Words whose 4th letter is O

Abdominales (n. pl.) A group including the greater part of fresh-water fishes, and many marine ones, having the ventral fins under the abdomen behind the pectorals.

Abdominous (a.) Having a protuberant belly; pot-bellied.

Abhor (v. i.) To shrink back with horror, disgust, or dislike; to be contrary or averse; -- with

Abhorrent (a.) Contrary or repugnant; discordant; inconsistent; -- followed by to.

Abiogenesis (n.) The supposed origination of living organisms from lifeless matter; such genesis as does not involve the action of living parents; spontaneous generation; -- called also abiogeny, and opposed to biogenesis.

Abrogate (v. t.) To annul by an authoritative act; to abolish by the authority of the maker or his successor; to repeal; -- applied to the repeal of laws, decrees, ordinances, the abolition of customs, etc.

Absolute (a.) Viewed apart from modifying influences or without comparison with other objects; actual; real; -- opposed to relative and comparative; as, absolute motion; absolute time or space.

Absolute (a.) Loosed from, or unconnected by, dependence on any other being; self-existent; self-sufficing.

Absolute (a.) Capable of being thought or conceived by itself alone; unconditioned; non-relative.

Absolution (n.) An absolving from ecclesiastical penalties, -- for example, excommunication.

Absolve (v. t.) To free from a penalty; to pardon; to remit (a sin); -- said of the sin or guilt.

Absonant (a.) Discordant; contrary; -- opposed to consonant.

Accommodation (n.) The act of fitting or adapting, or the state of being fitted or adapted; adaptation; adjustment; -- followed by to.

Accommodation (n.) Whatever supplies a want or affords ease, refreshment, or convenience; anything furnished which is desired or needful; -- often in the plural; as, the accommodations -- that is, lodgings and food -- at an inn.

Accompany (v. t.) To go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with; -- followed by with or by; as, he accompanied his speech with a bow.

Accomplished (a.) Complete in acquirements as the result usually of training; -- commonly in a good sense; as, an accomplished scholar, an accomplished villain.

Accord (v. t.) Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; -- preceded by own; as, of one's own accord.

Accord (v. t.) To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; -- followed by to.

Accord (v. i.) To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; -- followed by with, formerly also by to; as, his disposition accords with his looks.

Accordant (a.) Agreeing; consonant; harmonious; corresponding; conformable; -- followed by with or to.

Accordantly (adv.) In accordance or agreement; agreeably; conformably; -- followed by with or to.

Account (v. t.) To place to one's account; to put to the credit of; to assign; -- with to.

Account (v. i.) To render an account; to answer in judgment; -- with for; as, we must account for the use of our opportunities.

Account (v. i.) To give a satisfactory reason; to tell the cause of; to explain; -- with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty.

Acroamatical (a.) Communicated orally; oral; -- applied to the esoteric teachings of Aristotle, those intended for his genuine disciples, in distinction from his exoteric doctrines, which were adapted to outsiders or the public generally. Hence: Abstruse; profound.

Acroceraunian (a.) Of or pertaining to the high mountain range of "thunder-smitten" peaks (now Kimara), between Epirus and Macedonia.

Acronychal (a.) Rising at sunset and setting at sunrise, as a star; -- opposed to cosmical.

Acropetal (a.) Developing from below towards the apex, or from the circumference towards the center; centripetal; -- said of certain inflorescence.

Acrospire (n.) The sprout at the end of a seed when it begins to germinate; the plumule in germination; -- so called from its spiral form.

Adios (interj.) Adieu; farewell; good-by; -- chiefly used among Spanish-speaking people.

Adjourn (v. t.) To put off or defer to another day, or indefinitely; to postpone; to close or suspend for the day; -- commonly said of the meeting, or the action, of convened body; as, to adjourn the meeting; to adjourn a debate.

Admonish (v. t.) To counsel against wrong practices; to cation or advise; to warn against danger or an offense; -- followed by of, against, or a subordinate clause.

Adroit (a.) Dexterous in the use of the hands or in the exercise of the mental faculties; exhibiting skill and readiness in avoiding danger or escaping difficulty; ready in invention or execution; -- applied to persons and to acts; as, an adroit mechanic, an adroit reply.

Aeroboat (n.) A form of hydro-aeroplane; a flying boat.

Aeronef (n.) A power-driven, heavier-than-air flying machine.

Aeroyacht (n.) A form of hydro-aeroplane; a flying boat.

Afford (v. t.) To incur, stand, or bear without serious detriment, as an act which might under other circumstances be injurious; -- with an auxiliary, as can, could, might, etc.; to be able or rich enough.

Agnosticism (n.) The doctrine that the existence of a personal Deity, an unseen world, etc., can be neither proved nor disproved, because of the necessary limits of the human mind (as sometimes charged upon Hamilton and Mansel), or because of the insufficiency of the evidence furnished by physical and physical data, to warrant a positive conclusion (as taught by the school of Herbert Spencer); -- opposed alike dogmatic skepticism and to dogmatic theism.

Aground (adv. & a.) On the ground; stranded; -- a nautical term applied to a ship when its bottom lodges on the ground.

Albolith (n.) A kind of plastic cement, or artificial stone, consisting chiefly of magnesia and silica; -- called also albolite.

Alborak (n.) The imaginary milk-white animal on which Mohammed was said to have been carried up to heaven; a white mule.

Allocation (n.) The admission of an item in an account, or an allowance made upon an account; -- a term used in the English exchequer.

Allodial (a.) Pertaining to allodium; freehold; free of rent or service; held independent of a lord paramount; -- opposed to feudal; as, allodial lands; allodial system.

Allogamy (n.) Fertilization of the pistil of a plant by pollen from another of the same species; cross-fertilization.

Allograph (n.) A writing or signature made by some person other than any of the parties thereto; -- opposed to autograph.

Allomorph (n.) Any one of two or more distinct crystalAllomorph (n.) A variety of pseudomorph which has undergone partial or complete change or substitution of material; -- thus limonite is frequently an allomorph after pyrite.

Allopathy (n.) That system of medical practice which aims to combat disease by the use of remedies which produce effects different from those produced by the special disease treated; -- a term invented by Hahnemann to designate the ordinary practice, as opposed to homeopathy.

Alloxanic (a.) Of or pertaining to alloxan; -- applied to an acid obtained by the action of soluble alkalies on alloxan.

Allotrophic (a.) Dependent upon other organisms for nutrition; heterotrophic; -- said of plants unable to perform photosynthesis, as all saprophytes; -- opposed to autotrophic.

Alto (n.) Formerly the part sung by the highest male, or counter-tenor, voices; now the part sung by the lowest female, or contralto, voices, between in tenor and soprano. In instrumental music it now signifies the tenor.

Ammonia (n.) A gaseous compound of hydrogen and nitrogen, NH3, with a pungent smell and taste: -- often called volatile alkali, and spirits of hartshorn.

Ancone (n.) The corner or quoin of a wall, cross-beam, or rafter.

Anion (n.) An electro-negative element, or the element which, in electro-chemical decompositions, is evolved at the anode; -- opposed to cation.

Annotate (v. i.) To make notes or comments; -- with on or upon.

Argon (n.) A colorless, odorless gas occurring in the air (of which it constitutes 0.93 per cent by volume), in volcanic gases, etc.; -- so named on account of its inertness by Rayleigh and Ramsay, who prepared and examined it in 1894-95. Symbol, A; at. wt., 39.9. Argon is condensible to a colorless liquid boiling at -186.1? C. and to a solid melting at -189.6? C. It has a characteristic spectrum. No compounds of it are known, but there is physical evidence that its molecule is monatomic. Weig> Annotation (n.) A note, added by way of comment, or explanation; -- usually in the plural; as, annotations on ancient authors, or on a word or a passage.

Arnotto (n.) A red or yellowish-red dyeing material, prepared from the pulp surrounding the seeds of a tree (Bixa orellana) belonging to the tropical regions of America. It is used for coloring cheese, butter, etc.

Antonym (n.) A word of opposite meaning; a counterterm; -- used as a correlative of synonym.

Antozone (n.) A compound formerly supposed to be modification of oxygen, but now known to be hydrogen dioxide; -- so called because apparently antagonistic to ozone, converting it into ordinary oxygen.

Aplomb (n.) Assurance of manner or of action; self-possession.

Appoggiatura (n.) A passing tone preceding an essential tone, and borrowing the time it occupies from that; a short auxiliary or grace note one degree above or below the principal note unless it be of the same harmony; -- generally indicated by a note of smaller size, as in the illustration above. It forms no essential part of the harmony.

Appoint (v. t.) To direct, designate, or limit; to make or direct a new disposition of, by virtue of a power contained in a conveyance; -- said of an estate already conveyed.

Appointment (n.) An allowance to a person, esp. to a public officer; a perquisite; -- properly only in the plural.

Apposite (a.) Very applicable; well adapted; suitable or fit; relevant; pat; -- followed by to; as, this argument is very apposite to the case.

Aprosos (a. & adv.) By the way; to the purpose; suitably to the place or subject; -- a word used to introduce an incidental observation, suited to the occasion, though not strictly belonging to the narration.

Arboricole (a.) Tree-inhabiting; -- said of certain birds.

Argo (n.) The name of the ship which carried Jason and his fifty-four companions to Colchis, in quest of the Golden Fleece.

Arrogance (n.) The act or habit of arrogating, or making undue claims in an overbearing manner; that species of pride which consists in exorbitant claims of rank, dignity, estimation, or power, or which exalts the worth or importance of the person to an undue degree; proud contempt of others; lordArrogant (a.) Making, or having the disposition to make, exorbitant claims of rank or estimation; giving one's self an undue degree of importance; assuming; haughty; -- applied to persons.

Arrogant (a.) Containing arrogance; marked with arrogance; proceeding from undue claims or self-importance; -- applied to things; as, arrogant pretensions or behavior.

Arrogantly (adv.) In an arrogant manner; with undue pride or self-importance.

Arrowhead (n.) An aquatic plant of the genus Sagittaria, esp. S. sagittifolia, -- named from the shape of the leaves.

Arrowwood (n.) A shrub (Viburnum dentatum) growing in damp woods and thickets; -- so called from the long, straight, slender shoots.

Ashore (adv.) On shore or on land; on the land adjacent to water; to the shore; to the land; aground (when applied to a ship); -- sometimes opposed to aboard or afloat.

Associable (a.) Liable to be affected by sympathy with other parts; -- said of organs, nerves, muscles, etc.

Ascocarp (n.) In ascomycetous fungi, the spherical, discoid, or cup-shaped body within which the asci are collected, and which constitutes the mature fructification. The different forms are known in mycology under distinct names. Called also spore fruit.

Atmosphere (n.) The whole mass of aeriform fluid surrounding the earth; -- applied also to the gaseous envelope of any celestial orb, or other body; as, the atmosphere of Mars.

Atrous (a.) Coal-black; very black.

Aurocephalous (a.) Having a gold-colored head.

Aurochloride (n.) The trichloride of gold combination with the chloride of another metal, forming a double chloride; -- called also chloraurate.

Aurocyanide (n.) A double cyanide of gold and some other metal or radical; -- called also cyanaurate.

Aurous (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, gold; -- said of those compounds of gold in which this element has its lower valence; as, aurous oxide.

Autocatalysis (n.) Self-catalysis; catalysis of a substance by one of its own products, as of silver oxide by the silver formed by reduction of a small portion of it.

Autoclastic (a.) Broken in place; -- said of rocks having a broken or brecciated structure due to crushing, in contrast to those of brecciated materials brought from a distance.

Autocoherer (n.) A self-restoring coherer, as a microphonic detector.

Autoecious (a.) Passing through all its stages on one host, as certain parasitic fungi; -- contrasted with heteroecious.

Autogenetic (a.) Pertaining to, controlled by, or designating, a system of self-determined drainage.

Autohypnotic (a.) Pert. to autohypnotism; self-hypnotizing.

Autokinetic (a.) Self-moving; moving automatically.

Automobile (n.) An automobile vehicle or mechanism; esp., a self-propelled vehicle suitable for use on a street or roadway. Automobiles are usually propelled by internal combustion engines (using volatile inflammable liquids, as gasoAutostability (n.) Automatic stability; also, inherent stability. An aeroplane is inherently stable if it keeps in steady poise by virtue of its shape and proportions alone; it is automatically stable if it keeps in steady poise by means of self-operative mechanism.

Autosuggestion (n.) Self-suggestion as distinguished from suggestion coming from another, esp. in hypnotism. Autosuggestion is characteristic of certain mental conditions in which expectant belief tends to produce disturbance of function of one or more organs.

Autotoxication (n.) Same as Auto-intoxication.

Autotransformer (n.) A transformer in which part of the primary winding is used as a secondary winding, or vice versa; -- called also a compensator or balancing coil.

Autotrophic (a.) Capable of self-nourishment; -- said of all plants in which photosynthetic activity takes place, as opposed to parasitism or saprophytism.

Autochronograph (n.) An instrument for the instantaneous self-recording or printing of time.

Autochthon (n.) One who is supposed to rise or spring from the ground or the soil he inhabits; one of the original inhabitants or aborigines; a native; -- commonly in the plural. This title was assumed by the ancient Greeks, particularly the Athenians.

Autoclave (n.) A kind of French stewpan with a steam-tight lid.

Autocracy (n.) Independent or self-derived power; absolute or controlling authority; supremacy.

Autocratrix (n.) A female sovereign who is independent and absolute; -- a title given to the empresses of Russia.

Autodidact (n.) One who is self-taught; an automath.

Autodynamic (a.) Supplying its own power; -- applied to an instrument of the nature of a water-ram.

Autofecundation (n.) Self-impregnation.

Autogamous (a.) Characterized by autogamy; self-fertilized.

Autogamy (n.) Self-fertilization, the fertilizing pollen being derived from the same blossom as the pistil acted upon.

Autogeneal (a.) Self-produced; autogenous.

Autogenetic (a.) Relating to autogenesis; self-generated.

Autogenous (a.) Self-generated; produced independently.

Autolatry (n.) Self-worship.

Automath (n.) One who is self-taught.

Automatical (a.) Pertaining to, or produced by, an automaton; of the nature of an automaton; self-acting or self-regulating under fixed conditions; -- esp. applied to machinery or devices in which certain things formerly or usually done by hand are done by the machine or device itself; as, the automatic feed of a lathe; automatic gas lighting; an automatic engine or switch; an automatic mouse.

Automatism (n.) The state or quality of being automatic; the power of self-moving; automatic, mechanical, or involuntary action. (Metaph.) A theory as to the activity of matter.

Automaton (v. i.) A self-moving machine, or one which has its motive power within itself; -- applied chiefly to machines which appear to imitate spontaneously the motions of living beings, such as men, birds, etc.

Autonomic (a.) Having the power of self-government; autonomous.

Autonomous (a.) Independent in government; having the right or power of self-government.

Autonomy (n.) The power or right of self-government; self-government, or political independence, of a city or a state.

Autopsy (a.) Dissection of a dead body, for the purpose of ascertaining the cause, seat, or nature of a disease; a post-mortem examination.

Autotheism (n.) The doctrine of God's self-existence.

Autotheism (n.) Deification of one's self; self-worship.

Autotheist (n.) One given to self-worship.

Axiom (a.) A self-evident and necessary truth, or a proposition whose truth is so evident as first sight that no reasoning or demonstration can make it plainer; a proposition which it is necessary to take for granted; as, "The whole is greater than a part;" "A thing can not, at the same time, be and not be."

Axiomatical (a.) Of or pertaining to an axiom; having the nature of an axiom; self-evident; characterized by axioms.

Baboon (n.) One of the Old World Quadrumana, of the genera Cynocephalus and Papio; the dog-faced ape. Baboons have dog-like muzzles and large canine teeth, cheek pouches, a short tail, and naked callosities on the buttocks. They are mostly African. See Mandrill, and Chacma, and Drill an ape.

Barometz (n.) The woolly-skinned rhizoma or rootstock of a fern (Dicksonia barometz), which, when specially prepared and inverted, somewhat resembles a lamb; -- called also Scythian lamb.

Baroness (n.) A baron's wife; also, a lady who holds the baronial title in her own right; as, the Baroness Burdett-Coutts.

Baroscope (n.) Any instrument showing the changes in the weight of the atmosphere; also, less appropriately, any instrument that indicates -or foreshadows changes of the weather, as a deep vial of liquid holding in suspension some substance which rises and falls with atmospheric changes.

Barouche (n.) A four-wheeled carriage, with a falling top, a seat on the outside for the driver, and two double seats on the inside arranged so that the sitters on the front seat face those on the back seat.

Baton (n.) An ordinary with its ends cut off, borne sinister as a mark of bastardy, and containing one fourth in breadth of the bend sinister; -- called also bastard bar. See Bend sinister.

Baroque (a.) Irregular in form; -- said esp. of a pearl.

Become (v. t.) To suit or be suitable to; to be congruous with; to befit; to accord with, in character or circumstances; to be worthy of, or proper for; to cause to appear well; -- said of persons and things.

Befog (v. t.) To involve in a fog; -- mostly as a participle or part. adj.

Before (prep.) Preceding in time; earlier than; previously to; anterior to the time when; -- sometimes with the additional idea of purpose; in order that.

Before (adv.) On the fore part; in front, or in the direction of the front; -- opposed to in the rear.

Beforehand (adv.) In a state of anticipation ore preoccupation; in advance; -- often followed by with.

Begone (p. p.) Surrounded; furnished; beset; environed (as in woe-begone).

Begonia (n.) A genus of plants, mostly of tropical America, many species of which are grown as ornamental plants. The leaves are curiously one-sided, and often exhibit brilliant colors.

Behoove (v. t.) To be necessary for; to be fit for; to be meet for, with respect to necessity, duty, or convenience; -- mostly used impersonally.

Bicornous (a.) Having two horns; two-horned; crescentlike.

Bicorporate (a.) Double-bodied, as a lion having one head and two bodies.

Bifoliate (a.) Having two leaves; two-leaved.

Bigotry (n.) The state of mind of a bigot; obstinate and unreasoning attachment of one's own belief and opinions, with narrow-minded intolerance of beliefs opposed to them.

Bijou (n.) A trinket; a jewel; -- a word applied to anything small and of elegant workmanship.

Bilocation (n.) Double location; the state or power of being in two places at the same instant; -- a miraculous power attributed to some of the saints.

Binocle (n.) A dioptric telescope, fitted with two tubes joining, so as to enable a person to view an object with both eyes at once; a double-barreled field glass or an opera glass.

Binomial (n.) An expression consisting of two terms connected by the sign plus (+) or minus (-); as, a + b, or 7 - 3.

Binomial (a.) Having two names; -- used of the system by which every animal and plant receives two names, the one indicating the genus, the other the species, to which it belongs.

Blood (n.) Temper of mind; disposition; state of the passions; -- as if the blood were the seat of emotions.

Bloodbird (n.) An Australian honeysucker (Myzomela sanguineolata); -- so called from the bright red color of the male bird.

Bloodletting (n.) The act or process of letting blood or bleeding, as by opening a vein or artery, or by cupping or leeches; -- esp. applied to venesection.

Bloodroot (n.) A plant (Sanguinaria Canadensis), with a red root and red sap, and bearing a pretty, white flower in early spring; -- called also puccoon, redroot, bloodwort, tetterwort, turmeric, and Indian paint. It has acrid emetic properties, and the rootstock is used as a stimulant expectorant. See Sanguinaria.

Bloodstone (n.) A green siliceous stone sprinkled with red jasper, as if with blood; hence the name; -- called also heliotrope.

Bloodwort (n.) A plant, Rumex sanguineus, or bloody-veined dock. The name is applied also to bloodroot (Sanguinaria Canadensis), and to an extensive order of plants (Haemodoraceae), the roots of many species of which contain a red coloring matter useful in dyeing.

Bloody (a.) Infamous; contemptible; -- variously used for mere emphasis or as a low epithet.

Bloom (n.) The delicate, powdery coating upon certain growing or newly-gathered fruits or leaves, as on grapes, plums, etc. Hence: Anything giving an appearance of attractive freshness; a flush; a glow.

Bloom (n.) A yellowish deposit or powdery coating which appears on well-tanned leather.

Bloom (n.) A popular term for a bright-hued variety of some minerals; as, the rose-red cobalt bloom.

Bloomer (n.) A costume for women, consisting of a short dress, with loose trousers gathered round ankles, and (commonly) a broad-brimmed hat.

Bobolink (n.) An American singing bird (Dolichonyx oryzivorus). The male is black and white; the female is brown; -- called also, ricebird, reedbird, and Boblincoln.

Bolometer (n.) An instrument for measuring minute quantities of radiant heat, especially in different parts of the spectrum; -- called also actinic balance, thermic balance.

Borofluoride (n.) A double fluoride of boron and hydrogen, or some other positive element, or radical; -- called also fluoboride, and formerly fluoborate.

Botocudos (n. pl.) A Brazilian tribe of Indians, noted for their use of poisons; -- also called Aymbores.

Brood (v. i.) To have the mind dwell continuously or moodily on a subject; to think long and anxiously; to be in a state of gloomy, serious thought; -- usually followed by over or on; as, to brood over misfortunes.

Brookweed (n.) A small white-flowered herb (Samolus Valerandi) found usually in wet places; water pimpernel.

Broom (n.) An implement for sweeping floors, etc., commonly made of the panicles or tops of broom corn, bound together or attached to a long wooden handle; -- so called because originally made of the twigs of the broom.

Bryozoa (n. pl.) A class of Molluscoidea, including minute animals which by budding form compound colonies; -- called also Polyzoa.

Bufonite (n.) An old name for a fossil consisting of the petrified teeth and palatal bones of fishes belonging to the family of Pycnodonts (thick teeth), whose remains occur in the oolite and chalk formations; toadstone; -- so named from a notion that it was originally formed in the head of a toad.

Bunodonts (n. pl.) A division of the herbivorous mammals including the hogs and hippopotami; -- so called because the teeth are tuberculated.

Cabob (n.) A small piece of mutton or other meat roasted on a skewer; -- so called in Turkey and Persia.

Caboched (a.) Showing the full face, but nothing of the neck; -- said of the head of a beast in armorial bearing.

Caboodle (n.) The whole collection; the entire quantity or number; -- usually in the phrase the whole caboodle.

Caboose (n.) A house on deck, where the cooking is done; -- commonly called the galley.

Calorisator (n.) An apparatus used in beet-sugar factories to heat the juice in order to aid the diffusion.

Cacophonious (a.) Harsh-sounding.

Caloric (n.) The principle of heat, or the agent to which the phenomena of heat and combustion were formerly ascribed; -- not now used in scientific nomenclature, but sometimes used as a general term for heat.

Calorificient (a.) Having, or relating to the power of producing heat; -- applied to foods which, being rich in carbon, as the fats, are supposed to give rise to heat in the animal body by oxidation.

Calotype (n.) A method of taking photographic pictures, on paper sensitized with iodide of silver; -- also called Talbotype, from the inventor, Mr. Fox. Talbot.

Camoys (a.) Flat; depressed; crooked; -- said only of the nose.

Canon (n.) The largest size of type having a specific name; -- so called from having been used for printing the canons of the church.

Canon (n.) The part of a bell by which it is suspended; -- called also ear and shank.

Carob (n.) An evergreen leguminous tree (Ceratania Siliqua) found in the countries bordering the Mediterranean; the St. John's bread; -- called also carob tree.

Carob (n.) One of the long, sweet, succulent, pods of the carob tree, which are used as food for animals and sometimes eaten by man; -- called also St. John's bread, carob bean, and algaroba bean.

Carolus (n.) An English gold coin of the value of twenty or twenty-three shillings. It was first struck in the reign of Charles I.

Catoptrics (n.) That part of optics which explains the properties and phenomena of reflected light, and particularly that which is reflected from mirrors or polished bodies; -- formerly called anacamptics.

Cero (n.) A large and valuable fish of the Mackerel family, of the genus Scomberomorus. Two species are found in the West Indies and less commonly on the Atlantic coast of the United States, -- the common cero (Scomberomorus caballa), called also kingfish, and spotted, or king, cero (S. regalis).

Cerotin (n.) A white crystalChloric (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, chlorine; -- said of those compounds of chlorine in which this element has a valence of five, or the next to its highest; as, chloric acid, HClO3.

Chlormethane (n.) A colorless gas, CH3Cl, of a sweet odor, easily condensed to a liquid; -- called also methyl chloride.

Chloropal (n.) A massive mineral, greenish in color, and opal-like in appearance. It is essentially a hydrous silicate of iron.

Chloropeptic (a.) Of or pertaining to an acid more generally called pepsin-hydrochloric acid.

Chloroplastid (n.) A granule of chlorophyll; -- also called chloroleucite.

Chlorous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, chlorine; -- said of those compounds of chlorine in which this element has a valence of three, the next lower than in chloric compounds; as, chlorous acid, HClO2.

Chlorous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the electro-negative character of chlorine; hence, electro-negative; -- opposed to basylous or zincous.

Chromic (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, chromium; -- said of the compounds of chromium in which it has its higher valence.

Chromid (n.) One of the Chromidae, a family of fresh-water fishes abundant in the tropical parts of America and Africa. Some are valuable food fishes, as the bulti of the Nile.

Chromite (n.) A black submetallic mineral consisting of oxide of chromium and iron; -- called also chromic iron.

Chromograph (n.) An apparatus by which a number of copies of written matter, maps, plans, etc., can be made; -- called also hectograph.

Chromoplastid (n.) A protoplasmic granule of some other color than green; -- also called chromoleucite.

Chronogram (n.) An inscription in which certain numeral letters, made to appear specially conspicuous, on being added together, express a particular date or epoch, as in the motto of a medal struck by Gustavus Adolphus in 1632: ChrIstVs DVX; ergo trIVMphVs.- the capitals of which give, when added as numerals, the sum 1632.

Chronometer (n.) A portable timekeeper, with a heavy compensation balance, and usually beating half seconds; -- intended to keep time with great accuracy for use an astronomical observations, in determining longitude, etc.

Chronoscope (n.) An instrument for measuring minute intervals of time; used in determining the velocity of projectiles, the duration of short-lived luminous phenomena, etc.

Cloot (n.) The Devil; Clootie; -- usually in the pl.

Colorado (a.) Reddish; -- often used in proper names of rivers or creeks.

Colorado (a.) Medium in color and strength; -- said of cigars.

Cocoanut (n.) The large, hard-shelled nut of the cocoa palm. It yields an agreeable milky liquid and a white meat or albumen much used as food and in making oil.

Cohosh (n.) A perennial American herb (Caulophyllum thalictroides), whose rootstock is used in medicine; -- also called pappoose root. The name is sometimes also given to the Cimicifuga racemosa, and to two species of Actaea, plants of the Crowfoot family.

Cologne (n.) A perfumed liquid, composed of alcohol and certain aromatic oils, used in the toilet; -- called also cologne water and eau de cologne.

Colorado beetle () A yellowish beetle (Doryphora decemColoradoite (n.) Mercury telluride, an iron-black metallic mineral, found in Colorado.

Conoid (n.) A solid formed by the revolution of a conic section about its axis; as, a parabolic conoid, elliptic conoid, etc.; -- more commonly called paraboloid, ellipsoid, etc.

Coronated (a.) Having the coronal feathers lengthened or otherwise distinguished; -- said of birds.

Coronated (a.) Girt about the spire with a row of tubercles or spines; -- said of spiral shells.

Coyote (n.) A carnivorous animal (Canis latrans), allied to the dog, found in the western part of North America; -- called also prairie wolf. Its voice is a snapping bark, followed by a prolonged, shrill howl.

Creosote (n.) Wood-tar oil; an oily antiseptic liquid, of a burning smoky taste, colorless when pure, but usually colored yellow or brown by impurity or exposure. It is a complex mixture of various phenols and their ethers, and is obtained by the distillation of wood tar, especially that of beechwood.

Crookes tube () A vacuum tube in which the exhaustion is carried to a very high degree, with the production of a distinct class of effects; -- so called from W. Crookes who introduced it.

Cryolite (n.) A fluoride of sodium and aluminum, found in Greenland, in white cleavable masses; -- used as a source of soda and alumina.

Cuboid (a.) Cube-shaped, or nearly so; as, the cuboid bone of the foot.

Cupola (n.) A revolving shot-proof turret for heavy ordnance.

Cymogene (n.) A highly volatile liquid, condensed by cold and pressure from the first products of the distillation of petroleum; -- used for producing low temperatures.

Cytogenous (a.) Producing cells; -- applied esp. to lymphatic, or adenoid, tissue.

Cytoid (a.) Cell-like; -- applied to the corpuscles of lymph, blood, chyle, etc.

Dagoba (n.) A dome-shaped structure built over relics of Buddha or some Buddhist saint.

Dakotas (n. pl) An extensive race or stock of Indians, including many tribes, mostly dwelling west of the Mississippi River; -- also, in part, called Sioux.

Dahoon () An evergreen shrub or small tree (Ilex cassine) of the southern United States, bearing red drupes and having soft, white, close-grained wood; -- called also dahoon holly.

Debouch (v. i.) To issue; -- said of a stream passing from a gorge out into an open valley or a plain.

Demotics (n.) The department of knowledge relative to the care and culture of the people; sociology in its broadest sense; -- in library cataloguing.

Demountable () Capable of being dismounted; -- said of a form of rim, for an automobile wheel, which can be removed with its tire from the wheel.

Decollation (n.) The act of beheading or state of one beheaded; -- especially used of the execution of St. John the Baptist.

Decollete (a.) Leaving the neck and shoulders uncovered; cut low in the neck, or low-necked, as a dress.

Decomposed (a.) Separated or broken up; -- said of the crest of birds when the feathers are divergent.

Deloul (n.) A special breed of the dromedary used for rapid traveling; the swift camel; -- called also herire, and maharik.

Democratic (a.) Befitting the common people; -- opposed to aristocratic.

Demoiselle (n.) The Numidian crane (Anthropoides virgo); -- so called on account of the grace and symmetry of its form and movements.

Demolition (n.) The act of overthrowing, pulling down, or destroying a pile or structure; destruction by violence; utter overthrow; -- opposed to construction; as, the demolition of a house, of military works, of a town, or of hopes.

Demonstration (n.) A course of reasoning showing that a certain result is a necessary consequence of assumed premises; -- these premises being definitions, axioms, and previously established propositions.

Deport (v. t.) To carry or demean; to conduct; to behave; -- followed by the reflexive pronoun.

Depose (v. t.) To testify under oath; to bear testimony to; -- now usually said of bearing testimony which is officially written down for future use.

Depositary (n.) One with whom anything is lodged in the trust; one who receives a deposit; -- the correlative of depositor.

Deposition (n.) The act of laying down one's testimony in writing; also, testimony laid or taken down in writing, under oath or affirmation, before some competent officer, and in reply to interrogatories and cross-interrogatories.

Depositor (n.) One who makes a deposit, especially of money in a bank; -- the correlative of depository.

Derogate (v. t.) To annul in part; to repeal partly; to restrict; to limit the action of; -- said of a law.

Derogate (v. t.) To lessen; to detract from; to disparage; to depreciate; -- said of a person or thing.

Derogate (v. i.) To take away; to detract; to withdraw; -- usually with from.

Derogate (v. i.) To act beneath one-s rank, place, birth, or character; to degenerate.

Derogation (n.) The act of derogating, partly repealing, or lessening in value; disparagement; detraction; depreciation; -- followed by of, from, or to.

Derogatory (a.) Tending to derogate, or lessen in value; expressing derogation; detracting; injurious; -- with from to, or unto.

Derotremata (n. pl.) The tribe of aquatic Amphibia which includes Amphiuma, Menopoma, etc. They have permanent gill openings, but no external gills; -- called also Cryptobranchiata.

Devoid (v. t.) Destitute; not in possession; -- with of; as, devoid of sense; devoid of pity or of pride.

Devoir (n.) Duty; service owed; hence, due act of civility or respect; -- now usually in the plural; as, they paid their devoirs to the ladies.

Devolve (v. t.) To transfer from one person to another; to deliver over; to hand down; -- generally with upon, sometimes with to or into.

Devolve (v. i.) To pass by transmission or succession; to be handed over or down; -- generally with on or upon, sometimes with to or into; as, after the general fell, the command devolved upon (or on) the next officer in rank.

Devote (v. t.) To give up wholly; to addict; to direct the attention of wholly or compound; to attach; -- often with a reflexive pronoun; as, to devote one's self to science, to one's friends, to piety, etc.

Dicoccous (a.) Composed of two coherent, one-seeded carpels; as, a dicoccous capsule.

Diiodide (n.) A compound of a binary type containing two atoms of iodine; -- called also biniodide.

Dinoceras (n.) A genus of large extinct Eocene mammals from Wyoming; -- called also Uintatherium. See Illustration in Appendix.

Dinosauria (n. pl.) An order of extinct mesozoic reptiles, mostly of large size (whence the name). Notwithstanding their size, they present birdlike characters in the skeleton, esp. in the pelvis and hind limbs. Some walked on their three-toed hind feet, thus producing the large "bird tracks," so-called, of mesozoic sandstones; others were five-toed and quadrupedal. See Illust. of Compsognathus, also Illustration of Dinosaur in Appendix.

Disobedient (a.) Neglecting or refusing to obey; omitting to do what is commanded, or doing what is prohibited; refractory; not observant of duty or rules prescribed by authority; -- applied to persons and acts.

Divorce (n.) The separation of a married woman from the bed and board of her husband -- divorce a mensa et toro (/ thoro), "from bed board."

Dodo (n.) A large, extinct bird (Didus ineptus), formerly inhabiting the Island of Mauritius. It had short, half-fledged wings, like those of the ostrich, and a short neck and legs; -- called also dronte. It was related to the pigeons.

Doloroso (a. & adv.) Plaintive; pathetic; -- used adverbially as a musical direction.

Donor (n.) One who grants an estate; in later use, one who confers a power; -- the opposite of donee.

EcboEclogite (n.) A rock consisting of granular red garnet, light green smaragdite, and common hornblende; -- so called in reference to its beauty.

Eikon (n.) An image or effigy; -- used rather in an abstract sense, and rarely for a work of art.

Embolic (a.) Pushing or growing in; -- said of a kind of invagination. See under Invagination.

Embonpoint (n.) Plumpness of person; -- said especially of persons somewhat corpulent.

Endothermic (a.) Designating, or pert. to, a reaction which occurs with absorption of heat; formed by such a reaction; as, an endothermic substance; -- opposed to exothermic.

Encore (adv. / interj.) Once more; again; -- used by the auditors and spectators of plays, concerts, and other entertainments, to call for a repetition of a particular part.

Encourage (v. t.) To give courage to; to inspire with courage, spirit, or hope; to raise, or to increase, the confidence of; to animate; enhearten; to incite; to help forward; -- the opposite of discourage.

Endogamous (a.) Marrying within the same tribe; -- opposed to exogamous.

Endogamy (n.) Marriage only within the tribe; a custom restricting a man in his choice of a wife to the tribe to which he belongs; -- opposed to exogamy.

Endoparasite (n.) Any parasite which lives in the internal organs of an animal, as the tapeworms, Trichina, etc.; -- opposed to ectoparasite. See Entozoon.

Endorhiza (n.) Any monocotyledonous plant; -- so named because many monocotyledons have an endorhizal embryo.

Endosperm (n.) The albumen of a seed; -- limited by recent writers to that formed within the embryo sac.

Endosporous (a.) Having the spores contained in a case; -- applied to fungi.

Endoss (v. t.) To put upon the back or outside of anything; -- the older spelling of endorse.

Endow (v. t.) To enrich or furnish with anything of the nature of a gift (as a quality or faculty); -- followed by with, rarely by of; as, man is endowed by his Maker with reason; to endow with privileges or benefits.

Endowment (n.) That which is given or bestowed upon the person or mind; gift of nature; accomplishment; natural capacity; talents; -- usually in the plural.

Entoglossal (a.) Within the tongue; -- applied to the glossohyal bone.

Entomophaga (n. pl.) A group of edentates, including the ant-eaters.

Entomophilous (a.) Fertilized by the agency of insects; -- said of plants in which the pollen is carried to the stigma by insects.

Entoperipheral (a.) Being, or having its origin, within the external surface of the body; -- especially applied to feelings, such as hunger, produced by internal disturbances. Opposed to epiperipheral.

Entoplastron (n.) The median plate of the plastron of turtles; -- called also entosternum.

Envoy (n.) An explanatory or commendatory postscript to a poem, essay, or book; -- also in the French from, l'envoi.

Enzootic (a.) Afflicting animals; -- used of a disease affecting the animals of a district. It corresponds to an endemic disease among men.

Epiotic (n.) The upper and outer element of periotic bone, -- in man forming a part of the temporal bone.

Ergo (conj. / adv.) Therefore; consequently; -- often used in a jocular way.

Ergot (n.) A diseased condition of rye and other cereals, in which the grains become black, and often spur-shaped. It is caused by a parasitic fungus, Claviceps purpurea.

Erroneous (a.) Wandering; straying; deviating from the right course; -- hence, irregular; unnatural.

Error (n.) The difference between the approximate result and the true result; -- used particularly in the rule of double position.

Error (n.) The difference between the observed value of a quantity and that which is taken or computed to be the true value; -- sometimes called residual error.

Escort (n.) A body of armed men to attend a person of distinction for the sake of affording safety when on a journey; one who conducts some one as an attendant; a guard, as of prisoners on a march; also, a body of persons, attending as a mark of respect or honor; -- applied to movements on land, as convoy is to movements at sea.

Escort (n.) To attend with a view to guard and protect; to accompany as safeguard; to give honorable or ceremonious attendance to; -- used esp. with reference to journeys or excursions on land; as, to escort a public functionary, or a lady; to escort a baggage wagon.

Essorant (a.) Standing, but with the wings spread, as if about to fly; -- said of a bird borne as a charge on an escutcheon.

Estoile (n.) A six-pointed star whose rays are wavy, instead of straight like those of a mullet.

Ethos (n.) The traits in a work of art which express the ideal or typic character -- character as influenced by the ethos (sense 1) of a people -- rather than realistic or emotional situations or individual character in a narrow sense; -- opposed to pathos.

Europium (n.) A metallic element of the rare-earth group, discovered spectroscopically by Demarcay in 1896. Symbol, Eu; at. wt., 152.0.

Eunomy (n.) Equal law, or a well-adjusted constitution of government.

Export (v. t.) To carry or send abroad, or out of a country, especially to foreign countries, as merchandise or commodities in the way of commerce; -- the opposite of import; as, to export grain, cotton, cattle, goods, etc.

Export (n.) That which is exported; a commodity conveyed from one country or State to another in the way of traffic; -- used chiefly in the plural, exports.

Exporter (n.) One who exports; the person who sends goods or commodities to a foreign country, in the way of commerce; -- opposed to importer.

Expostulate (v. i.) To reason earnestly with a person on some impropriety of his conduct, representing the wrong he has done or intends, and urging him to make redress or to desist; to remonstrate; -- followed by with.

Fagotto (n.) The bassoon; -- so called from being divided into parts for ease of carriage, making, as it were, a small fagot.

Famous (a.) Celebrated in fame or public report; renowned; mach talked of; distinguished in story; -- used in either a good or a bad sense, chiefly the former; often followed by for; as, famous for erudition, for eloquence, for military skill; a famous pirate.

Favor (n.) A letter or epistle; -- so called in civility or compliment; as, your favor of yesterday is received.

Favorable (n.) Beautiful; well-favored.

Favored (a.) Having a certain favor or appearance; featured; as, well-favored; hard-favored, etc.

Favorer (n.) One who favors; one who regards with kindness or friendship; a well-wisher; one who assists or promotes success or prosperity.

Favorite (n.) Short curls dangling over the temples; -- fashionable in the reign of Charles II.

Fluorescence (n.) A property possessed by fluor spar, uranium glass, sulphide of calcium, and many other substances, of glowing without appreciable rise of temperature when exposed to light or to ultra-violet rays, cathode rays, X rays, etc.

Flood (v. i.) The flowing in of the tide; the semidiurnal swell or rise of water in the ocean; -- opposed to ebb; as, young flood; high flood.

Fluorescein (n.) A yellowish red, crystalFluorine (n.) A non-metallic, gaseous element, strongly acid or negative, or associated with chlorine, bromine, and iodine, in the halogen group of which it is the first member. It always occurs combined, is very active chemically, and possesses such an avidity for most elements, and silicon especially, that it can neither be prepared nor kept in glass vessels. If set free it immediately attacks the containing material, so that it was not isolated until 1886. It is a pungent, corrosive, colorl> Fluoroid (n.) A tetrahexahedron; -- so called because it is a common form of fluorite.

Fluosilicate (n.) A double fluoride of silicon and some other (usually basic) element or radical, regarded as a salt of fluosilicic acid; -- called also silicofluoride.

Galop (n.) A kind of lively dance, in 2-4 time; also, the music to the dance.

Gamogenesis (n.) The production of offspring by the union of parents of different sexes; sexual reproduction; -- the opposite of agamogenesis.

Ganoid (a.) Of or pertaining to Ganoidei. -- n. One of the Ganoidei.

Gelose (n.) An amorphous, gummy carbohydrate, found in Gelidium, agar-agar, and other seaweeds.

Gemote (v. t.) A meeting; -- used in combination, as, Witenagemote, an assembly of the wise men.

Giaour (n.) An infidel; -- a term applied by Turks to disbelievers in the Mohammedan religion, especially Christrians.

GlyoxaGonochorism (n.) Separation of the sexes in different individuals; -- opposed to hermaphroditism.

Gonotheca (n.) A capsule developed on certain hydroids (Thecaphora), inclosing the blastostyle upon which the medusoid buds or gonophores are developed; -- called also gonangium, and teleophore. See Hydroidea, and Illust. of Campanularian.

Groomsman (n.) A male attendant of a bridegroom at his wedding; -- the correlative of bridesmaid.

Gyroidal (a.) Having the planes arranged spirally, so that they incGyronny (a.) Covered with gyrons, or divided so as to form several gyrons; -- said of an escutcheon.

Halogen (n.) An electro-negative element or radical, which, by combination with a metal, forms a haloid salt; especially, chlorine, bromine, and iodine; sometimes, also, fluorine and cyanogen. See Chlorine family, under Chlorine.

Haloid (a.) Resembling salt; -- said of certain binary compounds consisting of a metal united to a negative element or radical, and now chiefly applied to the chlorides, bromides, iodides, and sometimes also to the fluorides and cyanides.

Heroic (a.) Larger than life size, but smaller than colossal; -- said of the representation of a human figure.

Hexoctahedron (n.) A solid having forty-eight equal triangular faces.

Hodograph (n.) A curve described by the moving extremity of a Holoblastic (a.) Undergoing complete segmentation; composed entirely of germinal matter, the whole of the yolk undergoing fission; -- opposed to meroblastic.

Holocephali (n. pl.) An order of elasmobranch fishes, including, among living species, only the chimaeras; -- called also Holocephala. See Chimaera; also Illustration in Appendix.

HolocrystalHolohedral (a.) Having all the planes required by complete symmetry, -- in opposition to hemihedral.

Holometabolic (a.) Having a complete metamorphosis;-said of certain insects, as the butterflies and bees.

Holophotal (a.) Causing no loss of light; -- applied to reflectors which throw back the rays of light without perceptible loss.

Holophote (n.) A lamp with lenses or reflectors to collect the rays of light and throw them in a given direction; -- used in lighthouses.

Holophrastic (a.) Expressing a phrase or sentence in a single word, -- as is the case in the aboriginal languages of America.

Holosteric (a.) Wholly solid; -- said of a barometer constructed of solid materials to show the variations of atmospheric pressure without the use of liquids, as the aneroid.

Holostomatous (a.) Having an entire aperture; -- said of many univalve shells.

Homocategoric (a.) Belonging to the same category of individuality; -- a morphological term applied to organisms so related.

Homocercal (a.) Having the tail nearly or quite symmetrical, the vertebral column terminating near its base; -- opposed to heterocercal.

Homodont (a.) Having all the teeth similar in front, as in the porpoises; -- opposed to heterodont.

Homodromous (a.) Running in the same direction; -- said of stems twining round a support, or of the spiral succession of leaves on stems and their branches.

Homodromous (a.) Moving in the same direction; -- said of a lever or pulley in which the resistance and the actuating force are both on the same side of the fulcrum or axis.

Homoeomerous (a.) Having the main artery of the leg parallel with the sciatic nerve; -- said of certain birds.

Homogamous (a.) Having all the flowers alike; -- said of such composite plants as Eupatorium, and the thistels.

Homogangliate (a.) Having the ganglia of the nervous system symmetrically arranged, as in certain invertebrates; -- opposed to heterogangliate.

Homogeneous (a.) Of the same kind of nature; consisting of similar parts, or of elements of the like nature; -- opposed to heterogeneous; as, homogeneous particles, elements, or principles; homogeneous bodies.

Homogenesis (n.) That method of reproduction in which the successive generations are alike, the offspring, either animal or plant, running through the same cycle of existence as the parent; gamogenesis; -- opposed to heterogenesis.

Homogenetic (a.) Homogenous; -- applied to that class of homologies which arise from similarity of structure, and which are taken as evidences of common ancestry.

Homogenous (a.) Having a resemblance in structure, due to descent from a common progenitor with subsequent modification; homogenetic; -- applied both to animals and plants. See Homoplastic.

Homogeny (n.) The correspondence of common descent; -- a term used to supersede homology by Lankester, who also used homoplasy to denote any superinduced correspondence of position and structure in parts embryonically distinct (other writers using the term homoplasmy). Thus, there is homogeny between the fore limb of a mammal and the wing of a bird; but the right and left ventricles of the heart in both are only in homoplasy with each other, these having arisen independently since the divergen> Homographic (a.) Employing a single and separate character to represent each sound; -- said of certain methods of spelling words.

Homoiothermal (a.) Maintaining a uniform temperature; haematothermal; homothermic; -- applied to warm-bodied animals, because they maintain a nearly uniform temperature in spite of the great variations in the surrounding air; in distinct from the cold-blooded (poikilothermal) animals, whose body temperature follows the variations in temperature of the surrounding medium.

Homoiousian (n.) One of the semi-Arians of the 4th century, who held that the Son was of like, but not the same, essence or substance with the Father; -- opposed to homoousian.

Homologoumena (n. pl.) Those books of the New Testament which were acknowledged as canonical by the early church; -- distinguished from antilegomena.

Homomallous (a.) Uniformly bending or curving to one side; -- said of leaves which grow on several sides of a stem.

Homomorphism (n.) The possession, in one species of plants, of only one kind of flowers; -- opposed to heteromorphism, dimorphism, and trimorphism.

Homonymous (a.) Having the same name or designation; standing in the same relation; -- opposed to heteronymous.

Homoousian (n.) One of those, in the 4th century, who accepted the Nicene creed, and maintained that the Son had the same essence or substance with the Father; -- opposed to homoiousian.

Homoplast (n.) One of the plastids composing the idorgan of Haeckel; -- also called homoorgan.

Homostyled (a.) Having only one form of pistils; -- said of the flowers of some plants.

Homotaxis (n.) Similarly in arrangement of parts; -- the opposite of heterotaxy.

Homothermous (a.) Warm-blooded; homoiothermal; haematothermal.

Honor (n.) That which rightfully attracts esteem, respect, or consideration; self-respect; dignity; courage; fidelity; especially, excellence of character; high moral worth; virtue; nobleness; specif., in men, integrity; uprightness; trustworthness; in women, purity; chastity.

Honorable (a.) High-minded; actuated by principles of honor, or a scrupulous regard to probity, rectitude, or reputation.

Hylobate (n.) Any species of the genus Hylobates; a gibbon, or long-armed ape. See Gibbon.

Hypocrateriform (a.) hypocraterimorphous; salver-shaped.

Hypocraterimorphous (a.) Salver-shaped; having a slender tube, expanding suddenly above into a bowl-shaped or spreading border, as in the blossom of the phlox and the lilac.

HypocrystalHypogene (a.) Formed or crystallized at depths the earth's surface; -- said of granite, gneiss, and other rocks, whose crystallization is believed of have taken place beneath a great thickness of overlying rocks. Opposed to epigene.

Hypoglossal (a.) Under the tongue; -- applied esp., in the higher vertebrates, to the twelfth or last pair of cranial nerves, which are distributed to the base of the tongue.

Hypogynous (a.) Inserted below the pistil or pistils; -- said of sepals, petals, and stamens; having the sepals, petals, and stamens inserted below the pistil; -- said of a flower or a plant.

Hypoplastron (n.) The third lateral plate in the plastron of turtles; -- called also hyposternum.

Hypoptilum (n.) An accessory plume arising from the posterior side of the stem of the contour feathers of many birds; -- called also aftershaft. See Illust. of Feather.

Hyposkeletal (a.) Beneath the endoskeleton; hypaxial; as, the hyposkeletal muscles; -- opposed to episkeletal.

Hypostasis (n.) Substance; subsistence; essence; person; personality; -- used by the early theologians to denote any one of the three subdivisions of the Godhead, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Hypostasis (n.) Principle; an element; -- used by the alchemists in speaking of salt, sulphur, and mercury, which they considered as the three principles of all material bodies.

Hypostyle (a.) Resting upon columns; constructed by means of columns; -- especially applied to the great hall at Karnak.

Hypothenuse (n.) The side of a right-angled triangle that is opposite to the right angle.

Hypoxanthin (n.) A crystalIdeogram (n.) A symbol used for convenience, or for abbreviation; as, 1, 2, 3, +, -, /, $, /, etc.

Idioelectric (a.) Electric by virtue of its own peculiar properties; capable of becoming electrified by friction; -- opposed to anelectric.

Idiograph (n.) A mark or signature peculiar to an individual; a trade-mark.

Idiolatry (n.) Self-worship; excessive self-esteem.

Idiomorphous (a.) Apperaing in distinct crystals; -- said of the mineral constituents of a rock.

Idiopathical (a.) Pertaining to idiopathy; characterizing a disease arising primarily, and not in consequence of some other disease or injury; -- opposed to symptomatic, sympathetic, and traumatic.

Idioplasma (n.) That portion of the cell protoplasm which is the seat of all active changes, and which carries on the function of hereditary transmission; -- distinguished from the other portion, which is termed nutritive plasma. See Hygroplasm.

Idiot (n.) A fool; a simpleton; -- a term of reproach.

Idiothermic (a.) Self-heating; warmed, as the body of animal, by process going on within itself.

Ignoble (a.) Not a true or noble falcon; -- said of certain hawks, as the goshawk.

Ignoramus (n.) We are ignorant; we ignore; -- being the word formerly written on a bill of indictment by a grand jury when there was not sufficient evidence to warrant them in finding it a true bill. The phrase now used is, "No bill," "No true bill," or "Not found," though in some jurisdictions "Ignored" is still used.

Ignorant (a.) Unacquainted with; unconscious or unaware; -- used with of.

Ignore (v. t.) To throw out or reject as false or ungrounded; -- said of a bill rejected by a grand jury for want of evidence. See Ignoramus.

Iliopsoas (n.) The great flexor muscle of the hip joint, divisible into two parts, the iliac and great psoas, -- often regarded as distinct muscles.

Immolator (n.) One who offers in sacrifice; specifically, one of a sect of Russian fanatics who practice self-mutilatio and sacrifice.

Immovable (a.) Incapable of being moved; firmly fixed; fast; -- used of material things; as, an immovable foundatin.

Immovable (a.) Steadfast; fixed; unalterable; unchangeable; -- used of the mind or will; as, an immovable purpose, or a man who remain immovable.

Import (v. t.) To bring in from abroad; to introduce from without; especially, to bring (wares or merchandise) into a place or country from a foreign country, in the transactions of commerce; -- opposed to export. We import teas from China, coffee from Brasil, etc.

Import (n.) Merchandise imported, or brought into a country from without its boundaries; -- generally in the plural, opposed to exports.

Importation (v. t.) The act or practice of importing, or bringing into a country or state; -- opposed to exportation.

Importer (n.) One who imports; the merchant who brings goods into a country or state; -- opposed to exporter.

Impose (v. t.) To arrange in proper order on a table of stone or metal and lock up in a chase for printing; -- said of columns or pages of type, forms, etc.

Impotency (n.) Want of self-restraint or self-control.

Impotent (a.) Wanting the power of self-restraint; incontrolled; ungovernable; violent.

Indonesian (n.) A member of a race forming the chief pre-Malay population of the Malay Archipelago, and probably sprung from a mixture of Polynesian and Mongoloid immigrants. According to Keane, the autochthonous Negritos were largely expelled by the Caucasian Polynesians, themselves followed by Mongoloid peoples of Indo-Chinese affinities, from mixture with whom sprang the Indonesian race.

Incoercible (a.) Not capable of being reduced to the form of a liquid by pressure; -- said of any gas above its critical point; -- also particularly of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide, formerly regarded as incapable of liquefaction at any temperature or pressure.

Incoercible (a.) That can note be confined in, or excluded from, vessels, like ordinary fluids, gases, etc.; -- said of the imponderable fluids, heat, light, electricity, etc.

Incognita (n.) The state of being in disguise; -- said of a woman.

Incognito (a. / adv.) Without being known; in disguise; in an assumed character, or under an assumed title; -- said esp. of great personages who sometimes adopt a disguise or an assumed character in order to avoid notice.

Incoherent (a.) Not coherent; wanting cohesion; loose; unconnected; physically disconnected; not fixed to each; -- said of material substances.

Income (n.) That which is taken into the body as food; the ingesta; -- sometimes restricted to the nutritive, or digestible, portion of the food. See Food. Opposed to output.

Incompressibility (n.) The quality of being incompressible, or incapable of reduction in volume by pressure; -- formerly supposed to be a property of liquids.

Inconstant (a.) Not constant; not stable or uniform; subject to change of character, appearance, opinion, inclination, or purpose, etc.; not firm; unsteady; fickle; changeable; variable; -- said of persons or things; as, inconstant in love or friendship.

Incontinently (adv.) In an incontinent manner; without restraint, or without due restraint; -- used esp. of the passions or appetites.

Incorporate (v. t.) To unite with, or introduce into, a mass already formed; as, to incorporate copper with silver; -- used with with and into.

Incorporate (v. i.) To unite in one body so as to make a part of it; to be mixed or blended; -- usually followed by with.

Incorporeal (a.) Existing only in contemplation of law; not capable of actual visible seizin or possession; not being an object of sense; intangible; -- opposed to corporeal.

Indoctrinate (v. t.) To instruct in the rudiments or principles of learning, or of a branch of learning; to imbue with learning; to instruct in, or imbue with, principles or doctrines; to teach; -- often followed by in.

Indoors (adv.) Within the house; -- usually separated, in doors.

Inform (v. t.) To communicate knowledge to; to make known to; to acquaint; to advise; to instruct; to tell; to notify; to enlighten; -- usually followed by of.

Informed (a.) Unformed or ill-formed; deformed; shapeless.

Innovate (v. i.) To introduce novelties or changes; -- sometimes with in or on.

Insolvent (n.) One who is insolvent; as insolvent debtor; -- in England, before 1861, especially applied to persons not traders.

Insomuch (adv.) So; to such a degree; in such wise; -- followed by that or as, and formerly sometimes by both. Cf. Inasmuch.

Into (prep.) Expressing entrance, or a passing from the outside of a thing to its interior parts; -- following verbs expressing motion; as, come into the house; go into the church; one stream falls or runs into another; water enters into the fine vessels of plants.

Intonate (v. i.) To sound the tones of the musical scale; to practice the sol-fa.

Intonation (n.) Reciting in a musical prolonged tone; intonating, or singing of the opening phrase of a plain-chant, psalm, or canticle by a single voice, as of a priest. See Intone, v. t.

Involucre (n.) A continuous marginal covering of sporangia, in certain ferns, as in the common brake, or the cup-shaped processes of the filmy ferns.

Involuted (a.) Rolled inward from the edges; -- said of leaves in vernation, or of the petals of flowers in aestivation.

Involute (n.) A curve traced by the end of a string wound upon another curve, or unwound from it; -- called also evolvent. See Evolute.

Involution (n.) The act or process of raising a quantity to any power assigned; the multiplication of a quantity into itself a given number of times; -- the reverse of evolution.

Iodous (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, iodine. See -ous (chemical suffix).

Iodol (n.) A crystallized substance of the composition C4I4NH, technically tetra-iodo-pyrrol, used like iodoform.

Irrotational (a.) Not rotatory; passing from one point to another by a movement other than rotation; -- said of the movement of parts of a liquid or yielding mass.

Jacob (n.) A Hebrew patriarch (son of Isaac, and ancestor of the Jews), who in a vision saw a ladder reaching up to heaven (Gen. xxviii. 12); -- also called Israel.

Jacobin (n.) A Dominican friar; -- so named because, before the French Revolution, that order had a convent in the Rue St. Jacques, Paris.

Jacobin (n.) A fancy pigeon, in which the feathers of the neck form a hood, -- whence the name. The wings and tail are long, and the beak moderately short.

Jacobus (n.) An English gold coin, of the value of twenty-five shillings sterling, struck in the reign of James I.

Jako (n.) An African parrot (Psittacus erithacus), very commonly kept as a cage bird; -- called also gray parrot.

Jarosite (n.) An ocher-yellow mineral occurring on minute rhombohedral crystals. It is a hydrous sulphate of iron and potash.

Jehovist (n.) One who maintains that the vowel points of the word Jehovah, in Hebrew, are the proper vowels of that word; -- opposed to adonist.

Jehovistic (a.) Relating to, or containing, Jehovah, as a name of God; -- said of certain parts of the Old Testament, especially of the Pentateuch, in which Jehovah appears as the name of the Deity. See Elohistic.

Karob (n.) The twenty-fourth part of a grain; -- a weight used by goldsmiths.

Kenogenesis (n.) Modified evolution, in which nonprimitive characters make their appearance in consequence of a secondary adaptation of the embryo to the peculiar conditions of its environment; -- distinguished from palingenesis.

Kymograph (n.) An instrument for measuring, and recording graphically, the pressure of the blood in any of the blood vessels of a living animal; -- called also kymographion.

Labor (n.) To be oppressed with difficulties or disease; to do one's work under conditions which make it especially hard, wearisome; to move slowly, as against opposition, or under a burden; to be burdened; -- often with under, and formerly with of.

Leiotrichi (n. pl.) The division of mankind which embraces the smooth-haired races.

Levorotatory (a.) Turning or rotating the plane of polarization towards the left; levogyrate, as levulose, left-handed quartz crystals, etc.

Limoniad (n.) A nymph of the meadows; -- called also Limniad.

Lipogram (n.) A writing composed of words not having a certain letter or letters; -- as in the Odyssey of Tryphiodorus there was no A in the first book, no B in the second, and so on.

Liroconite (n.) A hydrated arseniate of copper, occurring in obtuse pyramidal crystals of a sky-blue or verdigris-green color.

Levorotation (n.) Rotation in the direction of an outgoing right-handed screw; counter-clockwise rotation; -- applied chiefly to the turning of the plane of polarization of light.

Locomotive (n.) A locomotive engine; a self-propelling wheel carriage, especially one which bears a steam boiler and one or more steam engines which communicate motion to the wheels and thus propel the carriage, -- used to convey goods or passengers, or to draw wagons, railroad cars, etc. See Illustration in Appendix.

Logography (n.) A mode of reporting speeches without using shorthand, -- a number of reporters, each in succession, taking down three or four words.

Logogriph (n.) A sort of riddle in which it is required to discover a chosen word from various combinations of its letters, or of some of its letters, which form other words; -- thus, to discover the chosen word chatter form cat, hat, rat, hate, rate, etc.

Logotype (n.) A single type, containing two or more letters; as, ae, Ae, /, /, /, etc. ; -- called also ligature.

Lotophagi (n. pl.) A people visited by Ulysses in his wanderings. They subsisted on the lotus. See Lotus (b), and Lotus-eater.

Lycopodiaceous (a.) Belonging, or relating, to the Lycopodiaceae, an order of cryptogamous plants (called also club mosses) with branching stems, and small, crowded, one-nerved, and usually pointed leaves.

Lygodium (n.) A genus of ferns with twining or climbing fronds, bearing stalked and variously-lobed divisions in pairs.

Manograph (n.) An optical device for making an indicator diagram for high-speed engines. It consists of a light-tight box or camera having at one end a small convex mirror which reflects a beam of light on to the ground glass or photographic plate at the other end. The mirror is pivoted so that it can be moved in one direction by a small plunger operated by an elastic metal diaphragm which closes a tube connected with the engine cylinder. It is also moved at right angles to this direction by a> Mavourneen (n.) My darling; -- an Irish term of endearment for a girl or woman.

Madonna (n.) My lady; -- a term of address in Italian formerly used as the equivalent of Madame, but for which Signora is now substituted. Sometimes introduced into English.

Mahoohoo (n.) The African white two-horned rhinoceros (Atelodus simus).

Majorat (a.) The right of succession to property according to age; -- so termed in some of the countries of continental Europe.

Malodor (n.) An Offensive to the sense of smell; ill-smelling.

Mason (v. t.) To build stonework or brickwork about, under, in, over, etc.; to construct by masons; -- with a prepositional suffix; as, to mason up a well or terrace; to mason in a kettle or boiler.

Mayonnaise (n.) A sauce compounded of raw yolks of eggs beaten up with olive oil to the consistency of a sirup, and seasoned with vinegar, pepper, salt, etc.; -- used in dressing salads, fish, etc. Also, a dish dressed with this sauce.

Melodeon (n.) A kind of small reed organ; -- a portable form of the seraphine.

Melop/ia (n.) The art of forming melody; melody; -- now often used for a melodic passage, rather than a complete melody.

Memorial (n.) A written representation of facts, addressed to the government, or to some branch of it, or to a society, etc., -- often accompanied with a petition.

Meroblast (n.) An ovum, as that of a mammal, only partially composed of germinal matter, that is, consisting of both a germinal portion and an albuminous or nutritive one; -- opposed to holoblast.

Meroblastic (a.) Consisting only in part of germinal matter; characterized by partial segmentation only; as, meroblastic ova, in which a portion of the yolk only undergoes fission; meroblastic segmentation; -- opposed to holoblastic.

Meropidan (n.) One of a family of birds (Meropidae), including the bee-eaters.

Mesotrochal (a.) Having the middle of the body surrounded by bands of cilia; -- said of the larvae of certain marine annelids.

Mesotype (n.) An old term covering natrolite or soda mesolite, scolecite or lime mesotype, and mesolite or lime-soda mesotype.

Metosteon (n.) The postero-lateral ossification in the sternum of birds; also, the part resulting from such ossification.

Metol (n.) A whitish soluble powder used as a developer in photography. Chemically, it is the sulphate of methyl-p-amino-m-cresol.

Minorat (a.) A custom or right, analogous to borough-English in England, formerly existing in various parts of Europe, and surviving in parts of Germany and Austria, by which certain entailed estates, as a homestead and adjacent land, descend to the youngest male heir.

Mitotic (a.) Of or pertaining to mitosis; karyokinetic; as, mitotic cell division; -- opposed to amitotic.

Minor (n.) A person of either sex who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded; an infant; in England and the United States, one under twenty-one years of age.

Minority (a. & n.) The smaller number; -- opposed to majority; as, the minority must be ruled by the majority.

Mixogamous (a.) Pairing with several males; -- said of certain fishes of which several males accompany each female during spawning.

Moco (n.) A South American rodent (Cavia rupestris), allied to the Guinea pig, but larger; -- called also rock cavy.

Monobasic (a.) Capable of being neutralized by a univalent base or basic radical; having but one acid hydrogen atom to be replaced; -- said of acids; as, acetic, nitric, and hydrochloric acids are monobasic.

Monocephalous (a.) Having a solitary head; -- said of unbranched composite plants.

Monoceros (n.) A one-horned creature; a unicorn; a sea monster with one horn.

Monoclinal (a.) Having one oblique inclination; -- applied to strata that dip in only one direction from the axis of elevation.

Monoclinic (a.) Having one oblique intersection; -- said of that system of crystallization in which the vertical axis is incMonodical (a.) Homophonic; -- applied to music in which the melody is confined to one part, instead of being shared by all the parts as in the style called polyphonic.

Monoecious (a.) Having the sexes united in one individual, as when male and female flowers grow upon the same individual plant; hermaphrodite; -- opposed to dioecious.

Monogamous (a.) Mating with but one of the opposite sex; -- said of birds and mammals.

Monogamy (n.) Single marriage; marriage with but one person, husband or wife, at the same time; -- opposed to polygamy. Also, one marriage only during life; -- opposed to deuterogamy.

Monogenesis (n.) Oneness of origin; esp. (Biol.), development of all beings in the universe from a single cell; -- opposed to polygenesis. Called also monism.

Monogenesis (n.) The direct development of an embryo, without metamorphosis, into an organism similar to the parent organism; -- opposed to metagenesis.

Monogenetic (a.) One in genesis; resulting from one process of formation; -- used of a mountain range.

Monogenist (n.) One who maintains that the human races are all of one species; -- opposed to polygenist.

Monomerous (a.) Having but one joint; -- said of the foot of certain insects.

Monomorphous (a.) Having but a single form; retaining the same form throughout the various stages of development; of the same or of an essentially similar type of structure; -- opposed to dimorphic, trimorphic, and polymorphic.

Monophonic (a.) Single-voiced; having but one part; as, a monophonic composition; -- opposed to polyphonic.

Monophyletic (a.) Of or pertaining to a single family or stock, or to development from a single common parent form; -- opposed to polyphyletic; as, monophyletic origin.

Monophyllous (a.) One-leaved; composed of a single leaf; as, a monophyllous involucre or calyx.

Monophyodont (a.) Having but one set of teeth; -- opposed to diphyodont.

Monopodium (n.) A single and continuous vegetable axis; -- opposed to sympodium.

Monopteral (a.) Round and without a cella; consisting of a single ring of columns supporting a roof; -- said esp. of a temple.

Monosulphide (n.) A sulphide containing one atom of sulphur, and analogous to a monoxide; -- contrasted with a polysulphide; as, galena is a monosulphide.

Monothalamous (a.) One-chambered.

Monothalmic (a.) Formed from one pistil; -- said of fruits.

Monozoa (n. pl.) A division of Radiolaria; -- called also Monocyttaria.

Morose (a.) Of a sour temper; sullen and austere; ill-humored; severe.

Moto (n.) Movement; manner of movement; particularly, movement with increased rapidity; -- used especially in the phrase con moto, directing to a somewhat quicker movement; as, andante con moto, a little more rapidly than andante, etc.

Motorial (n.) Causing or setting up motion; pertaining to organs of motion; -- applied especially in physiology to those nerves or nerve fibers which only convey impressions from a nerve center to muscles, thereby causing motion.

Monosaccharide () Alt. of -rid

Moron (n.) An inferior olive size having a woody pulp and a large clingstone pit, growing in the mountainous and high-valley districts around the city of Moron, in Spain.

Motograph (n.) A device utilized in the making of a loud-speaking telephone, depending on the fact that the friction between a metallic point and a moving cylinder of moistened chalk, or a moving slip of paper, on which it rests is diminished by the passage of a current between the point and the moving surface.

Motorcycle (n.) A bicycle having a motor attached so as to be self-propelled. In Great Britain the term motor cycle is treated by statute (3 Ed VII. c. 36) as limited to motor cars (self-propelled vehicles) designed to travel on not more than three wheels, and weighing unladen (that is, without water, fuel, or accumulators necessary for propulsion) not more than three hundred weight (336 lbs.).

Motorize (v. t.) To substitute motor-driven vehicles, or automobiles, for the horses and horse-drawn vehicles of (a fire department, city, etc.).

Mutoscope (n.) A simple form of moving-picture machine in which the series of views, exhibiting the successive phases of a scene, are printed on paper and mounted around the periphery of a wheel. The rotation of the wheel brings them rapidly into sight, one after another, and the blended effect gives a semblance of motion.

Mycomelic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid of the alloxan group, obtained as a honey-yellow powder. Its solutions have a gelatinous consistency.

Myronic (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, mustard; -- used specifically to designate a glucoside called myronic acid, found in mustard seed.

Myzostomata (n. pl.) An order of curious parasitic worms found on crinoids. The body is short and disklike, with four pairs of suckers and five pairs of hook-bearing parapodia on the under side.

Nicotiana (n.) A genus of American and Asiatic solanaceous herbs, with viscid foliage and funnel-shaped blossoms. Several species yield tobacco. See Tobacco.

Nicotinic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, nicotine; nicotic; -- used specifically to designate an acid related to pyridine, obtained by the oxidation of nicotine, and called nicotinic acid.

Notoriety (n.) The quality or condition of being notorious; the state of being generally or publicly known; -- commonly used in an unfavorable sense; as, the notoriety of a crime.

Notorious (a.) Generally known and talked of by the public; universally believed to be true; manifest to the world; evident; -- usually in an unfavorable sense; as, a notorious thief; a notorious crime or vice.

Obcompressed (a.) Compressed or flattened antero-posteriorly, or in a way opposite to the usual one.

Obcordate (a.) Heart-shaped, with the attachment at the pointed end; inversely cordate: as, an obcordate petal or leaf.

Obnoxious (a.) Subject; liable; exposed; answerable; amenable; -- with to.

Obsolete (a.) No longer in use; gone into disuse; disused; neglected; as, an obsolete word; an obsolete statute; -- applied chiefly to words, writings, or observances.

Obvoluted (a.) Overlapping; contorted; convolute; -- applied primarily, in botany, to two opposite leaves, each of which has one edge overlapping the nearest edge of the other, and secondarily to a circle of several leaves or petals which thus overlap.

October (n.) The tenth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

Octocerata (n.pl.) A suborder of Cephalopoda including Octopus, Argonauta, and allied genera, having eight arms around the head; -- called also Octopoda.

Octodecimo (n.) A book composed of sheets each of which is folded into eighteen leaves; hence; indicating more or less definitely a size of book, whose sheets are so folded; -- usually written 18mo or 18?, and called eighteenmo.

Octoic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, octane; -- used specifically, to designate any one of a group of acids, the most important of which is called caprylic acid.

Octopus (n.) A genus of eight-armed cephalopods, including numerous species, some of them of large size. See Devilfish,

Octostyle (a.) Having eight columns in the front; -- said of a temple or portico. The Parthenon is octostyle, but most large Greek temples are hexastele. See Hexastyle.

Odeon (n.) A kind of theater in ancient Greece, smaller than the dramatic theater and roofed over, in which poets and musicians submitted their works to the approval of the public, and contended for prizes; -- hence, in modern usage, the name of a hall for musical or dramatic performances.

Onion (n.) A liliaceous plant of the genus Allium (A. cepa), having a strong-flavored bulb and long hollow leaves; also, its bulbous root, much used as an article of food. The name is often extended to other species of the genus.

Ontogeny (n.) The history of the individual development of an organism; the history of the evolution of the germ; the development of an individual organism, -- in distinction from phylogeny, or evolution of the tribe. Called also henogenesis, henogeny.

Oppose (v. i.) To act adversely or in opposition; -- with against or to; as, a servant opposed against the act.

Opposite (a.) Placed over against; standing or situated over against or in front; facing; -- often with to; as, a house opposite to the Exchange.

Opposition (n.) The situation of a heavenly body with respect to another when in the part of the heavens directly opposite to it; especially, the position of a planet or satellite when its longitude differs from that of the sun 180?; -- signified by the symbol /; as, / / /, opposition of Jupiter to the sun.

Pacos (n.) An earthy-looking ore, consisting of brown oxide of iron with minute particles of native silver.

Palo (n.) A pole or timber of any kind; -- in the names of trees.

Pagoda (n.) A term by which Europeans designate religious temples and tower-like buildings of the Hindoos and Buddhists of India, Farther India, China, and Japan, -- usually but not always, devoted to idol worship.

Pagodite (n.) Agalmatolite; -- so called because sometimes carved by the Chinese into the form of pagodas. See Agalmatolite.

Pahoehoe (n.) A name given in the Sandwich Islands to lava having a relatively smooth surface, in distinction from the rough-surfaced lava, called a-a.

Panoistic (a.) Producing ova only; -- said of the ovaries of certain insects which do not produce vitelligenous cells.

Paroccipital (a.) Situated near or beside the occipital condyle or the occipital bone; paramastoid; -- applied especially to a process of the skull in some animals.

Parole (n.) A watchword given only to officers of guards; -- distinguished from countersign, which is given to all guards.

Paronymous (a.) Having the same derivation; allied radically; conjugate; -- said of certain words, as man, mankind, manhood, etc.

Paronymous (a.) Having a similar sound, but different orthography and different meaning; -- said of certain words, as al/ and awl; hair and hare, etc.

Parotid (a.) Situated near the ear; -- applied especially to the salivary gland near the ear.

Parotoid (a.) Resembling the parotid gland; -- applied especially to cutaneous glandular elevations above the ear in many toads and frogs.

Patonce (a.) Having the arms growing broader and floriated toward the end; -- said of a cross. See Illust. 9 of Cross.

Pecopteris (n.) An extensive genus of fossil ferns; -- so named from the regular comblike arrangement of the leaflets.

Pinocle (n.) A game at cards, played with forty-eight cards, being all the cards above the eight spots in two packs.

Peroxide (n.) An oxide containing more oxygen than some other oxide of the same element. Formerly peroxides were regarded as the highest oxides. Cf. Per-, 2.

Pelota (n.) A Basque, Spanish, and Spanish-American game played in a court, in which a ball is struck with a wickerwork racket.

Phloem (n.) That portion of fibrovascular bundles which corresponds to the inner bark; the liber tissue; -- distinguished from xylem.

Phlogisticate (v. t.) To combine phlogiston with; -- usually in the form and sense of the p. p. or the adj.; as, highly phlogisticated substances.

Phlogopite (n.) A kind of mica having generally a peculiar bronze-red or copperlike color and a pearly luster. It is a silicate of aluminia, with magnesia, potash, and some fluorine. It is characteristic of crystalPhlorone (n.) A yellow crystalPicoPisolite (n.) A variety of calcite, or calcium carbonate, consisting of aggregated globular concretions about the size of a pea; -- called also peastone, peagrit.

Pivot (n.) The officer or soldier who simply turns in his place whike the company or Poco (adv.) A little; -- used chiefly in phrases indicating the time or movement; as, poco piu allegro, a little faster; poco largo, rather slow.

Podophthalmia (n. pl.) The stalk-eyed Crustacea, -- an order of Crustacea having the eyes supported on movable stalks. It includes the crabs, lobsters, and prawns. Called also Podophthalmata, and Decapoda.

Podophyllum (n.) The rhizome and rootlet of the May apple (Podophyllum peltatum), -- used as a cathartic drug.

Podoscaph (n.) A canoe-shaped float attached to the foot, for walking on water.

Polonaise (n.) A stately Polish dance tune, in 3-4 measure, beginning always on the beat with a quaver followed by a crotchet, and closing on the beat after a strong accent on the second beat; also, a dance adapted to such music; a polacca.

Porosity (n.) The quality or state of being porous; -- opposed to density.

Priory (n.) A religious house presided over by a prior or prioress; -- sometimes an offshoot of, an subordinate to, an abbey, and called also cell, and obedience. See Cell, 2.

Proof (n.) A trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination; -- called also proof sheet.

Proof (a.) Being of a certain standard as to strength; -- said of alcoholic liquors.

Pyrone (n.) An unsaturated cyclic compound, C5H4O2, of which two varieties are known, / and /. /-pyrone is the parent substance of several natural yellow dyestuffs.

Pyrocatechin (n.) A white crystalPyrochlore (n.) A niobate of calcium, cerium, and other bases, occurring usually in octahedrons of a yellowish or brownish color and resinous luster; -- so called from its becoming grass-green on being subjected to heat under the blowpipe.

Pyrogenic (a.) Producing heat; -- said of substances, as septic poisons, which elevate the temperature of the body and cause fever.

Pyrolusite (n.) Manganese dioxide, a mineral of an iron-black or dark steel-gray color and metallic luster, usually soft. Pyrolusite parts with its oxygen at a red heat, and is extensively used in discharging the brown and green tints of glass (whence its name).

Pyromorphite (n.) Native lead phosphate with lead chloride, occurring in bright green and brown hexagonal crystals and also massive; -- so called because a fused globule crystallizes in cooling.

Pyrope (n.) A variety of garnet, of a poppy or blood-red color, frequently with a tinge of orange. It is used as a gem. See the Note under Garnet.

Pyrophorous (a.) Light-producing; of or pertaining to pyrophorus.

Pyrosmalite (n.) A mineral, usually of a pale brown or of a gray or grayish green color, consisting chiefly of the hydrous silicate of iron and manganese; -- so called from the odor given off before the blowpipe.

Pyrothonide (n.) A kind of empyreumatic oil produced by the combustion of textures of hemp, Pyroxanthin (n.) A yellow crystalPyroxylic (a.) Derived from wood by distillation; -- formerly used in designating crude wood spirit.

Pyroxylin (n.) A substance resembling gun cotton in composition and properties, but distinct in that it is more highly nitrified and is soluble in alcohol, ether, etc.; -- called also pyroxyle.

Razor (v. t.) A keen-edged knife of peculiar shape, used in shaving the hair from the face or the head.

Recollect (v. t.) Reflexively, to compose one's self; to recover self-command; as, to recollect one's self after a burst of anger; -- sometimes, formerly, in the perfect participle.

Recollect (n.) A friar of the Strict Observance, -- an order of Franciscans.

Recollection (n.) The act or practice of collecting or concentrating the mind; concentration; self-control.

Recompensation (n.) Used to denote a case where a set-off pleaded by the defendant is met by a set-off pleaded by the plaintiff.

Reconcile (v. t.) To make consistent or congruous; to bring to agreement or suitableness; -- followed by with or to.

Recording (a.) Keeping a record or a register; as, a recording secretary; -- applied to numerous instruments with an automatic appliance which makes a record of their action; as, a recording gauge or telegraph.

Recoupe (v. t.) To reimburse; to indemnify; -- often used reflexively and in the passive.

Recover (v. t.) To overcome; to get the better of, -- as a state of mind or body.

Recover (v. i.) To regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; -- often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of poverty; to recover from fright.

Redoubt (n.) A small, and usually a roughly constructed, fort or outwork of varying shape, commonly erected for a temporary purpose, and without flanking defenses, -- used esp. in fortifying tops of hills and passes, and positions in hostile territory.

Redoubtable (a.) Formidable; dread; terrible to foes; as, a redoubtable hero; hence, valiant; -- often in contempt or burlesque.

Redowa (n.) A Bohemian dance of two kinds, one in triple time, like a waltz, the other in two-four time, like a polka. The former is most in use.

Reformed (a.) Retained in service on half or full pay after the disbandment of the company or troop; -- said of an officer.

Rejoin (v. t.) To state in reply; -- followed by an object clause.

Remontant (a.) Rising again; -- applied to a class of roses which bloom more than once in a season; the hybrid perpetual roses, of which the Jacqueminot is a well-known example.

Remote (superl.) Removed to a distance; not near; far away; distant; -- said in respect to time or to place; as, remote ages; remote lands.

Remote (superl.) Hence, removed; not agreeing, according, or being related; -- in various figurative uses.

Remove (n.) The transfer of one's business, or of one's domestic belongings, from one location or dwelling house to another; -- in the United States usually called a move.

Renown (v.) The state of being much known and talked of; exalted reputation derived from the extensive praise of great achievements or accomplishments; fame; celebrity; -- always in a good sense.

Repose (v.) To lay at rest; to cause to be calm or quiet; to compose; to rest, -- often reflexive; as, to repose one's self on a couch.

Repose (v.) That harmony or moderation which affords rest for the eye; -- opposed to the scattering and division of a subject into too many unconnected parts, and also to anything which is overstrained; as, a painting may want repose.

Repousse (a.) Ornamented with patterns in relief made by pressing or hammering on the reverse side; -- said of thin metal, or of a vessel made of thin metal.

Resolve (v. i.) To separate the component parts of; to reduce to the constituent elements; -- said of compound substances; hence, sometimes, to melt, or dissolve.

Resolve (v. i.) To reduce to simple or intelligible notions; -- said of complex ideas or obscure questions; to make clear or certain; to free from doubt; to disentangle; to unravel; to explain; hence, to clear up, or dispel, as doubt; as, to resolve a riddle.

Resolve (v. i.) To express, as an opinion or determination, by resolution and vote; to declare or decide by a formal vote; -- followed by a clause; as, the house resolved (or, it was resolved by the house) that no money should be apropriated (or, to appropriate no money).

Resolve (v. i.) To change or convert by resolution or formal vote; -- used only reflexively; as, the house resolved itself into a committee of the whole.

Resolved (p. p. & a.) Having a fixed purpose; determined; resolute; -- usually placed after its noun; as, a man resolved to be rich.

Resonance (n.) A prolongation or increase of any sound, either by reflection, as in a cavern or apartment the walls of which are not distant enough to return a distinct echo, or by the production of vibrations in other bodies, as a sounding-board, or the bodies of musical instruments.

Resort (v.) The act of going to, or making application; a betaking one's self; the act of visiting or seeking; recourse; as, a place of popular resort; -- often figuratively; as, to have resort to force.

Revolt (n.) To be disgusted, shocked, or grossly offended; hence, to feel nausea; -- with at; as, the stomach revolts at such food; his nature revolts at cruelty.

Revolution (n.) The motion of any body, as a planet or satellite, in a curved Revolution (n.) The motion of a point, Revolve (v. i.) To turn or roll round on, or as on, an axis, like a wheel; to rotate, -- which is the more specific word in this sense.

Revolving (a.) Making a revolution or revolutions; rotating; -- used also figuratively of time, seasons, etc., depending on the revolution of the earth.

Reconcentrado (n.) Lit., one who has been reconcentrated; specif., in Cuba, the Philippines, etc., during the revolution of 1895-98, one of the rural noncombatants who were concentrated by the military authorities in areas surrounding the fortified towns, and later were reconcentrated in the smaller limits of the towns themselves.

Reconcentration (n.) The act of reconcentrating or the state of being reconcentrated; esp., the act or policy of concentrating the rural population in or about towns and villages for convenience in political or military administration, as in Cuba during the revolution of 1895-98.

Resonator (n.) Any of various apparatus for exhibiting or utilizing the effects of resonance in connection with open circuits, as a device having an oscillating circuit which includes a helix of bare copper wire, a variable number of coils of which can be connected in circuit with a condenser and spark gap excited with an induction coil. It is used to create high-frequency electric brush discharges.

Resonator (n.) The antenna system and other high-frequency circuits of a receiving apparatus.

Rigorism (n.) Strictness in ethical principles; -- usually applied to ascetic ethics, and opposed to ethical latitudinarianism.

Ridotto (n.) A favorite Italian public entertainment, consisting of music and dancing, -- held generally on fast eves.

Rigor (n.) Stiffness of opinion or temper; rugged sternness; hardness; relentless severity; hard-heartedness; cruelty.

Rigor (n.) Exactness without allowance, deviation, or indulgence; strictness; as, the rigor of criticism; to execute a law with rigor; to enforce moral duties with rigor; -- opposed to lenity.

Rigorism (n.) Rigidity in principle or practice; strictness; -- opposed to laxity.

Rigorist (n.) One who is rigorous; -- sometimes applied to an extreme Jansenist.

Rocoa (n.) The orange-colored pulp covering the seeds of the tropical plant Bixa Orellana, from which annotto is prepared. See Annoto.

Rudolphine (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a set of astronomical tables computed by Kepler, and founded on the observations of Tycho Brahe; -- so named from Rudolph II., emperor of Germany.

Rumor (n.) A current story passing from one person to another, without any known authority for its truth; -- in this sense often personified.

Sagoin (n.) A marmoset; -- called also sagouin.

Sapotaceous (a.) Of or pertaining to a natural order (Sapotaceae) of (mostly tropical) trees and shrubs, including the star apple, the Lucuma, or natural marmalade tree, the gutta-percha tree (Isonandra), and the India mahwa, as well as the sapodilla, or sapota, after which the order is named.

Savor (n.) To have a particular smell or taste; -- with of.

Savor (n.) To partake of the quality or nature; to indicate the presence or influence; to smack; -- with of.

Savory (n.) An aromatic labiate plant (Satureia hortensis), much used in cooking; -- also called summer savory.

Savoy (n.) A variety of the common cabbage (Brassica oleracea major), having curled leaves, -- much cultivated for winter use.

Saxon (n.) Also used in the sense of Anglo-Saxon.

Saxon (n.) The language of the Saxons; Anglo-Saxon.

Saxon (a.) Anglo-Saxon.

Saxonic (a.) Relating to the Saxons or Anglo- Saxons.

Saxonism (n.) An idiom of the Saxon or Anglo-Saxon language.

Salon (n.) An apartment for the reception and exhibition of works of art; hence, an annual exhibition of paintings, sculptures, etc., held in Paris by the Society of French Artists; -- sometimes called the Old Salon. New Salon is a popular name for an annual exhibition of paintings, sculptures, etc., held in Paris at the Champs de Mars, by the Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts (National Society of Fine Arts), a body of artists who, in 1890, seceded from the Societe des Artistes Francais (Societ> Schoolmistress (n.) A woman who governs and teaches a school; a female school-teacher.

Schooner (n.) A large goblet or drinking glass, -- used for lager beer or ale.

Schottische (n.) A Scotch round dance in 2-4 time, similar to the polka, only slower; also, the music for such a dance; -- not to be confounded with the Ecossaise.

Scoop (n.) A spoon-shaped instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies.

Scooper (n.) The avocet; -- so called because it scoops up the mud to obtain food.

Scrophulariaceous (a.) Of or pertaining to a very large natural order of gamopetalous plants (Scrophulariaceae, or Scrophularineae), usually having irregular didynamous flowers and a two-celled pod. The order includes the mullein, foxglove, snapdragon, figwort, painted cup, yellow rattle, and some exotic trees, as the Paulownia.

Scrotiform (a.) Purse-shaped; pouch-shaped.

Second (n.) The second part in a concerted piece; -- often popularly applied to the alto.

Secondary (a.) Subsequent in origin; -- said of minerals produced by alteertion or deposition subsequent to the formation of the original rocks mass; also of characters of minerals (as secondary cleavage, etc.) developed by pressure or other causes.

Sego (n.) A liliaceous plant (Calochortus Nuttallii) of Western North America, and its edible bulb; -- so called by the Ute Indians and the Mormons.

Semolina (n.) The fine, hard parts of wheat, rounded by the attrition of the millstones, -- used in cookery.

Serolin (n.) A body found in fecal matter and thought to be formed in the intestines from the cholesterin of the bile; -- called also stercorin, and stercolin.

Serotine (n.) The European long-eared bat (Vesperugo serotinus).

Serotherapy (n.) Serum-therapy.

Shropshire (n.) An English breed of black-faced hornless sheep similar to the Southdown, but larger, now extensively raised in many parts of the world.

Shoo (interj.) Begone; away; -- an expression used in frightening away animals, especially fowls.

Shooi (n.) The Richardson's skua (Stercorarius parasiticus);- so called from its cry.

Shoot (v. i.) To let fly, or cause to be driven, with force, as an arrow or a bullet; -- followed by a word denoting the missile, as an object.

Shoot (v. i.) To discharge, causing a missile to be driven forth; -- followed by a word denoting the weapon or instrument, as an object; -- often with off; as, to shoot a gun.

Shoot (v. i.) To strike with anything shot; to hit with a missile; often, to kill or wound with a firearm; -- followed by a word denoting the person or thing hit, as an object.

Shoot (v. i.) To push or thrust forward; to project; to protrude; -- often with out; as, a plant shoots out a bud.

Shoot (v. i.) To cause an engine or weapon to discharge a missile; -- said of a person or an agent; as, they shot at a target; he shoots better than he rides.

Shoot (v. i.) To discharge a missile; -- said of an engine or instrument; as, the gun shoots well.

Shoot (v. i.) To be shot or propelled forcibly; -- said of a missile; to be emitted or driven; to move or extend swiftly, as if propelled; as, a shooting star.

Shooter (n.) A firearm; as, a five-shooter.

Simoon (n.) A hot, dry, suffocating, dust-laden wind, that blows occasionally in Arabia, Syria, and neighboring countries, generated by the extreme heat of the parched deserts or sandy plains.

Sinople (n.) Ferruginous quartz, of a blood-red or brownish red color, sometimes with a tinge of yellow.

Sloop (n.) A vessel having one mast and fore-and-aft rig, consisting of a boom-and-gaff mainsail, jibs, staysail, and gaff topsail. The typical sloop has a fixed bowsprit, topmast, and standing rigging, while those of a cutter are capable of being readily shifted. The sloop usually carries a centerboard, and depends for stability upon breadth of beam rather than depth of keel. The two types have rapidly approximated since 1880. One radical distinction is that a slop may carry a centerboard. Se> Smoothbore (a.) Having a bore of perfectly smooth surface; -- distinguished from rifled.

Snook (n.) A large perchlike marine food fish (Centropomus undecimalis) found both on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of tropical America; -- called also ravallia, and robalo.

Soho (interj.) Ho; -- a word used in calling from a distant place; a sportsman's halloo.

Solon (n.) A celebrated Athenian lawmaker, born about 638 b. c.; hence, a legislator; a publicist; -- often used ironically.

Sonorous (a.) Loud-sounding; giving a clear or loud sound; as, a sonorous voice.

Sonorous (a.) Impressive in sound; high-sounding.

Sonorous (a.) Sonant; vibrant; hence, of sounds produced in a cavity, deep-toned; as, sonorous rhonchi.

Sororize (v. i.) To associate, or hold fellowship, as sisters; to have sisterly feelings; -- analogous to fraternize.

Spooney (a.) Weak-minded; demonstratively fond; as, spooney lovers.

Spooney (n.) A weak-minded or silly person; one who is foolishly fond.

Spoor (n.) The track or trail of any wild animal; as, the spoor of an elephant; -- used originally by travelers in South Africa.

Stool (n.) A small channel on the side of a vessel, for the dead-eyes of the backstays.

Stool (n.) A bishop's seat or see; a bishop-stool.

Stoop (n.) Originally, a covered porch with seats, at a house door; the Dutch stoep as introduced by the Dutch into New York. Afterward, an out-of-door flight of stairs of from seven to fourteen steps, with platform and parapets, leading to an entrance door some distance above the street; the French perron. Hence, any porch, platform, entrance stairway, or small veranda, at a house door.

Strobile (n.) An individual asexually producing sexual individuals differing from itself also in other respects, as the tapeworm, -- one of the forms that occur in metagenesis.

Strockle (n.) A shovel with a turned-up edge, for frit, sand, etc.

Stroke (v. t.) The oar nearest the stern of a boat, by which the other oars are guided; -- called also stroke oar.

Stromeyerite (n.) A steel-gray mineral of metallic luster. It is a sulphide of silver and copper.

Strong (superl.) Pertaining to, or designating, a verb which forms its preterit (imperfect) by a variation in the root vowel, and the past participle (usually) by the addition of -en (with or without a change of the root vowel); as in the verbs strive, strove, striven; break, broke, broken; drink, drank, drunk. Opposed to weak, or regular. See Weak.

Strong (superl.) Applied to forms in Anglo-Saxon, etc., which retain the old declensional endings. In the Teutonic languages the vowel stems have held the original endings most firmly, and are called strong; the stems in -n are called weak other constant stems conform, or are irregular.

Strontium (n.) A radioactive isotope of strontium produced by certain nuclear reactions, and constituting one of the prominent harmful components of radioactive fallout from nuclear explosions; also called radiostrontium. It has a half-life of 28 years.

Strophulus (n.) See Red-gum, 1.

Subordinate (n.) One who stands in order or rank below another; -- distinguished from a principal.

Swoon (v. i.) To sink into a fainting fit, in which there is an apparent suspension of the vital functions and mental powers; to faint; -- often with away.

Synonym (n.) An incorrect or incorrectly applied scientific name, as a new name applied to a species or genus already properly named, or a specific name preoccupied by that of another species of the same genus; -- so used in the system of nomenclature (which see) in which the correct scientific names of certain natural groups (usually genera, species, and subspecies) are regarded as determined by priority.

Taboo (n.) A total prohibition of intercourse with, use of, or approach to, a given person or thing under pain of death, -- an interdict of religious origin and authority, formerly common in the islands of Polynesia; interdiction.

Taborite (n.) One of certain Bohemian reformers who suffered persecution in the fifteenth century; -- so called from Tabor, a hill or fortress where they encamped during a part of their struggles.

Tabouret (n.) A seat without arms or back, cushioned and stuffed: a high stool; -- so called from its resemblance to a drum.

Talon (n.) A kind of molding, concave at the bottom and convex at the top; -- usually called an ogee.

Taro (n.) A name for several aroid plants (Colocasia antiquorum, var. esculenta, Colocasia macrorhiza, etc.), and their rootstocks. They have large ovate-sagittate leaves and large fleshy rootstocks, which are cooked and used for food in tropical countries.

Tarot (n.) A game of cards; -- called also taroc.

Tatouay (n.) An armadillo (Xenurus unicinctus), native of the tropical parts of South America. It has about thirteen movable bands composed of small, nearly square, scales. The head is long; the tail is round and tapered, and nearly destitute of scales; the claws of the fore feet are very large. Called also tatouary, and broad-banded armadillo.

Telotrochous (a.) Having both a preoral and a posterior band of cilla; -- applied to the larvae of certain annelids.

Theobromine (n.) An alkaloidal ureide, C7H8N4O2, homologous with and resembling caffeine, produced artificially, and also extracted from cacao and chocolate (from Theobroma Cacao) as a bitter white crystalTheocrasy (n.) An intimate union of the soul with God in contemplation, -- an ideal of the Neoplatonists and of some Oriental mystics.

Theorica (n. pl.) Public moneys expended at Athens on festivals, sacrifices, and public entertainments (especially theatrical performances), and in gifts to the people; -- also called theoric fund.

Thionine (n.) An artificial red or violet dyestuff consisting of a complex sulphur derivative of certain aromatic diamines, and obtained as a dark crystalThiophenol (n.) A colorless mobile liquid, C6H5.SH, of an offensive odor, and analogous to phenol; -- called also phenyl sulphydrate.

Thiosulphate (n.) A salt of thiosulphuric acid; -- formerly called hyposulphite.

Thiotolene (n.) A colorless oily liquid, C4H3S.CH3, analogous to, and resembling, toluene; -- called also methyl thiophene.

Throat (n.) Hence, the passage through it to the stomach and lungs; the pharynx; -- sometimes restricted to the fauces.

Throat (n.) The upper fore corner of a boom-and-gaff sail, or of a staysail.

Throatwort (n.) A plant (Campanula Trachelium) formerly considered a remedy for sore throats because of its throat-shaped corolla.

Throb (v. i.) To beat, or pulsate, with more than usual force or rapidity; to beat in consequence of agitation; to palpitate; -- said of the heart, pulse, etc.

Thrombosis (n.) The obstruction of a blood vessel by a clot formed at the site of obstruction; -- distinguished from embolism, which is produced by a clot or foreign body brought from a distance.

Throne (n.) A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; -- a meaning given by the schoolmen.

Throstle (n.) A machine for spinning wool, cotton, etc., from the rove, consisting of a set of drawing rollers with bobbins and flyers, and differing from the mule in having the twisting apparatus stationary and the processes continuous; -- so called because it makes a singing noise.

Through (prep.) Among or in the midst of; -- used to denote passage; as, a fish swims through the water; the light glimmers through a thicket.

Throw (v. t.) To fling, cast, or hurl with a certain whirling motion of the arm, to throw a ball; -- distinguished from to toss, or to bowl.

Throw (v. t.) To bring forth; to produce, as young; to bear; -- said especially of rabbits.

Throw (v. t.) To twist two or more filaments of, as silk, so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; -- sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.

Throw (n.) The amount of vertical displacement produced by a fault; -- according to the direction it is designated as an upthrow, or a downthrow.

Tikor (n.) A starch or arrow-root made from the tubes of an East Indian zinziberaceous plant (Curcuma angustifolia); also, the plant itself.

Timothy grass () A kind of grass (Phleum pratense) with long cylindrical spikes; -- called also herd's grass, in England, cat's-tail grass, and meadow cat's-tail grass. It is much prized for fodder. See Illustration in Appendix.

Tomorn (adv.) To-morrow.

Trio (n.) The secondary, or episodical, movement of a minuet or scherzo, as in a sonata or symphony, or of a march, or of various dance forms; -- not limited to three parts or instruments.

Trionychoidea (n. pl.) A division of chelonians which comprises Trionyx and allied genera; -- called also Trionychoides, and Trionychina.

Trionyx (n.) A genus of fresh-water or river turtles which have the shell imperfectly developed and covered with a soft leathery skin. They are noted for their agility and rapacity. Called also soft tortoise, soft-shell tortoise, and mud turtle.

Trioxide (n.) An oxide containing three atoms of oxygen; as, sulphur trioxide, SO3; -- formerly called tritoxide.

Troop (n.) Soldiers, collectively; an army; -- now generally used in the plural.

Typothetae (n. pl.) Printers; -- used in the name of an association of the master printers of the United States and Canada, called The United Typothetae of America.

Tyrosin (n.) A white crystalValorization (n.) Act or process of attempting to give an arbitrary market value or price to a commodity by governmental interference, as by maintaining a purchasing fund, making loans to producers to enable them to hold their products, etc.; -- used chiefly of such action by Brazil.

Umhofo (n.) An African two-horned rhinoceros (Atelodus, / Rhinoceros, simus); -- called also chukuru, and white rhinoceros.

Unbody (v. i.) To leave the body; to be disembodied; -- said of the soul or spirit.

Unbosom (v. t.) To disclose freely; to reveal in confidence, as secrets; to confess; -- often used reflexively; as, to unbosom one's self.

Uncomely (a.) Not comely. -- adv. In an uncomely manner.

Unconscious (a.) Having no knowledge by experience; -- followed by of; as, a mule unconscious of the yoke.

Unio (n.) Any one of numerous species of fresh-water mussels belonging to Unio and many allied genera.

Unlooked (a.) Not observed or foreseen; unexpected; -- generally with for.

Unmoral (a.) Having no moral perception, quality, or relation; involving no idea of morality; -- distinguished from both moral and immoral.

Unsorted (a.) Not well selected; ill-chosen.

Unto (prep.) To; -- now used only in antiquated, formal, or scriptural style. See To.

Unwormed (a.) Not wormed; not having had the worm, or lytta, under the tongue cut out; -- said of a dog.

Unworthy (a.) Not worthy; wanting merit, value, or fitness; undeserving; worthless; unbecoming; -- often with of.

Utro () - (/). A combining form used in anatomy to indicate connection with, or relation to, the uterus; as in utro-ovarian.

Venous (a.) Contained in the veins, or having the same qualities as if contained in the veins, that is, having a dark bluish color and containing an insufficient amount of oxygen so as no longer to be fit for oxygenating the tissues; -- said of the blood, and opposed to arterial.

Veto (n.) A document or message communicating the reasons of the executive for not officially approving a proposed law; -- called also veto message.

Vidonia (n.) A dry white wine, of a tart flavor, produced in Teneriffe; -- called also Teneriffe.

Vigonia (a.) Of or pertaining to the vicu/a; characterizing the vicu/a; -- said of the wool of that animal, used in felting hats, and for other purposes.

Vigoroso (a. & adv.) Vigorous; energetic; with energy; -- a direction to perform a passage with energy and force.

Viroled (a.) Furnished with a virole or viroles; -- said of a horn or a bugle when the rings are of different tincture from the rest of the horn.

V moth () A common gray European moth (Halia vauaria) having a V-shaped spot of dark brown on each of the fore wings.

Volow (v. t.) To baptize; -- used in contempt by the Reformers.

Wahoo (n.) A certain shrub (Evonymus atropurpureus) having purple capsules which in dehiscence expose the scarlet-ariled seeds; -- called also burning bush.

Wegotism (n.) Excessive use of the pronoun we; -- called also weism.

Weroole (n.) An Australian lorikeet (Ptilosclera versicolor) noted for the variety of its colors; -- called also varied lorikeet.

Widow (v. t.) To reduce to the condition of a widow; to bereave of a husband; -- rarely used except in the past participle.

Xenomi (n. pl.) A suborder of soft-rayed fresh-water fishes of which the blackfish of Alaska (Dallia pectoralis) is the type.

Xenopterygii (n. pl.) A suborder of fishes including Gobiesox and allied genera. These fishes have soft-rayed fins, and a ventral sucker supported in front by the pectoral fins. They are destitute of scales.

Xenotime (n.) A native phosphate of yttrium occurring in yellowish-brown tetragonal crystals.

Xenon (n.) A very heavy, inert gaseous element occurring in the atmosphere in the proportion of one volume is about 20 millions. It was discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898. It can be condensed to a liquid boiling at -109? C., and to a solid which volatilizes without melting. Symbol Xe or X; atomic weight 130.2.

Xeronic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid, C8H12O4, related to fumaric acid, and obtained from citraconic acid as an oily substance having a bittersweet taste; -- so called from its tendency to form its anhydride.

Xerophilous (a.) Drought-loving; able withstand the absence or lack of moisture.

Xerophthalmia (n.) An abnormal dryness of the eyeball produced usually by long-continued inflammation and subsequent atrophy of the conjunctiva.

Xyloidin (n.) A substance resembling pyroxylin, obtained by the action of nitric acid on starch; -- called also nitramidin.

Xylophagous (a.) Eating, boring in, or destroying, wood; -- said especially of certain insect larvae, crustaceans, and mollusks.

Xylopyrography (n.) The art or practice of burning pictures on wood with a hot iron; -- called also poker painting. See Poker picture, under Poker.

Xylorcin (n.) A derivative of xylene obtained as a white crystalZamouse (n.) A West African buffalo (Bubalus brachyceros) having short horns depressed at the base, and large ears fringed internally with three rows of long hairs. It is destitute of a dewlap. Called also short-horned buffalo, and bush cow.

Zygodactylous (a.) Yoke-footed; having the toes disposed in pairs; -- applied to birds which have two toes before and two behind, as the parrot, cuckoo, woodpecker, etc.

Zygomorphous (a.) Symmetrical bilaterally; -- said of organisms, or parts of organisms, capable of division into two symmetrical halves only in a single plane.

Zygospore (n.) A spore formed by the union of several zoospores; -- called also zygozoospore.

Zymogen (n.) A mother substance, or antecedent, of an enzyme or chemical ferment; -- applied to such substances as, not being themselves actual ferments, may by internal changes give rise to a ferment.

Zymogene (n.) One of a physiological group of globular bacteria which produces fermentations of diverse nature; -- distinguished from pathogene.

Zymome (n.) A glutinous substance, insoluble in alcohol, resembling legumin; -- now called vegetable fibrin, vegetable albumin, or gluten casein.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

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