk for hoods, scarfs, etc.; -- often called simply mode.

Alum (n.) A double sulphate formed of aluminium and some other element (esp. an alkali metal) or of aluminium. It has twenty-four molecules of water of crystallization.

Animalculism (n.) The theory that the spermatozoon and not the ovum contains the whole of the embryo; spermatism; -- opposed to ovism.

Anemorphilous (a.) Fertilized by the agency of the wind; -- said of plants in which the pollen is carried to the stigma by the wind; wind-Fertilized.

Anemoscope (n.) An instrument which shows the direction of the wind; a wind vane; a weathercock; -- usually applied to a contrivance consisting of a vane above, connected in the building with a dial or index with pointers to show the changes of the wind.

Animadvert (v. i.) To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that.

Animadvert (v. i.) To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon.

Animating (a.) Causing animation; life-giving; inspiriting; rousing.

Anime (a.) Of a different tincture from the animal itself; -- said of the eyes of a rapacious animal.

Aramaic (a.) Pertaining to Aram, or to the territory, inhabitants, language, or literature of Syria and Mesopotamia; Aramaean; -- specifically applied to the northern branch of the Semitic family of languages, including Syriac and Chaldee.

Aromatical (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, aroma; fragrant; spicy; strong-scented; odoriferous; as, aromatic balsam.

Azymite (n.) One who administered the Eucharist with unleavened bread; -- a name of reproach given by those of the Greek church to the Latins.

Bayman (n.) In the United States navy, a sick-bay nurse; -- now officially designated as hospital apprentice.

Beam (n.) A heavy iron lever having an oscillating motion on a central axis, one end of which is connected with the piston rod from which it receives motion, and the other with the crank of the wheel shaft; -- called also working beam or walking beam.

Beam (n.) One of the long feathers in the wing of a hawk; -- called also beam feather.

Beam (v. t.) To send forth; to emit; -- followed ordinarily by forth; as, to beam forth light.

Bismer (n.) The fifteen-spined (Gasterosteus spinachia).

Bismuthinite (n.) Native bismuth sulphide; -- sometimes called bismuthite.

Blameless (a.) Free from blame; without fault; innocent; guiltless; -- sometimes followed by of.

Boom (n.) A long pole or spar, run out for the purpose of extending the bottom of a particular sail; as, the jib boom, the studding-sail boom, etc.

Boom (n.) A strong and extensive advance, with more or less noisy excitement; -- applied colloquially or humorously to market prices, the demand for stocks or commodities and to political chances of aspirants to office; as, a boom in the stock market; a boom in coffee.

Brambling (n.) The European mountain finch (Fringilla montifringilla); -- called also bramble finch and bramble.

Brimmed (a.) Having a brim; -- usually in composition.

Bromic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, bromine; -- said of those compounds of bromine in which this element has a valence of five, or the next to its highest; as, bromic acid.

Bromlife (n.) A carbonate of baryta and lime, intermediate between witherite and strontianite; -- called also alstonite.

Bromyrite (n.) Silver bromide, a rare mineral; -- called also bromargyrite.

Bummalo (n.) A small marine Asiatic fish (Saurus ophidon) used in India as a relish; -- called also Bombay duck.

Cadmean (a.) Of or pertaining to Cadmus, a fabulous prince of Thebes, who was said to have introduced into Greece the sixteen simple letters of the alphabet -- /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /, /. These are called Cadmean letters.

Calmness (n.) The state of quality of being calm; quietness; tranquillity; self-repose.

Cammock (n.) A plant having long hard, crooked roots, the Ononis spinosa; -- called also rest-harrow. The Scandix Pecten-Veneris is also called cammock.

Carmine (n.) The essential coloring principle of cochineal, extracted as a purple-red amorphous mass. It is a glucoside and possesses acid properties; -- hence called also carminic acid.

Catmint (n.) A well-know plant of the genus Nepeta (N. Cataria), somewhat like mint, having a string scent, and sometimes used in medicine. It is so called because cats have a peculiar fondness for it.

Champleve (a.) Having the ground engraved or cut out in the parts to be enameled; inlaid in depressions made in the ground; -- said of a kind of enamel work in which depressions made in the surface are filled with enamel pastes, which are afterward fired; also, designating the process of making such enamel work.

Chemiotaxis () The sensitiveness exhibited by small free-swimming organisms, as bacteria, zoospores of algae, etc., to chemical substances held in solution. They may be attracted (positive chemotaxis) or repelled (negative chemotaxis).

Champleve (a.) Having the ground engraved or cut out in the parts to be enameled; inlaid in depressions made in the ground; -- said of a kind of enamel work in which depressions made in the surface are filled with enamel pastes, which are afterward fired; also, designating the process of making such enamel work.

Chemiotaxis () The sensitiveness exhibited by small free-swimming organisms, as bacteria, zoospores of algae, etc., to chemical substances held in solution. They may be attracted (positive chemotaxis) or repelled (negative chemotaxis).

Cham (n.) The sovereign prince of Tartary; -- now usually written khan.

Chamber (n.) That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from the rest of the bore; -- formerly, in guns, made smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in breech-loading guns.

Chamois (n.) A soft leather made from the skin of the chamois, or from sheepskin, etc.; -- called also chamois leather, and chammy or shammy leather. See Shammy.

Chemisette (n.) An under-garment, worn by women, usually covering the neck, shoulders, and breast.

Chemism (n.) The force exerted between the atoms of elementary substance whereby they unite to form chemical compounds; chemical attaction; affinity; -- sometimes used as a general expression for chemical activity or relationship.

Chime (n.) To join in a conversation; to express assent; -- followed by in or in with.

Chyme (n.) The pulpy mass of semi-digested food in the small intestines just after its passage from the stomach. It is separated in the intestines into chyle and excrement. See Chyle.

Clamber (v. i.) To climb with difficulty, or with hands and feet; -- also used figuratively.

Clematis (n.) A genus of flowering plants, of many species, mostly climbers, having feathery styles, which greatly enlarge in the fruit; -- called also virgin's bower.

Clumps (n.) A game in which questions are asked for the purpose of enabling the questioners to discover a word or thing previously selected by two persons who answer the questions; -- so called because the players take sides in two "clumps" or groups, the "clump" which guesses the word winning the game.

Clumsy (superl.) Without skill or grace; wanting dexterity, nimbleness, or readiness; stiff; awkward, as if benumbed; unwieldy; unhandy; hence; ill-made, misshapen, or inappropriate; as, a clumsy person; a clumsy workman; clumsy fingers; a clumsy gesture; a clumsy excuse.

Coamings (n. pl.) Raised pieces of wood of iron around a hatchway, skylight, or other opening in the deck, to prevent water from running bellow; esp. the fore-and-aft pieces of a hatchway frame as distinguished from the transverse head ledges.

Commandeer (v. t.) To compel to perform military service; to seize for military purposes; -- orig. used of the Boers.

Cosmos (n.) A genus of composite plants closely related to Bidens, usually with very showy flowers, some with yellow, others with red, scarlet, purple, white, or lilac rays. They are natives of the warmer parts of America, and many species are cultivated. Cosmos bipinnatus and C. diversifolius are among the best-known species; C. caudatus, of the West Indies, is widely naturalized.

Commandant (n.) A commander; the commanding officer of a place, or of a body of men; as, the commandant of a navy-yard.

Commander (n.) An officer who ranks next below a captain, -- ranking with a lieutenant colonel in the army.

Commandery (n.) A district or a manor with lands and tenements appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an order of knights who was called a commander; -- called also a preceptory.

Comment (v. i.) To make remarks, observations, or criticism; especially, to write notes on the works of an author, with a view to illustrate his meaning, or to explain particular passages; to write annotations; -- often followed by on or upon.

Commentary (v. i.) A brief account of transactions or events written hastily, as if for a memorandum; -- usually in the plural; as, Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War.

Commissary (n.) An officer whose business is to provide food for a body of troops or a military post; -- officially called commissary of subsistence.

Commit (v. t.) To give in trust; to put into charge or keeping; to intrust; to consign; -- used with to, unto.

Commit (v. t.) To join for a contest; to match; -- followed by with.

Commit (v. t.) To pledge or bind; to compromise, expose, or endanger by some decisive act or preliminary step; -- often used reflexively; as, to commit one's self to a certain course.

Commitment (n.) A warrant or order for the imprisonment of a person; -- more frequently termed a mittimus.

Commodity (n.) That which affords convenience, advantage, or profit, especially in commerce, including everything movable that is bought and sold (except animals), -- goods, wares, merchandise, produce of land and manufactures, etc.

Common (v.) Not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary; plebeian; -- often in a depreciatory sense.

Common (n.) The right of taking a profit in the land of another, in common either with the owner or with other persons; -- so called from the community of interest which arises between the claimant of the right and the owner of the soil, or between the claimants and other commoners entitled to the same right.

Commoner (n.) A student in the university of Oxford, Eng., who is not dependent on any foundation for support, but pays all university charges; - - at Cambridge called a pensioner.

Commons (n. pl.) Provisions; food; fare, -- as that provided at a common table in colleges and universities.

Commune (n.) Absolute municipal self-government.

Communicable (a.) Communicative; free-speaking.

Corm (n.) A solid bulb-shaped root, as of the crocus. See Bulb.

Cosmical (a.) Rising or setting with the sun; -- the opposite of acronycal.

Cosmolabe (n.) An instrument resembling the astrolabe, formerly used for measuring the angles between heavenly bodies; -- called also pantacosm.

Cosmoplastic (a.) Pertaining to a plastic force as operative in the formation of the world independently of God; world-forming.

Cosmos (n.) The universe or universality of created things; -- so called from the order and harmony displayed in it.

Coumarin (n.) The concrete essence of the tonka bean, the fruit of Dipterix (formerly Coumarouna) odorata and consisting essentially of coumarin proper, which is a white crystalCramponee (a.) Having a cramp or square piece at the end; -- said of a cross so furnished.

Criminal (a.) Involving a crime; of the nature of a crime; -- said of an act or of conduct; as, criminal carelessness.

Criminal (a.) Relating to crime; -- opposed to civil; as, the criminal code.

Crimp (n.) Hair which has been crimped; -- usually in pl.

Creme (n.) Cream; -- a term used esp. in cookery, names of liqueurs, etc.

Culminate (a.) Growing upward, as distinguished from a lateral growth; -- applied to the growth of corals.

Curmurring (n.) Murmuring; grumbling; -- sometimes applied to the rumbling produced by a slight attack of the gripes.

Cyamellone (n.) A complex derivative of cyanogen, regarded as an acid, and known chiefly in its salts; -- called also hydromellonic acid.

Dalmatic (n.) A vestment with wide sleeves, and with two stripes, worn at Mass by deacons, and by bishops at pontifical Mass; -- imitated from a dress originally worn in Dalmatia.

Dammara (n.) A large tree of the order Coniferae, indigenous to the East Indies and Australasia; -- called also Agathis. There are several species.

Desmodont (n.) A member of a group of South American blood-sucking bats, of the genera Desmodus and Diphylla. See Vampire.

Desmognathous (a.) Having the maxillo-palatine bones united; -- applied to a group of carinate birds (Desmognathae), including various wading and swimming birds, as the ducks and herons, and also raptorial and other kinds.

Diamide (n.) Any compound containing two amido groups united with one or more acid or negative radicals, -- as distinguished from a diamine. Cf. Amido acid, under Amido, and Acid amide, under Amide.

Diamond (n.) A pointed projection, like a four-sided pyramid, used for ornament in Dismal (a.) Fatal; ill-omened; unlucky.

Dismount (v. t.) To throw or remove from the carriage, or from that on which a thing is mounted; to break the carriage or wheels of, and render useless; to deprive of equipments or mountings; -- said esp. of artillery.

Dogmatic (n.) One of an ancient sect of physicians who went by general principles; -- opposed to the Empiric.

Dormy (a.) Up, or ahead, as many holes as remain to be played; -- said of a player or side.

Dormant (a.) In a sleeping posture; as, a lion dormant; -- distinguished from couchant.

Dormouse (n.) A small European rodent of the genus Myoxus, of several species. They live in trees and feed on nuts, acorns, etc.; -- so called because they are usually torpid in winter.

Dromon () In the Middle Ages, a large, fast-sailing galley, or cutter; a large, swift war vessel.

Drum (n.) The tympanum of the ear; -- often, but incorrectly, applied to the tympanic membrane.

Drum (v. i.) To go about, as a drummer does, to gather recruits, to draw or secure partisans, customers, etc,; -- with for.

Drumfish (n.) Any fish of the family Sciaenidae, which makes a loud noise by means of its air bladder; -- called also drum.

Dummy (n.) A thick-witted person; a dolt.

Dummy (n.) The fourth or exposed hand when three persons play at a four-handed game of cards.

Eliminant (n.) The result of eliminating n variables between n homogeneous equations of any degree; -- called also resultant.

Enamor (v. t.) To inflame with love; to charm; to captivate; -- with of, or with, before the person or thing; as, to be enamored with a lady; to be enamored of books or science.

Enomoty (n.) A band of sworn soldiers; a division of the Spartan army ranging from twenty-five to thirty-six men, bound together by oath.

Erumpent (a.) Breaking out; -- said of certain fungi which burst through the texture of leaves.

Exempt (a.) Free, or released, from some liability to which others are subject; excepted from the operation or burden of some law; released; free; clear; privileged; -- (with from): not subject to; not liable to; as, goods exempt from execution; a person exempt from jury service.

Farm (a. & n.) The rent of land, -- originally paid by reservation of part of its products.

Fermeture (n.) The mechanism for closing the breech of a breech-loading firearm, in artillery consisting principally of the breechblock, obturator, and carrier ring.

Firm (superl.) Fixed; hence, closely compressed; compact; substantial; hard; solid; -- applied to the matter of bodies; as, firm flesh; firm muscles, firm wood.

Firm (superl.) Solid; -- opposed to fluid; as, firm land.

Firman (n.) In Turkey and some other Oriental countries, a decree or mandate issued by the sovereign; a royal order or grant; -- generally given for special objects, as to a traveler to insure him protection and assistance.

Flambeau (n.) A flaming torch, esp. one made by combining together a number of thick wicks invested with a quick-burning substance (anciently, perhaps, wax; in modern times, pitch or the like); hence, any torch.

Flamboyant (a.) Characterized by waving or flamelike curves, as in the tracery of windows, etc.; -- said of the later (15th century) French Gothic style.

Flaming (a.) Of the color of flame; high-colored; brilliant; dazzling.

Flamy (a.) Flaming; blazing; flamelike; flame-colored; composed of flame.

Flambe (a.) Decorated by glaze splashed or irregularly spread upon the surface, or apparently applied at the top and allowed to run down the sides; -- said of pieces of Chinese porcelain.

Foam (n.) To form foam, or become filled with foam; -- said of a steam boiler when the water is unduly agitated and frothy, as because of chemical action.

Form (n.) That assemblage or disposition of qualities which makes a conception, or that internal constitution which makes an existing thing to be what it is; -- called essential or substantial form, and contradistinguished from matter; hence, active or formative nature; law of being or activity; subjectively viewed, an idea; objectively, a law.

Form (n.) To go to make up; to act as constituent of; to be the essential or constitutive elements of; to answer for; to make the shape of; -- said of that out of which anything is formed or constituted, in whole or in part.

Formicary (n.) The nest or dwelling of a swarm of ants; an ant-hill.

Foumart (a.) The European polecat; -- called also European ferret, and fitchew. See Polecat.

From (prep.) Out of the neighborhood of; lessening or losing proximity to; leaving behind; by reason of; out of; by aid of; -- used whenever departure, setting out, commencement of action, being, state, occurrence, etc., or procedure, emanation, absence, separation, etc., are to be expressed. It is construed with, and indicates, the point of space or time at which the action, state, etc., are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out > Fromwards (prep.) A way from; -- the contrary of toward.

Frump (n.) A cross, old-fashioned person; esp., an old woman; a gossip.

Frumpish (a.) Cross-tempered; scornful.

Frumpish (a.) Old-fashioned, as a woman's dress.

Fulmar (n.) One of several species of sea birds, of the family procellariidae, allied to the albatrosses and petrels. Among the well-known species are the arctic fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis) (called also fulmar petrel, malduck, and mollemock), and the giant fulmar (Ossifraga gigantea).

Fulminate (v. t.) To utter or send out with denunciations or censures; -- said especially of menaces or censures uttered by ecclesiastical authority.

Gammer (n.) An old wife; an old woman; -- correlative of gaffer, an old man.

Geometrid (n.) One of numerous genera and species of moths, of the family Geometridae; -- so called because their larvae (called loopers, measuring worms, spanworms, and inchworms) creep in a looping manner, as if measuring. Many of the species are injurious to agriculture, as the cankerworms.

Germanium (n.) A rare element, recently discovered (1885), in a silver ore (argyrodite) at Freiberg. It is a brittle, silver-white metal, chemically intermediate between the metals and nonmetals, resembles tin, and is in general identical with the predicted ekasilicon. Symbol Ge. Atomic weight 72.3.

Germicide (a.) Destructive to germs; -- applied to any agent which has a destructive action upon living germs, particularly bacteria, or bacterial germs, which are considered the cause of many infectious diseases.

Germinal (n.) The seventh month of the French republican calendar [1792 -- 1806]. It began March 21 and ended April 19. See VendEmiaire.

Glomuliferous (a.) Having small clusters of minutely branched coral-like excrescences.

Gram (n.) The East Indian name of the chick-pea (Cicer arietinum) and its seeds; also, other similar seeds there used for food.

Graminivorous (a.) Feeding or subsisting on grass, and the like food; -- said of horses, cattle, and other animals.

Grim (Compar.) Of forbidding or fear-inspiring aspect; fierce; stern; surly; cruel; frightful; horrible.

Grimace (n.) A distortion of the countenance, whether habitual, from affectation, or momentary aad occasional, to express some feeling, as contempt, disapprobation, complacency, etc.; a smirk; a made-up face.

Grimalkin (n.) An old cat, esp. a she-cat.

Grimme (n.) A West African antelope (Cephalophus rufilotus) of a deep bay color, with a broad dorsal stripe of black; -- called also conquetoon.

Grumble (v. i.) To murmur or mutter with discontent; to make ill-natured complaints in a low voice and a surly manner.

Guimpe (n.) A kind of short chemisette, worn with a low-necked dress.

Gummer (n.) A punch-cutting tool, or machine for deepening and enlarging the spaces between the teeth of a worn saw.

Gummiferous (a.) Producing gum; gum-bearing.

Haemad (adv.) Toward the haemal side; on the haemal side of; -- opposed to neurad.

Haemapodous (a.) Having the limbs on, or directed toward, the ventral or hemal side, as in vertebrates; -- opposed to neuropodous.

Haematitic (a.) Of a blood-red color; crimson; (Bot.) brownish red.

Haematoblast (n.) One of the very minute, disk-shaped bodies found in blood with the ordinary red corpuscles and white corpuscles; a third kind of blood corpuscle, supposed by some to be an early stage in the development of the red corpuscles; -- called also blood plaque, and blood plate.

Haematocrya (n. pl.) The cold-blooded vertebrates. Same as Hematocrya.

Haematocryal (a.) Cold-blooded.

Haematoplastic (a.) Blood formative; -- applied to a substance in early fetal life, which breaks up gradually into blood vessels.

Haematothermal (a.) Warm-blooded; homoiothermal.

Halma (n.) The long jump, with weights in the hands, -- the most important of the exercises of the Pentathlon.

Hammer (v. t.) To form in the mind; to shape by hard intellectual labor; -- usually with out.

Hammerhead (n.) A fresh-water fish; the stone-roller.

Hammerhead (n.) An African fruit bat (Hypsignathus monstrosus); -- so called from its large blunt nozzle.

Harmonical (a.) Relating to harmony, -- as melodic relates to melody; harmonious; esp., relating to the accessory sounds or overtones which accompany the predominant and apparent single tone of any string or sonorous body.

Harmonical (a.) Having relations or properties bearing some resemblance to those of musical consonances; -- said of certain numbers, ratios, proportions, points, Harmotome (n.) A hydrous silicate of alumina and baryta, occurring usually in white cruciform crystals; cross-stone.

Helm (n.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; -- commonly used of the tiller or wheel alone.

Helmet (n.) A helmet-shaped hat, made of cork, felt, metal, or other suitable material, worn as part of the uniform of soldiers, firemen, etc., also worn in hot countries as a protection from the heat of the sun.

Helmet (n.) The hood-formed upper sepal or petal of some flowers, as of the monkshood or the snapdragon.

Helmeted (a.) Wearing a helmet; furnished with or having a helmet or helmet-shaped part; galeate.

Hermetical (a.) Made perfectly close or air-tight by fusion, so that no gas or spirit can enter or escape; as, an hermetic seal. See Note under Hermetically.

Hermetically (adv.) By fusion, so as to form an air-tight closure.

Hermodactyl (n.) A heart-shaped bulbous root, about the size of a finger, brought from Turkey, formerly used as a cathartic.

Hoemother (n.) The basking or liver shark; -- called also homer. See Liver shark, under Liver.

Holm (n.) A common evergreen oak, of Europe (Quercus Ilex); -- called also ilex, and holly.

Hommocky (a.) Filled with hommocks; piled in the form of hommocks; -- said of ice.

Hummel (v. t.) To separate from the awns; -- said of barley.

Idem (pron. / adj.) The same; the same as above; -- often abbreviated id.

Inimical (a.) Having the disposition or temper of an enemy; unfriendly; unfavorable; -- chiefly applied to private, as hostile is to public, enmity.

Ipomoea (n.) A genus of twining plants with showy monopetalous flowers, including the morning-glory, the sweet potato, and the cypress vine.

Isomeric (a.) Having the same percentage composition; -- said of two or more different substances which contain the same ingredients in the same proportions by weight, often used with with. Specif.: (a) Polymeric; i. e., having the same elements united in the same proportion by weight, but with different molecular weights; as, acetylene and benzine are isomeric (polymeric) with each other in this sense. See Polymeric. (b) Metameric; i. e., having the same elements united in the same proportion> Klamaths (n. pl.) A collective name for the Indians of several tribes formerly living along the Klamath river, in California and Oregon, but now restricted to a reservation at Klamath Lake; -- called also Clamets and Hamati.

Krameric (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, Krameria (rhatany); as, krameric acid, usually called ratanhia-tannic acid.

Krumhorn (a.) A reed stop in the organ; -- sometimes called cremona.

Lammas (n.) The first day of August; -- called also Lammas day, and Lammastide.

Lammergeier (n.) A very large vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), which inhabits the mountains of Southern Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. When full-grown it is nine or ten feet in extent of wings. It is brownish black above, with the under parts and neck rusty yellow; the forehead and crown white; the sides of the head and beard black. It feeds partly on carrion and partly on small animals, which it kills. It has the habit of carrying tortoises and marrow bones to a great height, and dropping the> Malma (n.) A spotted trout (Salvelinus malma), inhabiting Northern America, west of the Rocky Mountains; -- called also Dolly Varden trout, bull trout, red-spotted trout, and golet.

Mamma (n.) Mother; -- word of tenderness and familiarity.

Mammaliferous (a.) Containing mammalian remains; -- said of certain strata.

Mammillated (a.) Bounded like a nipple; -- said of the apex of some shells.

Mammose (a.) Having the form of the breast; breast-shaped.

Meum (n.) Lit., mine; that which is mine; -- used in the phrase meum et tuum, or meum and tuum; as, to confound meum and tuum, to fail to distinguish one's own property from that of others; to be dishonest.

Motmot (n.) Any one of several species of long-tailed, passerine birds of the genus Momotus, having a strong serrated beak. In most of the species the two long middle tail feathers are racket-shaped at the tip, when mature. The bird itself is said by some writers to trim them into this shape. They feed on insects, reptiles, and fruit, and are found from Mexico to Brazil. The name is derived from its note.

Mummichog (n.) Any one of several species of small American cyprinodont fishes of the genus Fundulus, and of allied genera; the killifishes; -- called also minnow.

Mummiform (a.) Having some resemblance to a mummy; -- in zoology, said of the pupae of certain insects.

Mummy (n.) A gummy liquor that exudes from embalmed flesh when heated; -- formerly supposed to have magical and medicinal properties.

Murmur (v. i.) To utter complaints in a low, half-articulated voice; to feel or express dissatisfaction or discontent; to grumble; -- often with at or against.

Myrmidon (n.) A soldier or a subordinate civil officer who executes cruel orders of a superior without protest or pity; -- sometimes applied to bailiffs, constables, etc.

Myrmotherine (a.) Feeding upon ants; -- said of certain birds.

Normal (a.) Denoting that series of hydrocarbons in which no carbon atom is united with more than two other carbon atoms; as, normal pentane, hexane, etc. Cf. Iso-.

Norman (n.) A native or inhabitant of Normandy; originally, one of the Northmen or Scandinavians who conquered Normandy in the 10th century; afterwards, one of the mixed (Norman-French) race which conquered England, under William the Conqueror.

Noumenal (a.) Of or pertaining to the noumenon; real; -- opposed to phenomenal.

Noumenon (n.) The of itself unknown and unknowable rational object, or thing in itself, which is distinguished from the phenomenon through which it is apprehended by the senses, and by which it is interpreted and understood; -- so used in the philosophy of Kant and his followers.

Ovum (n.) One of the series of egg-shaped ornaments into which the ovolo is often carved.

Palm (n.) A Palm (n.) A metallic disk, attached to a strap, and worn the palm of the hand, -- used to push the needle through the canvas, in sewing sails, etc.

Palm (n.) The broad flattened part of an antler, as of a full-grown fallow deer; -- so called as resembling the palm of the hand with its protruding fingers.

Palm (v. t.) To impose by fraud, as by sleight of hand; to put by unfair means; -- usually with off.

Palmated (a.) Having the distal portion broad, flat, and more or less divided into lobes; -- said of certain corals, antlers, etc.

Palmette (n.) A floral ornament, common in Greek and other ancient architecture; -- often called the honeysuckle ornament.

Palmic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, the castor-oil plant (Ricinus communis, or Palma Christi); -- formerly used to designate an acid now called ricinoleic acid.

Palmiped (a.) Web-footed, as a water fowl.

Permeable (a.) Capable of being permeated, or passed through; yielding passage; passable; penetrable; -- used especially of substances which allow the passage of fluids; as, wood is permeable to oil; glass is permeable to light.

Permeate (v. t.) To pass through the pores or interstices of; to penetrate and pass through without causing rupture or displacement; -- applied especially to fluids which pass through substances of loose texture; as, water permeates sand.

Permit (v. t.) To grant (one) express license or liberty to do an act; to authorize; to give leave; -- followed by an infinitive.

Permutation (n.) The arrangement of any determinate number of things, as units, objects, letters, etc., in all possible orders, one after the other; -- called also alternation. Cf. Combination, n., 4.

Permulator (n.) A special form of rotary converter with stationary commutator and rotating brushes, in which the exciting field is induced by the alternating current in a short-circuited magnetic core instead of being produced by an external magnet.

Plumbago (n.) A genus of herbaceous plants with pretty salver-shaped corollas, usually blue or violet; leadwort.

Plumbic (a.) Of, pertaining to, resembling, or containing, lead; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which it has a higher valence as contrasted with plumbous compounds; as, plumbic oxide.

Plumbous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, lead; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which it has a lower valence as contrasted with plumbic compounds.

Plume (v. t.) To pride; to vaunt; to boast; -- used reflexively; as, he plumes himself on his skill.

Plump (v. t.) To make plump; to fill (out) or support; -- often with up.

Poem (n.) A metrical composition; a composition in verse written in certain measures, whether in blank verse or in rhyme, and characterized by imagination and poetic diction; -- contradistinguished from prose; as, the poems of Homer or of Milton.

Pomme (a.) Having the ends terminating in rounded protuberances or single balls; -- said of a cross.

Pommette (a.) Having two balls or protuberances at each end; -- said of a cross.

Prime (a.) Having no common factor; -- used with to; as, 12 is prime to 25.

Premier (a.) Most ancient; -- said of the peer bearing the oldest title of his degree.

Premium (n.) Something offered or given for the loan of money; bonus; -- sometimes synonymous with interest, but generally signifying a sum in addition to the capital.

Prime (a.) Any number expressing the combining weight or equivalent of any particular element; -- so called because these numbers were respectively reduced to their lowest relative terms on the fixed standard of hydrogen as 1.

Prime (a.) An inch, as composed of twelve seconds in the duodecimal system; -- denoted by [']. See 2d Inch, n., 1.

Prime (v. i.) To work so that foaming occurs from too violent ebullition, which causes water to become mixed with, and be carried along with, the steam that is formed; -- said of a steam boiler.

Primitive (a.) Of or pertaining to a former time; old-fashioned; characterized by simplicity; as, a primitive style of dress.

Primitive (n.) An original or primary word; a word not derived from another; -- opposed to derivative.

Primp (a.) To be formal or affected in dress or manners; -- often with up.

Primrose (a.) An early flowering plant of the genus Primula (P. vulgaris) closely allied to the cowslip. There are several varieties, as the white-, the red-, the yellow-flowered, etc. Formerly called also primerole, primerolles.

Primrose (a.) Of or pertaining to the primrose; of the color of a primrose; -- hence, flowery; gay.

Promethean (a.) Having a life-giving quality; inspiring.

Promorphology (n.) Crystallography of organic forms; -- a division of morphology created by Haeckel. It is essentially stereometric, and relates to a mathematical conception of organic forms. See Tectology.

Promoter (n.) Specifically, one who sets on foot, and takes the preliminary steps in, a scheme for the organization of a corporation, a joint-stock company, or the like.

Promt (superl.) Ready and quick to act as occasion demands; meeting requirements readily; not slow, dilatory, or hesitating in decision or action; responding on the instant; immediate; as, prompt in obedience or compliance; -- said of persons.

Promt (superl.) Done or rendered quickly, readily, or immediately; given without delay or hesitation; -- said of conduct; as, prompt assistance.

Prompt (n.) A limit of time given for payment of an account for produce purchased, this limit varying with different goods. See Prompt-note.

Pulmobranchiate (a. & n.) Same as Pulmonibranchiata, -ate.

Pulmonata (n. pl.) An extensive division, or sub-class, of hermaphrodite gastropods, in which the mantle cavity is modified into an air-breathing organ, as in Helix, or land snails, Limax, or garden slugs, and many pond snails, as Limnaea and Planorbis.

Raiment (n.) Clothing in general; vesture; garments; -- usually singular in form, with a collective sense.

Reim (n.) A strip of oxhide, deprived of hair, and rendered pliable, -- used for twisting into ropes, etc.

Reimburse (v. t.) To make restoration or payment of an equivalent to (a person); to pay back to; to indemnify; -- often reflexive; as, to reimburse one's self by successful speculation.

Rhamnaceous (a.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of shrubs and trees (Rhamnaceae, or Rhamneae) of which the buckthorn (Rhamnus) is the type. It includes also the New Jersey tea, the supple-jack, and one of the plants called lotus (Zizyphus).

Rhombogene (n.) A dicyemid which produces infusorialike embryos; -- opposed to nematogene. See Dicyemata.

Rhomboid (n.) An oblique-angled parallelogram like a rhomb, but having only the opposite sides equal, the length and with being different.

Rhumb (n.) A Rhymer (n.) One who makes rhymes; a versifier; -- generally in contempt; a poor poet; a poetaster.

Rhymery (n.) The art or habit of making rhymes; rhyming; -- in contempt.

Rummage (n.) A place or room for the stowage of cargo in a ship; also, the act of stowing cargo; the pulling and moving about of packages incident to close stowage; -- formerly written romage.

Rummage (v. t.) To make room in, as a ship, for the cargo; to move about, as packages, ballast, so as to permit close stowage; to stow closely; to pack; -- formerly written roomage, and romage.

Rummager (n.) A person on shipboard whose business was to take charge of stowing the cargo; -- formerly written roomager, and romager.

Scammel (n.) The female bar-tailed godwit.

Scimitar (n.) A saber with a much curved blade having the edge on the convex side, -- in use among Mohammedans, esp., the Arabs and persians.

Scimitar (n.) A long-handled billhook. See Billhook.

Scumble (v. t.) To cover lighty, as a painting, or a drawing, with a thin wash of opaque color, or with color-crayon dust rubbed on with the stump, or to make any similar additions to the work, so as to produce a softened effect.

Scumming (n.) That which is scummed off; skimmings; scum; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Seaman (n.) One whose occupation is to assist in the management of ships at sea; a mariner; a sailor; -- applied both to officers and common mariners, but especially to the latter. Opposed to landman, or landsman.

Seamed (a.) Out of condition; not in good condition; -- said of a hawk.

Segmentation (n.) The act or process of dividing into segments; specifically (Biol.), a self-division into segments as a result of growth; cell cleavage; cell multiplication; endogenous cell formation.

Sermon (n.) Hence, a serious address; a lecture on one's conduct or duty; an exhortation or reproof; a homily; -- often in a depreciatory sense.

Sfumato (a.) Having vague outSham (n.) That which deceives expectation; any trick, fraud, or device that deludes and disappoint; a make-believe; delusion; imposture, humbug.

Shamanism (n.) The type of religion which once prevalied among all the Ural-Altaic peoples (Tungusic, Mongol, and Turkish), and which still survives in various parts of Northern Asia. The Shaman, or wizard priest, deals with good as well as with evil spirits, especially the good spirits of ancestors.

Shameless (a.) Destitute of shame; wanting modesty; brazen-faced; insensible to disgrace.

Slump (v. i.) To slide or slip on a declivity, so that the motion is perceptible; -- said of masses of earth or rock.

Slum (n.) A foul back street of a city, especially one filled with a poor, dirty, degraded, and often vicious population; any low neighborhood or dark retreat; -- usually in the plural; as, Westminster slums are haunts for theives.

Solmization (n.) The act of sol-faing.

Stammer (v. t.) To utter or pronounce with hesitation or imperfectly; -- sometimes with out.

Stammering (n.) A disturbance in the formation of sounds. It is due essentially to long-continued spasmodic contraction of the diaphragm, by which expiration is preented, and hence it may be considered as a spasmodic inspiration.

Stamp (v. t.) A half-penny.

Stampede (v. i.) To run away in a panic; -- said droves of cattle, horses, etc., also of armies.

Stimulant (n.) An agent which produces a temporary increase of vital activity in the organism, or in any of its parts; -- sometimes used without qualification to signify an alcoholic beverage used as a stimulant.

Stomatode (a.) Having a mouth; -- applied to certain Protozoa.

Stumble (v. i.) To strike or happen (upon a person or thing) without design; to fall or light by chance; -- with on, upon, or against.

Stump (n.) To put (a batsman) out of play by knocking off the bail, or knocking down the stumps of the wicket he is defending while he is off his allotted ground; -- sometimes with out.

Stumpage (n.) Timber in standing trees, -- often sold without the land at a fixed price per tree or per stump, the stumps being counted when the land is cleared.

Submarine (n.) A submarine boat; esp., Nav., a submarine torpedo boat; -- called specif. submergible submarine when capable of operating at various depths and of traveling considerable distances under water, and submersible submarine when capable of being only partly submerged, i.e., so that the conning tower, etc., is still above water. The latter type and most of the former type are submerged as desired by regulating the amount of water admitted to the ballast tanks and sink on an even keel;> Submit (v. t.) To yield, resign, or surrender to power, will, or authority; -- often with the reflexive pronoun.

Submit (v. t.) To leave or commit to the discretion or judgment of another or others; to refer; as, to submit a controversy to arbitrators; to submit a question to the court; -- often followed by a dependent proposition as the object.

Summon (v. t.) To call, bid, or cite; to notify to come to appear; -- often with up.

Surmounted (a.) Having its vertical height greater than the half span; -- said of an arch.

Surmounted (a.) Partly covered by another charge; -- said of an ordinary or other bearing.

Symmetrical (a.) Having an equal number of parts in the successive circles of floral organs; -- said of flowers.

Tammy (n.) A kind of woolen, or woolen and cotton, cloth, often highly glazed, -- used for curtains, sieves, strainers, etc.

Tasmanian (a.) Of or pertaining to Tasmania, or Van Diemen's Land. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Tasmania; specifically (Ethnol.), in the plural, the race of men that formerly inhabited Tasmania, but is now extinct.

Terminal (n.) A town lying at the end of a railroad; -- more properly called a terminus.

Teem (v. t.) To pour; -- commonly followed by out; as, to teem out ale.

Tegmentum (n.) A covering; -- applied especially to the bundles of longitudinal fibers in the upper part of the crura of the cerebrum.

Term (n.) A quadrangular pillar, adorned on the top with the figure of a head, as of a man, woman, or satyr; -- called also terminal figure. See Terminus, n., 2 and 3.

Term (n.) A member of a compound quantity; as, a or b in a + b; ab or cd in ab - cd.

Termagant (n.) A boisterous, brawling, turbulent person; -- formerly applied to both sexes, now only to women.

Termite (n.) Any one of numerous species of pseudoneoropterous insects belonging to Termes and allied genera; -- called also white ant. See Illust. of White ant.

Tammuz (n.) The fourth month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year, -- supposed to correspond nearly with our month of July.

Thamyn (n.) An Asiatic deer (Rucervus Eldi) resembling the swamp deer; -- called also Eld's deer.

Thimble (n.) Any thimble-shaped appendage or fixure.

Thimble (n.) A tubular cone for expanding a flue; -- called ferrule in England.

Thimble (n.) A ring of thin metal formed with a grooved circumference so as to fit within an eye-spice, or the like, and protect it from chafing.

Thimblerig (n.) A sleight-of-hand trick played with three small cups, shaped like thimbles, and a small ball or little pea.

Thimbleweed (n.) Any plant of the composite genus Rudbeckia, coarse herbs somewhat resembling the sunflower; -- so called from their conical receptacles.

Thomsonianism (n.) An empirical system which assumes that the human body is composed of four elements, earth, air, fire, and water, and that vegetable medicines alone should be used; -- from the founder, Dr. Samuel Thomson, of Massachusetts.

Thumb (v. t.) To soil or wear with the thumb or the fingers; to soil, or wear out, by frequent handling; also, to cover with the thumb; as, to thumb the touch-hole of a cannon.

Thumbscrew (n.) A screw having a flat-sided or knurled head, so that it may be turned by the thumb and forefinger.

Thummie (n.) The chiff-chaff.

Thymol (n.) A phenol derivative of cymene, C10H13.OH, isomeric with carvacrol, found in oil of thyme, and extracted as a white crystalTitmouse (n.) Any one of numerous species of small insectivorous singing birds belonging to Parus and allied genera; -- called also tit, and tomtit.

Tommy (n.) Bread, -- generally a penny roll; the supply of food carried by workmen as their daily allowance.

Trembler (n.) The vibrating hammer, or spring contact piece of a hammer break, as of the electric ignition apparatus for an internal-combustion engine.

Tram (n.) A four-wheeled truck running on rails, and used in a mine, as for carrying coal or ore.

Trammeled (a.) Having blazes, or white marks, on the fore and hind foot of one side, as if marked by trammels; -- said of a horse.

Trample (v. i.) To tread in contempt; -- with on or upon.

Tremando (a.) Trembling; -- used as a direction to perform a passage with a general shaking of the whole chord.

Tremble (v. i.) To shake involuntarily, as with fear, cold, or weakness; to quake; to quiver; to shiver; to shudder; -- said of a person or an animal.

Tremble (v. i.) To totter; to shake; -- said of a thing.

Tremolo (n.) A certain contrivance in an organ, which causes the notes to sound with rapid pulses or beats, producing a tremulous effect; -- called also tremolant, and tremulant.

Trimming (n.) That which serves to trim, make right or fitting, adjust, ornament, or the like; especially, the necessary or the ornamental appendages, as of a garment; hence, sometimes, the concomitants of a dish; a relish; -- usually in the pluraltrimmings. --.

Trimorphous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or characterized by, trimorphism; -- contrasted with monomorphic, dimorphic, and polymorphic.

Trimorphism (n.) The coexistence among individuals of the same species of three distinct forms, not connected, as a rule, by intermediate gradations; the condition among individuals of the same species of having three different shapes or proportions of corresponding parts; -- contrasted with polymorphism, and dimorphism.

Trump (n.) A wind instrument of music; a trumpet, or sound of a trumpet; -- used chiefly in Scripture and poetry.

Trump (n.) An old game with cards, nearly the same as whist; -- called also ruff.

Trumpeter (n.) Any one of several species of long-legged South American birds of the genus Psophia, especially P. crepitans, which is abundant, and often domesticated and kept with other poultry by the natives. They are allied to the cranes. So called from their loud cry. Called also agami, and yakamik.

Trumpetwood (n.) A tropical American tree (Cecropia peltata) of the Breadfruit family, having hollow stems, which are used for wind instruments; -- called also snakewood, and trumpet tree.

Tuum (n.) Lit., thine; that which is thine; -- used in meum and tuum. See 2d Meum.

Ullmannite (n.) A brittle mineral of a steel-gray color and metallic luster, containing antimony, arsenic, sulphur, and nickel.

Unemployment (n.) Quality or state of being not employed; -- used esp. in economics, of the condition of various social classes when temporarily thrown out of employment, as those engaged for short periods, those whose trade is decaying, and those least competent.

Valorization (n.) Act or process of attempting to give an arbitrary market value or price to a commodity by governmental interference, as by maintaining a purchasing fund, making loans to producers to enable them t Unamiable (a.) Not amiable; morose; ill-natured; repulsive.

Vermicelli (n.) The flour of a hard and small-grained wheat made into dough, and forced through small cylinders or pipes till it takes a slender, wormlike form, whence the Italian name. When the paste is made in larger tubes, it is called macaroni.

Vermilinguia (n. pl.) A tribe of edentates comprising the South American ant-eaters. The tongue is long, slender, exsertile, and very flexible, whence the name.

Viameter (n.) An odometer; -- called also viatometer.

Warm (superl.) Having yellow or red for a basis, or in their composition; -- said of colors, and opposed to cold which is of blue and its compounds.

Warmouth (n.) An American freshwater bream, or sunfish (Chaenobryttus gulosus); -- called also red-eyed bream.

Whim (n.) A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc., from mines, or for other purposes; -- called also whim gin, and whimsey.

Worm (v. t.) To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; -- often followed by out.

Wormed (a.) Penetrated by worms; injured by worms; worm-eaten; as, wormed timber.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.