Words whose 5th letter is B

Aeroboat (n.) A form of hydro-aeroplane; a flying boat.

Amiable (a.) Possessing sweetness of disposition; having sweetness of temper, kind-heartedness, etc., which causes one to be liked; as, an amiable woman.

Amoeboid (a.) Resembling an amoeba; amoeba-shaped; changing in shape like an amoeba.

Antibacterial (a.) Inimical to bacteria; -- applied esp. to serum for protection against bacterial diseases.

Archbutler (n.) A chief butler; -- an officer of the German empire.

Assibilation (n.) Change of a non-sibilant letter to a sibilant, as of -tion to -shun, duke to ditch.

Atrabiliary (a.) Melancholic or hypohondriac; atrabilious; -- from the supposed predominance of black bile, to the influence of which the ancients attributed hypochondria, melancholy, and mania.

Baseboard (n.) A board, or other woodwork, carried round the walls of a room and touching the floor, to form a base and protect the plastering; -- also called washboard (in England), mopboard, and scrubboard.

Barnburner (n.) A member of the radical section of the Democratic party in New York, about the middle of the 19th century, which was hostile to extension of slavery, public debts, corporate privileges, etc., and supported Van Buren against Cass for president in 1848; -- opposed to Hunker.

Bearberry (n.) A trailing plant of the heath family (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), having leaves which are tonic and astringent, and glossy red berries of which bears are said to be fond.

Blubber (v. t.) To give vent to (tears) or utter (broken words or cries); -- with forth or out.

Bluebeard (n.) The hero of a mediaeval French nursery legend, who, leaving home, enjoined his young wife not to open a certain room in his castle. She entered it, and found the murdered bodies of his former wives. -- Also used adjectively of a subject which it is forbidden to investigate.

Bluebell (n.) A plant of the genus Campanula, especially the Campanula rotundifolia, which bears blue bell-shaped flowers; the harebell.

Bluebottle (n.) A plant (Centaurea cyanus) which grows in grain fields. It receives its name from its blue bottle-shaped flowers.

Bluebreast (n.) A small European bird; the blue-throated warbler.

Brambling (n.) The European mountain finch (Fringilla montifringilla); -- called also bramble finch and bramble.

Buckboard (n.) A four-wheeled vehicle, having a long elastic board or frame resting on the bolsters or axletrees, and a seat or seats placed transversely upon it; -- called also buck wagon.

Cabob (n.) A small piece of mutton or other meat roasted on a skewer; -- so called in Turkey and Persia.

Calibre (n.) The diameter of the bore, as a cannon or other firearm, or of any tube; or the weight or size of the projectile which a firearm will carry; as, an 8 inch gun, a 12-pounder, a 44 caliber.

Capybara (n.) A large South American rodent (Hydrochaerus capybara) Living on the margins of lakes and rivers. It is the largest extant rodent, being about three feet long, and half that in height. It somewhat resembles the Guinea pig, to which it is related; -- called also cabiai and water hog.

Carob (n.) An evergreen leguminous tree (Ceratania Siliqua) found in the countries bordering the Mediterranean; the St. John's bread; -- called also carob tree.

Carob (n.) One of the long, sweet, succulent, pods of the carob tree, which are used as food for animals and sometimes eaten by man; -- called also St. John's bread, carob bean, and algaroba bean.

Celebrant (n.) One who performs a public religious rite; -- applied particularly to an officiating priest in the Roman Catholic Church, as distinguished from his assistants.

Celebrity (n.) A person of distinction or renown; -- usually in the plural; as, he is one of the celebrities of the place.

Cerebropathy (n.) A hypochondriacal condition verging upon insanity, occurring in those whose brains have been unduly taxed; -- called also brain fag.

Cerebrose (n.) A sugarlike body obtained by the decomposition of the nitrogenous non-phosphorized principles of the brain.

Chamber (n.) That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from the rest of the bore; -- formerly, in guns, made smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in breech-loading guns.

Clamber (v. i.) To climb with difficulty, or with hands and feet; -- also used figuratively.

Clapboard (n.) A narrow board, thicker at one edge than at the other; -- used for weatherboarding the outside of houses.

Crabbed (n.) Characterized by or manifesting, sourness, peevishness, or moroseness; harsh; cross; cynical; -- applied to feelings, disposition, or manners.

Crabbed (n.) Characterized by harshness or roughness; unpleasant; -- applied to things; as, a crabbed taste.

Cribbing (n.) A vicious habit of a horse; crib-biting. The horse lays hold of the crib or manger with his teeth and draws air into the stomach with a grunting sound.

Crowberry (n.) A heathlike plant of the genus Empetrum, and its fruit, a black, scarcely edible berry; -- also called crakeberry.

Cubebic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, cubebs; as, cubebic acid (a soft olive-green resin extracted from cubebs).

Dagoba (n.) A dome-shaped structure built over relics of Buddha or some Buddhist saint.

Dashboard (n.) A board placed on the fore part of a carriage, sleigh, or other vehicle, to intercept water, mud, or snow, thrown up by the heels of the horses; -- in England commonly called splashboard.

Dashboard (n.) A screen at the bow af a steam launch to keep off the spray; -- called also sprayboard.

Deadbeat (a.) Making a beat without recoil; giving indications by a single beat or excursion; -- said of galvanometers and other instruments in which the needle or index moves to the extent of its deflection and stops with little or no further oscillation.

Dearborn (n.) A four-wheeled carriage, with curtained sides.

Deerberry (n.) A shrub of the blueberry group (Vaccinium stamineum); also, its bitter, greenish white berry; -- called also squaw huckleberry.

Deliberate (a.) Weighing facts and arguments with a view to a choice or decision; carefully considering the probable consequences of a step; circumspect; slow in determining; -- applied to persons; as, a deliberate judge or counselor.

Deliberate (a.) Formed with deliberation; well-advised; carefully considered; not sudden or rash; as, a deliberate opinion; a deliberate measure or result.

Deliberate (v. i.) To take counsel with one's self; to weigh the arguments for and against a proposed course of action; to reflect; to consider; to hesitate in deciding; -- sometimes with on, upon, about, concerning.

Disobedient (a.) Neglecting or refusing to obey; omitting to do what is commanded, or doing what is prohibited; refractory; not observant of duty or rules prescribed by authority; -- applied to persons and acts.

Drawbench (n.) A machine in which strips of metal are drawn through a drawplate; especially, one in which wire is thus made; -- also called drawing bench.

Equable (a.) Equal and uniform; continuing the same at different times; -- said of motion, and the like; uniform in surface; smooth; as, an equable plain or globe.

Equable (a.) Uniform in action or intensity; not variable or changing; -- said of the feelings or temper.

Establish (a.) To originate and secure the permanent existence of; to found; to institute; to create and regulate; -- said of a colony, a state, or other institutions.

Establish (a.) To set up in business; to place advantageously in a fixed condition; -- used reflexively; as, he established himself in a place; the enemy established themselves in the citadel.

Exalbuminous (a.) Having no albumen about the embryo; -- said of certain seeds.

Filibuster (n.) A lawless military adventurer, especially one in quest of plunder; a freebooter; -- originally applied to buccaneers infesting the Spanish American coasts, but introduced into common English to designate the followers of Lopez in his expedition to Cuba in 1851, and those of Walker in his expedition to Nicaragua, in 1855.

Flambeau (n.) A flaming torch, esp. one made by combining together a number of thick wicks invested with a quick-burning substance (anciently, perhaps, wax; in modern times, pitch or the like); hence, any torch.

Flamboyant (a.) Characterized by waving or flamelike curves, as in the tracery of windows, etc.; -- said of the later (15th century) French Gothic style.

Flambe (a.) Decorated by glaze splashed or irregularly spread upon the surface, or apparently applied at the top and allowed to run down the sides; -- said of pieces of Chinese porcelain.

Flatboat (n.) A boat with a flat bottom and square ends; -- used for the transportation of bulky freight, especially in shallow waters.

Footboard (n.) The foot-rest of a coachman's box.

Footbreadth (n.) The breadth of a foot; -- used as a measure.

Forkbeard (n.) A European fish (Raniceps raninus), having a large flat head; -- also called tadpole fish, and lesser forked beard.

Forkbeard (n.) The European forked hake or hake's-dame (Phycis blennoides); -- also called great forked beard.

Frogbit (n.) A European plant (Hydrocharis Morsus-ranae), floating on still water and propagating itself by runners. It has roundish leaves and small white flowers.

Garibaldi (n.) A jacket worn by women; -- so called from its resemblance in shape to the red shirt worn by the Italians patriot Garibaldi.

Grumble (v. i.) To murmur or mutter with discontent; to make ill-natured complaints in a low voice and a surly manner.

Halfbeak (n.) Any slender, marine fish of the genus Hemirhamphus, having the upper jaw much shorter than the lower; -- called also balahoo.

Hangbird (n.) The Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula); -- so called because its nest is suspended from the limb of a tree. See Baltimore oriole.

Harebell (n.) A small, slender, branching plant (Campanula rotundifolia), having blue bell-shaped flowers; also, Scilla nutans, which has similar flowers; -- called also bluebell.

Hawkbill (n.) A sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), which yields the best quality of tortoise shell; -- called also caret.

Headborrow (n.) The chief of a frankpledge, tithing, or decennary, consisting of ten families; -- called also borsholder, boroughhead, boroughholder, and sometimes tithingman. See Borsholder.

Herdbook (n.) A book containing the list and pedigrees of one or more herds of choice breeds of cattle; -- also called herd record, or herd register.

Hexabasic (a.) Having six hydrogen atoms or six radicals capable of being replaced or saturated by bases; -- said of acids; as, mellitic acid is hexabasic.

Hidebound (a.) Having the skin adhering so closely to the ribs and back as not to be easily loosened or raised; -- said of an animal.

Hidebound (a.) Having the bark so close and constricting that it impedes the growth; -- said of trees.

Holoblastic (a.) Undergoing complete segmentation; composed entirely of germinal matter, the whole of the yolk undergoing fission; -- opposed to meroblastic.

Hornbill (n.) Any bird of the family Bucerotidae, of which about sixty species are known, belonging to numerous genera. They inhabit the tropical parts of Asia, Africa, and the East Indies, and are remarkable for having a more or less horn-like protuberance, which is usually large and hollow and is situated on the upper side of the beak. The size of the hornbill varies from that of a pigeon to that of a raven, or even larger. They feed chiefly upon fruit, but some species e> Hornbook (n.) The first book for children, or that from which in former times they learned their letters and rudiments; -- so called because a sheet of horn covered the small, thin board of oak, or the slip of paper, on which the alphabet, digits, and often the Lord's Prayer, were written or printed; a primer.

Hylobate (n.) Any species of the genus Hylobates; a gibbon, or long-armed ape. See Gibbon.

Ignoble (a.) Not a true or noble falcon; -- said of certain hawks, as the goshawk.

Illiberal (a.) Indicating a lack of breeding, culture, and the like; ignoble; rude; narrow-minded; disingenuous.

Imbibition (n.) The act or process of imbibing, or absorbing; as, the post-mortem imbibition of poisons.

Indebt (v. t.) To bring into debt; to place under obligation; -- chiefly used in the participle indebted.

Inhabile (a.) Unskilled; unready; awkward; incompetent; unqualified; -- said of person.

Insabbatati (n. pl.) The Waldenses; -- so called from their peculiary cut or marked sabots, or shoes.

Itzibu (n.) A silver coin of Japan, worth about thirty-four cents.

Jacob (n.) A Hebrew patriarch (son of Isaac, and ancestor of the Jews), who in a vision saw a ladder reaching up to heaven (Gen. xxviii. 12); -- also called Israel.

Jacobin (n.) A Dominican friar; -- so named because, before the French Revolution, that order had a convent in the Rue St. Jacques, Paris.

Jacobin (n.) A fancy pigeon, in which the feathers of the neck form a hood, -- whence the name. The wings and tail are long, and the beak moderately short.

Jacobus (n.) An English gold coin, of the value of twenty-five shillings sterling, struck in the reign of James I.

Juneberry (n.) The small applelike berry of American trees of genus Amelanchier; -- also called service berry.

Juneberry (n.) The shrub or tree which bears this fruit; -- also called shad bush, and had tree.

Karob (n.) The twenty-fourth part of a grain; -- a weight used by goldsmiths.

Katabolism (n.) Destructive or downward metabolism; regressive metamorphism; -- opposed to anabolism. See Disassimilation.

Kneebrush (n.) A tuft or brush of hair on the knees of some species of antelopes and other animals; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Kneebrush (n.) A thick mass or collection of hairs on the legs of bees, by aid of which they carry the collected pollen to the hive or nest; -- usually in the plural.

Knitback (n.) The plant comfrey; -- so called from its use as a restorative.

Knotberry (n.) The cloudberry (Rudus Chamaemorus); -- so called from its knotted stems.

Ladybird (n.) Any one of numerous species of small beetles of the genus Coccinella and allied genera (family Coccinellidae); -- called also ladybug, ladyclock, lady cow, lady fly, and lady beetle. Coccinella seplempunctata in one of the common European species. See Coccinella.

Legible (a.) Capable of being read or deciphered; distinct to the eye; plain; -- used of writing or printing; as, a fair, legible manuscript.

Longbow (n.) The ordinary bow, not mounted on a stock; -- so called in distinction from the crossbow when both were used as weapons of war. Also, sometimes, such a bow of about the height of a man, as distinguished from a much shorter one.

Marabou (n.) A kind of thrown raw silk, nearly white naturally, but capable of being dyed without scouring; also, a thin fabric made from it, as for scarfs, which resembles the feathers of the marabou in delicacy, -- whence the name.

Manubrium (n.) The proboscis of a jellyfish; -- called also hypostoma. See Illust. of Hydromedusa.

Meroblast (n.) An ovum, as that of a mammal, only partially composed of germinal matter, that is, consisting of both a germinal portion and an albuminous or nutritive one; -- opposed to holoblast.

Meroblastic (a.) Consisting only in part of germinal matter; characterized by partial segmentation only; as, meroblastic ova, in which a portion of the yolk only undergoes fission; meroblastic segmentation; -- opposed to holoblastic.

Mirabilis (n.) A genus of plants. See Four-o'clock.

Molybdenite (n.) A mineral occurring in soft, lead-gray, foliated masses or scales, resembling graphite; sulphide of molybdenum.

Molybdenum (n.) A rare element of the chromium group, occurring in nature in the minerals molybdenite and wulfenite, and when reduced obtained as a hard, silver-white, difficulty fusible metal. Symbol Mo. Atomic weight 95.9.

Monobasic (a.) Capable of being neutralized by a univalent base or basic radical; having but one acid hydrogen atom to be replaced; -- said of acids; as, acetic, nitric, and hydrochloric acids are monobasic.

Moonblind (a.) Dim-sighted; purblind.

Moonblink (n.) A temporary blindness, or impairment of sight, said to be caused by sleeping in the moonlight; -- sometimes called nyctalopia.

Moorball (n.) A fresh-water alga (Cladophora Aegagropila) which forms a globular mass.

Nawab (n.) A rich, retired Anglo-Indian; a nabob.

Notable (a.) Well-known; notorious.

October (n.) The tenth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

Omnibus (n.) A sheet-iron cover for articles in a leer or annealing arch, to protect them from drafts.

Ovalbumen (n.) The albumin from white of eggs; egg albumin; -- in distinction from serum albumin. See Albumin.

Ovenbird (n.) Any species of the genus Furnarius, allied to the creepers. They inhabit South America and the West Indies, and construct curious oven-shaped nests.

Ovenbird (n.) In the United States, Seiurus aurocapillus; -- called also golden-crowned thrush.

Ovenbird (n.) In England, sometimes applied to the willow warbler, and to the long-tailed titmouse.

Pallbearer (n.) One of those who attend the coffin at a funeral; -- so called from the pall being formerly carried by them.

Parabanic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a nitrogenous acid which is obtained by the oxidation of uric acid, as a white crystalPliable (v.) Flexible in disposition; readily yielding to influence, arguments, persuasion, or discipline; easy to be persuaded; -- sometimes in a bad sense; as, a pliable youth.

Plumbago (n.) A genus of herbaceous plants with pretty salver-shaped corollas, usually blue or violet; leadwort.

Plumbic (a.) Of, pertaining to, resembling, or containing, lead; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which it has a higher valence as contrasted with plumbous compounds; as, plumbic oxide.

Plumbous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, lead; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which it has a lower valence as contrasted with plumbic compounds.

Pokebag (n.) The European long-tailed titmouse; -- called also poke-pudding.

Polybasic (a.) Capable of neutralizing, or of combining with, several molecules of a monacid base; having several hydrogen atoms capable of being replaced by basic radicals; -- said of certain acids; as, sulphuric acid is polybasic.

Polybasite (n.) An iron-black ore of silver, consisting of silver, sulphur, and antimony, with some copper and arsenic.

Presbyter (n.) One ordained to the second order in the ministry; -- called also priest.

Puffball (n.) A kind of ball-shaped fungus (Lycoperdon giganteum, and other species of the same genus) full of dustlike spores when ripe; -- called also bullfist, bullfice, puckfist, puff, and puffin.

Raspberry (n.) The thimble-shaped fruit of the Rubus Idaeus and other similar brambles; as, the black, the red, and the white raspberry.

Reedbird (n.) One of several small Asiatic singing birds of the genera Sch/nicola and Eurycercus; -- called also reed babbler.

Rehabilitate (v. t.) To invest or clothe again with some right, authority, or dignity; to restore to a former capacity; to reinstate; to qualify again; to restore, as a delinquent, to a former right, rank, or privilege lost or forfeited; -- a term of civil and canon law.

Reimburse (v. t.) To make restoration or payment of an equivalent to (a person); to pay back to; to indemnify; -- often reflexive; as, to reimburse one's self by successful speculation.

Rhombogene (n.) A dicyemid which produces infusorialike embryos; -- opposed to nematogene. See Dicyemata.

Rhomboid (n.) An oblique-angled parallelogram like a rhomb, but having only the opposite sides equal, the length and with being different.

Rhumb (n.) A Rietboc (n.) The reedbuck, a South African antelope (Cervicapra arundinacea); -- so called from its frequenting dry places covered with high grass or reeds. Its color is yellowish brown. Called also inghalla, and rietbok.

Ringbill (n.) The ring-necked scaup duck; -- called also ring-billed blackhead. See Scaup.

Rosebay (n.) An herb (Epilobium spicatum) with showy purple flowers, common in Europe and North America; -- called also great willow herb.

Sackbut (n.) A brass wind instrument, like a bass trumpet, so contrived that it can be lengthened or shortened according to the tone required; -- said to be the same as the trombone.

Sagebrush (n.) A low irregular shrub (Artemisia tridentata), of the order Compositae, covering vast tracts of the dry alkaScribe (v. t.) To cut (anything) in such a way as to fit closely to a somewhat irregular surface, as a baseboard to a floor which is out of level, a board to the curves of a molding, or the like; -- so called because the workman marks, or scribe, with the compasses the Scriber (n.) A sharp-pointed tool, used by joiners for drawing lines on stuff; a marking awl.

Scrub (n.) A worn-out brush.

Scumble (v. t.) To cover lighty, as a painting, or a drawing, with a thin wash of opaque color, or with color-crayon dust rubbed on with the stump, or to make any similar additions to the work, so as to produce a softened effect.

Seedbox (n.) A plant (Ludwigia alternifolia) which has somewhat cubical or box-shaped capsules.

Semibreve (n.) A note of half the time or duration of the breve; -- now usually called a whole note. It is the longest note in general use.

Shagbark (n.) A rough-barked species of hickory (Carya alba), its nut. Called also shellbark. See Hickory.

Shagbark (n.) The West Indian Pithecolobium micradenium, a legiminous tree with a red coiled-up pod.

Sherbet (n.) A preparation of bicarbonate of soda, tartaric acid, sugar, etc., variously flavored, for making an effervescing drink; -- called also sherbet powder.

Shipboard (n.) A ship's side; hence, by extension, a ship; -- found chiefly in adverbial phrases; as, on shipboard; a shipboard.

Showbread (n.) Bread of exhibition; loaves to set before God; -- the term used in translating the various phrases used in the Hebrew and Greek to designate the loaves of bread which the priest of the week placed before the Lord on the golden table in the sanctuary. They were made of fine flour unleavened, and were changed every Sabbath. The loaves, twelve in number, represented the twelve tribes of Israel. They were to be eaten by the priests only, and in the Holy Place.

Sideboard (n.) A piece of dining-room furniture having compartments and shelves for keeping or displaying articles of table service.

Skewbald (a.) Marked with spots and patches of white and some color other than black; -- usually distinguished from piebald, in which the colors are properly white and black. Said of horses.

Snowball (n.) The Guelder-rose.

Snowbird (n.) Any finch of the genus Junco which appears in flocks in winter time, especially J. hyemalis in the Eastern United States; -- called also blue snowbird. See Junco.

Soapberry tree () Any tree of the genus Sapindus, esp. Sapindus saponaria, the fleshy part of whose fruit is used instead of soap in washing linen; -- also called soap tree.

Spekboom (n.) The purslane tree of South Africa, -- said to be the favorite food of elephants.

Squabble (v. t.) To disarrange, so that the letters or lines stand awry or are mixed and need careful readjustment; -- said of type that has been set up.

Starboard (v. t.) That side of a vessel which is on the right hand of a person who stands on board facing the bow; -- opposed to larboard, or port.

Starboard (a.) Pertaining to the right-hand side of a ship; being or lying on the right side; as, the starboard quarter; starboard tack.

Stilbene (n.) A hydrocarbon, C14H12, produced artificially in large, fine crystals; -- called also diphenyl ethylene, toluylene, etc.

Strabismus (n.) An affection of one or both eyes, in which the optic axes can not be directed to the same object, -- a defect due either to undue contraction or to undue relaxation of one or more of the muscles which move the eyeball; squinting; cross-eye.

Strobile (n.) An individual asexually producing sexual individuals differing from itself also in other respects, as the tapeworm, -- one of the forms that occur in metagenesis.

Stubborn (a.) Firm as a stub or stump; stiff; unbending; unyielding; persistent; hence, unreasonably obstinate in will or opinion; not yielding to reason or persuasion; refractory; harsh; -- said of persons and things; as, stubborn wills; stubborn ore; a stubborn oak; as stubborn as a mule.

Stumble (v. i.) To strike or happen (upon a person or thing) without design; to fall or light by chance; -- with on, upon, or against.

Tallboy (n.) A kind of long-stemmed wineglass or cup.

Tallboy (n.) A piece of household furniture common in the eighteenth century, usually in two separate parts, with larger drawers above and smaller ones below and raised on legs fifteen inches or more in height; -- called also highboy.

Tallboy (n.) A long sheet-metal pipe for a chimney top.

Tenebrae (n.) The matins and lauds for the last three days of Holy Week, commemorating the sufferings and death of Christ, -- usually sung on the afternoon or evening of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, instead of on the following days.

Terebene (n.) A polymeric modification of terpene, obtained as a white crystalTerebrant (a.) Boring, or adapted for boring; -- said of certain Hymenoptera, as the sawflies.

Terebrating (a.) Boring; perforating; -- applied to molluskas which form holes in rocks, wood, etc.

Terebrating (a.) Boring; piercing; -- applied to certain kinds of pain, especially to those of locomotor ataxia.

Theobromine (n.) An alkaloidal ureide, C7H8N4O2, homologous with and resembling caffeine, produced artificially, and also extracted from cacao and chocolate (from Theobroma Cacao) as a bitter white crystalThimble (n.) Any thimble-shaped appendage or fixure.

Thimble (n.) A tubular cone for expanding a flue; -- called ferrule in England.

Thimble (n.) A ring of thin metal formed with a grooved circumference so as to fit within an eye-spice, or the like, and protect it from chafing.

Thimblerig (n.) A sleight-of-hand trick played with three small cups, shaped like thimbles, and a small ball or little pea.

Thimbleweed (n.) Any plant of the composite genus Rudbeckia, coarse herbs somewhat resembling the sunflower; -- so called from their conical receptacles.

Throb (v. i.) To beat, or pulsate, with more than usual force or rapidity; to beat in consequence of agitation; to palpitate; -- said of the heart, pulse, etc.

Thumb (v. t.) To soil or wear with the thumb or the fingers; to soil, or wear out, by frequent handling; also, to cover with the thumb; as, to thumb the touch-hole of a cannon.

Thumbscrew (n.) A screw having a flat-sided or knurled head, so that it may be turned by the thumb and forefinger.

Trembler (n.) The vibrating hammer, or spring contact piece of a hammer break, as of the electric ignition apparatus for an internal-combustion engine.

Treebeard (n.) A pendulous branching lichen (Usnea barbata); -- so called from its resemblance to hair.

Tremble (v. i.) To shake involuntarily, as with fear, cold, or weakness; to quake; to quiver; to shiver; to shudder; -- said of a person or an animal.

Tremble (v. i.) To totter; to shake; -- said of a thing.

Trouble (v. t.) To give occasion for labor to; -- used in polite phraseology; as, I will not trouble you to deliver the letter.

Vocabulary (n.) A list or collection of words arranged in alphabetical order and explained; a dictionary or lexicon, either of a whole language, a single work or author, a branch of science, or the like; a word-book.

Washboard (n.) A broad, thin plank, fixed along the gunwale of boat to keep the sea from breaking inboard; also, a plank on the sill of a lower deck port, for the same purpose; -- called also wasteboard.

Whinberry (n.) The English bilberry; -- so called because it grows on moors among the whins, or furze.

Wishbone (n.) The forked bone in front of the breastbone in birds; -- called also merrythought, and wishing bone. See Merrythought, and Furculum.




About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.