Words whose 4th letter is P

Acephala (n. pl.) That division of the Mollusca which includes the bivalve shells, like the clams and oysters; -- so called because they have no evident head. Formerly the group included the Tunicata, Brachiopoda, and sometimes the Bryozoa. See Mollusca.

Acephalocyst (n.) A larval entozoon in the form of a subglobular or oval vesicle, or hydatid, filled with fluid, sometimes found in the tissues of man and the lower animals; -- so called from the absence of a head or visible organs on the vesicle. These cysts are the immature stages of certain tapeworms. Also applied to similar cysts of different origin.

Acephalous (a.) Without a distinct head; -- a term applied to bivalve mollusks.

Adapt (v. t.) To make suitable; to fit, or suit; to adjust; to alter so as to fit for a new use; -- sometimes followed by to or for.

Adipic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, fatty or oily substances; -- applied to certain acids obtained from fats by the action of nitric acid.

Aliped (a.) Wing-footed, as the bat.

Aliphatic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, fat; fatty; -- applied to compounds having an openc-hain structure. The aliphatic compounds thus include not only the fatty acids and other derivatives of the paraffin hydrocarbons, but also unsaturated compounds, as the ethylene and acetylene series.

Anapest (n.) A metrical foot consisting of three syllables, the first two short, or unaccented, the last long, or accented (/ / -); the reverse of the dactyl. In Latin d/-/-tas, and in English in-ter-vene#, are examples of anapests.

Apophyge (n.) The small hollow curvature given to the top or bottom of the shaft of a column where it expands to meet the edge of the fillet; -- called also the scape.

Arapaima (n.) A large fresh-water food fish of South America.

Asiphonate (a.) Destitute of a siphon or breathing tube; -- said of many bivalve shells.

Auspicate (v. t.) To give a favorable turn to in commencing; to inaugurate; -- a sense derived from the Roman practice of taking the auspicium, or inspection of birds, before undertaking any important business.

Auspicious (a.) Favoring; favorable; propitious; -- applied to persons or things.

Bedplate (n.) The foundation framing or piece, by which the other parts are supported and held in place; the bed; -- called also baseplate and soleplate.

Bumptious (a.) Self-conceited; forward; pushing.

Camp (n.) A mound of earth in which potatoes and other vegetables are stored for protection against frost; -- called also burrow and pie.

Camp (v. i.) To pitch or prepare a camp; to encamp; to lodge in a camp; -- often with out.

Campaniform (a.) Bell-shaped.

Campaniliform (a.) Bell-shaped; campanulate; campaniform.

Campanula (n.) A large genus of plants bearing bell-shaped flowers, often of great beauty; -- also called bellflower.

Campanulaceous (a.) Of pertaining to, or resembling, the family of plants (Camponulaceae) of which Campanula is the type, and which includes the Canterbury bell, the harebell, and the Venus's looking-glass.

Campanularian (n.) A hydroid of the family ampanularidae, characterized by having the polyps or zooids inclosed in bell-shaped calicles or hydrothecae.

Campanulate (a.) Bell-shaped.

Camphor (n.) A gum resembling ordinary camphor, obtained from a tree (Dryobalanops camphora) growing in Sumatra and Borneo; -- called also Malay camphor, camphor of Borneo, or borneol. See Borneol.

CappeCappeak (n.) The front piece of a cap; -- now more commonly called visor.

Capper (n.) A by-bidder; a decoy for gamblers [Slang, U. S.].

Carp (v. i.) To find fault; to cavil; to censure words or actions without reason or ill-naturedly; -- usually followed by at.

Carp (n.) A fresh-water herbivorous fish (Cyprinus carpio.). Several other species of Cyprinus, Catla, and Carassius are called carp. See Cruclan carp.

Carpathian (a.) Of or pertaining to a range of mountains in Austro-Hungary, called the Carpathians, which partially inclose Hungary on the north, east, and south.

Carpellum (n.) A simple pistil or single-celled ovary or seed vessel, or one of the parts of a compound pistil, ovary, or seed vessel. See Illust of Carpaphore.

Carpetbag (n.) A portable bag for travelers; -- so called because originally made of carpet.

Carpetbagger (n.) An adventurer; -- a term of contempt for a Northern man seeking private gain or political advancement in the southern part of the United States after the Civil War (1865).

Carping (a.) Fault-finding; censorious caviling. See Captious.

Carpophagous (a.) Living on fruits; fruit-consuming.

Chaparajos (n. pl.) Overalls of sheepskin or leather, usually open at the back, worn, esp. by cowboys, to protect the legs from thorny bushes, as in the chaparral; -- called also chapareras or colloq. chaps.

Chaparajos (n. pl.) Overalls of sheepskin or leather, usually open at the back, worn, esp. by cowboys, to protect the legs from thorny bushes, as in the chaparral; -- called also chapareras or colloq. chaps.

Chap (n.) One of the jaws or the fleshy covering of a jaw; -- commonly in the plural, and used of animals, and colloquially of human beings.

Chapfallen (a.) Having the lower chap or jaw drooping, -- an indication of humiliation and dejection; crestfallen; discouraged. See Chopfallen.

Chapiter (n.) A summary in writing of such matters as are to be inquired of or presented before justices in eyre, or justices of assize, or of the peace, in their sessions; -- also called articles.

Chip (n.) Anything dried up, withered, or without flavor; -- used contemptuously.

Chipmunk (n.) A squirrel-like animal of the genus Tamias, sometimes called the striped squirrel, chipping squirrel, ground squirrel, hackee. The common species of the United States is the Tamias striatus.

Chippeways (n. pl.) A tribe of Indians formerly inhabiting the northern and western shores of Lake Superior; -- called also Objibways.

Chippy (n.) A small American sparrow (Spizella socialis), very common near dwelling; -- also called chipping bird and chipping sparrow, from its simple note.

Chop (v. t.) To cut by striking repeatedly with a sharp instrument; to cut into pieces; to mince; -- often with up.

Chop (v. t.) To sever or separate by one more blows of a sharp instrument; to divide; -- usually with off or down.

Chop (v. t.) To seize or devour greedily; -- with up.

Chop (v. i.) To interrupt; -- with in or out.

Chop (n.) A jaw of an animal; -- commonly in the pl. See Chops.

Clap (v. t.) To thrust, drive, put, or close, in a hasty or abrupt manner; -- often followed by to, into, on, or upon.

Clap (v. i.) To enter with alacrity and briskness; -- with to or into.

Clapboard (n.) A narrow board, thicker at one edge than at the other; -- used for weatherboarding the outside of houses.

Clepsine (n.) A genus of fresh-water leeches, furnished with a proboscis. They feed upon mollusks and worms.

Clip (v. i.) To move swiftly; -- usually with indefinite it.

Clip (n.) A projecting flange on the upper edge of a horseshoe, turned up so as to embrace the lower part of the hoof; -- called also toe clip and beak.

Clypeastroid (a.) Like or related to the genus Clupeaster; -- applied to a group of flattened sea urchins, with a rosette of pores on the upper side.

Clypeiform (a.) Shield-shaped; clypeate.

Compo (n.) Short for Composition; -- used, esp. in England, colloq. in various trade applications;

Corps (n.) In some countries of Europe, a form of students' social society binding the members to strict adherence to certain student customs and its code of honor; -- Ger. spelling usually korps.

Compact (p. p. & a) Composed or made; -- with of.

Compact (v. t.) To thrust, drive, or press closely together; to join firmly; to consolidate; to make close; -- as the parts which compose a body.

Companion (n.) A fellow; -- in contempt.

Company (n.) An association of persons for the purpose of carrying on some enterprise or business; a corporation; a firm; as, the East India Company; an insurance company; a joint-stock company.

Company (n.) Partners in a firm whose names are not mentioned in its style or title; -- often abbreviated in writing; as, Hottinguer & Co.

Comparative (a.) Expressing a degree greater or less than the positive degree of the quality denoted by an adjective or adverb. The comparative degree is formed from the positive by the use of -er, more, or less; as, brighter, more bright, or less bright.

Comparator (n.) An instrument or machine for comparing anything to be measured with a standard measure; -- applied especially to a machine for comparing standards of length.

Compare (v. t.) To inflect according to the degrees of comparison; to state positive, comparative, and superlative forms of; as, most adjectives of one syllable are compared by affixing "- er" and "-est" to the positive form; as, black, blacker, blackest; those of more than one syllable are usually compared by prefixing "more" and "most", or "less" and "least", to the positive; as, beautiful, more beautiful, most beautiful.

Compartment (n.) One of the sections into which the hold of a ship is divided by water-tight bulkheads.

Compass (n.) Moderate bounds, limits of truth; moderation; due limits; -- used with within.

Compass (v. t.) To inclose on all sides; to surround; to encircle; to environ; to invest; to besiege; -- used with about, round, around, and round about.

Compatible (a.) Capable of existing in harmony; congruous; suitable; not repugnant; -- usually followed by with.

Compensate (v. i.) To make amends; to supply an equivalent; -- followed by for; as, nothing can compensate for the loss of reputation.

Compensation (n.) The extinction of debts of which two persons are reciprocally debtors by the credits of which they are reciprocally creditors; the payment of a debt by a credit of equal amount; a set-off.

Compensator (n.) One who, or that which, compensates; -- a name applied to various mechanical devices.

Competent (a.) Rightfully or properly belonging; incident; -- followed by to.

Competition (n.) The act of seeking, or endeavoring to gain, what another is endeavoring to gain at the same time; common strife for the same objects; strife for superiority; emulous contest; rivalry, as for approbation, for a prize, or as where two or more persons are engaged in the same business and each seeking patronage; -- followed by for before the object sought, and with before the person or thing competed with.

Complacent (a.) Self-satisfied; contented; kindly; as, a complacent temper; a complacent smile.

Complain (v. i.) To give utterance to expression of grief, pain, censure, regret. etc.; to lament; to murmur; to find fault; -- commonly used with of. Also, to creak or squeak, as a timber or wheel.

Complaint (n.) Expression of grief, regret, pain, censure, or resentment; lamentation; murmuring; accusation; fault-finding.

Complement (v. t.) The interval wanting to complete the octave; -- the fourth is the complement of the fifth, the sixth of the third.

Complexioned (a.) Having (such) a complexion; -- used in composition; as, a dark-complexioned or a ruddy-complexioned person.

Comply (v. i.) To yield assent; to accord; agree, or acquiesce; to adapt one's self; to consent or conform; -- usually followed by with.

Compone (a.) Divided into squares of alternate tinctures in a single row; -- said of any bearing; or, in the case of a bearing having curved Comport (v. i.) To agree; to accord; to suit; -- sometimes followed by with.

Comport (v. t.) To carry; to conduct; -- with a reflexive pronoun.

Composed (a.) Free from agitation; calm; sedate; quiet; tranquil; self-possessed.

Composition (n.) A literary, musical, or artistic production, especially one showing study and care in arrangement; -- often used of an elementary essay or translation done as an educational exercise.

Compound (v. i.) To effect a composition; to come to terms of agreement; to agree; to settle by a compromise; -- usually followed by with before the person participating, and for before the thing compounded or the consideration.

Compressor (n.) An apparatus for confining or flattening between glass plates an object to be examined with the microscope; -- called also compressorium.

Compunct (a.) Affected with compunction; conscience-stricken.

Compurgation (v. t.) The act or practice of justifying or confirming a man's veracity by the oath of others; -- called also wager of law. See Purgation; also Wager of law, under Wager.

Coop (v. t.) To confine in a coop; hence, to shut up or confine in a narrow compass; to cramp; -- usually followed by up, sometimes by in.

Copperhead (n.) A poisonous American serpent (Ancistrodon conotortrix), closely allied to the rattlesnake, but without rattles; -- called also copper-belly, and red viper.

Copperworm (n.) The teredo; -- so called because it injures the bottoms of vessels, where not protected by copper.

Corporality (n.) The state of being or having a body; bodily existence; corporeality; -- opposed to spirituality.

Corporeal (a.) Having a body; consisting of, or pertaining to, a material body or substance; material; -- opposed to spiritual or immaterial.

Corpse (n.) A human body in general, whether living or dead; -- sometimes contemptuously.

Corpse (n.) The dead body of a human being; -- used also Fig.

Coup (n.) A sudden stroke; an unexpected device or stratagem; -- a term used in various ways to convey the idea of promptness and force.

Coupe (n.) A four-wheeled close carriage for two persons inside, with an outside seat for the driver; -- so called because giving the appearance of a larger carriage cut off.

Couped (a.) Cut off smoothly, as distinguished from erased; -- used especially for the head or limb of an animal. See Erased.

Couple (a.) One of the pairs of plates of two metals which compose a voltaic battery; -- called a voltaic couple or galvanic couple.

Cowpox (n.) A pustular eruptive disease of the cow, which, when communicated to the human system, as by vaccination, protects from the smallpox; vaccinia; -- called also kinepox, cowpock, and kinepock.

Crapaudine (n.) Turning on pivots at the top and bottom; -- said of a door.

Crappie (n.) A kind of fresh-water bass of the genus Pomoxys, found in the rivers of the Southern United States and Mississippi valley. There are several species.

Crepusculous (a.) Flying in the twilight or evening, or before sunrise; -- said certain birds and insects.

CryptocrystalCripple () A rocky shallow in a stream; -- a lumberman's term.

Cuppy (a.) Characterized by cup shakes; -- said of timber.

Cusp (n.) The point or horn of the crescent moon or other crescent-shaped luminary.

Cuspid (n.) One of the canine teeth; -- so called from having but one point or cusp on the crown. See Tooth.

Deep (superl.) Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; -- opposed to shallow or superficial; intricate; mysterious; not obvious; obscure; as, a deep subject or plot.

Deep (superl.) Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning.

Deep (superl.) Of low tone; full-toned; not high or sharp; grave; heavy.

Deep (superl.) Muddy; boggy; sandy; -- said of roads.

Deepness (n.) The state or quality of being deep, profound, mysterious, secretive, etc.; depth; profundity; -- opposed to shallowness.

Deiparous (a.) Bearing or bringing forth a god; -- said of the Virgin Mary.

Delphin (n.) A fatty substance contained in the oil of the dolphin and the porpoise; -- called also phocenin.

Deoperculate (a.) Having the lid removed; -- said of the capsules of mosses.

Despair (v. i.) To be hopeless; to have no hope; to give up all hope or expectation; -- often with of.

Desperate (a.) Extreme, in a bad sense; outrageous; -- used to mark the extreme predominance of a bad quality.

Despoil (v. t.) To deprive for spoil; to plunder; to rob; to pillage; to strip; to divest; -- usually followed by of.

Despondent (a.) Marked by despondence; given to despondence; low-spirited; as, a despondent manner; a despondent prisoner.

Dioptase (n.) A hydrous silicate of copper, occurring in emerald-green crystals.

Dioptrics (n.) The science of the refraction of light; that part of geometrical optics which treats of the laws of the refraction of light in passing from one medium into another, or through different mediums, as air, water, or glass, and esp. through different lenses; -- distinguished from catoptrics, which refers to reflected light.

Disparagement (n.) Injurious comparison with an inferior; a depreciating or dishonoring opinion or insinuation; diminution of value; dishonor; indignity; reproach; disgrace; detraction; -- commonly with to.

Disparity (n.) Inequality; difference in age, rank, condition, or excellence; dissimilitude; -- followed by between, in, of, as to, etc.; as, disparity in, or of, years; a disparity as to color.

Dispart (n.) A piece of metal placed on the muzzle, or near the trunnions, on the top of a piece of ordnance, to make the Dispatch (v. t.) To send off or away; -- particularly applied to sending off messengers, messages, letters, etc., on special business, and implying haste.

Dispatch (v. t.) A message dispatched or sent with speed; especially, an important official letter sent from one public officer to another; -- often used in the plural; as, a messenger has arrived with dispatches for the American minister; naval or military dispatches.

Dispense (v. t.) To exempt; to excuse; to absolve; -- with from.

Displayed (a.) With wings expanded; -- said of a bird of pray, esp. an eagle.

Displease (v. t.) To make not pleased; to excite a feeling of disapprobation or dislike in; to be disagreeable to; to offend; to vex; -- often followed by with or at. It usually expresses less than to anger, vex, irritate, or provoke.

Dispose (v. t.) To give a tendency or inclination to; to adapt; to cause to turn; especially, to incDisposition (n.) Natural or prevailing spirit, or temperament of mind, especially as shown in intercourse with one's fellow-men; temper of mind.

Dispositioned (a.) Having (such) a disposition; -- used in compounds; as, well-dispositioned.

Dispossess (v. t.) To put out of possession; to deprive of the actual occupancy of, particularly of land or real estate; to disseize; to eject; -- usually followed by of before the thing taken away; as, to dispossess a king of his crown.

Dispossession (n.) The putting out of possession, wrongfully or otherwise, of one who is in possession of a freehold, no matter in what title; -- called also ouster.

Drapery (n.) The occupation of a draper; cloth-making, or dealing in cloth.

Drop (n.) The depth of a square sail; -- generally applied to the courses only.

Drop (v. i.) To come unexpectedly; -- with in or into; as, my old friend dropped in a moment.

Dropper (n.) A dog which suddenly drops upon the ground when it sights game, -- formerly a common, and still an occasional, habit of the setter.

Dump (n.) A thick, ill-shapen piece; a clumsy leaden counter used by boys in playing chuck farthing.

Dump (v. t.) A dull, gloomy state of the mind; sadness; melancholy; low spirits; despondency; ill humor; -- now used only in the plural.

Dysprosium (n.) An element of the rare earth-group. Symbol Dy; at. wt., 162.5.

Eelpot (n.) A boxlike structure with funnel-shaped traps for catching eels; an eelbuck.

Eelpout (n.) A European fish (Zoarces viviparus), remarkable for producing living young; -- called also greenbone, guffer, bard, and Maroona eel. Also, an American species (Z. anguillaris), -- called also mutton fish, and, erroneously, congo eel, ling, and lamper eel. Both are edible, but of little value.

Eelpout (n.) A fresh-water fish, the burbot.

Eggplant (n.) A plant (Solanum Melongena), of East Indian origin, allied to the tomato, and bearing a large, smooth, edible fruit, shaped somewhat like an egg; mad-apple.

Elapse (v. i.) To slip or glide away; to pass away silently, as time; -- used chiefly in reference to time.

Elope (v. t.) To run away, or escape privately, from the place or station to which one is bound by duty; -- said especially of a woman or a man, either married or unmarried, who runs away with a paramour or a sweetheart.

Elopement (n.) The act of eloping; secret departure; -- said of a woman and a man, one or both, who run away from their homes for marriage or for cohabitation.

Enepidermic (a.) Applied to the skin without friction; -- said of medicines.

Eosphorite (n.) A hydrous phosphate of alumina and manganese. It is generally of a rose-pink color, -- whence the name.

Epiperipheral (a.) Connected with, or having its origin upon, the external surface of the body; -- especially applied to the feelings which originate at the extremities of nerves distributed on the outer surface, as the sensation produced by touching an object with the finger; -- opposed to entoperipheral.

Exoptile (n.) A name given by Lestiboudois to dicotyledons; -- so called because the plumule is naked.

Pigpecker (n.) The European garden warbler (Sylvia, / Currica, hortensis); -- called also beccafico and greater pettychaps.

Frippery (n.) Coast-off clothes.

Gamp (n.) A large umbrella; -- said to allude to Mrs. Gamp's umbrella, in Dickens's "Martin Chuzzlewit."

Gasp (v. t.) To emit or utter with gasps; -- with forth, out, away, etc.

Geophagous (a.) Earth-eating.

Gimp (n.) A narrow ornamental fabric of silk, woolen, or cotton, often with a metallic wire, or sometimes a coarse cord, running through it; -- used as trimming for dresses, furniture, etc.

Grape (n.) A well-known edible berry growing in pendent clusters or bunches on the grapevine. The berries are smooth-skinned, have a juicy pulp, and are cultivated in great quantities for table use and for making wine and raisins.

Grapeshot (n.) A cluster, usually nine in number, of small iron balls, put together by means of cast-iron circular plates at top and bottom, with two rings, and a central connecting rod, in order to be used as a charge for a cannon. Formerly grapeshot were inclosed in canvas bags.

Grapnel (n.) A small anchor, with four or five flukes or claws, used to hold boats or small vessels; hence, any instrument designed to grapple or hold; a grappling iron; a grab; -- written also grapGripe (n.) Pinching and spasmodic pain in the intestines; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Gripe (n.) An assemblage of ropes, dead-eyes, and hocks, fastened to ringbolts in the deck, to secure the boats when hoisted; also, broad bands passed around a boat to secure it at the davits and prevent swinging.

Happiness (n.) Fortuitous elegance; unstudied grace; -- used especially of language.

Happy (superl.) Experiencing the effect of favorable fortune; having the feeling arising from the consciousness of well-being or of enjoyment; enjoying good of any kind, as peace, tranquillity, comfort; contented; joyous; as, happy hours, happy thoughts.

Harp (n.) To dwell on or recur to a subject tediously or monotonously in speaking or in writing; to refer to something repeatedly or continually; -- usually with on or upon.

Harpa (n.) A genus of marine univalve shells; the harp shells; -- so called from the form of the shells, and their ornamental ribs.

Harper (n.) A brass coin bearing the emblem of a harp, -- formerly current in Ireland.

Harpsichord (n.) A harp-shaped instrument of music set horizontally on legs, like the grand piano, with strings of wire, played by the fingers, by means of keys provided with quills, instead of hammers, for striking the strings. It is now superseded by the piano.

Harpy (n.) A large and powerful, double-crested, short-winged American eagle (Thrasaetus harpyia). It ranges from Texas to Brazil.

Heap (v. t.) To collect in great quantity; to amass; to lay up; to accumulate; -- usually with up; as, to heap up treasures.

Heap (v. t.) To throw or lay in a heap; to make a heap of; to pile; as, to heap stones; -- often with up; as, to heap up earth; or with on; as, to heap on wood or coal.

Heep (n.) The hip of the dog-rose.

Help (v. t.) To furnish with relief, as in pain or disease; to be of avail against; -- sometimes with of before a word designating the pain or disease, and sometimes having such a word for the direct object.

Helpless (a.) Unsupplied; destitute; -- with of.

Herpes (n.) An eruption of the skin, taking various names, according to its form, or the part affected; especially, an eruption of vesicles in small distinct clusters, accompanied with itching or tingling, including shingles, ringworm, and the like; -- so called from its tendency to creep or spread from one part of the skin to another.

Hippe (n.) A genus of marine decapod crustaceans, which burrow rapidly in the sand by pushing themselves backward; -- called also bait bug. See Illust. under Anomura.

Hipparion (n.) An extinct genus of Tertiary mammals allied to the horse, but three-toed, having on each foot a small lateral hoof on each side of the main central one. It is believed to be one of the ancestral genera of the Horse family.

Hippocampus (n.) A fabulous monster, with the head and fore quarters of a horse joined to the tail of a dolphin or other fish (Hippocampus brevirostris), -- seen in Pompeian paintings, attached to the chariot of Neptune.

Hippocampus (n.) A genus of lophobranch fishes of several species in which the head and neck have some resemblance to those of a horse; -- called also sea horse.

Hippocrepian (n.) One of an order of fresh-water Bryozoa, in which the tentacles are on a lophophore, shaped like a horseshoe. See Phylactolaema.

Hippophagous (a.) Feeding on horseflesh; -- said of certain nomadic tribes, as the Tartars.

Hippurite (n.) A fossil bivalve mollusk of the genus Hippurites, of many species, having a conical, cup-shaped under valve, with a flattish upper valve or lid. Hippurites are found only in the Cretaceous rocks.

Hoop (n.) A circle, or combination of circles, of thin whalebone, metal, or other elastic material, used for expanding the skirts of ladies' dresses; crinoHoop (n.) A quart pot; -- so called because originally bound with hoops, like a barrel. Also, a portion of the contents measured by the distance between the hoops.

Hooper (n.) The European whistling, or wild, swan (Olor cygnus); -- called also hooper swan, whooping swan, and elk.

Hopper (n.) A chute, box, or receptacle, usually funnel-shaped with an opening at the lower part, for delivering or feeding any material, as to a machine; as, the wooden box with its trough through which grain passes into a mill by joining or shaking, or a funnel through which fuel passes into a furnace, or coal, etc., into a car.

Hopper (n.) A vessel for carrying waste, garbage, etc., out to sea, so constructed as to discharge its load by a mechanical contrivance; -- called also dumping scow.

Hopple (n.) A fetter for horses, or cattle, when turned out to graze; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Hump (v. t.) To form into a hump; to make hump-shaped; to hunch; -- often with up.

Hump (v. t.) To bend or gather together for strenuous effort, as in running; to do or effect by such effort; to exert; -- usually reflexively or with it; as, you must hump yourself.

Inapathy (n.) Sensibility; feeling; -- opposed to apathy.

Inappropriate (a.) Not instrument (to); not appropriate; unbecoming; unsuitable; not specially fitted; -- followed by to or for.

Inoperculate (a.) Having no operculum; -- said of certain gastropod shells.

Inspiration (n.) The act of inspiring or breathing in; breath; specif. (Physiol.), the drawing of air into the lungs, accomplished in mammals by elevation of the chest walls and flattening of the diaphragm; -- the opposite of expiration.

Inspire (v. t.) To draw in by the operation of breathing; to inhale; -- opposed to expire.

Inspire (v. i.) To draw in breath; to inhale air into the lungs; -- opposed to expire.

Inspired (a.) Communicated or given as by supernatural or divine inspiration; having divine authority; hence, sacred, holy; -- opposed to uninspired, profane, or secular; as, the inspired writings, that is, the Scriptures.

Isopoda (n. pl.) An order of sessile-eyed Crustacea, usually having seven pairs of legs, which are all similar in structure.

Isopodiform (a.) Having the shape of an isopod; -- said of the larvae of certain insects.

Isopogonous (a.) Having the two webs equal in breath; -- said of feathers.

Jumper (n.) an instrument for boring holes in rocks by percussion without hammering, consisting of a bar of iron with a chisel-edged steel tip at one or both ends, operated by striking it against the rock, turning it slightly with each blow.

Jump (v. i.) To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; -- followed by with.

Jumper (n.) A rude kind of sleigh; -- usually, a simple box on runners which are in one piece with the poles that form the thills.

Kamptulicon (n.) A kind of elastic floor cloth, made of India rubber, gutta-percha, linseed oil, and powdered cork.

Karpholite (n.) A fibrous mineral occurring in tufts of a straw-yellow color. It is a hydrous silicate of alumina and manganese.

Keep (v. i.) To be in session; as, school keeps to-day.

Kelp (n.) The calcined ashes of seaweed, -- formerly much used in the manufacture of glass, now used in the manufacture of iodine.

Kipper (n.) A salmon split open, salted, and dried or smoked; -- so called because salmon after spawning were usually so cured, not being good when fresh.

Kipper (a.) Amorous; also, lively; light-footed; nimble; gay; sprightly.

Klipspringer (n.) A small, graceful South African antelope (Nanotragus oreotragus), which, like the chamois, springs from one crag to another with great agility; -- called also kainsi.

Knapweed (n.) The black centaury (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the knoblike heads of flowers. Called also bullweed.

Knop (n.) Any boldly projecting sculptured ornament; esp., the ornamental termination of a pinnacle, and then synonymous with finial; -- called also knob, and knosp.

Knoppern (n.) A kind of gall produced by a gallfly on the cup of an acorn, -- used in tanning and dyeing.

Krypton (n.) An inert gaseous element of the argon group, occurring in air to the extent of about one volume in a million. It was discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898. Liquefying point, -- 152? C.; symbol, Kr; atomic weight, 83.0.

Lamp (n.) A light-producing vessel, instrument or apparatus; especially, a vessel with a wick used for the combustion of oil or other inflammable liquid, for the purpose of producing artificial light.

Lampas (n.) An inflammation and swelling of the soft parts of the roof of the mouth immediately behind the fore teeth in the horse; -- called also lampers.

Lampic (a.) Pertaining to, or produced by, a lamp; -- formerly said of a supposed acid.

Lamprey (n.) An eel-like marsipobranch of the genus Petromyzon, and allied genera. The lampreys have a round, sucking mouth, without jaws, but set with numerous minute teeth, and one to three larger teeth on the palate (see Illust. of Cyclostomi). There are seven small branchial openings on each side.

Leap year () Bissextile; a year containing 366 days; every fourth year which leaps over a day more than a common year, giving to February twenty-nine days. See Bissextile.

Limpet (n.) Any species of Siphonaria, a genus of limpet-shaped Pulmonifera, living between tides, on rocks.

Lipped (a.) Having a lip or lips; having a raised or rounded edge resembling the lip; -- often used in composition; as, thick-lipped, thin-lipped, etc.

Lippitude (n.) Soreness of eyes; the state of being blear-eyed; blearedness.

Lisp (v. i.) To pronounce the sibilant letter s imperfectly; to give s and z the sound of th; -- a defect common among children.

Loop (n.) The portion of a vibrating string, air column, etc., between two nodes; -- called also ventral segment.

Loop (v. t.) To make a loop of or in; to fasten with a loop or loops; -- often with up; as, to loop a string; to loop up a curtain.

Lumper (n.) The European eelpout; -- called also lumpen.

Lumpfish (n.) A large, thick, clumsy, marine fish (Cyclopterus lumpus) of Europe and America. The color is usually translucent sea green, sometimes purplish. It has a dorsal row of spiny tubercles, and three rows on each side, but has no scales. The ventral fins unite and form a ventral sucker for adhesion to stones and seaweeds. Called also lumpsucker, cock-paddle, sea owl.

Lymphadenitis (n.) Inflammation of the lymphatic glands; -- called also lymphitis.

Lymphoma (n.) A tumor having a structure resembling that of a lymphatic gland; -- called also lymphadenoma.

Maypole (n.) A tall pole erected in an open place and wreathed with flowers, about which the rustic May-day sports were had.

Mesprise (n.) Misadventure; ill-success.

Morphine (n.) A bitter white crystalMorphogeny (n.) History of the evolution of forms; that part of ontogeny that deals with the germ history of forms; -- distinguished from physiogeny.

Neaped (a.) Left aground on the height of a spring tide, so that it will not float till the next spring tide; -- called also beneaped.

Neophyte (n.) A new convert or proselyte; -- a name given by the early Christians, and still given by the Roman Catholics, to such as have recently embraced the Christian faith, and been admitted to baptism, esp. to converts from heathenism or Judaism.

Neoplatonism (n.) A pantheistic eclectic school of philosophy, of which Plotinus was the chief (A. D. 205-270), and which sought to reconcile the Platonic and Aristotelian systems with Oriental theosophy. It tended to mysticism and theurgy, and was the last product of Greek philosophy.

Nippers (n. pl.) A number of rope-yarns wound together, used to secure a cable to the messenger.

Nippitate (a.) Peculiary strong and good; -- said of ale or liquor.

Nipplewort (n.) A yellow-flowered composite herb (Lampsana communis), formerly used as an external application to the nipples of women; -- called also dock-cress.

Nonpareil (a.) Something of unequaled excellence; a peerless thing or person; a nonesuch; -- often used as a name.

Nonplane (a.) Not lying in one plane; -- said of certain curves.

Nonprossed (imp. & p. p.) of Non-pros

Nymph (n.) Any one of a subfamily (Najades) of butterflies including the purples, the fritillaries, the peacock butterfly, etc.; -- called also naiad.

Nymphales (n. pl.) An extensive family of butterflies including the nymphs, the satyrs, the monarchs, the heliconias, and others; -- called also brush-footed butterflies.

Ocypodian (n.) One of a tribe of crabs which live in holes in the sand along the seashore, and run very rapidly, -- whence the name.

Onappo (n.) A nocturnal South American monkey (Callithrix discolor), noted for its agility; -- called also ventriloquist monkey.

Ovipara (n. pl.) An artifical division of vertebrates, including those that lay eggs; -- opposed to Vivipara.

Oviparous (a.) Producing young from rggs; as, an oviparous animal, in which the egg is generally separated from the animal, and hatched after exclusion; -- opposed to viviparous.

Oviposit (v. i.) To lay or deposit eggs; -- said esp. of insects.

Palpicorn (n.) One of a group of aquatic beetles (Palpicornia) having short club-shaped antennae, and long maxillary palpi.

Palpitate (v. i.) To beat rapidly and more strongly than usual; to throb; to bound with emotion or exertion; to pulsate violently; to flutter; -- said specifically of the heart when its action is abnormal, as from excitement.

Pampiniform (a.) In the form of tendrils; -- applied especially to the spermatic and ovarian veins.

Paspy (n.) A kind of minuet, in triple time, of French origin, popular in the reign of Queen Elizabeth and for some time after; -- called also passing measure, and passymeasure.

People (n.) Persons, generally; an indefinite number of men and women; folks; population, or part of population; as, country people; -- sometimes used as an indefinite subject or verb, like on in French, and man in German; as, people in adversity.

Pepper (n.) A well-known, pungently aromatic condiment, the dried berry, either whole or powdered, of the Piper nigrum.

Pepperer (n.) A grocer; -- formerly so called because he sold pepper.

Peppergrass (n.) Any herb of the cruciferous genus Lepidium, especially the garden peppergrass, or garden cress, Lepidium sativum; -- called also pepperwort. All the species have a pungent flavor.

Pepperidge (n.) A North American tree (Nyssa multiflora) with very tough wood, handsome oval polished leaves, and very acid berries, -- the sour gum, or common tupelo. See Tupelo.

Peppermint (n.) A volatile oil (oil of peppermint) distilled from the fresh herb; also, a well-known essence or spirit (essence of peppermint) obtained from it.

Peppery (a.) Fig.: Hot-tempered; passionate; choleric.

Perpender (n.) A large stone reaching through a wall so as to appear on both sides of it, and acting as a binder; -- called also perbend, perpend stone, and perpent stone.

Perpetration (n.) The act of perpetrating; a doing; -- commonly used of doing something wrong, as a crime.

Pimpillo (n.) A West Indian name for the prickly pear (Opuntia); -- called also pimploes.

Pitpan (n.) A long, flat-bottomed canoe, used for the navigation of rivers and lagoons in Central America.

Pluperfect (a.) More than perfect; past perfect; -- said of the tense which denotes that an action or event was completed at or before the time of another past action or event.

Pompadour (n.) A crimson or pink color; also, a style of dress cut low and square in the neck; also, a mode of dressing the hair by drawing it straight back from the forehead over a roll; -- so called after the Marchioness de Pompadour of France. Also much used adjectively.

Pompano (n.) Any one of several species of marine fishes of the genus Trachynotus, of which four species are found on the Atlantic coast of the United States; -- called also palometa.

Porphyritic (a.) Relating to, or resembling, porphyry, that is, characterized by the presence of distinct crystals, as of feldspar, quartz, or augite, in a relatively fine-grained base, often aphanitic or cryptocrystalPorphyry (n.) A term used somewhat loosely to designate a rock consisting of a fine-grained base (usually feldspathic) through which crystals, as of feldspar or quartz, are disseminated. There are red, purple, and green varieties, which are highly esteemed as marbles.

Porpita (n.) A genus of bright-colored Siphonophora found floating in the warmer parts of the ocean. The individuals are round and disk-shaped, with a large zooid in the center of the under side, surrounded by smaller nutritive and reproductive zooids, and by slender dactylozooids near the margin. The disk contains a central float, or pneumatocyst.

Porpoise (n.) A true dolphin (Delphinus); -- often so called by sailors.

Prepense (v. t.) Devised, contrived, or planned beforehand; preconceived; premeditated; aforethought; -- usually placed after the word it qualifies; as, malice prepense.

Preponderant (a.) Preponderating; outweighing; overbalancing; -- used literally and figuratively; as, a preponderant weight; of preponderant importance.

Preposition (n.) A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Prepossession (n.) Preoccupation of the mind by an opinion, or impression, already formed; preconceived opinion; previous impression; bias; -- generally, but not always, used in a favorable sense; as, the prepossessions of childhood.

Propagable (a.) Capable of being spread or extended by any means; -- said of tenets, doctrines, or principles.

Propaganda (n.) The college of the Propaganda, instituted by Urban VIII. (1623-1644) to educate priests for missions in all parts of the world.

Propagate (v. t.) To cause to continue or multiply by generation, or successive production; -- applied to animals and plants; as, to propagate a breed of horses or sheep; to propagate a species of fruit tree.

Propane (n.) A heavy gaseous hydrocarbon, C3H8, of the paraffin series, occurring naturally dissolved in crude petroleum, and also made artificially; -- called also propyl hydride.

Proper (a.) Pertaining to one of a species, but not common to the whole; not appellative; -- opposed to common; as, a proper name; Dublin is the proper name of a city.

Proper (a.) Represented in its natural color; -- said of any object used as a charge.

Prophetical (a.) Containing, or pertaining to, prophecy; foretelling events; as, prophetic writings; prophetic dreams; -- used with of before the thing foretold.

Propidene (n.) The unsymmetrical hypothetical hydrocarbon radical, CH3.CH2.CH, analogous to ethylidene, and regarded as the type of certain derivatives of propane; -- called also propylidene.

Propithecus (n.) A genus including the long-tailed, or diadem, indris. See Indris.

Propitiatory (n.) The mercy seat; -- so called because a symbol of the propitiated Jehovah.

Propitious (a.) Hence, kind; gracious; merciful; helpful; -- said of a person or a divinity.

Proportion (n.) The equality or similarity of ratios, especially of geometrical ratios; or a relation among quantities such that the quotient of the first divided by the second is equal to that of the third divided by the fourth; -- called also geometrical proportion, in distinction from arithmetical proportion, or that in which the difference of the first and second is equal to the difference of the third and fourth.

Pulpiteer (n.) One who speaks in a pulpit; a preacher; -- so called in contempt.

Pumpkin (n.) A well-known trailing plant (Cucurbita pepo) and its fruit, -- used for cooking and for feeding stock; a pompion.

Puppet (n.) One controlled in his action by the will of another; a tool; -- so used in contempt.

Purple (a.) Imperial; regal; -- so called from the color having been an emblem of imperial authority.

Purple (a.) Blood-red; bloody.

Purport (n.) To intend to show; to intend; to mean; to signify; to import; -- often with an object clause or infinitive.

Purpose (v. t.) To propose, as an aim, to one's self; to determine upon, as some end or object to be accomplished; to intend; to design; to resolve; -- often followed by an infinitive or dependent clause.

Purpure (n.) Purple, -- represented in engraving by diagonal Purpuric (a.) Pertaining to or designating, a nitrogenous acid contained in uric acid. It is not known in the pure state, but forms well-known purple-red compounds (as murexide), whence its name.

Purpuriparous (a.) Producing, or connected with, a purple-colored secretion; as, the purpuriparous gland of certain gastropods.

Rampacious (a.) High-spirited; rampageous.

Rampant (v.) Rising with fore paws in the air as if attacking; -- said of a beast of prey, especially a lion. The right fore leg and right hind leg should be raised higher than the left.

Rampion (n.) A plant (Campanula Rapunculus) of the Bellflower family, with a tuberous esculent root; -- also called ramps.

Rapparee (n.) A wild Irish plunderer, esp. one of the 17th century; -- so called from his carrying a half-pike, called a rapary.

Raspberry (n.) The thimble-shaped fruit of the Rubus Idaeus and other similar brambles; as, the black, the red, and the white raspberry.

Reap (v. t.) To gather; to obtain; to receive as a reward or harvest, or as the fruit of labor or of works; -- in a good or a bad sense; as, to reap a benefit from exertions.

Respondent (n.) One who answers in certain suits or proceedings, generally those which are not according to the course of the common law, as in equity and admiralty causes, in petitions for partition, and the like; -- distinquished from appellant.

Respondent (n.) One who maintains a thesis in reply, and whose province it is to refute objections, or overthrow arguments; -- distinguished from opponent.

Responsion (n.) The first university examination; -- called also little go. See under Little, a.

Rhaphides (n. pl.) Minute transparent, often needle-shaped, crystals found in the tissues of plants.

Rhapsody (n.) A recitation or song of a rhapsodist; a portion of an epic poem adapted for recitation, or usually recited, at one time; hence, a division of the Iliad or the Odyssey; -- called also a book.

Rhyparography (n.) In ancient art, the painting of genre or still-life pictures.

Rump (n.) The hind or tail end; a fag-end; a remnant.

Salpa (n.) A genus of transparent, tubular, free-swimming oceanic tunicates found abundantly in all the warmer latitudes. See Illustration in Appendix.

Samphire (n.) The species of glasswort (Salicornia herbacea); -- called in England marsh samphire.

Sapphic (a.) Belonging to, or in the manner of, Sappho; -- said of a certain kind of verse reputed to have been invented by Sappho, consisting of five feet, of which the first, fourth, and fifth are trochees, the second is a spondee, and the third a dactyl.

Sappho (n.) Any one of several species of brilliant South American humming birds of the genus Sappho, having very bright-colored and deeply forked tails; -- called also firetail.

Scaphite (n.) Any fossil cephalopod shell of the genus Scaphites, belonging to the Ammonite family and having a chambered boat-shaped shell. Scaphites are found in the Cretaceous formation.

Scaphocephaly (n.) A deformed condition of the skull, in which the vault is narrow, elongated, and more or less boat-shaped.

Scaphoid (a.) Resembling a boat in form; boat-shaped.

Scepterellate (a.) Having a straight shaft with whorls of spines; -- said of certain sponge spicules. See Illust. under Spicule.

Scupper (v.) An opening cut through the waterway and bulwarks of a ship, so that water falling on deck may flow overboard; -- called also scupper hole.

Scyphiform (a.) Cup-shaped.

Scyphophori (n. pl.) An order of fresh-water fishes inhabiting tropical Africa. They have rudimentary electrical organs on each side of the tail.

Scyphus (n.) A kind of large drinking cup, -- used by Greeks and Romans, esp. by poor folk.

Scyphus (n.) A cup-shaped stem or podetium in lichens. Also called scypha. See Illust. of Cladonia pyxidata, under Lichen.

Sempervivum (n.) A genus of fleshy-leaved plants, of which the houseleek (Sempervivum tectorum) is the commonest species.

Seppuku (n.) Same as Hara-kiri.

Serpent (n.) A bass wind instrument, of a loud and coarse tone, formerly much used in military bands, and sometimes introduced into the orchestra; -- so called from its form.

Serpentarius (n.) A constellation on the equator, lying between Scorpio and Hercules; -- called also Ophiuchus.

Serpentine (n.) A mineral or rock consisting chiefly of the hydrous silicate of magnesia. It is usually of an obscure green color, often with a spotted or mottled appearance resembling a serpent's skin. Precious, or noble, serpentine is translucent and of a rich oil-green color.

Serpiginous (a.) Creeping; -- said of lesions which heal over one portion while continuing to advance at another.

Serpula (n.) Any one of numerous species of tubicolous annelids of the genus Serpula and allied genera of the family Serpulidae. They secrete a calcareous tube, which is usually irregularly contorted, but is sometimes spirally coiled. The worm has a wreath of plumelike and often bright-colored gills around its head, and usually an operculum to close the aperture of its tube when it retracts.

Shop (n.) A person's occupation, business, profession, or the like, as a subject of attention, interest, conversation, etc.; -- generally in deprecation.

Shapeless (a.) Destitute of shape or regular form; wanting symmetry of dimensions; misshapen; -- opposed to shapely.

Shapely (superl.) Well-formed; having a regular shape; comely; symmetrical.

Ship (v. i.) To engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war.

Shipboard (n.) A ship's side; hence, by extension, a ship; -- found chiefly in adverbial phrases; as, on shipboard; a shipboard.

Shipworm (n.) Any long, slender, worm-shaped bivalve mollusk of Teredo and allied genera. The shipworms burrow in wood, and are destructive to wooden ships, piles of wharves, etc. See Teredo.

Shopkeeper (n.) A trader who sells goods in a shop, or by retail; -- in distinction from one who sells by wholesale.

Simpai (n.) A long-tailed monkey (Semnopitchecus melalophus) native of Sumatra. It has a crest of black hair. The forehead and cheeks are fawn color, the upper parts tawny and red, the under parts white. Called also black-crested monkey, and sinpae.

Simper (n.) A constrained, self-conscious smile; an affected, silly smile; a smirk.

Simple (a.) Consisting of a single individual or zooid; as, a simple ascidian; -- opposed to compound.

Simple (a.) A medicinal plant; -- so called because each vegetable was supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy.

Skip (v. i.) To leap lightly; to move in leaps and hounds; -- commonly implying a sportive spirit.

Skip (v. i.) Fig.: To leave matters unnoticed, as in reading, speaking, or writing; to pass by, or overlook, portions of a thing; -- often followed by over.

Skipjack (n.) A shallow sailboat with a rectiSkipper (n.) Any one of numerous species of small butterflies of the family Hesperiadae; -- so called from their peculiar short, jerking flight.

Slapeface (n.) A soft-spoken, crafty hypocrite.

Slip (n.) To move or fly (out of place); to shoot; -- often with out, off, etc.; as, a bone may slip out of its place.

Snipe (v. i.) To shoot at detached men of an enemy's forces at long range, esp. when not in action; -- often with at.

Slip (n.) A leash or string by which a dog is held; -- so called from its being made in such a manner as to slip, or become loose, by relaxation of the hand.

Slop (n.) Mean and weak drink or liquid food; -- usually in the plural.

Slop (n.) Dirty water; water in which anything has been washed or rinsed; water from wash-bowls, etc.

Slop (v. i.) To overflow or be spilled as a liquid, by the motion of the vessel containing it; -- often with over.

Slop (v. i.) Ready-made clothes; also, among seamen, clothing, bedding, and other furnishings.

Slopseller (n.) One who sells slops, or ready-made clothes. See 4th Slop, 3.

Slopshop (n.) A shop where slops. or ready-made clothes, are sold.

Slopwork (n.) The manufacture of slops, or cheap ready-made clothing; also, such clothing; hence, hasty, slovenly work of any kind.

Snap (n.) To break upon suddenly with sharp, angry words; to treat snappishly; -- usually with up.

Snap (v. i.) To make an effort to bite; to aim to seize with the teeth; to catch eagerly (at anything); -- often with at; as, a dog snapsat a passenger; a fish snaps at the bait.

Snap (v. i.) To utter sharp, harsh, angry words; -- often with at; as, to snap at a child.

Snap (v. t.) A sudden severe interval or spell; -- applied to the weather; as, a cold snap.

Snap (v. t.) A thin, crisp cake, usually small, and flavored with ginger; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Snaphance (n.) A trifling or second-rate thing or person.

Snipefish (n.) A long, slender deep-sea fish (Nemichthys scolopaceus) with a slender beak.

Soapberry tree () Any tree of the genus Sapindus, esp. Sapindus saponaria, the fleshy part of whose fruit is used instead of soap in washing Soapfish (n.) Any serranoid fish of the genus Rhypticus; -- so called from the soapy feeling of its skin.

Soapwort (n.) A common plant (Saponaria officinalis) of the Pink family; -- so called because its bruised leaves, when agitated in water, produce a lather like that from soap. Called also Bouncing Bet.

Soup (n.) A liquid food of many kinds, usually made by boiling meat and vegetables, or either of them, in water, -- commonly seasoned or flavored; strong broth.

Stapes (n.) The innermost of the ossicles of the ear; the stirrup, or stirrup bone; -- so called from its form. See Illust. of Ear.

Stephanite (n.) A sulphide of antimony and silver of an iron-black color and metallic luster; called also black silver, and brittle silver ore.

Stop (n.) Some part of the articulating organs, as the lips, or the tongue and palate, closed (a) so as to cut off the passage of breath or voice through the mouth and the nose (distinguished as a lip-stop, or a front-stop, etc., as in p, t, d, etc.), or (b) so as to obstruct, but not entirely cut off, the passage, as in l, n, etc.; also, any of the consonants so formed.

Stopped (a.) Made by complete closure of the mouth organs; shut; -- said of certain consonants (p, b, t, d, etc.).

Stopper (n.) A short piece of rope having a knot at one or both ends, with a lanyard under the knot, -- used to secure something.

Stupid (a.) Very dull; insensible; senseless; wanting in understanding; heavy; sluggish; in a state of stupor; -- said of persons.

Stupid (a.) Resulting from, or evincing, stupidity; formed without skill or genius; dull; heavy; -- said of things.

Sulphacid (n.) An acid in which, to a greater or less extent, sulphur plays a part analogous to that of oxygen in an oxyacid; thus, thiosulphuric and sulpharsenic acids are sulphacids; -- called also sulphoacid. See the Note under Acid, n., 2.

Sulphide (n.) A binary compound of sulphur, or one so regarded; -- formerly called sulphuret.

Sulphindigotic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a sulphonic acid obtained, as a blue solution, by dissolving indigo in sulphuric acid; -- formerly called also cerulic sulphuric acid, but properly called indigo-disulphonic acid.

Sulphion (n.) A hypothetical radical, SO4, regarded as forming the acid or negative constituent of sulphuric acid and the sulphates in electrolytic decomposition; -- so called in accordance with the binary theory of salts.

Sulphocyanate (n.) A salt of sulphocyanic acid; -- also called thiocyanate, and formerly inaccurately sulphocyanide.

Sulphonic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, a sulphone; -- used specifically to designate any one of a series of acids (regarded as acid ethereal salts of sulphurous acid) obtained by the oxidation of the mercaptans, or by treating sulphuric acid with certain aromatic bases (as benzene); as, phenyl sulphonic acid, C6H5.SO2.OH, a stable colorless crystalSulphostannic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a sulphacid of tin (more exactly called metasulphostannic acid), which is obtained as a dark brown amorphous substance, H/SnS/, forming a well-known series of salts.

Sulphuryl (n.) The hypothetical radical SO2; -- called also sulphon.

Sumpitan (n.) A kind of blowgun for discharging arrows, -- used by the savages of Borneo and adjacent islands.

Supply (v. t.) To fill up, or keep full; to furnish with what is wanted; to afford, or furnish with, a sufficiency; as, rivers are supplied by smaller streams; an aqueduct supplies an artificial lake; -- often followed by with before the thing furnished; as, to supply a furnace with fuel; to supply soldiers with ammunition.

Supply (n.) The food, and the like, which meets the daily necessities of an army or other large body of men; store; -- used chiefly in the plural; as, the army was discontented for lack of supplies.

Suppression (n.) Complete stoppage of a natural secretion or excretion; as, suppression of urine; -- used in contradiction to retention, which signifies that the secretion or excretion is retained without expulsion.

Surprise (n.) To lead (one) to do suddenly and without forethought; to bring (one) into some unexpected state; -- with into; as, to be surprised into an indiscretion; to be surprised into generosity.

Suspect (a.) One who, or that which, is suspected; an object of suspicion; -- formerly applied to persons and things; now, only to persons suspected of crime.

Suspect (v. t.) To imagine to exist; to have a slight or vague opinion of the existence of, without proof, and often upon weak evidence or no evidence; to mistrust; to surmise; -- commonly used regarding something unfavorable, hurtful, or wrong; as, to suspect the presence of disease.

Swap (v. i.) To strike; -- with off.

Sylph (n.) Any one of several species of very brilliant South American humming birds, having a very long and deeply-forked tail; as, the blue-tailed sylph (Cynanthus cyanurus).

Sympathetic (a.) Produced by sympathy; -- applied particularly to symptoms or affections. See Sympathy.

Sympathy (n.) Feeling corresponding to that which another feels; the quality of being affected by the affection of another, with feelings correspondent in kind, if not in degree; fellow-feeling.

Symphyseotomy (n.) The operation of dividing the symphysis pubis for the purpose of facilitating labor; -- formerly called the Sigualtian section.

Symplectic (a.) Plaiting or joining together; -- said of a bone next above the quadrate in the mandibular suspensorium of many fishes, which unites together the other bones of the suspensorium.

Symposium (n.) A collection of short essays by different authors on a common topic; -- so called from the appellation given to the philosophical dialogue by the Greeks.

Syrphus fly () Any one of numerous species of dipterous flies of the genus Syrphus and allied genera. They are usually bright-colored, with yellow bands, and hover around plants. The larvae feed upon plant lice, and are, therefore, very beneficial to agriculture.

Tapper (n.) The lesser spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopus minor); -- called also tapperer, tabberer, little wood pie, barred woodpecker, wood tapper, hickwall, and pump borer.

Temperature (n.) The degree of heat of the body of a living being, esp. of the human body; also (Colloq.), loosely, the excess of this over the normal (of the human body 98?-99.5? F., in the mouth of an adult about 98.4?).

Temper (n.) Heat of mind or passion; irritation; proneness to anger; -- in a reproachful sense.

Tempered (a.) Brought to a proper temper; as, tempered steel; having (such) a temper; -- chiefly used in composition; as, a good-tempered or bad-tempered man; a well-tempered sword.

Temporal (n.) Anything temporal or secular; a temporality; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Temporality (n.) The state or quality of being temporary; -- opposed to perpetuity.

Temporality (n.) That which pertains to temporal welfare; material interests; especially, the revenue of an ecclesiastic proceeding from lands, tenements, or lay fees, tithes, and the like; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Temporariness (n.) The quality or state of being temporary; -- opposed to perpetuity.

Tipper (n.) A kind of ale brewed with brackish water obtained from a particular well; -- so called from the first brewer of it, one Thomas Tipper.

Tippet (n.) A cape, or scarflike garment for covering the neck, or the neck and shoulders, -- usually made of fur, cloth, or other warm material.

Tipping (n.) A distinct articulation given in playing quick notes on the flute, by striking the tongue against the roof of the mouth; double-tonguing.

Tippler (n.) One who keeps a tippling-house.

Torpedo (n.) A kind of small submarine boat carrying an explosive charge, and projected from a ship against another ship at a distance, or made self-propelling, and otherwise automatic in its action against a distant ship.

Torpedo (n.) A kind of detonating cartridge or shell placed on a rail, and exploded when crushed under the locomotive wheels, -- used as an alarm signal.

Topper (n.) A three-square float (file) used by comb makers.

Topper (n.) Tobacco left in the bottom of a pipe bowl; -- so called from its being often taken out and placed on top of the newly filled bowl. Also, a cigar stump.

Tripitaka (n.) The three divisions, or "baskets" (pitakas), of buddhist scriptures, -- the Vinayapitaka [Skr. Vinayapi/aka] , or Basket of DiscipTriplex (a.) Havingthree principal operative parts or motions, so as to produce a three-fold effect.

Trap (v. t.) To dress with ornaments; to adorn; -- said especially of horses.

Trap (n.) An old term rather loosely used to designate various dark-colored, heavy igneous rocks, including especially the feldspathic-augitic rocks, basalt, dolerite, amygdaloid, etc., but including also some kinds of diorite. Called also trap rock.

Trapdoor (n.) A door in a level for regulating the ventilating current; -- called also weather door.

Trapeze (n.) A swinging horizontal bar, suspended at each end by a rope; -- used by gymnasts.

Trapezohedron (n.) A solid bounded by twenty-four equal and similar trapeziums; a tetragonal trisoctahedron. See the Note under Trisoctahedron.

Trapezoid (n.) A plane four-sided figure, having two sides parallel to each other.

Traphole (n.) See Trou-de-loup.

Trepan (n.) A crown-saw or cylindrical saw for perforating the skull, turned, when used, like a bit or gimlet. See Trephine.

Trepang (n.) Any one of several species of large holothurians, some of which are dried and extensively used as food in China; -- called also beche de mer, sea cucumber, and sea slug.

Trip (n. i.) To move with light, quick steps; to walk or move lightly; to skip; to move the feet nimbly; -- sometimes followed by it. See It, 5.

Trip (v. t.) To cause to stumble, or take a false step; to cause to lose the footing, by striking the feet from under; to cause to fall; to throw off the balance; to supplant; -- often followed by up; as, to trip up a man in wrestling.

Triparted (a.) Parted into three piece; having three parts or pieces; -- said of the field or of a bearing; as, a cross triparted.

Tripartient (a.) Dividing into three parts; -- said of a number which exactly divides another into three parts.

Tripe (n.) The entrails; hence, humorously or in contempt, the belly; -- generally used in the plural.

Tripetalous (a.) Having three petals, or flower leaves; three-petaled.

Triphthong (n.) A combination of three vowel sounds in a single syllable, forming a simple or compound sound; also, a union of three vowel characters, representing together a single sound; a trigraph; as, eye, -ieu in adieu, -eau in beau, are examples of triphthongs.

Triphylite (n.) A mineral of a grayish-green or bluish color, consisting of the phosphates of iron, manganese, and lithia.

Triphyllous (a.) Having three leaves; three-leaved.

Tripinnatifid (a.) Thrice pinnately cleft; -- said of a pinnatifid leaf when its segments are pinnatifid, and the subdivisions of these also are pinnatifid.

Triplasian (a.) Three-fold; triple; treble.

Triplicostate (a.) Three-ribbed.

Tripod (n.) A three-legged frame or stand, usually jointed at top, for supporting a theodolite, compass, telescope, camera, or other instrument.

Tripodian (n.) An ancient stringed instrument; -- so called because, in form, it resembled the Delphic tripod.

Tripping (a.) Having the right forefoot lifted, the others remaining on the ground, as if he were trotting; trippant; -- said of an animal, as a hart, buck, and the like, used as a bearing.

Tropaeolin (n.) A name given to any one of a series of orange-red dyestuffs produced artificially from certain complex sulphonic acid derivatives of azo and diazo hydrocarbons of the aromatic series; -- so called because of the general resemblance to the shades of nasturtium (Tropaeolum).

Trophic (a.) Of or connected with nutrition; nitritional; nourishing; as, the so-called trophic nerves, which have a direct influence on nutrition.

Tryptone (n.) The peptone formed by pancreatic digestion; -- so called because it is formed through the agency of the ferment trypsin.

Turpeth (n.) The root of Ipom/a Turpethum, a plant of Ceylon, Malabar, and Australia, formerly used in medicine as a purgative; -- sometimes called vegetable turpeth.

Turpeth (n.) A heavy yellow powder, Hg3O2SO4, which consists of a basic mercuric sulphate; -- called also turpeth mineral.

Twopence (n.) A small coin, and money of account, in England, equivalent to two pennies, -- minted to a fixed annual amount, for almsgiving by the sovereign on Maundy Thursday.

Tymp (n.) A hollow water-cooled iron casting in the upper part of the archway in which the dam stands.

Tympano (n.) A kettledrum; -- chiefly used in the plural to denote the kettledrums of an orchestra. See Kettledrum.

Tympanum (n.) A drum-shaped wheel with spirally curved partitions by which water is raised to the axis when the wheel revolves with the lower part of the circumference submerged, -- used for raising water, as for irrigation.

Unappealable (a.) Not to be appealed from; -- said of a judge or a judgment that can not be overruled.

Uniparous (a.) Producing but one axis of inflorescence; -- said of the scorpioid cyme.

Unipolar (a.) Having but one pole or process; -- applied to those ganglionic nerve cells which have but one radiating process; -- opposed to multipolar.

Uropygium (n.) The prominence at the posterior extremity of a bird's body, which supports the feathers of the tail; the rump; -- sometimes called pope's nose.

Vamp (v. t.) To provide, as a shoe, with new upper leather; hence, to piece, as any old thing, with a new part; to repair; to patch; -- often followed by up.

Vampire (n.) A blood-sucking ghost; a soul of a dead person superstitiously believed to come from the grave and wander about by night sucking the blood of persons asleep, thus causing their death. This superstition is now prevalent in parts of Eastern Europe, and was especially current in Hungary about the year 1730.

Vampire (n.) Either one of two or more species of South American blood-sucking bats belonging to the genera Desmodus and Diphylla. These bats are destitute of molar teeth, but have strong, sharp cutting incisors with which they make punctured wounds from which they suck the blood of horses, cattle, and other animals, as well as man, chiefly during sleep. They have a caecal appendage to the stomach, in which the blood with which they gorge themselves is stored.

Wapp (n.) A fair-leader.

Warp (v. t.) To cast prematurely, as young; -- said of cattle, sheep, etc.

Warp (v. i.) To cast the young prematurely; to slink; -- said of cattle, sheep, etc.

Warp (v.) A premature casting of young; -- said of cattle, sheep, etc.

Weep (n.) The lapwing; the wipe; -- so called from its cry.

Weep (v. i.) To hang the branches, as if in sorrow; to be pendent; to droop; -- said of a plant or its branches.

Weeping (a.) Having slender, pendent branches; -- said of trees; as, weeping willow; a weeping ash.

Whopper (n.) Something uncommonly large of the kind; something astonishing; -- applied especially to a bold lie.

Whip (v. t.) To overlay (a cord, rope, or the like) with other cords going round and round it; to overcast, as the edge of a seam; to wrap; -- often with about, around, or over.

Whip (v. t.) To take or move by a sudden motion; to jerk; to snatch; -- with into, out, up, off, and the like.

Whip (v. t.) A huntsman who whips in the hounds; whipper-in.

Whipcord (n.) A kind of hard-twisted or braided cord, sometimes used for making whiplashes.

Whiplash (n.) The lash of a whip, -- usually made of thongs of leather, or of cords, braided or twisted.

Whipparee (n.) A large sting ray (Rhinoptera bonasus, or R. quadriloba) of the Atlantic coast of the United States. Its snout appears to be four-lobed when viewed in front, whence it is also called cow-nosed ray.

Whipstitch (n.) A tailor; -- so called in contempt.

Wisp (n.) A Will-o'-the-wisp; an ignis fatuus.

Wrap (v. t.) To snatch up; transport; -- chiefly used in the p. p. wrapt.

Wrap (v. t.) To cover by winding or folding; to envelop completely; to involve; to infold; -- often with up.

Wrap (n.) A wrapper; -- often used in the plural for blankets, furs, shawls, etc., used in riding or traveling.

Yaupon (n.) A shrub (Ilex Cassine) of the Holly family, native from Virginia to Florida. The smooth elliptical leaves are used as a substitute for tea, and were formerly used in preparing the black drink of the Indians of North Carolina. Called also South-Sea tea.

Yelper (n.) The avocet; -- so called from its sharp, shrill cry.

Zoophorous (n.) The part between the architrave and cornice; the frieze; -- so called from the figures of animals carved upon it.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.