Words whose 4th letter is T

Abatvoix (n.) The sounding-board over a pulpit or rostrum.

Abet (v. t.) To instigate or encourage by aid or countenance; -- used in a bad sense of persons and acts; as, to abet an ill-doer; to abet one in his wicked courses; to abet vice; to abet an insurrection.

Abet (v. t.) To support, uphold, or aid; to maintain; -- in a good sense.

Abstain (v. i.) To hold one's self aloof; to forbear or refrain voluntarily, and especially from an indulgence of the passions or appetites; -- with from.

Abstentious (a.) Characterized by abstinence; self-restraining.

Abstinence (n.) The act or practice of abstaining; voluntary forbearance of any action, especially the refraining from an indulgence of appetite, or from customary gratifications of animal or sensual propensities. Specifically, the practice of abstaining from intoxicating beverages, -- called also total abstinence.

Abstinence (n.) The practice of self-denial by depriving one's self of certain kinds of food or drink, especially of meat.

Abstract (a.) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word.

Abut (v. i.) To project; to terminate or border; to be contiguous; to meet; -- with on, upon, or against; as, his land abuts on the road.

Abutilon (n.) A genus of malvaceous plants of many species, found in the torrid and temperate zones of both continents; -- called also Indian mallow.

Abutment (n.) In breech-loading firearms, the block behind the barrel which receives the pressure due to recoil.

Acetabular (a.) Cup-shaped; saucer-shaped; acetabuliform.

Acetonaemia (n.) Alt. of -nemia

Acetabulifera (n. pl.) The division of Cephalopoda in which the arms are furnished with cup-shaped suckers, as the cuttlefishes, squids, and octopus; the Dibranchiata. See Cephalopoda.

Acetabuliform (a.) Shaped like a shallow cup; saucer-shaped; as, an acetabuliform calyx.

Acetanilide (n.) A compound of aniAcetone (n.) A volatile liquid consisting of three parts of carbon, six of hydrogen, and one of oxygen; pyroacetic spirit, -- obtained by the distillation of certain acetates, or by the destructive distillation of citric acid, starch, sugar, or gum, with quicklime.

Acutangular (a.) Acute-angled.

Acute (a.) Sharp at the end; ending in a sharp point; pointed; -- opposed to blunt or obtuse; as, an acute angle; an acute leaf.

Acute (a.) Having nice discernment; perceiving or using minute distinctions; penetrating; clever; shrewd; -- opposed to dull or stupid; as, an acute observer; acute remarks, or reasoning.

Acute (a.) High, or shrill, in respect to some other sound; -- opposed to grave or low; as, an acute tone or accent.

Acute (a.) Attended with symptoms of some degree of severity, and coming speedily to a crisis; -- opposed to chronic; as, an acute disease.

Acuteness (n.) The faculty of nice discernment or perception; acumen; keenness; sharpness; sensitiveness; -- applied to the senses, or the understanding. By acuteness of feeling, we perceive small objects or slight impressions: by acuteness of intellect, we discern nice distinctions.

Acuteness (n.) Shrillness; high pitch; -- said of sounds.

Acutifoliate (a.) Having sharp-pointed leaves.

Adit (n.) An entrance or passage. Specifically: The nearly horizontal opening by which a mine is entered, or by which water and ores are carried away; -- called also drift and tunnel.

Aesthesia (n.) Perception by the senses; feeling; -- the opposite of anaesthesia.

Aesthesodic (a.) Conveying sensory or afferent impulses; -- said of nerves.

Aestivation (n.) The state of torpidity induced by the heat and dryness of summer, as in certain snails; -- opposed to hibernation.

Agate (n.) A tool used by gold-wire drawers, bookbinders, etc.; -- so called from the agate fixed in it for burnishing.

Agitator (n.) One of a body of men appointed by the army, in Cromwell's time, to look after their interests; -- called also adjutators.

Amitosis (n.) Cell division in which there is first a simple cleavage of the nucleus without change in its structure (such as the formation of chromosomes), followed by the division of the cytoplasm; direct cell division; -- opposed to mitosis. It is not the usual mode of division, and is believed by many to occur chiefly in highly specialized cells which are incapable of long-continued multiplication, in transitory structures, and in those in early stages of degeneration.

Amitotic (a.) Of or pertaining to amitosis; karyostenotic; -- opposed to mitotic.

Alutaceous (a.) Of a pale brown color; leather-yellow.

Amotus (a.) Elevated, -- as a toe, when raised so high that the tip does not touch the ground.

Anatiferous (a.) Producing ducks; -- applied to Anatifae, under the absurd notion of their turning into ducks or geese. See Barnacle.

Anatreptic (a.) Overthrowing; defeating; -- applied to Plato's refutative dialogues.

Anatropous (a.) Having the ovule inverted at an early period in its development, so that the chalaza is as the apparent apex; -- opposed to orthotropous.

Anethol (n.) A substance obtained from the volatile oils of anise, fennel, etc., in the form of soft shining scales; -- called also anise camphor.

Anything (n.) Expressing an indefinite comparison; -- with as or like.

Apathy (n.) Want of feeling; privation of passion, emotion, or excitement; dispassion; -- applied either to the body or the mind. As applied to the mind, it is a calmness, indolence, or state of indifference, incapable of being ruffled or roused to active interest or exertion by pleasure, pain, or passion.

Apatite (n.) Native phosphate of lime, occurring usually in six-sided prisms, color often pale green, transparent or translucent.

Aphthae (n. pl.) Roundish pearl-colored specks or flakes in the mouth, on the lips, etc., terminating in white sloughs. They are commonly characteristic of thrush.

Aretaics (n.) The ethical theory which excludes all relations between virtue and happiness; the science of virtue; -- contrasted with eudemonics.

Arytenoid (a.) Ladle-shaped; -- applied to two small cartilages of the larynx, and also to the glands, muscles, etc., connected with them. The cartilages are attached to the cricoid cartilage and connected with the vocal cords.

Aunt (n.) The sister of one's father or mother; -- correlative to nephew or niece. Also applied to an uncle's wife.

Avatar (n.) The descent of a deity to earth, and his incarnation as a man or an animal; -- chiefly associated with the incarnations of Vishnu.

Azotine () Alt. of -tin

Banter (v. t.) To address playful good-natured ridicule to, -- the person addressed, or something pertaining to him, being the subject of the jesting; to rally; as, he bantered me about my credulity.

Banter (v. t.) To delude or trick, -- esp. by way of jest.

Banter (n.) The act of bantering; joking or jesting; humorous or good-humored raillery; pleasantry.

Bantingism (n.) A method of reducing corpulence by avoiding food containing much farinaceous, saccharine, or oily matter; -- so called from William Banting of London.

Baptist (n.) One who administers baptism; -- specifically applied to John, the forerunner of Christ.

Barter (v. t.) To trade or exchange in the way of barter; to exchange (frequently for an unworthy consideration); to traffic; to truck; -- sometimes followed by away; as, to barter away goods or honor.

Bastard (n.) Lacking in genuineness; spurious; false; adulterate; -- applied to things which resemble those which are genuine, but are really not so.

Baste (v. t.) To sew loosely, or with long stitches; -- usually, that the work may be held in position until sewed more firmly.

Battel (n.) Provisions ordered from the buttery; also, the charges for them; -- only in the pl., except when used adjectively.

Batter (v. t.) A semi-liquid mixture of several ingredients, as, flour, eggs, milk, etc., beaten together and used in cookery.

Bantu (n.) A member of one of the great family of Negroid tribes occupying equatorial and southern Africa. These tribes include, as important divisions, the Kafirs, Damaras, Bechuanas, and many tribes whose names begin with Aba-, Ama-, Ba-, Ma-, Wa-, variants of the Bantu plural personal prefix Aba-, as in Ba-ntu, or Aba-ntu, itself a combination of this prefix with the syllable -ntu, a person.

Battalion (n.) An infantry command of two or more companies, which is the tactical unit of the infantry, or the smallest command which is self-supporting upon the battlefield, and also the unit in which the strength of the infantry of an army is expressed.

Beat (v. t.) To cheat; to chouse; to swindle; to defraud; -- often with out.

Beat (v. i.) To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; -- said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.

Beat (v. i.) A cheat or swindler of the lowest grade; -- often emphasized by dead; as, a dead beat.

Beatification (n.) The act of beatifying, or the state of being beatified; esp., in the R. C. Church, the act or process of ascertaining and declaring that a deceased person is one of "the blessed," or has attained the second degree of sanctity, -- usually a stage in the process of canonization.

Beatitude (n.) Any one of the nine declarations (called the Beatitudes), made in the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. v. 3-12), with regard to the blessedness of those who are distinguished by certain specified virtues.

Beetle (v. t.) A machine in which fabrics are subjected to a hammering process while passing over rollers, as in cotton mills; -- called also beetling machine.

Beetlehead (n.) The black-bellied plover, or bullhead (Squatarola helvetica). See Plover.

Bent (a. & p. p.) Strongly incBerthierite (n.) A double sulphide of antimony and iron, of a dark steel-gray color.

Bestir (v. t.) To put into brisk or vigorous action; to move with life and vigor; -- usually with the reciprocal pronoun.

Bestow (v. t.) To give or confer; to impart; -- with on or upon.

Bestow (v. t.) To demean; to conduct; to behave; -- followed by a reflexive pronoun.

Better (n.) Advantage, superiority, or victory; -- usually with of; as, to get the better of an enemy.

Better (n.) One who has a claim to precedence; a superior, as in merit, social standing, etc.; -- usually in the plural.

Betterment (n.) An improvement of an estate which renders it better than mere repairing would do; -- generally used in the plural.

Betty (n.) A pear-shaped bottle covered round with straw, in which olive oil is sometimes brought from Italy; -- called by chemists a Florence flask.

Benthos (n.) The bottom of the sea, esp. of the deep oceans; hence (Bot. & Zool.), the fauna and flora of the sea bottom; -- opposed to plankton.

Biltong (n.) Lean meat cut into strips and sun-dried.

Biotite (n.) Mica containing iron and magnesia, generally of a black or dark green color; -- a common constituent of crystalBirth (n.) The act or fact of coming into life, or of being born; -- generally applied to human beings; as, the birth of a son.

Bitternut (n.) The swamp hickory (Carya amara). Its thin-shelled nuts are bitter.

Bittersweet (n.) A climbing shrub, with oval coral-red berries (Solanum dulcamara); woody nightshade. The whole plant is poisonous, and has a taste at first sweetish and then bitter. The branches are the officinal dulcamara.

Bittersweet (n.) An American woody climber (Celastrus scandens), whose yellow capsules open late in autumn, and disclose the red aril which covers the seeds; -- also called Roxbury waxwork.

Blather (n.) Voluble, foolish, or nonsensical talk; -- often in the pl.

Blet (v. i.) To decay internally when overripe; -- said of fruit.

Blather (n.) Voluble, foolish, or nonsensical talk; -- often in the pl.

Blet (v. i.) To decay internally when overripe; -- said of fruit.

Bletonism (n.) The supposed faculty of perceiving subterraneous springs and currents by sensation; -- so called from one Bleton, of France.

Blot (v. t.) To obliterate, as writing with ink; to cancel; to efface; -- generally with out; as, to blot out a word or a sentence. Often figuratively; as, to blot out offenses.

Bogtrotter (n.) One who lives in a boggy country; -- applied in derision to the lowest class of Irish.

Bolt (n.) A shaft or missile intended to be shot from a crossbow or catapult, esp. a short, stout, blunt-headed arrow; a quarrel; an arrow, or that which resembles an arrow; a dart.

Bolt (v. t.) To separate, as if by sifting or bolting; -- with out.

Bolthead (n.) A long, straight-necked, glass vessel for chemical distillations; -- called also a matrass or receiver.

Boot (v. t.) To profit; to advantage; to avail; -- generally followed by it; as, what boots it?

Boot (n.) A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach.

Booted (a.) Having an undivided, horny, bootlike covering; -- said of the tarsus of some birds.

Boston (n.) A game at cards, played by four persons, with two packs of fifty-two cards each; -- said to be so called from Boston, Massachusetts, and to have been invented by officers of the French army in America during the Revolutionary war.

Bottlehead (n.) A cetacean allied to the grampus; -- called also bottle-nosed whale.

Bottleholder (n.) One who attends a pugilist in a prize fight; -- so called from the bottle of water of which he has charge.

Bottom (n.) Low land formed by alluvial deposits along a river; low-lying ground; a dale; a valley.

Bottom (v. t.) To found or build upon; to fix upon as a support; -- followed by on or upon.

Bottom (v. i.) To rest, as upon an ultimate support; to be based or grounded; -- usually with on or upon.

Bottomed (a.) Having at the bottom, or as a bottom; resting upon a bottom; grounded; -- mostly, in composition; as, sharp-bottomed; well-bottomed.

Bout (n.) A conflict; contest; attempt; trial; a set-to at anything; as, a fencing bout; a drinking bout.

Bostryx (n.) A form of cymose inflorescence with all the flowers on one side of the rachis, usually causing it to curl; -- called also a uniparous helicoid cyme.

Brat (n.) A child; an offspring; -- formerly used in a good sense, but now usually in a contemptuous sense.

Bretwalda (n.) The official title applied to that one of the Anglo-Saxon chieftains who was chosen by the other chiefs to lead them in their warfare against the British tribes.

Britannia (n.) A white-metal alloy of tin, antimony, bismuth, copper, etc. It somewhat resembles silver, and is used for table ware. Called also Britannia metal.

British (a.) Of or pertaining to Great Britain or to its inhabitants; -- sometimes restricted to the original inhabitants.

Brother (n.) One related or closely united to another by some common tie or interest, as of rank, profession, membership in a society, toil, suffering, etc.; -- used among judges, clergymen, monks, physicians, lawyers, professors of religion, etc.

Brotherhood (n.) The whole body of persons engaged in the same business, -- especially those of the same profession; as, the legal or medical brotherhood.

Bunt (n.) A fungus (Ustilago foetida) which affects the ear of cereals, filling the grains with a fetid dust; -- also called pepperbrand.

Bustle (n.) A kind of pad or cushion worn on the back below the waist, by women, to give fullness to the skirts; -- called also bishop, and tournure.

Butte (n.) A detached low mountain, or high rising abruptly from the general level of the surrounding plain; -- applied to peculiar elevations in the Rocky Mountain region.

Butterbird (n.) The rice bunting or bobolink; -- so called in the island of Jamaica.

Butterbur (n.) A broad-leaved plant (Petasites vulgaris) of the Composite family, said to have been used in England for wrapping up pats of butter.

Buttercup (n.) A plant of the genus Ranunculus, or crowfoot, particularly R. bulbosus, with bright yellow flowers; -- called also butterflower, golden cup, and kingcup. It is the cuckoobud of Shakespeare.

Butternut (n.) An American tree (Juglans cinerea) of the Walnut family, and its edible fruit; -- so called from the oil contained in the latter. Sometimes called oil nut and white walnut.

Butternut (n.) The nut of the Caryocar butyrosum and C. nuciferum, of S. America; -- called also Souari nut.

Butting joint () A joint between two pieces of timber or wood, at the end of one or both, and either at right angles or oblique to the grain, as the joints which the struts and braces form with the truss posts; -- sometimes called abutting joint.

Button (n.) A catch, of various forms and materials, used to fasten together the different parts of dress, by being attached to one part, and passing through a slit, called a buttonhole, in the other; -- used also for ornament.

Button (n.) To fasten with a button or buttons; to inclose or make secure with buttons; -- often followed by up.

Buttonbush (n.) A shrub (Cephalanthus occidentalis) growing by the waterside; -- so called from its globular head of flowers. See Capitulum.

Buttons (n.) A boy servant, or page, -- in allusion to the buttons on his livery.

Buttonwood (n.) The Platanus occidentalis, or American plane tree, a large tree, producing rough balls, from which it is named; -- called also buttonball tree, and, in some parts of the United States, sycamore. The California buttonwood is P. racemosa.

Cactus (n.) Any plant of the order Cactacae, as the prickly pear and the night-blooming cereus. See Cereus. They usually have leafless stems and branches, often beset with clustered thorns, and are mostly natives of the warmer parts of America.

Caltrap (n.) A genus of herbaceous plants (Tribulus) of the order Zygophylleae, having a hard several-celled fruit, armed with stout spines, and resembling the military instrument of the same name. The species grow in warm countries, and are often very annoying to cattle.

Cantabile (n.) A piece or passage, whether vocal or instrumental, peculiarly adapted to singing; -- sometimes called cantilena.

Cantharidin (n.) The active principle of the cantharis, or Spanish fly, a volatile, acrid, bitter solid, crystallizing in four-sided prisms.

Cantharis (n.) A beetle (Lytta, / Cantharis, vesicatoria), havin1g an elongated cylindrical body of a brilliant green color, and a nauseous odor; the blister fly or blister beetle, of the apothecary; -- also called Spanish fly. Many other species of Lytta, used for the same purpose, take the same name. See Blister beetle, under Blister. The plural form in usually applied to the dried insects used in medicine.

Canton (n.) A small territorial district; esp. one of the twenty-two independent states which form the Swiss federal republic; in France, a subdivision of an arrondissement. See Arrondissement.

Cantoned (a.) Having a charge in each of the four corners; -- said of a cross on a shield, and also of the shield itself.

Cart (n.) A two-wheeled vehicle for the ordinary purposes of husbandry, or for transporting bulky and heavy articles.

Cart (n.) An open two-wheeled pleasure carriage.

Carter (n.) Any species of Phalangium; -- also called harvestman

Cartoon (n.) A design or study drawn of the full size, to serve as a model for transferring or copying; -- used in the making of mosaics, tapestries, fresco pantings and the like; as, the cartoons of Raphael.

Castanea (n.) A genus of nut-bearing trees or shrubs including the chestnut and chinquapin.

Castanets (n. pl.) Two small, concave shells of ivory or hard wood, shaped like spoons, fastened to the thumb, and beaten together with the middle finger; -- used by the Spaniards and Moors as an accompaniment to their dance and guitars.

Castigatory (n.) An instrument formerly used to punish and correct arrant scolds; -- called also a ducking stool, or trebucket.

Castile soap () A kind of fine, hard, white or mottled soap, made with olive oil and soda; also, a soap made in imitation of the above-described soap.

Castoreum (n.) A peculiar bitter orange-brown substance, with strong, penetrating odor, found in two sacs between the anus and external genitals of the beaver; castor; -- used in medicine as an antispasmodic, and by perfumers.

Cent (n.) An old game at cards, supposed to be like piquet; -- so called because 100 points won the game.

Cental (n.) A weight of one hundred pounds avoirdupois; -- called in many parts of the United States a Hundredweight.

Center (n.) A temporary structure upon which the materials of a vault or arch are supported in position until the work becomes self-supporting.

Centreboard (n.) A movable or sliding keel formed of a broad board or slab of wood or metal which may be raised into a water-tight case amidships, when in shallow water, or may be lowered to increase the area of lateral resistance and prevent leeway when the vessel is beating to windward. It is used in vessels of all sizes along the coast of the United States

Centimetre (n.) The hundredth part of a meter; a measure of length equal to rather more than thirty-nine hundredths (0.3937) of an inch. See Meter.

Centiped (n.) A species of the Myriapoda; esp. the large, flattened, venomous kinds of the order Chilopoda, found in tropical climates. they are many-jointed, and have a great number of feet.

CentroCertain (a.) Determined; resolved; -- used with an infinitive.

Certain (a.) Not specifically named; indeterminate; indefinite; one or some; -- sometimes used independenty as a noun, and meaning certain persons.

Celtium (n.) A supposed new element of the rare-earth group, accompanying lutecium and scandium in the gadolinite earths. Symbol, Ct (no period).

Centauromachy (n.) A fight in which centaurs take part, -- a common theme for relief sculpture, as in the Parthenon metopes.

Centrosphere (n.) The nucleus or central part of the earth, forming most of its mass; -- disting. from lithosphere, hydrosphere, etc.

Celtium (n.) A supposed new element of the rare-earth group, accompanying lutecium and scandium in the gadolinite earths. Symbol, Ct (no period).

Centauromachy (n.) A fight in which centaurs take part, -- a common theme for relief sculpture, as in the Parthenon metopes.

Centrosphere (n.) The nucleus or central part of the earth, forming most of its mass; -- disting. from lithosphere, hydrosphere, etc.

Chat (n.) A bird of the genus Icteria, allied to the warblers, in America. The best known species are the yellow-breasted chat (I. viridis), and the long-tailed chat (I. longicauda). In Europe the name is given to several birds of the family Saxicolidae, as the stonechat, and whinchat.

Chatoyant (n.) A hard stone, as the cat's-eye, which presents on a polished surface, and in the interior, an undulating or wary light.

Chatterer (n.) A bird of the family Ampelidae -- so called from its monotonous note. The Bohemion chatterer (Ampelis garrulus) inhabits the arctic regions of both continents. In America the cedar bird is a more common species. See Bohemian chatterer, and Cedar bird.

Clothing (n.) A covering of non-conducting material on the outside of a boiler, or steam chamber, to prevent radiation of heat.

Clutch (n.) The hands, claws, or talons, in the act of grasping firmly; -- often figuratively, for power, rapacity, or cruelty; as, to fall into the clutches of an adversary.

Clutch (n.) To seize, clasp, or gripe with the hand, hands, or claws; -- often figuratively; as, to clutch power.

Clutch (v. i.) To reach (at something) as if to grasp; to catch or snatch; -- often followed by at.

Contraption (n.) A contrivance; a new-fangled device; -- used scornfully.

Control (n.) Any of the physical factors determining the climate of any particular place, as latitude,distribution of land and water, altitude, exposure, prevailing winds, permanent high- or low-barometric-pressure areas, ocean currents, mountain barriers, soil, and vegetation.

Controller (n.) A lever controlling the speed of an engine; -- applied esp. to the lever governing a throttle valve, as of a steam or gasoColt (n.) The young of the equine genus or horse kind of animals; -- sometimes distinctively applied to the male, filly being the female. Cf. Foal.

Contest (v. i.) To engage in contention, or emulation; to contend; to strive; to vie; to emulate; -- followed usually by with.

Continency (n.) Self-restraint; self-command.

Contorniate (n.) A species of medal or medallion of bronze, having a deep furrow on the contour or edge; -- supposed to have been struck in the days of Constantine and his successors.

Contortuplicate (a.) Plaited lengthwise and twisted in addition, as the bud of the morning-glory.

Contrabass (n.) Double bass; -- applied to any instrument of the same deep range as the stringed double bass; as, the contrabass ophicleide; the contrabass tuba or bombardon.

Contraction (n.) Something contracted or abbreviated, as a word or phrase; -- as, plenipo for plenipotentiary; crim. con. for criminal conversation, etc.

Contraposition (n.) A so-called immediate inference which consists in denying the original subject of the contradictory predicate; e.g.: Every S is P; therefore, no Not-P is S.

Contribution (n.) That which is contributed; -- either the portion which an individual furnishes to the common stock, or the whole which is formed by the gifts of individuals.

Cooter (n.) A fresh-water tortoise (Pseudemus concinna) of Florida.

Cootfoot (n.) The phalarope; -- so called because its toes are like the coot's.

Corticifer (n.) One of the Gorgoniacea; -- so called because the fleshy part surrounds a solid axis, like a bark.

Cost (v. t.) The amount paid, charged, or engaged to be paid, for anything bought or taken in barter; charge; expense; hence, whatever, as labor, self-denial, suffering, etc., is requisite to secure benefit.

Costiferous (a.) Rib-bearing, as the dorsal vertebrae.

Costotome (n.) An instrument (chisel or shears) to cut the ribs and open the thoracic cavity, in post-mortem examinations and dissections.

Cotter (n.) A piece of wood or metal, commonly wedge-shaped, used for fastening together parts of a machine or structure. It is driven into an opening through one or all of the parts. [See Illust.] In the United States a cotter is commonly called a key.

Cottise (n.) A diminutive of the bendlet, containing one half its area or one quarter the area of the bend. When a single cottise is used alone it is often called a cost. See also Couple-close.

Cottised (a.) Set between two cottises, -- said of a bend; or between two barrulets, -- said of a bar or fess.

Cottolene (n.) A product from cotton-seed, used as lard.

Cotton (n.) A soft, downy substance, resembling fine wool, consisting of the unicellular twisted hairs which grow on the seeds of the cotton plant. Long-staple cotton has a fiber sometimes almost two inches long; short-staple, from two thirds of an inch to an inch and a half.

Cotton (v. i.) To unite; to agree; to make friends; -- usually followed by with.

Cotton (v. i.) To take a liking to; to stick to one as cotton; -- used with to.

Cottontail (n.) The American wood rabbit (Lepus sylvaticus); -- also called Molly cottontail.

Crate (n.) A box or case whose sides are of wooden slats with interspaces, -- used especially for transporting fruit.

Crater (n.) A constellation of the southen hemisphere; -- called also the Cup.

Crateriform (a.) Having the form of a shallow bowl; -- said of a corolla.

Cretic (n.) A poetic foot, composed of one short syllable between two long ones (- / -).

Crith (n.) The unit for estimating the weight of a/riform substances; -- the weight of a liter of hydrogen at 0/ centigrade, and with a tension of 76 centimeters of mercury. It is 0.0896 of a gram, or 1.38274 grains.

Criticise (v. i.) To act as a critic; to pass literary or artistic judgment; to play the critic; -- formerly used with on or upon.

Crotch (n.) A stanchion or post of wood or iron, with two arms for supporting a boom, spare yards, etc.; -- called also crane and crutch.

Crotch (n.) In the three-ball carom game, a small space at each corner of the table. See Crotched, below.

Crotched (a.) Lying within a crotch; -- said of the object balls in the three-ball carom game whenever the centers of both lie within a 4/-inch square at a corner of the table, in which case but three counts are allowed unless one or both balls be forced out of the crotch.

Cultivation (n.) Bestowal of time or attention for self-improvement or for the benefit of others; fostering care.

Cultrated (a.) Sharp-edged and pointed; shaped like a pruning knife, as the beak of certain birds.

Cultrivorous (a.) Devouring knives; swallowing, or pretending to swallow, knives; -- applied to persons who have swallowed, or have seemed to swallow, knives with impunity.

Cultured (a.) Characterized by mental and moral training; discipCurtain (n.) A flag; an ensign; -- in contempt.

Curtana (n.) The pointless sword carried before English monarchs at their coronation, and emblematically considered as the sword of mercy; -- also called the sword of Edward the Confessor.

Curtate (a.) Shortened or reduced; -- said of the distance of a planet from the sun or earth, as measured in the plane of the ecliptic, or the distance from the sun or earth to that point where a perpendicular, let fall from the planet upon the plane of the ecliptic, meets the ecliptic.

Custody (n.) Judicial or penal safe-keeping.

Custom (n.) Long-established practice, considered as unwritten law, and resting for authority on long consent; usage. See Usage, and Prescription.

Customer (n.) A peculiar person; -- in an indefinite sense; as, a queer customer; an ugly customer.

Custrel (n.) An armor-bearer to a knight.

Cutter (n.) A small armed vessel, usually a steamer, in the revenue marine service; -- also called revenue cutter.

Cutter (n.) A small, light one-horse sleigh.

Cutter (n.) A kind of soft yellow brick, used for facework; -- so called from the facility with which it can be cut.

Cuttlefish (n.) A foul-mouthed fellow.

Cyathophylloid (n.) A fossil coral of the family Cyathophyllidae; sometimes extended to fossil corals of other related families belonging to the group Rugosa; -- also called cup corals. Thay are found in paleozoic rocks.

Cysticercus (n.) The larval form of a tapeworm, having the head and neck of a tapeworm attached to a saclike body filled with fluid; -- called also bladder worm, hydatid, and measle (as, pork measle).

Cystidea (n. pl.) An order of Crinoidea, mostly fossils of the Paleozoic rocks. They were usually roundish or egg-shaped, and often unsymmetrical; some were sessile, others had short stems.

Dactyl (n.) A poetical foot of three sylables (-- ~ ~), one long followed by two short, or one accented followed by two unaccented; as, L. tegm/n/, E. mer\b6ciful; -- so called from the similarity of its arrangement to that of the joints of a finger.

Dactylology (n.) The art of communicating ideas by certain movements and positions of the fingers; -- a method of conversing practiced by the deaf and dumb.

Dart (n.) A pointed missile weapon, intended to be thrown by the hand; a short lance; a javelin; hence, any sharp-pointed missile weapon, as an arrow.

Darter (n.) The snakebird, a water bird of the genus Plotus; -- so called because it darts out its long, snakelike neck at its prey. See Snakebird.

Darter (n.) A small fresh-water etheostomoid fish. The group includes numerous genera and species, all of them American. See Etheostomoid.

Dartle (v. t. & i.) To pierce or shoot through; to dart repeatedly: -- frequentative of dart.

Delta (n.) The closed figure produced by connecting three coils or circuits successively, end for end, esp. in a three-phase system; -- often used attributively, as delta winding, delta connection (which see), etc.

Destroyer (n.) = Torpedo-boat destroyer.

Deathbird (n.) Tengmalm's or Richardson's owl (Nyctale Tengmalmi); -- so called from a superstition of the North American Indians that its note presages death.

Deathwatch (n.) A small wingless insect, of the family Psocidae, which makes a similar but fainter sound; -- called also deathtick.

Debtee (n.) One to whom a debt is due; creditor; -- correlative to debtor.

Debtor (n.) One who owes a debt; one who is indebted; -- correlative to creditor.

Deltoid (a.) Shaped like the Greek / (delta); delta-shaped; triangular.

Dental (a.) Formed by the aid of the teeth; -- said of certain articulations and the letters representing them; as, d t are dental letters.

Dentiform (a.) Having the form of a tooth or of teeth; tooth-shaped.

Dentil (n.) A small square block or projection in cornices, a number of which are ranged in an ornamental band; -- used particularly in the Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite orders.

Dentirostral (a.) Having a toothed bill; -- applied to a group of passerine birds, having the bill notched, and feeding chiefly on insects, as the shrikes and vireos. See Illust. (N) under Beak.

Dentoid (a.) Shaped like a tooth; tooth-shaped.

Destine (v. t.) To determine the future condition or application of; to set apart by design for a future use or purpose; to fix, as by destiny or by an authoritative decree; to doom; to ordain or preordain; to appoint; -- often with the remoter object preceded by to or for.

Destitute (a.) Forsaken; not having in possession (something necessary, or desirable); deficient; lacking; devoid; -- often followed by of.

Destitute (v. t.) To make destitute; to cause to be in want; to deprive; -- followed by of.

Destructionist (n.) One who believes in the final destruction or complete annihilation of the wicked; -- called also annihilationist.

Destructive (a.) Causing destruction; tending to bring about ruin, death, or devastation; ruinous; fatal; productive of serious evil; mischievous; pernicious; -- often with of or to; as, intemperance is destructive of health; evil examples are destructive to the morals of youth.

Deuterocanonical (a.) Pertaining to a second canon, or ecclesiastical writing of inferior authority; -- said of the Apocrypha, certain Epistles, etc.

Deuterogamy (n.) A second marriage, after the death of the first husband of wife; -- in distinction from bigamy, as defined in the old canon law. See Bigamy.

Deuterogenic (a.) Of secondary origin; -- said of certain rocks whose material has been derived from older rocks.

Deutoxide (n.) A compound containing in the molecule two atoms of oxygen united with some other element or radical; -- usually called dioxide, or less frequently, binoxide.

Dexter (a.) On the right-hand side of a shield, i. e., towards the right hand of its wearer. To a spectator in front, as in a pictorial representation, this would be the left side.

Dexterity (n.) Right-handedness.

Dextrality (n.) The state of being on the right-hand side; also, the quality of being right-handed; right-handedness.

Dextrin (n.) A translucent, gummy, amorphous substance, nearly tasteless and odorless, used as a substitute for gum, for sizing, etc., and obtained from starch by the action of heat, acids, or diastase. It is of somewhat variable composition, containing several carbohydrates which change easily to their respective varieties of sugar. It is so named from its rotating the plane of polarization to the right; -- called also British gum, Alsace gum, gommelin, leiocome, etc. See Achroodextrin, and E> Dextrorse (a.) Turning from the left to the right, in the ascending Diathermanous (a.) Having the property of transmitting radiant heat; diathermal; -- opposed to athermanous.

Diathermometer (n.) An instrument for examining the thermal resistance or heat-conducting power of liquids.

Dictograph (n.) A telephonic instrument for office or other similar use, having a sound-magnifying device enabling the ordinary mouthpiece to be dispensed with. Much use has been made of it for overhearing, or for recording, conversations for the purpose of obtaining evidence for use in litigation.

Diatomous (a.) Having a single, distinct, diagonal cleavage; -- said of crystals.

Dictyogen (n.) A plant with net-veined leaves, and monocotyledonous embryos, belonging to the class Dictyogenae, proposed by Lindley for the orders Dioscoreaceae, Smilaceae, Trilliaceae, etc.

Dint (n.) Force; power; -- esp. in the phrase by dint of.

Dipteral (a.) Having a double row of columns on each on the flanks, as well as in front and rear; -- said of a temple.

Dipterous (a.) Having two wings; two-winged.

Dipterygian (a.) Having two dorsal fins; -- said of certain fishes.

Diet (n.) The federative assembly of the old Germanic Confederation (1815 -- 66).

Dirty (superl.) Sullied; clouded; -- applied to color.

Dirty (v. t.) To tarnish; to sully; to scandalize; -- said of reputation, character, etc.

Distain (v. t.) To tinge with a different color from the natural or proper one; to stain; to discolor; to sully; to tarnish; to defile; -- used chiefly in poetry.

Distance (n.) Relative space, between troops in ranks, measured from front to rear; -- contrasted with interval, which is measured from right to left.

Distant (a.) Far separated; far off; not near; remote; -- in place, time, consanguinity, or connection; as, distant times; distant relatives.

Distemper (v. t.) To deprive of temper or moderation; to disturb; to ruffle; to make disaffected, ill-humored, or malignant.

Distemper (v. t.) A morbid state of the animal system; indisposition; malady; disorder; -- at present chiefly applied to diseases of brutes; as, a distemper in dogs; the horse distemper; the horn distemper in cattle.

Disthene (n.) Cyanite or kyanite; -- so called in allusion to its unequal hardness in two different directions. See Cyanite.

Distichous (n.) Disposed in two vertical rows; two-ranked.

Distinct (a.) Separate in place; not conjunct; not united by growth or otherwise; -- with from.

Distinct (a.) So separated as not to be confounded with any other thing; not liable to be misunderstood; not confused; well-defined; clear; as, we have a distinct or indistinct view of a prospect.

Distinguish (v. t.) To separate from others by a mark of honor; to make eminent or known; to confer distinction upon; -- with by or for.

Distinguish (v. i.) To make distinctions; to perceive the difference; to exercise discrimination; -- with between; as, a judge distinguishes between cases apparently similar, but differing in principle.

Distinguished (a.) Separated from others by distinct difference; having, or indicating, superiority; eminent or known; illustrious; -- applied to persons and deeds.

Distract (v. t.) To unsettle the reason of; to render insane; to craze; to madden; -- most frequently used in the participle, distracted.

Distrait (a.) Absent-minded; lost in thought; abstracted.

Distyle (a.) Having two columns in front; -- said of a temple, portico, or the like.

Dittied (a.) Set, sung, or composed as a ditty; -- usually in composition.

Dogtooth (n.) An ornament common in Gothic architecture, consisting of pointed projections resembling teeth; -- also called tooth ornament.

Dotty (a.) Unsteady in gait; hence, feeble; half-witted.

Duster (n.) A revolving wire-cloth cylinder which removes the dust from rags, etc.

Duster (n.) A light over-garment, worn in traveling to protect the clothing from dust.

Dustpan (n.) A shovel-like utensil for conveying away dust brushed from the floor.

Duotype (n.) A print made from two half-tone plates made from the same negative, but etched differently.

Earth (n.) Any earthy-looking metallic oxide, as alumina, glucina, zirconia, yttria, and thoria.

Earth (v. t.) To cover with earth or mold; to inter; to bury; -- sometimes with up.

Earthdrake (n.) A mythical monster of the early Anglo-Saxon literature; a dragon.

Earthwards (adv.) Toward the earth; -- opposed to heavenward or skyward.

Earthworm (n.) Any worm of the genus Lumbricus and allied genera, found in damp soil. One of the largest and most abundant species in Europe and America is L. terrestris; many others are known; -- called also angleworm and dewworm.

East (n.) Formerly, the part of the United States east of the Alleghany Mountains, esp. the Eastern, or New England, States; now, commonly, the whole region east of the Mississippi River, esp. that which is north of Maryland and the Ohio River; -- usually with the definite article; as, the commerce of the East is not independent of the agriculture of the West.

Easter (v. i.) To veer to the east; -- said of the wind.

Easterling (n.) A native of a country eastward of another; -- used, by the English, of traders or others from the coasts of the Baltic.

Egotism (n.) The practice of too frequently using the word I; hence, a speaking or writing overmuch of one's self; self-exaltation; self-praise; the act or practice of magnifying one's self or parading one's own doings. The word is also used in the sense of egoism.

Eisteddfod (n.) Am assembly or session of the Welsh bards; an annual congress of bards, minstrels and literati of Wales, -- being a patriotic revival of the old custom.

Elater (n.) Any beetle of the family Elateridae, having the habit, when laid on the back, of giving a sudden upward spring, by a quick movement of the articulation between the abdomen and thorax; -- called also click beetle, spring beetle, and snapping beetle.

Elaterite (n.) A mineral resin, of a blackish brown color, occurring in soft, flexible masses; -- called also mineral caoutchouc, and elastic bitumen.

Elative (a.) Raised; lifted up; -- a term applied to what is also called the absolute superlative, denoting a high or intense degree of a quality, but not excluding the idea that an equal degree may exist in other cases.

Empty (superl.) Containing nothing; not holding or having anything within; void of contents or appropriate contents; not filled; -- said of an inclosure, as a box, room, house, etc.; as, an empty chest, room, purse, or pitcher; an empty stomach; empty shackles.

Empty (superl.) Free; clear; devoid; -- often with of.

Empty (superl.) Destitute of effect, sincerity, or sense; -- said of language; as, empty words, or threats.

Empty (superl.) Unable to satisfy; unsatisfactory; hollow; vain; -- said of pleasure, the world, etc.

Empty (superl.) Producing nothing; unfruitful; -- said of a plant or tree; as, an empty vine.

Empty (n.) An empty box, crate, cask, etc.; -- used in commerce, esp. in transportation of freight; as, "special rates for empties."

Epitasis (n.) That part which embraces the main action of a play, poem, and the like, and leads on to the catastrophe; -- opposed to protasis.

Epithelioma (n.) A malignant growth containing epithelial cells; -- called also epithelial cancer.

Epithelium (n.) The superficial layer of cells lining the alimentary canal and all its appendages, all glands and their ducts, blood vessels and lymphatics, serous cavities, etc. It often includes the epidermis (i. e., keratin-producing epithelial cells), and it is sometimes restricted to the alimentary canal, the glands and their appendages, -- the term endothelium being applied to the lining membrane of the blood vessels, lymphatics, and serous cavities.

salt () Sulphate of magnesia having cathartic qualities; -- originally prepared by boiling down the mineral waters at Epsom, England, -- whence the name; afterwards prepared from sea water; but now from certain minerals, as from siliceous hydrate of magnesia.

Erotesis (n.) A figure o/ speech by which a strong affirmation of the contrary, is implied under the form o/ an earnest interrogation, as in the following Erythema (n.) A disease of the skin, in which a diffused inflammation forms rose-colored patches of variable size.

Erythrina (n.) A genus of leguminous plants growing in the tropics; coral tree; -- so called from its red flowers.

Erythrite (n.) A colorless crystalErythrite (n.) A rose-red mineral, crystallized and earthy, a hydrous arseniate of cobalt, known also as cobalt bloom; -- called also erythrin or erythrine.

Erythrogen (n.) Carbon disulphide; -- so called from certain red compounds which it produces in combination with other substances.

Erythrogen (n.) A crystalErythroleic (a.) Having a red color and oily appearance; -- applied to a purple semifluid substance said to be obtained from archil.

Esoteric (a.) Designed for, and understood by, the specially initiated alone; not communicated, or not intelligible, to the general body of followers; private; interior; acroamatic; -- said of the private and more recondite instructions and doctrines of philosophers. Opposed to exoteric.

Esotery (n.) Mystery; esoterics; -- opposed to exotery.

Exothermic (a.) Characterized by, or formed with, evolution of heat; as, an exothermic reaction; -- opposed to endothermic.

Exoterical (a.) External; public; suitable to be imparted to the public; hence, capable of being readily or fully comprehended; -- opposed to esoteric, or secret.

Faction (n.) A party, in political society, combined or acting in union, in opposition to the government, or state; -- usually applied to a minority, but it may be applied to a majority; a combination or clique of partisans of any kind, acting for their own interests, especially if greedy, clamorous, and reckless of the common good.

Factious (a.) Given to faction; addicted to form parties and raise dissensions, in opposition to government or the common good; turbulent; seditious; prone to clamor against public measures or men; -- said of persons.

Factious (a.) Pertaining to faction; proceeding from faction; indicating, or characterized by, faction; -- said of acts or expressions; as, factious quarrels.

Factorage (n.) The allowance given to a factor, as a compensation for his services; -- called also a commission.

Factorial (n.) A name given to the factors of a continued product when the former are derivable from one and the same function F(x) by successively imparting a constant increment or decrement h to the independent variable. Thus the product F(x).F(x + h).F(x + 2h) . . . F[x + (n-1)h] is called a factorial term, and its several factors take the name of factorials.

Factorize (v. t.) To give warning to; -- said of a person in whose hands the effects of another are attached, the warning being to the effect that he shall not pay the money or deliver the property of the defendant in his hands to him, but appear and answer the suit of the plaintiff.

Facture (n.) The act or manner of making or doing anything; -- now used of a literary, musical, or pictorial production.

Faith (n.) The belief in the facts and truth of the Scriptures, with a practical love of them; especially, that confiding and affectionate belief in the person and work of Christ, which affects the character and life, and makes a man a true Christian, -- called a practical, evangelical, or saving faith.

Falter (v. & n.) To fail in distinctness or regularity of exercise; -- said of the mind or of thought.

Fast (n.) That which fastens or holds; especially, (Naut.) a mooring rope, hawser, or chain; -- called, according to its position, a bow, head, quarter, breast, or stern fast; also, a post on a pier around which hawsers are passed in mooring.

Feather (n.) Kind; nature; species; -- from the proverbial phrase, "Birds of a feather," that is, of the same species.

Feather (n.) The angular adjustment of an oar or paddle-wheel float, with reference to a horizontal axis, as it leaves or enters the water.

Feather (v. i.) To grow or form feathers; to become feathered; -- often with out; as, the birds are feathering out.

Feather (v. i.) To turn to a horizontal plane; -- said of oars.

Feathered (a.) Having feathers; -- said of an arrow, when the feathers are of a tincture different from that of the shaft.

Fertile (a.) Capable of producing fruit; fruit-bearing; as, fertile flowers.

Fertile (a.) Containing pollen; -- said of anthers.

Fiction (n.) That which is feigned, invented, or imagined; especially, a feigned or invented story, whether oral or written. Hence: A story told in order to deceive; a fabrication; -- opposed to fact, or reality.

Fifteenth (a.) Next in order after the fourteenth; -- the ordinal of fifteen.

Fifth (a.) Next in order after the fourth; -- the ordinal of five.

Fiftieth (a.) Next in order after the forty-ninth; -- the ordinal of fifty.

Fistula (n.) A permanent abnormal opening into the soft parts with a constant discharge; a deep, narrow, chronic abscess; an abnormal opening between an internal cavity and another cavity or the surface; as, a salivary fistula; an anal fistula; a recto-vaginal fistula.

Fistuliform (a.) Of a fistular form; tubular; pipe-shaped.

Flat (a.) Having a head at a very obtuse angle to the shaft; -- said of a club.

Flat (a.) Not having an inflectional ending or sign, as a noun used as an adjective, or an adjective as an adverb, without the addition of a formative suffix, or an infinitive without the sign to. Many flat adverbs, as in run fast, buy cheap, are from AS. adverbs in -e, the loss of this ending having made them like the adjectives. Some having forms in ly, such as exceeding, wonderful, true, are now archaic.

Flat (a.) Flattening at the ends; -- said of certain fruits.

Flat (superl.) Sonant; vocal; -- applied to any one of the sonant or vocal consonants, as distinguished from a nonsonant (or sharp) consonant.

Flat (n.) A flat-bottomed boat, without keel, and of small draught.

Flat (n.) A straw hat, broad-brimmed and low-crowned.

Flatboat (n.) A boat with a flat bottom and square ends; -- used for the transportation of bulky freight, especially in shallow waters.

Flatness (n.) Depression of tone; the state of being below the true pitch; -- opposed to sharpness or acuteness.

Flatter (n.) A flat-faced fulling hammer.

Flatter (v. t.) To treat with praise or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.

Flittermouse (n.) A bat; -- called also flickermouse, flindermouse, and flintymouse.

Flotson (n.) Goods lost by shipwreck, and floating on the sea; -- in distinction from jetsam or jetson.

Flute (v. i.) A channel of curved section; -- usually applied to one of a vertical series of such channels used to decorate columns and pilasters in classical architecture. See Illust. under Base, n.

Fontanel (n.) One of the membranous intervals between the incompleted angles of the parietal and neighboring bones of a fetal or young skull; -- so called because it exhibits a rhythmical pulsation.

Foot (n.) Fundamental principle; basis; plan; -- used only in the singular.

Foot (n.) Recognized condition; rank; footing; -- used only in the singular.

Foot (v. i.) To walk; -- opposed to ride or fly.

Foot (v. t.) To sum up, as the numbers in a column; -- sometimes with up; as, to foot (or foot up) an account.

Footboard (n.) The foot-rest of a coachman's box.

Footbreadth (n.) The breadth of a foot; -- used as a measure.

Footfight (n.) A conflict by persons on foot; -- distinguished from a fight on horseback.

Footman (n.) A moth of the family Lithosidae; -- so called from its livery-like colors.

Footrope (n.) The rope rigged below a yard, upon which men stand when reefing or furling; -- formerly called a horse.

Footstone (n.) The stone at the foot of a grave; -- opposed to headstone.

Fortalice (n.) A small outwork of a fortification; a fortilage; -- called also fortelace.

Forte (n.) The stronger part of the blade of a sword; the part of half nearest the hilt; -- opposed to foible.

Fortieth (a.) Following the thirty-ninth, or preceded by thirty-nine units, things, or parts.

Fortieth (n.) One of forty equal parts into which one whole is divided; the quotient of a unit divided by forty; one next in order after the thirty-ninth.

Forty (a.) Four times ten; thirty-nine and one more.

Foster (v. t.) Relating to nourishment; affording, receiving, or sharing nourishment or nurture; -- applied to father, mother, child, brother, etc., to indicate that the person so called stands in the relation of parent, child, brother, etc., as regards sustenance and nurture, but not by tie of blood.

Foutra (n.) A fig; -- a word of contempt.

Fretful (a.) Disposed to fret; ill-humored; peevish; angry; in a state of vexation; as, a fretful temper.

Fretted (p. p. & a.) Interlaced one with another; -- said of charges and ordinaries.

Fretten (a.) Rubbed; marked; as, pock-fretten, marked with the smallpox.

Frit (v. t.) To fritter; -- with away.

Fritillaria (n.) A genus of liliaceous plants, of which the crown-imperial (Fritillaria imperialis) is one species, and the Guinea-hen flower (F. Meleagris) another. See Crown-imperial.

Fritillary (n.) A plant with checkered petals, of the genus Fritillaria: the Guinea-hen flower. See Fritillaria.

Fritillary (n.) One of several species of butterflies belonging to Argynnis and allied genera; -- so called because the coloring of their wings resembles that of the common Fritillaria. See Aphrodite.

Fusted (a.) Moldy; ill-smelling.

Fustian (n.) An inflated style of writing; a kind of writing in which high-sounding words are used,' above the dignity of the thoughts or subject; bombast.

Fustic (n.) The wood of the Maclura tinctoria, a tree growing in the West Indies, used in dyeing yellow; -- called also old fustic.

Fusty (superl) Moldy; musty; ill-smelling; rank.

Gaited (a.) Having (such) a gait; -- used in composition; as, slow-gaited; heavy-gaited.

GantGastraea (n.) A primeval larval form; a double-walled sac from which, according to the hypothesis of Haeckel, man and all other animals, that in the first stages of their individual evolution pass through a two-layered structural stage, or gastrula form, must have descended. This idea constitutes the Gastraea theory of Haeckel. See Gastrula.

Gastromalacia (n.) A softening of the coats of the stomach; -- usually a post-morten change.

Gastropoda (n. pl.) One of the classes of Mollusca, of great extent. It includes most of the marine spiral shells, and the land and fresh-water snails. They generally creep by means of a flat, muscular disk, or foot, on the ventral side of the body. The head usually bears one or two pairs of tentacles. See Mollusca.

Gastrula (n.) An embryonic form having its origin in the invagination or pushing in of the wall of the planula or blastula (the blastosphere) on one side, thus giving rise to a double-walled sac, with one opening or mouth (the blastopore) which leads into the cavity (the archenteron) Genteel (a.) Possessing or exhibiting the qualities popularly regarded as belonging to high birth and breeding; free from vulgarity, or lowness of taste or behavior; adapted to a refined or cultivated taste; polite; well-bred; as, genteel company, manners, address.

Gentian (n.) Any one of a genus (Gentiana) of herbaceous plants with opposite leaves and a tubular four- or five-lobed corolla, usually blue, but sometimes white, yellow, or red. See Illust. of Capsule.

Gentile (a.) One of a non-Jewish nation; one neither a Jew nor a Christian; a worshiper of false gods; a heathen.

Gentility (n.) The quality or qualities appropriate to those who are well born, as self-respect, dignity, courage, courtesy, politeness of manner, a graceful and easy mien and behavior, etc.; good breeding.

Gentilize (v. i.) To act the gentleman; -- with it (see It, 5).

Gentisin (n.) A tasteless, yellow, crystalGentle (superl.) Well-born; of a good family or respectable birth, though not noble.

Gentle (n.) A trained falcon. See Falcon-gentil.

Gentleman (n.) One of gentle or refined manners; a well-bred man.

Gentleman (n.) A man, irrespective of condition; -- used esp. in the plural (= citizens; people), in addressing men in popular assemblies, etc.

Gentlemanly (a.) Of, pertaining to, resembling, or becoming, a gentleman; well-behaved; courteous; polite.

Gentleness (n.) The quality or state of being gentle, well-born, mild, benevolent, docile, etc.; gentility; softness of manners, disposition, etc.; mildness.

Gestic (a.) Relating to bodily motion; consisting of gestures; -- said especially with reference to dancing.

Gestour (n.) A reciter of gests or legendary tales; a story-teller.

Gilthead (n.) The Pagrus, / Chrysophrys, auratus, a valuable food fish common in the Mediterranean (so named from its golden-colored head); -- called also giltpoll.

Gilthead (n.) The Crenilabrus melops, of the British coasts; -- called also golden maid, conner, sea partridge.

Gilttail (n.) A yellow-tailed worm or larva.

Girt (a.) Bound by a cable; -- used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Glut (n.) The broad-nosed eel (Anguilla latirostris), found in Europe, Asia, the West Indies, etc.

Gnat (n.) A blood-sucking dipterous fly, of the genus Culex, undergoing a metamorphosis in water. The females have a proboscis armed with needlelike organs for penetrating the skin of animals. These are wanting in the males. In America they are generally called mosquitoes. See Mosquito.

Gnathidium (n.) The ramus of the lower jaw of a bird as far as it is naked; -- commonly used in the plural.

Gnatworm (n.) The aquatic larva of a gnat; -- called also, colloquially, wiggler.

Goat (n.) A hollow-horned ruminant of the genus Capra, of several species and varieties, esp. the domestic goat (C. hircus), which is raised for its milk, flesh, and skin.

Goatsucker (n.) One of several species of insectivorous birds, belonging to Caprimulgus and allied genera, esp. the European species (Caprimulgus Europaeus); -- so called from the mistaken notion that it sucks goats. The European species is also goat-milker, goat owl, goat chaffer, fern owl, night hawk, nightjar, night churr, churr-owl, gnat hawk, and dorhawk.

Goutwort (n.) A coarse umbelliferous plant of Europe (Aegopodium Podagraria); -- called also bishop's weed, ashweed, and herb gerard.

Grating (n.) A system of close equidistant and parallel Grit (n.) A hard, coarse-grained siliceous sandstone; as, millstone grit; -- called also gritrock and gritstone. The name is also applied to a finer sharp-grained sandstone; as, grindstone grit.

Grotesque (n.) Artificial grotto-work.

Guitar (n.) A stringed instrument of music resembling the lute or the violin, but larger, and having six strings, three of silk covered with silver wire, and three of catgut, -- played upon with the fingers.

Guitguit (n.) One of several species of small tropical American birds of the family Coerebidae, allied to the creepers; -- called also quit. See Quit.

Gutta (n.) One of a series of ornaments, in the form of a frustum of a cone, attached to the lower part of the triglyphs, and also to the lower faces of the mutules, in the Doric order; -- called also campana, and drop.

Haft (n.) A handle; that part of an instrument or vessel taken into the hand, and by which it is held and used; -- said chiefly of a knife, sword, or dagger; the hilt.

Hartford (n.) The Hartford grape, a variety of grape first raised at Hartford, Connecticut, from the Northern fox grape. Its large dark-colored berries ripen earlier than those of most other kinds.

Haste (n.) Celerity of motion; speed; swiftness; dispatch; expedition; -- applied only to voluntary beings, as men and other animals.

Haste (n.) Celerity of motion; speed; swiftness; dispatch; expedition; -- applied only to voluntary beings, as men and other animals.

Hastive (n.) Forward; early; -- said of fruits.

Hatter (v. t.) To tire or worry; -- out.

Hatteria (n.) A New Zealand lizard, which, in anatomical character, differs widely from all other existing lizards. It is the only living representative of the order Rhynchocephala, of which many Mesozoic fossil species are known; -- called also Sphenodon, and Tuatera.

Hautein (a.) High; -- said of the voice or flight of birds.

Heat (imp. & p. p.) Heated; as, the iron though heat red-hot.

Heptane (n.) Any one of several isometric hydrocarbons, C7H16, of the paraffin series (nine are possible, four are known); -- so called because the molecule has seven carbon atoms. Specifically, a colorless liquid, found as a constituent of petroleum, in the tar oil of cannel coal, etc.

Heptavalent (a.) Having seven units of attractive force or affinity; -- said of heptad elements or radicals.

Hilted (a.) Having a hilt; -- used in composition; as, basket-hilted, cross-hilted.

Hist (interj.) Hush; be silent; -- a signal for silence.

Histogenesis (n.) The formation and development of organic tissues; histogeny; -- the opposite of histolysis.

Histogenetic (a.) Tissue-producing; connected with the formation and development of the organic tissues.

Histology (n.) That branch of biological science, which treats of the minute (microscopic) structure of animal and vegetable tissues; -- called also histiology.

History (n.) A systematic, written account of events, particularly of those affecting a nation, institution, science, or art, and usually connected with a philosophical explanation of their causes; a true story, as distinguished from a romance; -- distinguished also from annals, which relate simply the facts and events of each year, in strict chronological order; from biography, which is the record of an individual's life; and from memoir, which is history composed from personal experience, ob> Histrionical (a.) Of or relating to the stage or a stageplayer; befitting a theatre; theatrical; -- sometimes in a bad sense.

Hinterland (n.) The land or region lying behind the coast district. The term is used esp. with reference to the so-called doctrine of the hinterland, sometimes advanced, that occupation of the coast supports a claim to an exclusive right to occupy, from time to time, the territory lying inland of the coast.

Hostler (n.) The person who has the care of horses at an inn or stable; hence, any one who takes care of horses; a groom; -- so called because the innkeeper formerly attended to this duty in person.

Hunt (v. t.) To search diligently after; to seek; to pursue; to follow; -- often with out or up; as, to hunt up the facts; to hunt out evidence.

Hunt (v. t.) To drive; to chase; -- with down, from, away, etc.; as, to hunt down a criminal; he was hunted from the parish.

Hunt (v. i.) To seek; to pursue; to search; -- with for or after.

Hurt (n.) A band on a trip-hammer helve, bearing the trunnions.

Hurt (v. t.) To wound the feelings of; to cause mental pain to; to offend in honor or self-respect; to annoy; to grieve.

Hunt (v. i.) To be in a state of instability of movement or forced oscillation, as a governor which has a large movement of the balls for small change of load, an arc-lamp clutch mechanism which moves rapidly up and down with variations of current, or the like; also, to seesaw, as a pair of alternators working in parallel.

Hysterology (n.) A figure by which the ordinary course of thought is inverted in expression, and the last put first; -- called also hysteron proteron.

Hystricomorphous (a.) Like, or allied to, the porcupines; -- said of a group (Hystricomorpha) of rodents.

Ianthina (n.) Any gastropod of the genus Ianthina, of which various species are found living in mid ocean; -- called also purple shell, and violet snail.

Ichthyoidal (a.) Somewhat like a fish; having some of the characteristics of fishes; -- said of some amphibians.

Ichthyolatry (n.) Worship of fishes, or of fish-shaped idols.

Ichthyomorphous (a.) Fish-shaped; as, the ichthyomorphic idols of ancient Assyria.

Ichthyosauria (n. pl.) An extinct order of marine reptiles, including Ichthyosaurus and allied forms; -- called also Ichthyopterygia. They have not been found later than the Cretaceous period.

Ichthyosaurus (n.) An extinct genus of marine reptiles; -- so named from their short, biconcave vertebrae, resembling those of fishes. Several species, varying in length from ten to thirty feet, are known from the Liassic, Oolitic, and Cretaceous formations.

Ichthyosis (n.) A disease in which the skin is thick, rough, and scaly; -- called also fishskin.

Initiative (n.) The right or procedure by which legislation may be introduced or enacted directly by the people, as in the Swiss Confederation and in many of the States of the United States; -- chiefly used with the. The procedure of the initiative is essentially as follows: Upon the filing of a petition signed by a required number or percentage of qualified voters the desired measure must be submitted to a popular vote, and upon receiving the required majority (commonly a majority of those vo> Instroke (n.) An inward stroke; specif., in a steam or other engine, a stroke in which the piston is moving away from the crank shaft; -- opposed to outstroke.

Instant (a.) A day of the present or current month; as, the sixth instant; -- an elliptical expression equivalent to the sixth of the month instant, i. e., the current month. See Instant, a., 3.

Instead (adv.) In the place or room; -- usually followed by of.

Instead (adv.) Equivalent; equal to; -- usually with of.

Instigate (v. t.) To goad or urge forward; to set on; to provoke; to incite; -- used chiefly with reference to evil actions; as to instigate one to a crime.

Jest (v. i.) To take part in a merrymaking; -- especially, to act in a mask or interlude.

Jester (n.) A buffoon; a merry-andrew; a court fool.

Jolt (v. t.) To cause to shake with a sudden up and down motion, as in a carriage going over rough ground, or on a high-trotting horse; as, the horse jolts the rider; fast driving jolts the carriage and the passengers.

Jowter (n.) A mounted peddler of fish; -- called also jouster.

Just (adv.) Precisely; exactly; -- in place, time, or degree; neither more nor less than is stated.

Keitloa (n.) A black, two-horned, African rhinoceros (Atelodus keitloa). It has the posterior horn about as long as the anterior one, or even longer.

Kilted (a.) Tucked or fastened up; -- said of petticoats, etc.

Knitback (n.) The plant comfrey; -- so called from its use as a restorative.

Knot (v. i.) To copulate; -- said of toads.

Knotberry (n.) The cloudberry (Rudus Chamaemorus); -- so called from its knotted stems.

Koftgari (a.) Ornamental work produced by inlaying steel with gold, -- a variety of damascening much used in the arts of India.

Kulturkampf (n.) Lit., culture war; -- a name, originating with Virchow (1821 -- 1902), given to a struggle between the the Roman Catholic Church and the German government, chiefly over the latter's efforts to control educational and ecclesiastical appointments in the interest of the political policy of centralization. The struggle began with the passage by the Prussian Diet in May, 1873, of the so-called May laws, or Falk laws, aiming at the regulation of the clergy. Opposition eventually com> Lactamic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an amido acid related to lactic acid, and called also amido-propionic acid.

Lactucic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, the juice of the Lactuca virosa; -- said of certain acids.

Lantern (n.) Something inclosing a light, and protecting it from wind, rain, etc. ; -- sometimes portable, as a closed vessel or case of horn, perforated tin, glass, oiled paper, or other material, having a lamp or candle within; sometimes fixed, as the glazed inclosure of a street light, or of a lighthouse light.

Lantern (n.) A kind of cage inserted in a stuffing box and surrounding a piston rod, to separate the packing into two parts and form a chamber between for the reception of steam, etc. ; -- called also lantern brass.

Last (n.) A load; a heavy burden; hence, a certain weight or measure, generally estimated at 4,000 lbs., but varying for different articles and in different countries. In England, a last of codfish, white herrings, meal, or ashes, is twelve barrels; a last of corn, ten quarters, or eighty bushels, in some parts of England, twenty-one quarters; of gunpowder, twenty-four barrels, each containing 100 lbs; of red herrings, twenty cades, or 20,000; of hides, twelve dozen; of leather, twenty dickers> Latten (n.) A kind of brass hammered into thin sheets, formerly much used for making church utensils, as candlesticks, crosses, etc.; -- called also latten brass.

Latter (a.) Later; more recent; coming or happening after something else; -- opposed to former; as, the former and latter rain.

Leatherback (n.) A large sea turtle (Sphargis coriacea), having no bony shell on its back. It is common in the warm and temperate parts of the Atlantic, and sometimes weighs over a thousand pounds; -- called also leather turtle, leathery turtle, leather-backed tortoise, etc.

Leatherwood (n.) A small branching shrub (Dirca palustris), with a white, soft wood, and a tough, leathery bark, common in damp woods in the Northern United States; -- called also moosewood, and wicopy.

Leet (n.) A court-leet; the district within the jurisdiction of a court-leet; the day on which a court-leet is held.

Leetman (n.) One subject to the jurisdiction of a court-leet.

Left (a.) Of or pertaining to that side of the body in man on which the muscular action of the limbs is usually weaker than on the other side; -- opposed to right, when used in reference to a part of the body; as, the left hand, or arm; the left ear. Also said of the corresponding side of the lower animals.

Left (n.) Those members of a legislative assembly (as in France) who are in the opposition; the advanced republicans and extreme radicals. They have their seats at the left-hand side of the presiding officer. See Center, and Right.

Lenticel (n.) A small, lens-shaped gland on the under side of some leaves.

Lenticular (a.) Resembling a lentil in size or form; having the form of a double-convex lens.

Lento (a. & adv.) Slow; in slow time; slowly; -- rarely written lente.

Lentoid (a.) Having the form of a lens; lens-shaped.

Leptiform (a.) Having a form somewhat like leptus; -- said of active insect larvae having three pairs of legs. See Larva.

Leptorhine (a.) Having the nose narrow; -- said esp. of the skull. Opposed to platyrhine.

Leptothrix (n.) Having the form of a little chain; -- applied to bacteria when, as in multiplication by fission, they form a chain of filiform individuals.

Leptus (n.) The six-legged young, or larva, of certain mites; -- sometimes used as a generic name. See Harvest mite, under Harvest.

Lest (a.) That (without the negative particle); -- after certain expressions denoting fear or apprehension.

Letterpress (n.) Print; letters and words impressed on paper or other material by types; -- often used of the reading matter in distinction from the illustrations.

Letterwood (n.) The beautiful and highly elastic wood of a tree of the genus Brosimum (B. Aubletii), found in Guiana; -- so called from black spots in it which bear some resemblance to hieroglyphics; also called snakewood, and leopardwood. It is much used for bows and for walking sticks.

Letts (n. pl.) An Indo-European people, allied to the Lithuanians and Old Prussians, and inhabiting a part of the Baltic provinces of Russia.

Lift (v. t.) To move in a direction opposite to that of gravitation; to raise; to elevate; to bring up from a lower place to a higher; to upheave; sometimes implying a continued support or holding in the higher place; -- said of material things; as, to lift the foot or the hand; to lift a chair or a burden.

Lift (v. t.) To raise, elevate, exalt, improve, in rank, condition, estimation, character, etc.; -- often with up.

Lift (n.) A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below; -- used for raising or supporting the end of the yard.

List (n.) A little square molding; a fillet; -- called also listel.

Listerism (n.) The systematic use of antiseptics in the performance of operations and the treatment of wounds; -- so called from Joseph Lister, an English surgeon.

Listing (n.) The throwing up of the soil into ridges, -- a method adopted in the culture of beets and some garden crops.

Litter (v. t.) To give birth to; to bear; -- said of brutes, esp. those which produce more than one at a birth, and also of human beings, in abhorrence or contempt.

Little (a.) Small in size or extent; not big; diminutive; -- opposed to big or large; as, a little body; a little animal; a little piece of ground; a little hill; a little distance; a little child.

Little (adv.) In a small quantity or degree; not much; slightly; somewhat; -- often with a preceding it.

Littoral (a.) Inhabiting the seashore, esp. the zone between high-water and low-water mark.

Littorina (n.) A genus of small pectinibranch mollusks, having thick spiral shells, abundant between tides on nearly all rocky seacoasts. They feed on seaweeds. The common periwinkle is a well-known example. See Periwinkle.

Lixt () 2d pers. sing. pres. of Lige, to lie, to tell lies, -- contracted for ligest.

Lister (n.) A double-moldboard plow which throws a deep furrow, and at the same time plants and covers grain in the bottom of the furrow.

Loft (v. t.) To make or furnish with a loft; to cause to have loft; as, a lofted house; a lofted golf-club head.

Lofter (n.) An iron club used in lofting the ball; -- called also lofting iron.

Lust (n.) Longing desire; eagerness to possess or enjoy; -- in a had sense; as, the lust of gain.

Lust (n.) To have an eager, passionate, and especially an inordinate or sinful desire, as for the gratification of the sexual appetite or of covetousness; -- often with after.

Lustre (n.) A fabric of wool and cotton with a lustrous surface, -- used for women's dresses.

Mantel (n.) The finish around a fireplace, covering the chimney-breast in front and sometimes on both sides; especially, a shelf above the fireplace, and its supports.

Mantelet (n.) A musket-proof shield of rope, wood, or metal, which is sometimes used for the protection of sappers or riflemen while attacking a fortress, or of gunners at embrasures; -- now commonly written mantlet.

Mantilla (n.) A kind of veil, covering the head and falling down upon the shoulders; -- worn in Spain, Mexico, etc.

Mantle (v. i.) To unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; -- said of hawks. Also used figuratively.

Mantle (v. i.) To spread out; -- said of wings.

Mantling (n.) The representation of a mantle, or the drapery behind and around a coat of arms: -- called also lambrequin.

Marten (n.) Any one of several fur-bearing carnivores of the genus Mustela, closely allied to the sable. Among the more important species are the European beech, or stone, marten (Mustela foina); the pine marten (M. martes); and the American marten, or sable (M. Americana), which some zoologists consider only a variety of the Russian sable.

Martin (n.) A perforated stone-faced runner for grinding.

Martingal (n.) The act of doubling, at each stake, that which has been lost on the preceding stake; also, the sum so risked; -- metaphorically derived from the bifurcation of the martingale of a harness.

Martinmas (n.) The feast of St. Martin, the eleventh of November; -- often called martlemans.

Martlet (n.) A bird without beak or feet; -- generally assumed to represent a martin. As a mark of cadency it denotes the fourth son.

Masted (a.) Furnished with a mast or masts; -- chiefly in composition; as, a three-masted schooner.

Master (n.) A vessel having (so many) masts; -- used only in compounds; as, a two-master.

Master (n.) A male person having another living being so far subject to his will, that he can, in the main, control his or its actions; -- formerly used with much more extensive application than now. (a) The employer of a servant. (b) The owner of a slave. (c) The person to whom an apprentice is articled. (d) A sovereign, prince, or feudal noble; a chief, or one exercising similar authority. (e) The head of a household. (f) The male head of a school or college. (g) A male teacher. (h) The dire> Master (n.) A title given by courtesy, now commonly pronounced mister, except when given to boys; -- sometimes written Mister, but usually abbreviated to Mr.

Master (n.) The commander of a merchant vessel; -- usually called captain. Also, a commissioned officer in the navy ranking next above ensign and below lieutenant; formerly, an officer on a man-of-war who had immediate charge, under the commander, of sailing the vessel.

Masterpiece (n.) Anything done or made with extraordinary skill; a capital performance; a chef-d'oeuvre; a supreme achievement.

Mastic (n.) A low shrubby tree of the genus Pistacia (P. Lentiscus), growing upon the islands and coasts of the Mediterranean, and producing a valuable resin; -- called also, mastic tree.

Mastigure (n.) Any one of several large spiny-tailed lizards of the genus Uromastix. They inhabit Southern Asia and North Africa.

Mastodyny (n.) Pain occuring in the mamma or female breast, -- a form of neuralgia.

Mastoid (a.) Resembling the nipple or the breast; -- applied specifically to a process of the temporal bone behind the ear.

Masturbation (n.) Onanism; self-pollution.

Mattages (n.) A shrike or butcher bird; -- written also matagasse.

Matter (n.) Affair worthy of account; thing of consequence; importance; significance; moment; -- chiefly in the phrases what matter 0 d h p u z no matter, and the like.

Matter (n.) Amount; quantity; portion; space; -- often indefinite.

Matter (n.) That which is permanent, or is supposed to be given, and in or upon which changes are effected by psychological or physical processes and relations; -- opposed to form.

Meated (a.) Having (such) meat; -- used chiefly in composition; as, thick-meated.

Meeting (n.) An assembly for worship; as, to attend meeting on Sunday; -- in England, applied distinctively and disparagingly to the worshiping assemblies of Dissenters.

Meetinghouse (n.) A house used as a place of worship; a church; -- in England, applied only to a house so used by Dissenters.

Melting (a.) Causing to melt; becoming melted; -- used literally or figuratively; as, a melting heat; a melting appeal; a melting mood.

Mention (n.) A speaking or notice of anything, -- usually in a brief or cursory manner. Used especially in the phrase to make mention of.

Mestee (n.) The offspring of a white person and a quadroon; -- so called in the West Indies.

Mettle (n.) Substance or quality of temperament; spirit, esp. as regards honor, courage, fortitude, ardor, etc.; disposition; -- usually in a good sense.

Mettled (a.) Having mettle; high-spirited; ardent; full of fire.

Mistake (n.) Misconception, error, which when non-negligent may be ground for rescinding a contract, or for refusing to perform it.

Mistressship (n.) Ladyship, a style of address; -- with the personal pronoun.

Mixture (n.) That which results from mixing different ingredients together; a compound; as, to drink a mixture of molasses and water; -- also, a medley.

Mixture (n.) A mass of two or more ingredients, the particles of which are separable, independent, and uncompounded with each other, no matter how thoroughly and finely commingled; -- contrasted with a compound; thus, gunpowder is a mechanical mixture of carbon, sulphur, and niter.

Mixture (n.) An organ stop, comprising from two to five ranges of pipes, used only in combination with the foundation and compound stops; -- called also furniture stop. It consists of high harmonics, or overtones, of the ground tone.

Montem (n.) A custom, formerly practiced by the scholars at Eton school, England, of going every third year, on Whittuesday, to a hillock near the Bath road, and exacting money from all passers-by, to support at the university the senior scholar of the school.

Monteith (n.) A vessel in which glasses are washed; -- so called from the name of the inventor.

Montgolfier (n.) A balloon which ascends by the buoyancy of air heated by a fire; a fire balloon; -- so called from two brothers, Stephen and Joseph Montgolfier, of France, who first constructed and sent up a fire balloon.

Month (n.) One of the twelve portions into which the year is divided; the twelfth part of a year, corresponding nearly to the length of a synodic revolution of the moon, -- whence the name. In popular use, a period of four weeks is often called a month.

Moot (n.) A meeting for discussion and deliberation; esp., a meeting of the people of a village or district, in Anglo-Saxon times, for the discussion and settlement of matters of common interest; -- usually in composition; as, folk-moot.

Mortar (n.) A short piece of ordnance, used for throwing bombs, carcasses, shells, etc., at high angles of elevation, as 45?, and even higher; -- so named from its resemblance in shape to the utensil above described.

Mortar (n.) A building material made by mixing lime, cement, or plaster of Paris, with sand, water, and sometimes other materials; -- used in masonry for joining stones, bricks, etc., also for plastering, and in other ways.

Mortification (n.) Hence: Deprivation or depression of self-approval; abatement or pride; humiliation; chagrin; vexation.

Mortification (n.) A gift to some charitable or religious institution; -- nearly synonymous with mortmain.

Mostick (n.) A painter's maul-stick.

Monteith (n.) A kind of cotton handkerchief having a uniform colored ground with a regular pattern of white spots produced by discharging the color; -- so called from the Glasgow manufactures.

Multigraph (n.) A combined rotary type-setting and printing machine for office use. The type is transferred semi-automatically by means of keys from a type-supply drum to a printing drum. The printing may be done by means of an inked ribbon to print "typewritten" letters, or directly from inked type or a stereotype plate, as in a printing press.

Must (n.) Being in a condition of dangerous frenzy, usually connected with sexual excitement; -- said of adult male elephants which become so at irregular intervals.

Mufti (n.) Citizen's dress when worn by a naval or military officer; -- a term derived from the British service in India.

Multanimous (a.) Many-minded; many-sided.

Multicarinate (a.) Many-keeled.

Multicuspid (a.) Multicuspidate; -- said of teeth.

Multilateral (a.) Having many sides; many-sided.

Multiplication (n.) The process of repeating, or adding to itself, any given number or quantity a certain number of times; commonly, the process of ascertaining by a briefer computation the result of such repeated additions; also, the rule by which the operation is performed; -- the reverse of division.

Multiplication (n.) The art of increasing gold or silver by magic, -- attributed formerly to the alchemists.

Multipolar (a.) Having many poles; -- applied especially to those ganglionic nerve cells which have several radiating processes.

Multisect (a.) Divided into many similar segments; -- said of an insect or myriapod.

Multispiral (a.) Having numerous spiral coils round a center or nucleus; -- said of the opercula of certain shells.

Multivalvular (a.) Many-valved; having more than two valves; -- said of certain shells, as the chitons.

Munting (n.) Same as Mullion; -- especially used in joiner's work.

Must (v. i. / auxiliary) To be obliged; to be necessitated; -- expressing either physical or moral necessity; as, a man must eat for nourishment; we must submit to the laws.

Mustaiba (n.) A close-grained, neavy wood of a brownish color, brought from Brazil, and used in turning, for making the handles of tools, and the like.

Mustang (n.) The half-wild horse of the plains in Mexico, California, etc. It is small, hardy, and easily sustained.

Myrtle (n.) A species of the genus Myrtus, especially Myrtus communis. The common myrtle has a shrubby, upright stem, eight or ten feet high. Its branches form a close, full head, thickly covered with ovate or lanceolate evergreen leaves. It has solitary axillary white or rosy flowers, followed by black several-seeded berries. The ancients considered it sacred to Venus. The flowers, leaves, and berries are used variously in perfumery and as a condiment, and the beautifully mottled wood is used> Mystery (a.) A kind of secret religious celebration, to which none were admitted except those who had been initiated by certain preparatory ceremonies; -- usually plural; as, the Eleusinian mysteries.

Nasturtium (n.) Any plant of the genus Tropaeolum, geraniaceous herbs, having mostly climbing stems, peltate leaves, and spurred flowers, and including the common Indian cress (Tropaeolum majus), the canary-bird flower (T. peregrinum), and about thirty more species, all natives of South America. The whole plant has a warm pungent flavor, and the fleshy fruits are used as a substitute for capers, while the leaves and flowers are sometimes used in salads.

Nautilus (n.) The argonaut; -- also called paper nautilus. See Argonauta, and Paper nautilus, under Paper.

Nectariferous (a.) Secreting nectar; -- said of blossoms or their parts.

Nectarine (n.) A smooth-skinned variety of peach.

Neptune (n.) The remotest known planet of our system, discovered -- as a result of the computations of Leverrier, of Paris -- by Galle, of Berlin, September 23, 1846. Its mean distance from the sun is about 2,775,000,000 miles, and its period of revolution is about 164,78 years.

Neutral (a.) Having neither acid nor basic properties; unable to turn red litmus blue or blue litmus red; -- said of certain salts or other compounds. Contrasted with acid, and alkaNoctiluca (n.) That which shines at night; -- a fanciful name for phosphorus.

Noctivagant (a.) Going about in the night; night-wandering.

Noctuary (n.) A record of what passes in the night; a nightly journal; -- distinguished from diary.

Noctuid (n.) Any one of numerous moths of the family Noctuidae, or Noctuaelitae, as the cutworm moths, and armyworm moths; -- so called because they fly at night.

Nocturnal (a.) Of, pertaining to, done or occuring in, the night; as, nocturnal darkness, cries, expedition, etc.; -- opposed to diurnal.

Nocturne (n.) A night piece, or serenade. The name is now used for a certain graceful and expressive form of instrumental composition, as the nocturne for orchestra in Mendelsohn's "Midsummer-Night's Dream" music.

Northerner (n.) A native or inhabitant of the Northern States; -- contradistinguished from Southerner.

Northing (n.) Distance northward from any point of departure or of reckoning, measured on a meridian; -- opposed to southing.

Nuptial (n.) Marriage; wedding; nuptial ceremony; -- now only in the plural.

Nycthemeron (n.) The natural day and night, or space of twenty-four hours.

Offtake (n.) A channel for taking away air or water; also, the point of beginning of such a channel; a take-off.

Obstinate (a.) Pertinaciously adhering to an opinion, purpose, or course; persistent; not yielding to reason, arguments, or other means; stubborn; pertinacious; -- usually implying unreasonableness.

Oestrual (a.) Of or pertaining to sexual desire; -- mostly applied to brute animals; as, the oestrual period; oestrual influence.

Opetide (n.) Open time; -- applied to different things

Oration (n.) An elaborate discourse, delivered in public, treating an important subject in a formal and dignified manner; especially, a discourse having reference to some special occasion, as a funeral, an anniversary, a celebration, or the like; -- distinguished from an argument in court, a popular harangue, a sermon, a lecture, etc.; as, Webster's oration at Bunker Hill.

Orator (n.) An officer who is the voice of the university upon all public occasions, who writes, reads, and records all letters of a public nature, presents, with an appropriate address, those persons on whom honorary degrees are to be conferred, and performs other like duties; -- called also public orator.

Orotund (a.) Characterized by fullness, clearness, strength, and smoothness; ringing and musical; -- said of the voice or manner of utterance.

Pastorium (n.) A parsonage; -- so called in some Baptist churches.

Pant (v. i.) To beat with unnatural violence or rapidity; to palpitate, or throb; -- said of the heart.

Pantalet (n.) One of the legs of the loose drawers worn by children and women; particularly, the lower part of such a garment, coming below the knee, often made in a separate piece; -- chiefly in the plural.

Panther (n.) A large dark-colored variety of the leopard, by some zoologists considered a distinct species. It is marked with large ringlike spots, the centers of which are darker than the color of the body.

Pantoscopic (a.) Literally, seeing everything; -- a term applied to eyeglasses or spectacles divided into two segments, the upper being designed for distant vision, the lower for vision of near objects.

Part (n.) A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; talent; -- usually in the plural with a collective sense.

Part (n.) Quarter; region; district; -- usually in the plural.

Part (n.) Such portion of any quantity, as when taken a certain number of times, will exactly make that quantity; as, 3 is a part of 12; -- the opposite of multiple. Also, a Part (v. i.) To go away; to depart; to take leave; to quit each other; hence, to die; -- often with from.

Part (v. i.) To perform an act of parting; to relinquish a connection of any kind; -- followed by with or from.

Partake (v. i.) To have something of the properties, character, or office; -- usually followed by of.

Parted (a.) Cleft so that the divisions reach nearly, but not quite, to the midrib, or the base of the blade; -- said of a leaf, and used chiefly in composition; as, three-parted, five-parted, etc.

Participate (v. i.) To have a share in common with others; to take a part; to partake; -- followed by in, formely by of; as, to participate in a debate.

Participle (n.) A part of speech partaking of the nature both verb and adjective; a form of a verb, or verbal adjective, modifying a noun, but taking the adjuncts of the verb from which it is derived. In the sentences: a letter is written; being asleep he did not hear; exhausted by toil he will sleep soundly, -- written, being, and exhaustedare participles.

Particolored (a.) Same as Party-colored.

Particular (a.) Forming a part of a genus; relatively limited in extension; affirmed or denied of a part of a subject; as, a particular proposition; -- opposed to universal: e. g. (particular affirmative) Some men are wise; (particular negative) Some men are not wise.

Particular (n.) One of the details or items of grounds of claim; -- usually in the pl.; also, a bill of particulars; a minute account; as, a particular of premises.

Parting (n.) A separation; a leave-taking.

Partlet (n.) A hen; -- so called from the ruffing of her neck feathers.

Partridge (n.) Any one of several species of quail-like birds belonging to Colinus, and allied genera.

Paste (n.) A kind of cement made of flour and water, starch and water, or the like, -- used for uniting paper or other substances, as in bookbinding, etc., -- also used in calico printing as a vehicle for mordant or color.

Pastille (n.) A small cone or mass made of paste of gum, benzoin, cinnamon, and other aromatics, -- used for fumigating or scenting the air of a room.

Pastorale (n.) A composition in a soft, rural style, generally in 6-8 or 12-8 time.

Pattee (a.) Narrow at the inner, and very broad at the other, end, or having its arms of that shape; -- said of a cross. See Illust. (8) of Cross.

Pattern (n.) A full-sized model around which a mold of sand is made, to receive the melted metal. It is usually made of wood and in several parts, so as to be removed from the mold without injuring it.

Peat (n.) A small person; a pet; -- sometimes used contemptuously.

Pecten (n.) A vascular pigmented membrane projecting into the vitreous humor within the globe of the eye in birds, and in many reptiles and fishes; -- also called marsupium.

Pelta (n.) A small shield, especially one of an approximately elliptic form, or crescent-shaped.

Peltated (a.) Shield-shaped; scutiform; (Bot.) having the stem or support attached to the lower surface, instead of at the base or margin; -- said of a leaf or other organ.

Pent (v. t.) Penned or shut up; confined; -- often with up.

Pentabasic (a.) Capable of uniting with five molecules of a monacid base; having five acid hydrogen atoms capable of substitution by a basic radical; -- said of certain acids.

Pentacid (a.) Capable of neutralizing, or combining with, five molecules of a monobasic acid; having five hydrogen atoms capable of substitution by acid residues; -- said of certain complex bases.

Pentacle (n.) A figure composed of two equilateral triangles intersecting so as to form a six-pointed star, -- used in early ornamental art, and also with superstitious import by the astrologers and mystics of the Middle Ages.

Pentacrostic (n.) A set of verses so disposed that the name forming the subject of the acrostic occurs five times -- the whole set of verses being divided into five different parts from top to bottom.

Pentadecane (n.) A hydrocarbon of the paraffin series, (C15H32) found in petroleum, tar oil, etc., and obtained as a colorless liquid; -- so called from the fifteen carbon atoms in the molecule.

Pentail (n.) A peculiar insectivore (Ptilocercus Lowii) of Borneo; -- so called from its very long, quill-shaped tail, which is scaly at the base and plumose at the tip.

Pentalpha (n.) A five-pointed star, resembling five alphas joined at their bases; -- used as a symbol.

Pentamera (n. pl.) An extensive division of Coleoptera, including those that normally have five-jointed tarsi. It embraces about half of all the known species of the Coleoptera.

Pentamethylene (n.) A hypothetical hydrocarbon, C5H10, metameric with the amylenes, and the nucleus of a large number of derivatives; -- so named because regarded as composed of five methylene residues. Cf. Trimethylene, and Tetramethylene.

Pentastyle (a.) Having five columns in front; -- said of a temple or portico in classical architecture.

Pentateuch (n.) The first five books of the Old Testament, collectively; -- called also the Law of Moses, Book of the Law of Moses, etc.

Pentathionic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid of sulphur obtained by leading hydrogen sulphide into a solution of sulphur dioxide; -- so called because it contains five atoms of sulphur.

Pentavalent (a.) Having a valence of five; -- said of certain atoms and radicals.

Pentecost (n.) A solemn festival of the Jews; -- so called because celebrated on the fiftieth day (seven weeks) after the second day of the Passover (which fell on the sixteenth of the Jewish month Nisan); -- hence called, also, the Feast of Weeks. At this festival an offering of the first fruits of the harvest was made. By the Jews it was generally regarded as commemorative of the gift of the law on the fiftieth day after the departure from Egypt.

Pentecost (n.) A festival of the Roman Catholic and other churches in commemoration of the descent of the Holy Spirit on the apostles; which occurred on the day of Pentecost; -- called also Whitsunday.

Pentecosty (n.) A troop of fifty soldiers in the Spartan army; -- called also pentecostys.

Penthouse (n.) A shed or roof sloping from the main wall or building, as over a door or window; a lean-to. Also figuratively.

Pentremites (n.) A genus of crinoids belonging to the Blastoidea. They have five petal-like ambulacra.

Pentroof (n.) See Lean-to.

Peptohydrochloric (a.) Designating a hypothetical acid (called peptohydrochloric acid, pepsinhydrochloric acid, and chloropeptic acid) which is supposed to be formed when pepsin and dilute (0.1-0.4 per cent) hydrochloric acid are mixed together.

Pestalozzian (a.) Belonging to, or characteristic of, a system of elementary education which combined manual training with other instruction, advocated and practiced by Jean Henri Pestalozzi (1746-1827), a Swiss teacher.

Pestiferous (a.) Pest-bearing; pestilential; noxious to health; malignant; infectious; contagious; as, pestiferous bodies.

Pestle (n.) A constable's or bailiff's staff; -- so called from its shape.

Petticoat (n.) A loose under-garment worn by women, and covering the body below the waist.

Pettitoes (n. pl.) The toes or feet of a pig, -- often used as food; sometimes, in contempt, the human feet.

Pettychaps (n.) Any one of several species of small European singing birds of the subfamily Sylviinae, as the willow warbler, the chiff-chaff, and the golden warbler (Sylvia hortensis).

Pentathlon (n.) In the modern Olympic Games, a composite contest made up of a running broad jump, throwing the javelin, a 200-meter run, throwing the discus, and a 1500-meter run.

Pentosan () Alt. of -sane

Photobacterium (n.) A genus including certain comma-shaped marine bacteria which emit bluish or greenish phosphorescence. Also, any microorganism of this group.

Photoheliometer (n.) A double-lens instrument for measuring slight variations of the sun's diameter by photography, utilizing the common chord of two overlapping images.

Photophilous (n.) Light-loving; growing in strong light, as many plants.

Photophore (n.) A light-emitting organ; specif., one of the luminous spots on certain marine (mostly deep-sea) fishes.

Photoplay (n.) A play for representation or exhibition by moving pictures; also, the moving-picture representation of a play.

Photosynthesis (n.) The process of constructive metabolism by which carbohydrates are formed from water vapor and the carbon dioxide of the air in the chlorophyll-containing tissues of plants exposed to the action of light. It was formerly called assimilation, but this is now commonly used as in animal physiology. The details of the process are not yet clearly known. Baeyer's theory is that the carbon dioxide is reduced to carbon monoxide, which, uniting with the hydrogen of the water in the c> Phatagin (n.) The long-tailed pangolin (Manis tetradactyla); -- called also ipi.

Photics (n.) The science of light; -- a general term sometimes employed when optics is restricted to light as a producing vision.

Photogalvanography (n.) The art or process of making photo-electrotypes.

Phytolithology (n.) The branch of science which treats of fossil plants; -- usually called paleobotany, sometimes paleophytology.

Pietist (n.) One of a class of religious reformers in Germany in the 17th century who sought to revive declining piety in the Protestant churches; -- often applied as a term of reproach to those who make a display of religious feeling. Also used adjectively.

Pint (n.) A measure of capacity, equal to half a quart, or four gills, -- used in liquid and dry measures. See Quart.

Pintail (n.) A northern duck (Dafila acuta), native of both continents. The adult male has a long, tapering tail. Called also gray duck, piketail, piket-tail, spike-tail, split-tail, springtail, sea pheasant, and gray widgeon.

Pintail (n.) The sharp-tailed grouse of the great plains and Rocky Mountains (Pediocaetes phasianellus); -- called also pintailed grouse, pintailed chicken, springtail, and sharptail.

Pistachio (n.) The nut of the Pistacia vera, a tree of the order Anacardiaceae, containing a kernel of a pale greenish color, which has a pleasant taste, resembling that of the almond, and yields an oil of agreeable taste and odor; -- called also pistachio nut. It is wholesome and nutritive. The tree grows in Arabia, Persia, Syria, and Sicily.

Pistil (n.) The seed-bearing organ of a flower. It consists of an ovary, containing the ovules or rudimentary seeds, and a stigma, which is commonly raised on an elongated portion called a style. When composed of one carpel a pistil is simple; when composed of several, it is compound. See Illust. of Flower, and Ovary.

Pistillate (a.) Having a pistil or pistils; -- usually said of flowers having pistils but no stamens.

Pistol (n.) The smallest firearm used, intended to be fired from one hand, -- now of many patterns, and bearing a great variety of names. See Illust. of Revolver.

Pitta (n.) Any one of a large group of bright-colored clamatorial birds belonging to Pitta, and allied genera of the family Pittidae. Most of the species are varied with three or more colors, such as blue, green, crimson, yellow, purple, and black. They are called also ground thrushes, and Old World ant thrushes; but they are not related to the true thrushes.

Pittacal (n.) A dark blue substance obtained from wood tar. It consists of hydrocarbons which when oxidized form the orange-yellow eupittonic compounds, the salts of which are dark blue.

Plate (n.) A small five-sided area (enveloping a diamond-shaped area one foot square) beside which the batter stands and which must be touched by some part of a player on completing a run; -- called also home base, or home plate.

Plater (n.) A horse that runs chiefly in plate, esp. selling-plate, races; hence, an inferior race horse.

Plateau (n.) A flat surface; especially, a broad, level, elevated area of land; a table-land.

Platen (n.) The movable table of a machine tool, as a planer, on which the work is fastened, and presented to the action of the tool; -- also called table.

Plateresque (a.) Resembling silver plate; -- said of certain architectural ornaments.

Plating (n.) The art or process of covering anything with a plate or plates, or with metal, particularly of overlaying a base or dull metal with a thin plate of precious or bright metal, as by mechanical means or by electro-magnetic deposition.

Platinic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, platinum; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which the element has a higher valence, as contrasted with the platinous compounds; as, platinic chloride (PtCl4).

Platinocyanic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid compound of platinous cyanide and hydrocyanic acid. It is obtained as a cinnaber-red crystalPlatinoid (n.) An alloy of German silver containing tungsten; -- used for forming electrical resistance coils and standards.

Platinous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, platinum; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which the element has a lower valence, as contrasted with the platinic compounds; as, platinous chloride (PtCl2).

Platinum (n.) A metallic element, intermediate in value between silver and gold, occurring native or alloyed with other metals, also as the platinum arsenide (sperrylite). It is heavy tin-white metal which is ductile and malleable, but very infusible, and characterized by its resistance to strong chemical reagents. It is used for crucibles, for stills for sulphuric acid, rarely for coin, and in the form of foil and wire for many purposes. Specific gravity 21.5. Atomic weight 194.3. Symbol Pt. > Platycoelian (a.) Flat at the anterior and concave at the posterior end; -- said of the centra of the vertebrae of some extinct dinouaurs.

Platyptera (n. pl.) A division of Pseudoneuroptera including the species which have four broad, flat wings, as the termites, or white-ants, and the stone flies (Perla).

Platyrhine (a.) Having the nose broad; -- opposed to leptorhine.

Platyrhini (n. pl.) A division of monkeys, including the American species, which have a broad nasal septum, thirty-six teeth, and usually a prehensile tail. See Monkey.

Plethora (n.) Overfullness; especially, excessive fullness of the blood vessels; repletion; that state of the blood vessels or of the system when the blood exceeds a healthy standard in quantity; hyperaemia; -- opposed to anaemia.

Plethoric (a.) Haeving a full habit of body; characterized by plethora or excess of blood; as, a plethoric constitution; -- used also metaphorically.

Plot (n.) Any scheme, stratagem, secret design, or plan, of a complicated nature, adapted to the accomplishment of some purpose, usually a treacherous and mischievous one; a conspiracy; an intrigue; as, the Rye-house Plot.

Pluteus (n.) The free-swimming larva of sea urchins and ophiurans, having several long stiff processes inclosing calcareous rods.

Plutonism (n.) The theory, early advanced in geology, that the successive rocks of the earth's crust were formed by igneous fusion; -- opposed to the Neptunian theory.

Poltroon (n.) An arrant coward; a dastard; a craven; a mean-spirited wretch.

Pontee (n.) An iron rod used by glass makers for manipulating the hot glass; -- called also, puntil, puntel, punty, and ponty. See Fascet.

Pontoon (n.) A wooden flat-bottomed boat, a metallic cylinder, or a frame covered with canvas, India rubber, etc., forming a portable float, used in building bridges quickly for the passage of troops.

Port (v. t.) To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; -- said of the helm, and used chiefly in the imperative, as a command; as, port your helm.

Portcullis (n.) An English coin of the reign of Elizabeth, struck for the use of the East India Company; -- so called from its bearing the figure of a portcullis on the reverse.

Porter (n.) A bar of iron or steel at the end of which a forging is made; esp., a long, large bar, to the end of which a heavy forging is attached, and by means of which the forging is lifted and handled in hammering and heating; -- called also porter bar.

Portfire (n.) A case of strong paper filled with a composition of niter, sulphur, and mealed powder, -- used principally to ignite the priming in proving guns, and as an incendiary material in shells.

Portionist (n.) A scholar at Merton College, Oxford, who has a certain academical allowance or portion; -- corrupted into postmaster.

Post (v. t.) To inform; to give the news to; to make (one) acquainted with the details of a subject; -- often with up.

Posterior (a.) Later in time; hence, later in the order of proceeding or moving; coming after; -- opposed to prior.

Posterior (a.) Situated behind; hinder; -- opposed to anterior.

Posterior (a.) At or toward the caudal extremity; caudal; -- in human anatomy often used for dorsal.

Posterior (a.) On the side next the axis of inflorescence; -- said of an axillary flower.

Posteriority (n.) The state of being later or subsequent; as, posteriority of time, or of an event; -- opposed to priority.

Posterity (n.) The race that proceeds from a progenitor; offspring to the furthest generation; the aggregate number of persons who are descended from an ancestor of a generation; descendants; -- contrasted with ancestry; as, the posterity of Abraham.

Postero () - (/). A combining form meaning posterior, back; as, postero-inferior, situated back and below; postero-lateral, situated back and at the side.

Postgeniture (n.) The condition of being born after another in the same family; -- distinguished from primogeniture.

Postticous (a.) Situated on the outer side of a filament; -- said of an extrorse anther.

Postman (n.) One of the two most experienced barristers in the Court of Exchequer, who have precedence in motions; -- so called from the place where he sits. The other of the two is called the tubman.

Postmark (v. t.) To mark with a post-office stamp; as, to postmark a letter or parcel.

Postposition (n.) A word or particle placed after, or at the end of, another word; -- distinguished from preposition.

Postprandial (a.) Happening, or done, after dinner; after-dinner; as, postprandial speeches.

Postulate (n.) Something demanded or asserted; especially, a position or supposition assumed without proof, or one which is considered as self-evident; a truth to which assent may be demanded or challenged, without argument or evidence.

Postulate (n.) The enunciation of a self-evident problem, in distinction from an axiom, which is the enunciation of a self-evident theorem.

Potter (n.) The red-bellied terrapin. See Terrapin.

Postexilic (a.) belonging to a period subsequent to the Babylonian captivity or exile (b. c. 597 or about 586-about 537).

Pratique (n.) Primarily, liberty of converse; intercourse; hence, a certificate, given after compliance with quarantine regulations, permitting a ship to land passengers and crew; -- a term used particularly in the south of Europe.

Pretend (v. i.) To put in, or make, a claim, truly or falsely; to allege a title; to lay claim to, or strive after, something; -- usually with to.

Preterit (a.) Past; -- applied to a tense which expresses an action or state as past.

Prettiness (n.) The quality or state of being pretty; -- used sometimes in a disparaging sense.

Pretty (superl.) Affectedly nice; foppish; -- used in an ill sense.

Pretty (superl.) Mean; despicable; contemptible; -- used ironically; as, a pretty trick; a pretty fellow.

Pretty (adv.) In some degree; moderately; considerably; rather; almost; -- less emphatic than very; as, I am pretty sure of the fact; pretty cold weather.

Pritch (n.) A sharp-pointed instrument; also, an eelspear.

Protasis (n.) The introductory or subordinate member of a sentence, generally of a conditional sentence; -- opposed to apodosis. See Apodosis.

Protection (n.) A writing that protects or secures from molestation or arrest; a pass; a safe-conduct; a passport.

Protection (n.) A theory, or a policy, of protecting the producers in a country from foreign competition in the home market by the imposition of such discriminating duties on goods of foreign production as will restrict or prevent their importation; -- opposed to free trade.

Protectorate (n.) Government by a protector; -- applied especially to the government of England by Oliver Cromwell.

Proteles (n.) A South Africa genus of Carnivora, allied to the hyenas, but smaller and having weaker jaws and teeth. It includes the aard-wolf.

Proterandrous (a.) Having the stamens come to maturity before the pistil; -- opposed to proterogynous.

Proteranthous (a.) Having flowers appearing before the leaves; -- said of certain plants.

Proterogynous (a.) Having the pistil come to maturity before the stamens; protogynous; -- opposed to proterandrous.

Protest (v. i.) To make a solemn declaration (often a written one) expressive of opposition; -- with against; as, he protest against your votes.

Protestant (v.) One who protests; -- originally applied to those who adhered to Luther, and protested against, or made a solemn declaration of dissent from, a decree of the Emperor Charles V. and the Diet of Spires, in 1529, against the Reformers, and appealed to a general council; -- now used in a popular sense to designate any Christian who does not belong to the Roman Catholic or the Greek Church.

Protestation (n.) Formerly, a declaration in common-law pleading, by which the party interposes an oblique allegation or denial of some fact, protesting that it does or does not exist, and at the same time avoiding a direct affirmation or denial.

Proteus (n.) A genus of aquatic eel-shaped amphibians found in caves in Austria. They have permanent external gills as well as lungs. The eyes are small and the legs are weak.

Prothesis (n.) A credence table; -- so called by the Eastern or Greek Church.

Protocanonical (a.) Of or pertaining to the first canon, or that which contains the authorized collection of the books of Scripture; -- opposed to deutero-canonical.

Protomartyr (n.) The first martyr; the first who suffers, or is sacrificed, in any cause; -- applied esp. to Stephen, the first Christian martyr.

Protoplasm (n.) The viscid and more or less granular material of vegetable and animal cells, possessed of vital properties by which the processes of nutrition, secretion, and growth go forward; the so-called " physical basis of life;" the original cell substance, cytoplasm, cytoblastema, bioplasm sarcode, etc.

Protoplast (n.) A first-formed organized body; the first individual, or pair of individuals, of a species.

Protoplasta (n. pl.) A division of fresh-water rhizopods including those that have a soft body and delicate branched pseudopodia. The genus Gromia is one of the best-known.

Protoplastic (a.) First-formed.

Protopope (n.) One of the clergy of first rank in the lower order of secular clergy; an archpriest; -- called also protopapas.

Protoxide (n.) That one of a series of oxides having the lowest proportion of oxygen. See Proto-, 2 (b).

Protozoonite (n.) One of the primary, or first-formed, segments of an embryonic arthropod.

Protract (v. t.) To extend; to protrude; as, the cat can protract its claws; -- opposed to retract.

Protractor (n.) A muscle which extends an organ or part; -- opposed to retractor.

Prutenic (a.) Prussian; -- applied to certain astronomical tables published in the sixteenth century, founded on the principles of Copernicus, a Prussian.

Punt (n.) A flat-bottomed boat with square ends. It is adapted for use in shallow waters.

Putting (n.) The throwing of a heavy stone, shot, etc., with the hand raised or extended from the shoulder; -- originally, a Scottish game.

Putty (n.) A kind of thick paste or cement compounded of whiting, or soft carbonate of lime, and linseed oil, when applied beaten or kneaded to the consistence of dough, -- used in fastening glass in sashes, stopping crevices, and for similar purposes.

Puttyroot (n.) An American orchidaceous plant (Aplectrum hyemale) which flowers in early summer. Its slender naked rootstock produces each year a solid corm, filled with exceedingly glutinous matter, which sends up later a single large oval evergreen plaited leaf. Called also Adam-and-Eve.

Quaternary (a.) Later than, or subsequent to, the Tertiary; Post-tertiary; as, the Quaternary age, or Age of man.

Quaternity (n.) The union of four in one, as of four persons; -- analogous to the theological term trinity.

Quatorze (n.) The four aces, kings, queens, knaves, or tens, in the game of piquet; -- so called because quatorze counts as fourteen points.

Quatuor (n.) A quartet; -- applied chiefly to instrumental compositions.

Quit (a.) To meet the claims upon, or expectations entertained of; to conduct; to acquit; -- used reflexively.

Quoth (v. t.) Said; spoke; uttered; -- used only in the first and third persons in the past tenses, and always followed by its nominative, the word or words said being the object; as, quoth I. quoth he.

Rafter (n.) Originally, any rough and somewhat heavy piece of timber. Now, commonly, one of the timbers of a roof which are put on sloping, according to the inclination of the roof. See Illust. of Queen-post.

Rant (v. i.) To rave in violent, high-sounding, or extravagant language, without dignity of thought; to be noisy, boisterous, and bombastic in talk or declamation; as, a ranting preacher.

Rant (n.) High-sounding language, without importance or dignity of thought; boisterous, empty declamation; bombast; as, the rant of fanatics.

Ranter (n.) One of a religious sect which sprung up in 1645; -- called also Seekers. See Seeker.

Ranter (n.) One of the Primitive Methodists, who seceded from the Wesleyan Methodists on the ground of their deficiency in fervor and zeal; -- so called in contempt.

Raptorial (a.) Rapacious; living upon prey; -- said especially of certain birds.

Raptorial (a.) Adapted for seizing prey; -- said of the legs, claws, etc., of insects, birds, and other animals.

Rattle (v. i.) To make a clatter with the voice; to talk rapidly and idly; to clatter; -- with on or away; as, she rattled on for an hour.

Rattle (n.) The noise in the throat produced by the air in passing through mucus which the lungs are unable to expel; -- chiefly observable at the approach of death, when it is called the death rattle. See R/le.

Rattlebox (n.) Any species of Crotalaria, a genus of yellow-flowered herbs, with inflated, many-seeded pods.

Rattlewings (n.) The golden-eye.

Rattoon (n.) One of the stems or shoots of sugar cane of the second year's growth from the root, or later. See Plant-cane.

Rectangle (n.) A four-sided figure having only right angles; a right-angled parallelogram.

Rectangular (a.) Right-angled; having one or more angles of ninety degrees.

Rectangularity (n.) The quality or condition of being rectangular, or right-angled.

Rectinerved (a.) Having the veins or nerves straight; -- said of leaves.

Rectiserial (a.) Arranged in exactly vertical ranks, as the leaves on stems of many kinds; -- opposed to curviserial.

Recto (n.) The right-hand page; -- opposed to verso.

Rectum (n.) The terminal part of the large intestine; -- so named because supposed by the old anatomists to be straight. See Illust. under Digestive.

Redtail (n.) The red-tailed hawk.

Redtop (n.) A kind of grass (Agrostis vulgaris) highly valued in the United States for pasturage and hay for cattle; -- called also English grass, and in some localities herd's grass. See Illustration in Appendix. The tall redtop is Triodia seslerioides.

Renter (n.) One who rents or leases an estate; -- usually said of a lessee or tenant.

Renter (v. t.) To restore the original design of, by working in new warp; -- said with reference to tapestry.

Reptant (a.) Creeping; crawling; -- said of reptiles, worms, etc.

Reptilia (n. pl.) A class of air-breathing oviparous vertebrates, usually covered with scales or bony plates. The heart generally has two auricles and one ventricle. The development of the young is the same as that of birds.

Restiform (a.) Formed like a rope; -- applied especially to several ropelike bundles or masses of fibers on the dorsal side of the medulla oblongata.

Restive (a.) Uneasy; restless; averse to standing still; fidgeting about; -- applied especially to horses.

Retting (n.) The act or process of preparing flax for use by soaking, maceration, and kindred processes; -- also called rotting. See Ret.

Rhatanhy (n.) The powerfully astringent root of a half-shrubby Peruvian plant (Krameria triandra). It is used in medicine and to color port wine.

Rhotacism (n.) An oversounding, or a misuse, of the letter r; specifically (Phylol.), the tendency, exhibited in the Indo-European languages, to change s to r, as wese to were.

Rictus (n.) The gape of the mouth, as of birds; -- often resricted to the corners of the mouth.

Rietboc (n.) The reedbuck, a South African antelope (Cervicapra arundinacea); -- so called from its frequenting dry places covered with high grass or reeds. Its color is yellowish brown. Called also inghalla, and rietbok.

Root (v. t.) To plant and fix deeply in the earth, or as in the earth; to implant firmly; hence, to make deep or radical; to establish; -- used chiefly in the participle; as, rooted trees or forests; rooted dislike.

Root (v. t.) To tear up by the root; to eradicate; to extirpate; -- with up, out, or away.

Rostrum (n.) The Beaks; the stage or platform in the forum where orations, pleadings, funeral harangues, etc., were delivered; -- so called because after the Latin war, it was adorned with the beaks of captured vessels; later, applied also to other platforms erected in Rome for the use of public orators.

Rout (n.) The state of being disorganized and thrown into confusion; -- said especially of an army defeated, broken in pieces, and put to flight in disorder or panic; also, the act of defeating and breaking up an army; as, the rout of the enemy was complete.

Root (v. i.) To shout for, or otherwise noisly applaud or encourage, a contestant, as in sports; hence, to wish earnestly for the success of some one or the happening of some event, with the superstitious notion that this action may have efficacy; -- usually with for; as, the crowd rooted for the home team.

Runt (a.) Any animal which is unusually small, as compared with others of its kind; -- applied particularly to domestic animals.

Runt (a.) A dwarf; also, a mean, despicable, boorish person; -- used opprobriously.

Rust (n.) A minute mold or fungus forming reddish or rusty spots on the leaves and stems of cereal and other grasses (Trichobasis Rubigo-vera), now usually believed to be a form or condition of the corn mildew (Puccinia graminis). As rust, it has solitary reddish spores; as corn mildew, the spores are double and blackish.

Rusty (superl.) Rust-colored; dark.

Rutterkin (n.) An old crafty fox or beguiler -- a word of contempt.

Saltant (v.) In a leaping position; springing forward; -- applied especially to the squirrel, weasel, and rat, also to the cat, greyhound, monkey, etc.

Saltarello (n.) A popular Italian dance in quick 3-4 or 6-8 time, running mostly in triplets, but with a hop step at the beginning of each measure. See Tarantella.

Saltire (v.) A St. Andrew's cross, or cross in the form of an X, -- one of the honorable ordinaries.

Saltirewise (adv.) In the manner of a saltire; -- said especially of the blazoning of a shield divided by two Saltmouth (n.) A wide-mouthed bottle with glass stopper for holding chemicals, especially crystallized salts.

Santalic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, sandalwood (Santalum); -- used specifically to designate an acid obtained as a resinous or red crystalSantoninic (a.) Of or pertaining to santonin; -- used specifically to designate an acid not known in the free state, but obtained in its salts.

Sawtooth (n.) An arctic seal (Lobodon carcinophaga), having the molars serrated; -- called also crab-eating seal.

Scat (interj.) Go away; begone; away; -- chiefly used in driving off a cat.

Scatch (n.) A kind of bit for the bridle of a horse; -- called also scatchmouth.

Scutate (a.) Buckler-shaped; round or nearly round.

Scutellated (a.) Having the tarsi covered with broad transverse scales, or scutella; -- said of certain birds.

Scutelliplantar (a.) Having broad scutella on the front, and small scales on the posterior side, of the tarsus; -- said of certain birds.

Scutiform (a.) Shield-shaped; scutate.

Scutiped (a.) Having the anterior surface of the tarsus covered with scutella, or transverse scales, in the form of incomplete bands terminating at a groove on each side; -- said of certain birds.

Scuttle (n.) A wide-mouthed vessel for holding coal: a coal hod.

Scutum (n.) An oblong shield made of boards or wickerwork covered with leather, with sometimes an iron rim; -- carried chiefly by the heavy-armed infantry.

Scythe (n.) A scythe-shaped blade attached to ancient war chariots.

Scythewhet (n.) Wilson's thrush; -- so called from its note.

Sectile (a.) Capable of being cut; specifically (Min.), capable of being severed by the knife with a smooth cut; -- said of minerals.

Section (n.) One of the portions, of one square mile each, into which the public lands of the United States are divided; one thirty-sixth part of a township. These sections are subdivided into quarter sections for sale under the homestead and preemption laws.

Section (n.) A division of a genus; a group of species separated by some distinction from others of the same genus; -- often indicated by the sign /.

Sententiary (n.) One who read lectures, or commented, on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, Bishop of Paris (1159-1160), a school divine.

Sentimental (a.) IncSentinel (n.) A marine crab (Podophthalmus vigil) native of the Indian Ocean, remarkable for the great length of its eyestalks; -- called also sentinel crab.

Sentisection (n.) Painful vivisection; -- opposed to callisection.

Sept (n.) A clan, tribe, or family, proceeding from a common progenitor; -- used especially of the ancient clans in Ireland.

Septette (n.) A musical composition for seven instruments or seven voices; -- called also septuor.

Septicidal (a.) Dividing the partitions; -- said of a method of dehiscence in which a pod splits through the partitions and is divided into its component carpels.

Septiferous (a.) Bearing a partition; -- said of the valves of a capsule.

Septifragal (a.) Breaking from the partitions; -- said of a method of dehiscence in which the valves of a pod break away from the partitions, and these remain attached to the common axis.

Septillion (n.) According to the French method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-four ciphers annexed. According to the English method, the number expressed by a unit with forty-two ciphers annexed. See Numeration.

Septuagesima (n.) The third Sunday before Lent; -- so called because it is about seventy days before Easter.

Septuagint (n.) A Greek version of the Old Testament; -- so called because it was believed to be the work of seventy (or rather of seventy-two) translators.

Sesterce (n.) A Roman coin or denomination of money, in value the fourth part of a denarius, and originally containing two asses and a half, afterward four asses, -- equal to about two pence sterling, or four cents.

Sestet (n.) A piece of music composed for six voices or six instruments; a sextet; -- called also sestuor.

Settee (n.) A long seat with a back, -- made to accommodate several persons at once.

Settee (n.) A vessel with a very long, sharp prow, carrying two or three masts with lateen sails, -- used in the Mediterranean.

Setter (n.) One who, or that which, sets; -- used mostly in composition with a noun, as typesetter; or in combination with an adverb, as a setter on (or inciter), a setter up, a setter forth.

Setter (n.) An adornment; a decoration; -- with off.

Setterwort (n.) The bear's-foot (Helleborus f/tidus); -- so called because the root was used in settering, or inserting setons into the dewlaps of cattle. Called also pegroots.

Settle (n.) To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; -- said of a liquid; as, to settle coffee, or the grounds of coffee.

Settle (n.) To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; -- said of the ground, of roads, and the like; as, clear weather settles the roads.

Sextant (n.) An instrument for measuring angular distances between objects, -- used esp. at sea, for ascertaining the latitude and longitude. It is constructed on the same optical principle as Hadley's quadrant, but usually of metal, with a nicer graduation, telescopic sight, and its arc the sixth, and sometimes the third, part of a circle. See Quadrant.

Sextillion (n.) According to the method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-one ciphers annexed. According to the English method, a million raised to the sixth power, or the number expressed by a unit with thirty-six ciphers annexed. See Numeration.

Sextodecimo (a.) Having sixteen leaves to a sheet; of, or equal to, the size of one fold of a sheet of printing paper when folded so as to make sixteen leaves, or thirty-two pages; as, a sextodecimo volume.

Sextodecimo (n.) A book composed of sheets each of which is folded into sixteen leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of a book; -- usually written 16mo, or 16?.

Shatter (n.) A fragment of anything shattered; -- used chiefly or soley in the phrase into shatters; as, to break a glass into shatters.

Sheth (n.) The part of a plow which projects downward beneath the beam, for holding the share and other working parts; -- also called standard, or post.

Shot (n.) Small globular masses of lead, of various sizes, -- used chiefly for killing game; as, bird shot; buckshot.

Shotgun (n.) A light, smooth-bored gun, often double-barreled, especially designed for firing small shot at short range, and killing small game.

Sifter (n.) Any lamellirostral bird, as a duck or goose; -- so called because it sifts or strains its food from the water and mud by means of the lamell/ of the beak.

Sinter (n.) Dross, as of iron; the scale which files from iron when hammered; -- applied as a name to various minerals.

Sister (n.) One of the same kind, or of the same condition; -- generally used adjectively; as, sister fruits.

Sixtieth (a.) Next in order after the fifty-ninth.

Sixtieth (n.) The next in order after the fifty-ninth; the tenth after the fiftieth.

Sixty (a.) Six times ten; fifty-nine and one more; threescore.

Skat (n.) A three-handed card game played with 32 cards, of which two constitute the skat (sense 2), or widow. The players bid for the privilege of attempting any of several games or tasks, in most of which the player undertaking the game must take tricks counting in aggregate at least 61 (the counting cards being ace 11, ten 10, king 4, queen 3, jack 2). The four jacks are the best trumps, ranking club, spade, heart, diamond, and ten outranks king or queen (but when the player undertakes to l> Skate (n.) A metallic runner with a frame shaped to fit the sole of a shoe, -- made to be fastened under the foot, and used for moving rapidly on ice.

Skutterudite (n.) A mineral of a bright metallic luster and tin-white to pale lead-gray color. It consists of arsenic and cobalt.

Slattern (v. t.) To consume carelessly or wastefully; to waste; -- with away.

Spat (n.) A kind of short cloth or leather gaiter worn over the upper part of the shoe and fastened beneath the instep; -- chiefly in pl.

Spot (a.) on hand for immediate delivery after sale; -- said of commodities; as, spot wheat.

Snatch (v. i.) To attempt to seize something suddenly; to catch; -- often with at; as, to snatch at a rope.

Snithy (a.) Sharp; piercing; cutting; -- applied to the wind.

Soft (superl.) Easily yielding to pressure; easily impressed, molded, or cut; not firm in resisting; impressible; yielding; also, malleable; -- opposed to hard; as, a soft bed; a soft peach; soft earth; soft wood or metal.

Soft (superl.) Applied to a palatal, a sibilant, or a dental consonant (as g in gem, c in cent, etc.) as distinguished from a guttural mute (as g in go, c in cone, etc.); -- opposed to hard.

Soften (v. t.) To render less hard; -- said of matter.

Softness (n.) The quality or state of being soft; -- opposed to hardness, and used in the various specific senses of the adjective.

Sonties (n.) Probably from "saintes" saints, or from sanctities; -- used as an oath.

South (v. i.) To come to the meridian; to cross the north and south Southcottian (n.) A follower of Joanna Southcott (1750-1814), an Englishwoman who, professing to have received a miraculous calling, preached and prophesied, and committed many impious absurdities.

Southing (n.) Distance southward from any point departure or of reckoning, measured on a meridian; -- opposed to northing.

Southwester (n.) A hat made of painted canvas, oiled cloth, or the like, with a flap at the back, -- worn in stormy weather.

Spatangoidea (n. pl.) An order of irregular sea urchins, usually having a more or less heart-shaped shell with four or five petal-like ambulacra above. The mouth is edentulous and situated anteriorly, on the under side.

Spatangus (n.) A genus of heart-shaped sea urchins belonging to the Spatangoidea.

Spitchcocked (a.) Broiled or fried after being split lengthwise; -- said of eels.

Spite (n.) Ill-will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite.

Spitted (a.) Shot out long; -- said of antlers.

State (n.) The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as, the States-general of Holland.

Statics (n.) That branch of mechanics which treats of the equilibrium of forces, or relates to bodies as held at rest by the forces acting on them; -- distinguished from dynamics.

Station (n.) One of the places at which ecclesiastical processions pause for the performance of an act of devotion; formerly, the tomb of a martyr, or some similarly consecrated spot; now, especially, one of those representations of the successive stages of our Lord's passion which are often placed round the naves of large churches and by the side of the way leading to sacred edifices or shrines, and which are visited in rotation, stated services being performed at each; -- called also Station> Statoblast (n.) One of a peculiar kind of internal buds, or germs, produced in the interior of certain Bryozoa and sponges, especially in the fresh-water species; -- also called winter buds.

Statuette (n.) A small statue; -- usually applied to a figure much less than life size, especially when of marble or bronze, or of plaster or clay as a preparation for the marble or bronze, as distinguished from a figure in terra cotta or the like. Cf. Figurine.

Stature (n.) The natural height of an animal body; -- generally used of the human body.

Statute (n.) An act of the legislature of a state or country, declaring, commanding, or prohibiting something; a positive law; the written will of the legislature expressed with all the requisite forms of legislation; -- used in distinction fraom common law. See Common law, under Common, a.

Statute (a.) An assemblage of farming servants (held possibly by statute) for the purpose of being hired; -- called also statute fair.

Stet (subj. 3d pers. sing.) Let it stand; -- a word used by proof readers to signify that something once erased, or marked for omission, is to remain.

Stethometer (n.) An apparatus for measuring the external movements of a given point of the chest wall, during respiration; -- also called thoracometer.

Stitchery (n.) Needlework; -- in contempt.

Stuttering (n.) The act of one who stutters; -- restricted by some physiologists to defective speech due to inability to form the proper sounds, the breathing being normal, as distinguished from stammering.

Stitch (n.) An arrangement of stitches, or method of stitching in some particular way or style; as, cross-stitch; herringbone stitch, etc.

Subtle (superl.) Sly in design; artful; cunning; insinuating; subtile; -- applied to persons; as, a subtle foe.

Subtle (superl.) Characterized by refinement and niceness in drawing distinctions; nicely discriminating; -- said of persons; as, a subtle logician; refined; tenuous; sinuous; insinuating; hence, penetrative or pervasive; -- said of the mind; its faculties, or its operations; as, a subtle intellect; a subtle imagination; a subtle process of thought; also, difficult of apprehension; elusive.

Subtonic (a.) Applied to, or distinguishing, a speech element consisting of tone, or proper vocal sound, not pure as in the vowels, but dimmed and otherwise modified by some kind of obstruction in the oral or the nasal passage, and in some cases with a mixture of breath sound; -- a term introduced by Dr. James Rush in 1833. See Guide to Pronunciation, //155, 199-202.

Subtonic (n.) The seventh tone of the scale, or that immediately below the tonic; -- called also subsemitone.

Subtrihedral (a.) Approaching the form of a three-sided pyramid; as, the subtrihedral crown of a tooth.

Subtriplicate (a.) Expressed by the cube root; -- said especially of ratios.

Suit (n.) That which follows as a retinue; a company of attendants or followers; the assembly of persons who attend upon a prince, magistrate, or other person of distinction; -- often written suite, and pronounced sw/t.

Suit (n.) Things that follow in a series or succession; the individual objects, collectively considered, which constitute a series, as of rooms, buildings, compositions, etc.; -- often written suite, and pronounced sw/t.

Suit (n.) One of the four sets of cards which constitute a pack; -- each set consisting of thirteen cards bearing a particular emblem, as hearts, spades, cubs, or diamonds.

Suit (v. i.) To agree; to accord; to be fitted; to correspond; -- usually followed by with or to.

Sultan (n.) A ruler, or sovereign, of a Mohammedan state; specifically, the ruler of the Turks; the Padishah, or Grand Seignior; -- officially so called.

Sustaltic (a.) Mournful; -- said of a species of music among the ancient Greeks.

Suttee (n.) A Hindoo widow who immolates herself, or is immolated, on the funeral pile of her husband; -- so called because this act of self-immolation is regarded as envincing excellence of wifely character.

Sutteeism (n.) The practice of self-immolation of widows in Hindostan.

Switch (v. t.) To turn from one railway track to another; to transfer by a switch; -- generally with off, from, etc.; as, to switch off a train; to switch a car from one track to another.

Systole (n.) The contraction of the heart and arteries by which the blood is forced onward and the circulation kept up; also, the contraction of a rhythmically pulsating contractile vacuole; -- correlative to diastole.

Synthesis (n.) The combination of separate elements of thought into a whole, as of simple into complex conceptions, species into genera, individual propositions into systems; -- the opposite of analysis.

Synthetical (a.) Comprising within itself structural or other characters which are usually found only in two or more diverse groups; -- said of species, genera, and higher groups. See the Note under Comprehensive, 3.

Syntonin (n.) A proteid substance (acid albumin) formed from the albuminous matter of muscle by the action of dilute acids; -- formerly called musculin. See Acid albumin, under Albumin.

Systole (n.) The contraction of the heart and arteries by which the blood is forced onward and the circulation kept up; -- correlative to diastole.

Systyle (a.) Having a space equal to two diameters or four modules between two columns; -- said of a portico or building. See Intercolumniation.

Tagtail (n.) A person who attaches himself to another against the will of the latter; a hanger-on.

Tantalite (n.) A heavy mineral of an iron-black color and submetallic luster. It is essentially a tantalate of iron.

Tantalum (n.) A rare nonmetallic element found in certain minerals, as tantalite, samarskite, and fergusonite, and isolated as a dark powder which becomes steel-gray by burnishing. Symbol Ta. Atomic weight 182.0. Formerly called also tantalium.

Tantivy (adv.) Swiftly; speedily; rapidly; -- a fox-hunting term; as, to ride tantivy.

Tantrum (n.) A whim, or burst of ill-humor; an affected air.

Tartar (n.) A reddish crust or sediment in wine casks, consisting essentially of crude cream of tartar, and used in marking pure cream of tartar, tartaric acid, potassium carbonate, black flux, etc., and, in dyeing, as a mordant for woolen goods; -- called also argol, wine stone, etc.

Tartar (n.) A native or inhabitant of Tartary in Asia; a member of any one of numerous tribes, chiefly Moslem, of Turkish origin, inhabiting the Russian Europe; -- written also, more correctly but less usually, Tatar.

Tartarous (a.) Resembling, or characteristic of, a Tartar; ill-natured; irritable.

Tartralic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a white amorphous deliquescent substance, C8H10O11; -- called also ditartaric, tartrilic, or tartrylic acid.

Tartrazine (n.) An artificial dyestuff obtained as an orange-yellow powder, and regarded as a phenyl hydrazine derivative of tartaric and sulphonic acids.

Taste (v. t.) To partake of; to participate in; -- usually with an implied sense of relish or pleasure.

Taste (n.) Intellectual relish; liking; fondness; -- formerly with of, now with for; as, he had no taste for study.

Taste (n.) The power of perceiving and relishing excellence in human performances; the faculty of discerning beauty, order, congruity, proportion, symmetry, or whatever constitutes excellence, particularly in the fine arts and belles-letters; critical judgment; discernment.

Taster (n.) One of a peculiar kind of zooids situated on the polyp-stem of certain Siphonophora. They somewhat resemble the feeding zooids, but are destitute of mouths. See Siphonophora.

Tasty (superl.) Having a good taste; -- applied to persons; as, a tasty woman. See Taste, n., 5.

Tatter (n.) A rag, or a part torn and hanging; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Tatter (v. t.) To rend or tear into rags; -- used chiefly in the past participle as an adjective.

Tattler (n.) Any one of several species of large, long-legged sandpipers belonging to the genus Totanus.

Tattlery (n.) Idle talk or chat; tittle-tattle.

Tattoo (n.) An indelible mark or figure made by puncturing the skin and introducing some pigment into the punctures; -- a mode of ornamentation practiced by various barbarous races, both in ancient and modern times, and also by some among civilized nations, especially by sailors.

Taut (a.) Tight; stretched; not slack; -- said esp. of a rope that is tightly strained.

Tautegorical (a.) Expressing the same thing with different words; -- opposed to allegorical.

Tautog (n.) An edible labroid fish (Haitula onitis, or Tautoga onitis) of the Atlantic coast of the United States. When adult it is nearly black, more or less irregularly barred, with greenish gray. Called also blackfish, oyster fish, salt-water chub, and moll.

Tautology (n.) A repetition of the same meaning in different words; needless repetition of an idea in different words or phrases; a representation of anything as the cause, condition, or consequence of itself, as in the following Taotai (n.) In China, an official at the head of the civil and military affairs of a circuit, which consists of two or more fu, or territorial departments; -- called also, by foreigners, intendant of circuit. Foreign consuls and commissioners associated with taotais as superintendants of trade at the treaty ports are ranked with the taotai.

Teatish (a.) Peevish; tettish; fretful; -- said of a child. See Tettish.

Tectorial (a.) Of or pertaining to covering; -- applied to a membrane immediately over the organ of Corti in the internal ear.

Teetee (n.) Any one of several species of small, soft-furred South American monkeys belonging to Callithrix, Chrysothrix, and allied genera; as, the collared teetee (Callithrix torquatus), and the squirrel teetee (Chrysothrix sciurea). Called also pinche, titi, and saimiri. See Squirrel monkey, under Squirrel.

Teeter (v. i. & t.) To move up and down on the ends of a balanced plank, or the like, as children do for sport; to seesaw; to titter; to titter-totter.

Tent (n.) A kind of wine of a deep red color, chiefly from Galicia or Malaga in Spain; -- called also tent wine, and tinta.

Tent (n.) A pavilion or portable lodge consisting of skins, canvas, or some strong cloth, stretched and sustained by poles, -- used for sheltering persons from the weather, especially soldiers in camp.

Tentaculocyst (n.) One of the auditory organs of certain medusae; -- called also auditory tentacle.

Tenter (n.) A machine or frame for stretching cloth by means of hooks, called tenter-hooks, so that it may dry even and square.

Tertian (n.) A liquid measure formerly used for wine, equal to seventy imperial, or eighty-four wine, gallons, being one third of a tun.

Tertiary (a.) Growing on the innermost joint of a bird's wing; tertial; -- said of quills.

Testament (n.) One of the two distinct revelations of God's purposes toward man; a covenant; also, one of the two general divisions of the canonical books of the sacred Scriptures, in which the covenants are respectively revealed; as, the Old Testament; the New Testament; -- often limited, in colloquial language, to the latter.

Testamur (n.) A certificate of merit or proficiency; -- so called from the Latin words, Ita testamur, with which it commences.

Teste (n.) The witnessing or concluding clause, duty attached; -- said of a writ, deed, or the like.

Tester (n.) An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Testify (v. i.) To declare a charge; to protest; to give information; to bear witness; -- with against.

Testudo (n.) A kind of musical instrument. a species of lyre; -- so called in allusion to the lyre of Mercury, fabled to have been made of the shell of a tortoise.

Tetterwort (n.) A plant used as a remedy for tetter, -- in England the calendine, in America the bloodroot.

Teuton (n.) A member of the Teutonic branch of the Indo-European, or Aryan, family.

Text (n.) A style of writing in large characters; text-hand also, a kind of type used in printing; as, German text.

That (pron., a., conj., & adv.) To introduce, a reason or cause; -- equivalent to for that, in that, for the reason that, because.

That (pron., a., conj., & adv.) To introduce a purpose; -- usually followed by may, or might, and frequently preceded by so, in order, to the end, etc.

That (pron., a., conj., & adv.) To introduce a consequence, result, or effect; -- usually preceded by so or such, sometimes by that.

Theta (n.) A letter of the Greek alphabet corresponding to th in English; -- sometimes called the unlucky letter, from being used by the judges on their ballots in passing condemnation on a prisoner, it being the first letter of the Greek qa`natos, death.

Thither (adv.) To that place; -- opposed to hither.

Thither (a.) Being on the farther side from the person speaking; farther; -- a correlative of hither; as, on the thither side of the water.

Tittlebat (n.) The three-spined stickleback.

Toothbill (n.) A peculiar fruit-eating ground pigeon (Didunculus strigiostris) native of the Samoan Islands, and noted for its resemblance, in several characteristics, to the extinct dodo. Its beak is stout and strongly hooked, and the mandible has two or three strong teeth toward the end. Its color is chocolate red. Called also toothbilled pigeon, and manu-mea.

Toothshell (n.) Any species of Dentalium and allied genera having a tooth-shaped shell. See Dentalium.

Tortoise (n.) having a color like that of a tortoise's shell, black with white and orange spots; -- used mostly to describe cats of that color.

Tortoise (n.) a tortoise-shell cat.

Tortrix (n.) Any one of numerous species of small moths of the family Tortricidae, the larvae of which usually roll up the leaves of plants on which they live; -- also called leaf roller.

Tortrix (n.) A genus of tropical short-tailed snakes, which are not venomous. One species (Tortrix scytalae) is handsomely banded with black, and is sometimes worn alive by the natives of Brazil for a necklace.

Tortuous (a.) Oblique; -- applied to the six signs of the zodiac (from Capricorn to Gemini) which ascend most rapidly and obliquely.

Tout (n.) One who gives a tip on a race horses for an expected compensation, esp. in hopes of a share in any winnings; -- usually contemptuous.

Tretys (a.) Long and well-proportioned; nicely made; pretty.

Triternate (a.) Three times ternate; -- applied to a leaf whose petiole separates into three branches, each of which divides into three parts which each bear three leafiets.

Trithing (n.) One of three ancient divisions of a county in England; -- now called riding.

Triton (n.) Any one of numerous species of aquatic salamanders. The common European species are Hemisalamandra cristata, Molge palmata, and M. alpestris, a red-bellied species common in Switzerland. The most common species of the United States is Diemyctylus viridescens. See Illust. under Salamander.

Truth (n.) The quality or being true; as: -- (a) Conformity to fact or reality; exact accordance with that which is, or has been; or shall be.

Tsetse (n.) A venomous two-winged African fly (Glossina morsitans) whose bite is very poisonous, and even fatal, to horses and cattle, but harmless to men. It renders extensive districts in which it abounds uninhabitable during certain seasons of the year.

Tuft (n.) A nobleman, or person of quality, especially in the English universities; -- so called from the tuft, or gold tassel, on the cap worn by them.

Tufthunter (n.) A hanger-on to noblemen, or persons of quality, especially in English universities; a toady. See 1st Tuft, 3.

Turtle (n.) The curved plate in which the form is held in a type-revolving cylinder press.

Tutti (n. pl.) All; -- a direction for all the singers or players to perform together.

Twain (a. & n.) Two; -- nearly obsolete in common discourse, but used in poetry and burlesque.

Tuatara (n.) A large iguanalike reptile (Sphenodon punctatum) formerly common in New Zealand, but now confined to certain islets near the coast. It reaches a length of two and a half feet, is dark olive-green with small white or yellowish specks on the sides, and has yellow spines along the back, except on the neck.

Twitter (v. i.) To make the sound of a half-suppressed laugh; to titter; to giggle.

Twitter (n.) A half-suppressed laugh; a fit of laughter partially restrained; a titter; a giggle.

Ulotrichous (a.) Having woolly or crispy hair; -- opposed to leiotrichous.

Unstratified (a.) Not stratified; -- applied to massive rocks, as granite, porphyry, etc., and also to deposits of loose material, as the glacial till, which occur in masses without layers or strata.

Unstudied (a.) Not skilled; unversed; -- followed by in.

Urite (n.) One of the segments of the abdomen or post-abdomen of arthropods.

Uvitic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid, CH3C6H3(CO2H)2, obtained as a white crystalVentail (n.) That part of a helmet which is intended for the admission of air, -- sometimes in the visor.

Venter (n.) The belly; the abdomen; -- sometimes applied to any large cavity containing viscera.

Ventilate (v. t.) To provide with a vent, or escape, for air, gas, etc.; as, to ventilate a mold, or a water-wheel bucket.

Ventrad (adv.) Toward the ventral side; on the ventral side; ventrally; -- opposed to dorsad.

Ventral (a.) Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the belly, or ventral side, of an animal or of one of its parts; hemal; abdominal; as, the ventral fin of a fish; the ventral root of a spinal nerve; -- opposed to dorsal.

Victoria (n.) One of an American breed of medium-sized white hogs with a slightly dished face and very erect ears.

Vertebrally (adv.) At or within a vertebra or vertebrae; -- distinguished from interverterbrally.

Vertebrarterial (a.) Of or pertaining to a vertebrae and an artery; -- said of the foramina in the transverse processes of cervical vertebrae and of the canal which they form for the vertebral artery and vein.

Vertebrated (a.) Having movable joints resembling vertebrae; -- said of the arms ophiurans.

Vertebrated (a.) Of or pertaining to the Vertebrata; -- used only in the form vertebrate.

Vest (n.) To clothe with authority, power, or the like; to put in possession; to invest; to furnish; to endow; -- followed by with before the thing conferred; as, to vest a court with power to try cases of life and death.

Vest (n.) To place or give into the possession or discretion of some person or authority; to commit to another; -- with in before the possessor; as, the power of life and death is vested in the king, or in the courts.

Vest (v. i.) To come or descend; to be fixed; to take effect, as a title or right; -- followed by in; as, upon the death of the ancestor, the estate, or the right to the estate, vests in the heir at law.

Vestales (n. pl.) A group of butterflies including those known as virgins, or gossamer-winged butterflies.

Vestry (n.) A room appendant to a church, in which sacerdotal vestments and sacred utensils are sometimes kept, and where meetings for worship or parish business are held; a sacristy; -- formerly called revestiary.

Vestry (n.) A parochial assembly; an assembly of persons who manage parochial affairs; -- so called because usually held in a vestry.

Vettura (n.) An Italian four-wheeled carriage, esp. one let for hire; a hackney coach.

Victor (n.) The winner in a contest; one who gets the better of another in any struggle; esp., one who defeats an enemy in battle; a vanquisher; a conqueror; -- often followed by art, rarely by of.

Victoria (n.) A genus of aquatic plants named in honor of Queen Victoria. The Victoria regia is a native of Guiana and Brazil. Its large, spreading leaves are often over five feet in diameter, and have a rim from three to five inches high; its immense rose-white flowers sometimes attain a diameter of nearly two feet.

Victoria (n.) A kind of low four-wheeled pleasure carriage, with a calash top, designed for two persons and the driver who occupies a high seat in front.

Victoria (n.) An asteroid discovered by Hind in 1850; -- called also Clio.

Victory (n.) The defeat of an enemy in battle, or of an antagonist in any contest; a gaining of the superiority in any struggle or competition; conquest; triumph; -- the opposite of defeat.

Victual (n.) Food; -- now used chiefly in the plural. See Victuals.

Virtuous (a.) Chaste; pure; -- applied especially to women.

Volt (n.) The unit of electro-motive force; -- defined by the International Electrical Congress in 1893 and by United States Statute as, that electro-motive force which steadily applied to a conductor whose resistance is one ohm will produce a current of one ampere. It is practically equivalent to / the electro-motive force of a standard Clark's cell at a temperature of 15? C.

Volta (n.) A turning; a time; -- chiefly used in phrases signifying that the part is to be repeated one, two, or more times; as, una volta, once. Seconda volta, second time, points to certain modifications in the close of a repeated strain.

Voltzite (n.) An oxysulphide of lead occurring in implanted spherical globules of a yellowish or brownish color; -- called also voltzine.

Vorticella (n.) Any one of numerous species of ciliated Infusoria belonging to Vorticella and many other genera of the family Vorticellidae. They have a more or less bell-shaped body with a circle of vibrating cilia around the oral disk. Most of the species have slender, contractile stems, either simple or branched.

Wait (v. t.) To cause to wait; to defer; to postpone; -- said of a meal; as, to wait dinner.

Want (v. i.) To be absent; to be deficient or lacking; to fail; not to be sufficient; to fall or come short; to lack; -- often used impersonally with of; as, it wants ten minutes of four.

Wanton (n.) A roving, frolicsome thing; a trifler; -- used rarely as a term of endearment.

Wast () The second person singular of the verb be, in the indicative mood, imperfect tense; -- now used only in solemn or poetical style. See Was.

Waste (v. i.) To procure or sustain a reduction of flesh; -- said of a jockey in preparation for a race, etc.

Wastel (n.) A kind of white and fine bread or cake; -- called also wastel bread, and wastel cake.

Waster (v. t.) An imperfection in the wick of a candle, causing it to waste; -- called also a thief.

Waster (v. t.) A kind of cudgel; also, a blunt-edged sword used as a foil.

Wattmeter (n.) An instrument for measuring power in watts, -- much used in measuring the energy of an electric current.

Wattle (n.) The astringent bark of several Australian trees of the genus Acacia, used in tanning; -- called also wattle bark.

Watteau (a.) Having the appearance of that which is seen in pictures by Antoine Watteau, a French painter of the eighteenth century; -- said esp. of women's garments; as, a Watteau bodice.

Wattle (n.) In Australasia, any tree of the genus Acacia; -- so called from the wattles, or hurdles, which the early settlers made of the long, pliable branches or of the split stems of the slender species.

Wattless (a.) Without any power (cf. Watt); -- said of an alternating current or component of current when it differs in phase by ninety degrees from the electromotive force which produces it, or of an electromotive force or component thereof when the current it produces differs from it in phase by 90 degrees.

Weetweet (n.) A throwing toy, or implement, of the Australian aborigines, consisting of a cigar-shaped stick fastened at one end to a flexible twig. It weighs in all about two ounces, and is about two feet long.

Weather (a.) Being toward the wind, or windward -- opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc.

Weatherboard (n.) A clapboard or feather-edged board used in weatherboarding.

Weathercock (n.) A vane, or weather vane; -- so called because originally often in the figure of a cock, turning on the top of a spire with the wind, and showing its direction.

Welt (n.) In steam boilers and sheet-iron work, a strip riveted upon the edges of plates that form a butt joint.

Welt (n.) In machine-made stockings, a strip, or flap, of which the heel is formed.

Went () imp. & p. p. of Wend; -- now obsolete except as the imperfect of go, with which it has no etymological connection. See Go.

Wentletrap (n.) Any one of numerous species of elegant, usually white, marine shells of the genus Scalaria, especially Scalaria pretiosa, which was formerly highly valued; -- called also staircase shell. See Scalaria.

Wert () The second person singular, indicative and subjunctive moods, imperfect tense, of the verb be. It is formed from were, with the ending -t, after the analogy of wast. Now used only in solemn or poetic style.

What (pron., a., & adv.) As an exclamatory word: -- (a) Used absolutely or independently; -- often with a question following.

What (pron., a., & adv.) Used substantively with the antecedent suppressed, equivalent to that which, or those p who, or those h which; -- called a compound relative.

What (pron., a., & adv.) Whatever; whatsoever; what thing soever; -- used indefinitely.

What (pron., a., & adv.) Used adverbially, in part; partly; somewhat; -- with a following preposition, especially, with, and commonly with repetition.

Whatever (pron.) Anything soever which; the thing or things of any kind; being this or that; of one nature or another; one thing or another; anything that may be; all that; the whole that; all particulars that; -- used both substantively and adjectively.

Whether (pron.) Which (of two); which one (of two); -- used interrogatively and relatively.

Whether (conj.) In case; if; -- used to introduce the first or two or more alternative clauses, the other or others being connected by or, or by or whether. When the second of two alternatives is the simple negative of the first it is sometimes only indicated by the particle not or no after the correlative, and sometimes it is omitted entirely as being distinctly implied in the whether of the first.

Whit (n.) The smallest part or particle imaginable; a bit; a jot; an iota; -- generally used in an adverbial phrase in a negative sentence.

White (superl.) Reflecting to the eye all the rays of the spectrum combined; not tinted with any of the proper colors or their mixtures; having the color of pure snow; snowy; -- the opposite of black or dark; as, white paper; a white skin.

Whitebeam (n.) The common beam tree of England (Pyrus Aria); -- so called from the white, woolly under surface of the leaves.

Whitecap (n.) The whitethroat; -- so called from its gray head.

Whitehead (n.) The blue-winged snow goose.

Whiterump (n.) The American black-tailed godwit.

Whiteside (n.) The golden-eye.

Whitewall (n.) The spotted flycatcher; -- so called from the white color of the under parts.

Whiteweed (n.) A perennial composite herb (Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum) with conspicuous white rays and a yellow disk, a common weed in grass lands and pastures; -- called also oxeye daisy.

Whitewing (n.) The chaffinch; -- so called from the white bands on the wing.

Whitewood (n.) The soft and easily-worked wood of the tulip tree (Liriodendron). It is much used in cabinetwork, carriage building, etc.

Whither (adv.) To what place; -- used interrogatively; as, whither goest thou?

Whither (adv.) To what or which place; -- used relatively.

Whither (adv.) To what point, degree, end, conclusion, or design; whereunto; whereto; -- used in a sense not physical.

Whiting (n.) A common European food fish (Melangus vulgaris) of the Codfish family; -- called also fittin.

Whiting (n.) A North American fish (Merlucius vulgaris) allied to the preceding; -- called also silver hake.

Whiting (n.) Any one of several species of North American marine sciaenoid food fishes belonging to genus Menticirrhus, especially M. Americanus, found from Maryland to Brazil, and M. littoralis, common from Virginia to Texas; -- called also silver whiting, and surf whiting.

Whitmonday (n.) The day following Whitsunday; -- called also Whitsun Monday.

Whitsunday (n.) The seventh Sunday, and the fiftieth day, after Easter; a festival of the church in commemoration of the descent of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost; Pentecost; -- so called, it is said, because, in the primitive church, those who had been newly baptized appeared at church between Easter and Pentecost in white garments.

Whitsuntide (n.) The week commencing with Whitsunday, esp. the first three days -- Whitsunday, Whitsun Monday, and Whitsun Tuesday; the time of Pentecost.

Whittuesday (n.) The day following Whitmonday; -- called also Whitsun Tuesday.

Whitecap (n.) A member of a self-appointed vigilance committee attempting by lynch-law methods to drive away or coerce persons obnoxious to it. Some early ones wore white hoods or masks.

Whitehead (n.) A form of self-propelling torpedo.

Witted (a.) Having (such) a wit or understanding; as, a quick-witted boy.

Wittol (n.) A man who knows his wife's infidelity and submits to it; a tame cuckold; -- so called because the cuckoo lays its eggs in the wittol's nest.

Wont (v. t.) To accustom; -- used reflexively.

Worth (v. i.) To be; to become; to betide; -- now used only in the phrases, woe worth the day, woe worth the man, etc., in which the verb is in the imperative, and the nouns day, man, etc., are in the dative. Woe be to the day, woe be to the man, etc., are equivalent phrases.

Worth (a.) Deserving of; -- in a good or bad sense, but chiefly in a good sense.

Worthy (n.) Having suitable, adapted, or equivalent qualities or value; -- usually with of before the thing compared or the object; more rarely, with a following infinitive instead of of, or with that; as, worthy of, equal in excellence, value, or dignity to; entitled to; meriting; -- usually in a good sense, but sometimes in a bad one.

Worthy (n.) A man of eminent worth or value; one distinguished for useful and estimable qualities; a person of conspicuous desert; -- much used in the plural; as, the worthies of the church; political worthies; military worthies.

Wrath (v. t.) To anger; to enrage; -- also used impersonally.

Writ (n.) That which is written; writing; scripture; -- applied especially to the Scriptures, or the books of the Old and New testaments; as, sacred writ.

Writative (a.) IncWrite (v. t.) To make known by writing; to record; to prove by one's own written testimony; -- often used reflexively.

Xanthamide (n.) An amido derivative of xanthic acid obtained as a white crystalXanthian (a.) Of or pertaining to Xanthus, an ancient town on Asia Minor; -- applied especially to certain marbles found near that place, and now in the British Museum.

Xanthinine (n.) A complex nitrogenous substance related to urea and uric acid, produced as a white powder; -- so called because it forms yellow salts, and because its solution forms a blue fluorescence like quinine.

Xanthoma (n.) A skin disease marked by the development or irregular yellowish patches upon the skin, especially upon the eyelids; -- called also xanthelasma.

Xanthophyll (n.) A yellow coloring matter found in yellow autumn leaves, and also produced artificially from chlorophyll; -- formerly called also phylloxanthin.

Xanthoprotein (n.) A yellow acid substance formed by the action of hot nitric acid on albuminous or proteid matter. It is changed to a deep orange-yellow color by the addition of ammonia.

Xanthose (n.) An orange-yellow substance found in pigment spots of certain crabs.

Xanthin () A white microcrystalYesterday (adv.) On the day last past; on the day preceding to-day; as, the affair took place yesterday.

Yestereve (n.) Alt. of Yester-evening

Yestreen (n.) Yester-evening; yesternight; last night.

Yoit (n.) The European yellow-hammer.

Zantewood (n.) A yellow dyewood; fustet; -- called also zante, and zante fustic. See Fustet, and the Note under Fustic.

Zootic (a.) Containing the remains of organized bodies; -- said of rock or soil.

Zootomy (n.) The dissection or the anatomy of animals; -- distinguished from androtomy.

Zosterops (n.) A genus of birds that comprises the white-eyes. See White-eye.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.