Words whose 5th letter is I

Abacinate (v. t.) To blind by a red-hot metal plate held before the eyes.

Ability (n.) The quality or state of being able; power to perform, whether physical, moral, intellectual, conventional, or legal; capacity; skill or competence in doing; sufficiency of strength, skill, resources, etc.; -- in the plural, faculty, talent.

Abolish (v. t.) To do away with wholly; to annul; to make void; -- said of laws, customs, institutions, governments, etc.; as, to abolish slavery, to abolish folly.

Abominable (a.) Excessive; large; -- used as an intensive.

Abominate (v. t.) To turn from as ill-omened; to hate in the highest degree, as if with religious dread; loathe; as, to abominate all impiety.

Abscission (n.) A figure of speech employed when a speaker having begun to say a thing stops abruptly: thus, "He is a man of so much honor and candor, and of such generosity -- but I need say no more."

Abstinence (n.) The act or practice of abstaining; voluntary forbearance of any action, especially the refraining from an indulgence of appetite, or from customary gratifications of animal or sensual propensities. Specifically, the practice of abstaining from intoxicating beverages, -- called also total abstinence.

Abstinence (n.) The practice of self-denial by depriving one's self of certain kinds of food or drink, especially of meat.

Abutilon (n.) A genus of malvaceous plants of many species, found in the torrid and temperate zones of both continents; -- called also Indian mallow.

Acacia (n.) The inspissated juice of several species of acacia; -- called also gum acacia, and gum arabic.

Acclivous (a.) Sloping upward; rising as a hillside; -- opposed to declivous.

Acidic (a.) Containing a high percentage of silica; -- opposed to basic.

Aconite (n.) The herb wolfsbane, or monkshood; -- applied to any plant of the genus Aconitum (tribe Hellebore), all the species of which are poisonous.

Acquiesce (v. i.) To rest satisfied, or apparently satisfied, or to rest without opposition and discontent (usually implying previous opposition or discontent); to accept or consent by silence or by omitting to object; -- followed by in, formerly also by with and to.

Acquiescence (n.) A silent or passive assent or submission, or a submission with apparent content; -- distinguished from avowed consent on the one hand, and on the other, from opposition or open discontent; quiet satisfaction.

Acquit (v. t.) To set free, release or discharge from an obligation, duty, liability, burden, or from an accusation or charge; -- now followed by of before the charge, formerly by from; as, the jury acquitted the prisoner; we acquit a man of evil intentions.

Acutifoliate (a.) Having sharp-pointed leaves.

Adipic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, fatty or oily substances; -- applied to certain acids obtained from fats by the action of nitric acid.

Adonis (n.) A genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae, containing the pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis); -- named from Adonis, whose blood was fabled to have stained the flower.

Adroit (a.) Dexterous in the use of the hands or in the exercise of the mental faculties; exhibiting skill and readiness in avoiding danger or escaping difficulty; ready in invention or execution; -- applied to persons and to acts; as, an adroit mechanic, an adroit reply.

Aestivation (n.) The state of torpidity induced by the heat and dryness of summer, as in certain snails; -- opposed to hibernation.

Affair (n.) That which is done or is to be done; matter; concern; as, a difficult affair to manage; business of any kind, commercial, professional, or public; -- often in the plural. "At the head of affairs." Junius.

Afflicting (a.) Grievously painful; distressing; afflictive; as, an afflicting event. -- Af*flict"ing*ly, adv.

Agami (n.) A South American bird (Psophia crepitans), allied to the cranes, and easily domesticated; -- called also the gold-breasted trumpeter. Its body is about the size of the pheasant. See Trumpeter.

Aggrieve (v. t.) To give pain or sorrow to; to afflict; hence, to oppress or injure in one's rights; to bear heavily upon; -- now commonly used in the passive TO be aggrieved.

Aiguille (n.) A needle-shaped peak.

Altrices (n. pl.) Nursers, -- a term applied to those birds whose young are hatched in a very immature and helpless condition, so as to require the care of their parents for some time; -- opposed to praecoces.

American (n.) A native of America; -- originally applied to the aboriginal inhabitants, but now applied to the descendants of Europeans born in America, and especially to the citizens of the United States.

Amphiaster (n.) The achromatic figure, formed in mitotic cell-division, consisting of two asters connected by a spindle-shaped bundle of rodlike fibers diverging from each aster, and called the spindle.

Amphiblastic (a.) Segmenting unequally; -- said of telolecithal ova with complete segmentation.

Amphibrach (n.) A foot of three syllables, the middle one long, the first and last short (~ -- ~); as, h/b/r/. In modern prosody the accented syllable takes the place of the long and the unaccented of the short; as, pro-phet#ic.

Amphicoelous (a.) Having both ends concave; biconcave; -- said of vertebrae.

Amphidisc (n.) A peculiar small siliceous spicule having a denticulated wheel at each end; -- found in freshwater sponges.

Amphidromical (a.) Pertaining to an Attic festival at the naming of a child; -- so called because the friends of the parents carried the child around the hearth and then named it.

Amphigamous (a.) Having a structure entirely cellular, and no distinct sexual organs; -- a term applied by De Candolle to the lowest order of plants.

Amphigen (n.) An element that in combination produces amphid salt; -- applied by Berzelius to oxygen, sulphur, selenium, and tellurium.

Amphioxus (n.) A fishlike creature (Amphioxus lanceolatus), two or three inches long, found in temperature seas; -- also called the lancelet. Its body is pointed at both ends. It is the lowest and most generalized of the vertebrates, having neither brain, skull, vertebrae, nor red blood. It forms the type of the group Acrania, Leptocardia, etc.

Amphipoda (n. pl.) A numerous group of fourteen -- footed Crustacea, inhabiting both fresh and salt water. The body is usually compressed laterally, and the anterior pairs or legs are directed downward and forward, but the posterior legs are usually turned upward and backward. The beach flea is an example. See Tetradecapoda and Arthrostraca.

Amphistylic (a.) Having the mandibular arch articulated with the hyoid arch and the cranium, as in the cestraciont sharks; -- said of a skull.

Ampliation (n.) A postponement of the decision of a cause, for further consideration or re-argument.

Amplify (v. t.) To render larger, more extended, or more intense, and the like; -- used especially of telescopes, microscopes, etc.

Amplify (v. i.) To speak largely or copiously; to be diffuse in argument or description; to dilate; to expatiate; -- often with on or upon.

Amplitude (n.) The extent of a movement measured from the starting point or position of equilibrium; -- applied especially to vibratory movements.

Amplitude (n.) An angle upon which the value of some function depends; -- a term used more especially in connection with elliptic functions.

Anadiplosis (n.) A repetition of the last word or any prominent word in a sentence or clause, at the beginning of the next, with an adjunct idea; as, "He retained his virtues amidst all his misfortunes -- misfortunes which no prudence could foresee or prevent."

Anatiferous (a.) Producing ducks; -- applied to Anatifae, under the absurd notion of their turning into ducks or geese. See Barnacle.

Anglicanism (n.) The principles of the established church of England; also, in a restricted sense, the doctrines held by the high-church party.

Anguiform (a.) Snake-shaped.

Anguilliform (a.) Eel-shaped.

Anilic (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, anil; indigotic; -- applied to an acid formed by the action of nitric acid on indigo.

Anility (n.) The state of being and old woman; old-womanishness; dotage.

Apatite (n.) Native phosphate of lime, occurring usually in six-sided prisms, color often pale green, transparent or translucent.

Apodictical (a.) Self-evident; intuitively true; evident beyond contradiction.

Aposiopesis (n.) A figure of speech in which the speaker breaks off suddenly, as if unwilling or unable to state what was in his mind; as, "I declare to you that his conduct -- but I can not speak of that, here."

Appoint (v. t.) To direct, designate, or limit; to make or direct a new disposition of, by virtue of a power contained in a conveyance; -- said of an estate already conveyed.

Appointment (n.) An allowance to a person, esp. to a public officer; a perquisite; -- properly only in the plural.

Apprise (v. t.) To give notice, verbal or written; to inform; -- followed by of; as, we will apprise the general of an intended attack; he apprised the commander of what he had done.

Archiater (n.) Chief physician; -- a term applied, on the continent of Europe, to the first or body physician of princes and to the first physician of some cities.

Arching (n.) Hogging; -- opposed to sagging.

Architecture (n.) The art or science of building; especially, the art of building houses, churches, bridges, and other structures, for the purposes of civil life; -- often called civil architecture.

Archilute (n.) A large theorbo, or double-necked lute, formerly in use, having the bass strings doubled with an octave, and the higher strings with a unison.

Astringent (a.) Drawing together the tissues; binding; contracting; -- opposed to laxative; as, astringent medicines; a butter and astringent taste; astringent fruit.

Atheistical (a.) Pertaining to, implying, or containing, atheism; -- applied to things; as, atheistic doctrines, opinions, or books.

Atheistical (a.) Disbelieving the existence of a God; impious; godless; -- applied to persons; as, an atheistic writer.

Attaint (v. t.) To find guilty; to convict; -- said esp. of a jury on trial for giving a false verdict.

Attrite (a.) Repentant from fear of punishment; having attrition of grief for sin; -- opposed to contrite.

Auspicate (v. t.) To give a favorable turn to in commencing; to inaugurate; -- a sense derived from the Roman practice of taking the auspicium, or inspection of birds, before undertaking any important business.

Auspicious (a.) Favoring; favorable; propitious; -- applied to persons or things.

Azotine () Alt. of -tin

Azurine (n.) The blue roach of Europe (Leuciscus caeruleus); -- so called from its color.

Azymite (n.) One who administered the Eucharist with unleavened bread; -- a name of reproach given by those of the Greek church to the Latins.

Bagnio (n.) A house for bathing, sweating, etc.; -- also, in Turkey, a prison for slaves.

Bantingism (n.) A method of reducing corpulence by avoiding food containing much farinaceous, saccharine, or oily matter; -- so called from William Banting of London.

Baptist (n.) One who administers baptism; -- specifically applied to John, the forerunner of Christ.

Barbiers (n.) A variety of paralysis, peculiar to India and the Malabar coast; -- considered by many to be the same as beriberi in chronic form.

Barrigudo (n.) A large, dark-colored, South American monkey, of the genus Lagothrix, having a long prehensile tail.

Barringout (n.) The act of closing the doors of a schoolroom against a schoolmaster; -- a boyish mode of rebellion in schools.

Batwing (a.) Shaped like a bat's wing; as, a bat's-wing burner.

Babiism (n.) The doctrine of a modern religious pantheistical sect in Persia, which was founded, about 1844, by Mirza Ali Mohammed ibn Rabhik (1820 -- 1850), who assumed the title of Bab-ed-Din (Per., Gate of the Faith). Babism is a mixture of Mohammedan, Christian, Jewish, and Parsi elements. This doctrine forbids concubinage and polygamy, and frees women from many of the degradations imposed upon them among the orthodox Mohammedans. Mendicancy, the use of intoxicating liquors and drugs, and > Beading (n.) The beads or bead-forming quality of certain liquors; as, the beading of a brand of whisky.

Bearing (n.) Any single emblem or charge in an escutcheon or coat of arms -- commonly in the pl.

Bearing (n.) The widest part of a vessel below the plank-sheer.

Bearing rein () A short rein looped over the check hook or the hames to keep the horse's head up; -- called in the United States a checkrein.

Beatification (n.) The act of beatifying, or the state of being beatified; esp., in the R. C. Church, the act or process of ascertaining and declaring that a deceased person is one of "the blessed," or has attained the second degree of sanctity, -- usually a stage in the process of canonization.

Beatitude (n.) Any one of the nine declarations (called the Beatitudes), made in the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. v. 3-12), with regard to the blessedness of those who are distinguished by certain specified virtues.

Bellied (a.) Having (such) a belly; puffed out; -- used in composition; as, pot-bellied; shad-bellied.

Benzine (n.) A liquid consisting mainly of the lighter and more volatile hydrocarbons of petroleum or kerosene oil, used as a solvent and for cleansing soiled fabrics; -- called also petroleum spirit, petroleum benzine. Varieties or similar products are gasoBerlin (n.) A four-wheeled carriage, having a sheltered seat behind the body and separate from it, invented in the 17th century, at Berlin.

Berlin (n.) Fine worsted for fancy-work; zephyr worsted; -- called also Berlin wool.

Bestir (v. t.) To put into brisk or vigorous action; to move with life and vigor; -- usually with the reciprocal pronoun.

Betaine (n.) A nitrogenous base, C5H11NO2, produced artificially, and also occurring naturally in beet-root molasses and its residues, from which it is extracted as a white crystalBethink (v. t.) To call to mind; to recall or bring to recollection, reflection, or consideration; to think; to consider; -- generally followed by a reflexive pronoun, often with of or that before the subject of thought.

Biacid (a.) Having two hydrogen atoms which can be replaced by negative atoms or radicals to form salts; -- said of bases. See Diacid.

Biprism (n.) A combination of two short rectangular glass prisms cemented together at their diagonal faces so as to form a cube; -- called also optical cube. It is used in one form of photometer.

Bibliolatry (n.) Book worship, esp. of the Bible; -- applied by Roman Catholic divines to the exaltation of the authority of the Bible over that of the pope or the church, and by Protestants to an excessive regard to the letter of the Scriptures.

Biggin (n.) A coffeepot with a strainer or perforated metallic vessel for holding the ground coffee, through which boiling water is poured; -- so called from Mr. Biggin, the inventor.

Billiards (n.) A game played with ivory balls o a cloth-covered, rectangular table, bounded by elastic cushions. The player seeks to impel his ball with his cue so that it shall either strike (carom upon) two other balls, or drive another ball into one of the pockets with which the table sometimes is furnished.

Biotite (n.) Mica containing iron and magnesia, generally of a black or dark green color; -- a common constituent of crystalBiquintile (n.) An aspect of the planets when they are distant from each other by twice the fifth part of a great circle -- that is, twice 72 degrees.

Birdie (n.) A pretty or dear little bird; -- a pet name.

Bobbin (n.) A cylindrical or spool-shaped coil or insulated wire, usually containing a core of soft iron which becomes magnetic when the wire is traversed by an electrical current.

Bocking (n.) A coarse woolen fabric, used for floor cloths, to cover carpets, etc.; -- so called from the town of Bocking, in England, where it was first made.

Bornite (n.) A valuable ore of copper, containing copper, iron, and sulphur; -- also called purple copper ore (or erubescite), in allusion to the colors shown upon the slightly tarnished surface.

Bowfin (n.) A voracious ganoid fish (Amia calva) found in the fresh waters of the United States; the mudfish; -- called also Johnny Grindle, and dogfish.

Breviary (n.) A book containing the daily public or canonical prayers of the Roman Catholic or of the Greek Church for the seven canonical hours, namely, matins and lauds, the first, third, sixth, and ninth hours, vespers, and compBrevipennate (a.) Short-winged; -- applied to birds which can not fly, owing to their short wings, as the ostrich, cassowary, and emu.

Brevirostrate (a.) Short-billed; having a short beak.

British (a.) Of or pertaining to Great Britain or to its inhabitants; -- sometimes restricted to the original inhabitants.

Bromic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, bromine; -- said of those compounds of bromine in which this element has a valence of five, or the next to its highest; as, bromic acid.

Bulbil (n.) A small or secondary bulb; hence, now almost exclusively: An aerial bulb or deciduous bud, produced in the leaf axils, as in the tiger lily, or relpacing the flowers, as in some onions, and capable, when separated, of propagating the plant; -- called also bulblet and brood bud.

Buccinator (n.) A muscle of the cheek; -- so called from its use in blowing wind instruments.

Bumkin (n.) A projecting beam or boom; as: (a) One projecting from each bow of a vessel, to haul the fore tack to, called a tack bumpkin. (b) One from each quarter, for the main-brace blocks, and called brace bumpkin. (c) A small outrigger over the stern of a boat, to extend the mizzen.

Bushing (n.) A bush or lining; -- sometimes called a thimble. See 4th Bush.

Buskin (n.) A similar covering for the foot and leg, made with very thick soles, to give an appearance of elevation to the stature; -- worn by tragic actors in ancient Greece and Rome. Used as a symbol of tragedy, or the tragic drama, as distinguished from comedy.

Butting joint () A joint between two pieces of timber or wood, at the end of one or both, and either at right angles or oblique to the grain, as the joints which the struts and braces form with the truss posts; -- sometimes called abutting joint.

Cabbiri (n. pl.) Certain deities originally worshiped with mystical rites by the Pelasgians in Lemnos and Samothrace and afterwards throughout Greece; -- also called sons of Hephaestus (or Vulcan), as being masters of the art of working metals.

Cabriolet (n.) A one-horse carriage with two seats and a calash top.

Cacaine (n.) The essential principle of cacao; -- now called theobromine.

Cachinnation (n.) Loud or immoderate laughter; -- often a symptom of hysterical or maniacal affections.

Caesium (n.) A rare alkaCalcification (n.) The process of change into a stony or calcareous substance by the deposition of lime salt; -- normally, as in the formation of bone and of teeth; abnormally, as in calcareous degeneration of tissue.

Calcite (n.) Calcium carbonate, or carbonate of lime. It is rhombohedral in its crystallization, and thus distinguished from aragonite. It includes common limestone, chalk, and marble. Called also calc-spar and calcareous spar.

Callisection (n.) Painless vivisection; -- opposed to sentisection.

Calvinism (n.) The theological tenets or doctrines of John Calvin (a French theologian and reformer of the 16th century) and his followers, or of the so-called calvinistic churches.

Camail (n.) a hood worn in church services, -- the amice, or the like.

Carbide (n.) A binary compound of carbon with some other element or radical, in which the carbon plays the part of a negative; -- formerly termed carburet.

Carbinol (n.) Methyl alcohol, CH3OH; -- also, by extension, any one in the homologous series of paraffine alcohols of which methyl alcohol is the type.

Carcinology (n.) The department of zoology which treats of the Crustacea (lobsters, crabs, etc.); -- called also malacostracology and crustaceology.

Carling (n.) A short timber running lengthwise of a ship, from one transverse desk beam to another; also, one of the cross timbers that strengthen a hath; -- usually in pl.

Carmine (n.) The essential coloring principle of cochineal, extracted as a purple-red amorphous mass. It is a glucoside and possesses acid properties; -- hence called also carminic acid.

Carping (a.) Fault-finding; censorious caviling. See Captious.

Carrion (n.) A contemptible or worthless person; -- a term of reproach.

Cassideous (a.) Helmet-shaped; -- applied to a corolla having a broad, helmet-shaped upper petal, as in aconite.

Cassino (n.) A game at cards, played by two or more persons, usually for twenty-one points.

Cassiopeia (n.) A constellation of the northern hemisphere, situated between Cepheus and Perseus; -- so called in honor of the wife of Cepheus, a fabulous king of Ethiopia.

Castigatory (n.) An instrument formerly used to punish and correct arrant scolds; -- called also a ducking stool, or trebucket.

Castile soap () A kind of fine, hard, white or mottled soap, made with olive oil and soda; also, a soap made in imitation of the above-described soap.

Cataian (n.) A native of Cathay or China; a foreigner; -- formerly a term of reproach.

Catkin (n.) An ament; a species of inflorescence, consisting of a slender axis with many unisexual apetalous flowers along its sides, as in the willow and poplar, and (as to the staminate flowers) in the chestnut, oak, hickory, etc. -- so called from its resemblance to a cat's tail. See Illust. of Ament.

Catling (n.) A double-edged, sharp-pointed dismembering knife.

Catmint (n.) A well-know plant of the genus Nepeta (N. Cataria), somewhat like mint, having a string scent, and sometimes used in medicine. It is so called because cats have a peculiar fondness for it.

Caulicle (n.) A short caulis or stem, esp. the rudimentary stem seen in the embryo of seed; -- otherwise called a radicle.

Centimetre (n.) The hundredth part of a meter; a measure of length equal to rather more than thirty-nine hundredths (0.3937) of an inch. See Meter.

Centiped (n.) A species of the Myriapoda; esp. the large, flattened, venomous kinds of the order Chilopoda, found in tropical climates. they are many-jointed, and have a great number of feet.

Cerris (n.) A species of oak (Quercus cerris) native in the Orient and southern Europe; -- called also bitter oak and Turkey oak.

Cervicide (n.) The act of killing deer; deer-slaying.

Celtium (n.) A supposed new element of the rare-earth group, accompanying lutecium and scandium in the gadolinite earths. Symbol, Ct (no period).

Celtium (n.) A supposed new element of the rare-earth group, accompanying lutecium and scandium in the gadolinite earths. Symbol, Ct (no period).

Chemiotaxis () The sensitiveness exhibited by small free-swimming organisms, as bacteria, zoospores of algae, etc., to chemical substances held in solution. They may be attracted (positive chemotaxis) or repelled (negative chemotaxis).

Chemiotaxis () The sensitiveness exhibited by small free-swimming organisms, as bacteria, zoospores of algae, etc., to chemical substances held in solution. They may be attracted (positive chemotaxis) or repelled (negative chemotaxis).

Chaliced (a.) Having a calyx or cup; cup-shaped.

Chapiter (n.) A summary in writing of such matters as are to be inquired of or presented before justices in eyre, or justices of assize, or of the peace, in their sessions; -- also called articles.

Chariot (n.) A two-wheeled car or vehicle for war, racing, state processions, etc.

Chariot (n.) A four-wheeled pleasure or state carriage, having one seat.

Chariotee (n.) A light, covered, four-wheeled pleasure carriage with two seats.

Chelidonius (n.) A small stone taken from the gizzard of a young swallow. -- anciently worn as a medicinal charm.

Chemisette (n.) An under-garment, worn by women, usually covering the neck, shoulders, and breast.

Chemism (n.) The force exerted between the atoms of elementary substance whereby they unite to form chemical compounds; chemical attaction; affinity; -- sometimes used as a general expression for chemical activity or relationship.

Cherimoyer (n.) A small downy-leaved tree (Anona Cherimolia), with fragrant flowers. It is a native of Peru.

Chewink (n.) An american bird (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) of the Finch family, so called from its note; -- called also towhee bunting and ground robin.

Chylifaction (n.) The act or process by which chyle is formed from food in animal bodies; chylification, -- a digestive process.

Circinate (a.) Rolled together downward, the tip occupying the center; -- a term used in reference to foliation or leafing, as in ferns.

Cirriform (a.) Formed like a cirrus or tendril; -- said of appendages of both animals and plants.

Clarichord (n.) A musical instrument, formerly in use, in form of a spinet; -- called also manichord and clavichord.

Clarify (v. t.) To make clear or bright by freeing from feculent matter; to defecate; to fine; -- said of liquids, as wine or sirup.

Clavicorn (a.) Having club-shaped antennae. See Antennae

Clavicornes (n. pl.) A group of beetles having club-shaped antennae.

Claviform (a.) Club-shaped; clavate.

Clevis (n.) A piece of metal bent in the form of an oxbow, with the two ends perforated to receive a pin, used on the end of the tongue of a plow, wagen, etc., to attach it to a draft chain, whiffletree, etc.; -- called also clavel, clevy.

Cluniac (n.) A monk of the reformed branch of the Benedictine Order, founded in 912 at Cluny (or Clugny) in France. -- Also used as a.

Coamings (n. pl.) Raised pieces of wood of iron around a hatchway, skylight, or other opening in the deck, to prevent water from running bellow; esp. the fore-and-aft pieces of a hatchway frame as distinguished from the transverse head ledges.

Coquille (n.) A shell or shell-like dish or mold in which viands are served.

Cobbing (a.) Haughty; purse-proud. See Cob, n., 2.

Codeine (n.) One of the opium alkaloids; a white crystalCoexist (v. i.) To exist at the same time; -- sometimes followed by with.

Coexistence (n.) Existence at the same time with another; -- contemporary existence.

Collie (n.) The Scotch shepherd dog. There are two breeds, the rough-haired and smooth-haired. It is remarkable for its intelligence, displayed especially in caring for flocks.

Combination (n.) The result of combining or uniting; union of persons or things; esp. a union or alliance of persons or states to effect some purpose; -- usually in a bad sense.

Commissary (n.) An officer whose business is to provide food for a body of troops or a military post; -- officially called commissary of subsistence.

Commit (v. t.) To give in trust; to put into charge or keeping; to intrust; to consign; -- used with to, unto.

Commit (v. t.) To join for a contest; to match; -- followed by with.

Commit (v. t.) To pledge or bind; to compromise, expose, or endanger by some decisive act or preliminary step; -- often used reflexively; as, to commit one's self to a certain course.

Commitment (n.) A warrant or order for the imprisonment of a person; -- more frequently termed a mittimus.

Concinnity (n.) Internal harmony or fitness; mutual adaptation of parts; elegance; -- used chiefly of style of discourse.

Concise (a.) Expressing much in a few words; condensed; brief and compacted; -- used of style in writing or speaking.

Condisciple (n.) A schoolfellow; a fellow-student.

Condition (n.) A clause in a contract, or agreement, which has for its object to suspend, to defeat, or in some way to modify, the principal obligation; or, in case of a will, to suspend, revoke, or modify a devise or bequest. It is also the case of a future uncertain event, which may or may not happen, and on the occurrence or non-occurrence of which, the accomplishment, recission, or modification of an obligation or testamentary disposition is made to depend.

Confide (v. i.) To put faith (in); to repose confidence; to trust; -- usually followed by in; as, the prince confides in his ministers.

Confide (v. t.) To intrust; to give in charge; to commit to one's keeping; -- followed by to.

Confidence (n.) The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; -- formerly followed by of, now commonly by in.

Confidence (n.) The state of mind characterized by one's reliance on himself, or his circumstances; a feeling of self-sufficiency; such assurance as leads to a feeling of security; self-reliance; -- often with self prefixed.

Confidence (n.) Having self-reliance; bold; undaunted.

Confine (v. i.) To have a common boundary; to border; to lie contiguous; to touch; -- followed by on or with.

Confine (n.) Common boundary; border; limit; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Confinement (n.) Restraint within doors by sickness, esp. that caused by childbirth; lying-in.

Congiary (n.) A present, as of corn, wine, or oil, made by a Roman emperor to the soldiers or the people; -- so called because measured to each in a congius.

Conning tower (n.) The shot-proof pilot house of a war vessel.

Connive (v. i.) To close the eyes upon a fault; to wink (at); to fail or forbear by intention to discover an act; to permit a proceeding, as if not aware of it; -- usually followed by at.

Conoid (n.) A solid formed by the revolution of a conic section about its axis; as, a parabolic conoid, elliptic conoid, etc.; -- more commonly called paraboloid, ellipsoid, etc.

Considerable (a.) Of some distinction; noteworthy; influential; respectable; -- said of persons.

Consideration (n.) Attentive respect; appreciative regard; -- used especially in diplomatic or stately correspondence.

Consignee (n.) The person to whom goods or other things are consigned; a factor; -- correlative to consignor.

Consignor (n.) One who consigns something to another; -- opposed to consignee.

Consist (v. i.) To be composed or made up; -- followed by of.

Consist (v. i.) To have as its substance or character, or as its foundation; to be; -- followed by in.

Consist (v. i.) To be consistent or harmonious; to be in accordance; -- formerly used absolutely, now followed by with.

Consist (v. i.) To insist; -- followed by on.

Consistorian (a.) Pertaining to a Presbyterian consistory; -- a contemptuous term of 17th century controversy.

Continency (n.) Self-restraint; self-command.

Copaiva (n.) A more or less viscid, yellowish liquid, the bitter oleoresin of several species of Copaifera, a genus of trees growing in South America and the West Indies. It is stimulant and diuretic, and is much used in affections of the mucous membranes; -- called also balsam of copaiba.

Coquimbite (n.) A mineral consisting principally of sulphate of iron; white copperas; -- so called because found in the province of Coquimbo, Chili.

Coquina (n.) A soft, whitish, coral-like stone, formed of broken shells and corals, found in the southern United States, and used for roadbeds and for building material, as in the fort at St. Augustine, Florida.

Corbiestep (n.) One of the steps in which a gable wall is often finished in place of a continuous slope; -- also called crowstep.

Corniform (a.) Having the shape of a horn; horn-shaped.

Cornin (n.) A bitter principle obtained from dogwood (Cornus florida), as a white crystalCorticifer (n.) One of the Gorgoniacea; -- so called because the fleshy part surrounds a solid axis, like a bark.

Cosmical (a.) Rising or setting with the sun; -- the opposite of acronycal.

Costiferous (a.) Rib-bearing, as the dorsal vertebrae.

Cottise (n.) A diminutive of the bendlet, containing one half its area or one quarter the area of the bend. When a single cottise is used alone it is often called a cost. See also Couple-close.

Cottised (a.) Set between two cottises, -- said of a bend; or between two barrulets, -- said of a bar or fess.

Cowbird (n.) The cow blackbird (Molothrus ater), an American starling. Like the European cuckoo, it builds no nest, but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds; -- so called because frequently associated with cattle.

Cowfish (n.) A marine plectognath fish (Ostracoin quadricorne, and allied species), having two projections, like horns, in front; -- called also cuckold, coffer fish, trunkfish.

Crania (n.) A genus of living Brachiopoda; -- so called from its fancied resemblance to the cranium or skull.

Credit (n.) Trust given or received; expectation of future playment for property transferred, or of fulfillment or promises given; mercantile reputation entitling one to be trusted; -- applied to individuals, corporations, communities, or nations; as, to buy goods on credit.

Credit (n.) The side of an account on which are entered all items reckoned as values received from the party or the category named at the head of the account; also, any one, or the sum, of these items; -- the opposite of debit; as, this sum is carried to one's credit, and that to his debit; A has several credits on the books of B.

Creditor (n.) One who gives credit in business matters; hence, one to whom money is due; -- correlative to debtor.

Cretic (n.) A poetic foot, composed of one short syllable between two long ones (- / -).

Criminal (a.) Involving a crime; of the nature of a crime; -- said of an act or of conduct; as, criminal carelessness.

Criminal (a.) Relating to crime; -- opposed to civil; as, the criminal code.

Criticise (v. i.) To act as a critic; to pass literary or artistic judgment; to play the critic; -- formerly used with on or upon.

Crocidolite (n.) A mineral occuring in silky fibers of a lavender blue color. It is related to hornblende and is essentially a silicate of iron and soda; -- called also blue asbestus. A silicified form, in which the fibers penetrating quartz are changed to oxide of iron, is the yellow brown tiger-eye of the jewelers.

Cronian (a.) Saturnian; -- applied to the North Polar Sea.

Cruciform (a.) Cross-shaped; (Bot.) having four parts arranged in the form of a cross.

Cuboid (a.) Cube-shaped, or nearly so; as, the cuboid bone of the foot.

Culminate (a.) Growing upward, as distinguished from a lateral growth; -- applied to the growth of corals.

Cultivation (n.) Bestowal of time or attention for self-improvement or for the benefit of others; fostering care.

Cupric (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, copper; containing copper; -- said of those compounds of copper in which this element is present in its lowest proportion.

Curricle (n.) A two-wheeled chaise drawn by two horses abreast.

Cursive (n.) A manuscript, especially of the New Testament, written in small, connected characters or in a running hand; -- opposed to uncial.

Curvinerved (a.) Having the ribs or the veins of the leaves curved; -- called also curvinervate and curve-veined.

Cushion (n.) A riotous kind of dance, formerly common at weddings; -- called also cushion dance.

Cuspid (n.) One of the canine teeth; -- so called from having but one point or cusp on the crown. See Tooth.

Cyanin (n.) The blue coloring matter of flowers; -- called also anthokyan and anthocyanin.

Cyanite (n.) A mineral occuring in thin-bladed crystals and crystalCypris (n.) A genus of small, bivalve, fresh-water Crustacea, belonging to the Ostracoda; also, a member of this genus.

Cysticercus (n.) The larval form of a tapeworm, having the head and neck of a tapeworm attached to a saclike body filled with fluid; -- called also bladder worm, hydatid, and measle (as, pork measle).

Cystidea (n. pl.) An order of Crinoidea, mostly fossils of the Paleozoic rocks. They were usually roundish or egg-shaped, and often unsymmetrical; some were sessile, others had short stems.

Cytoid (a.) Cell-like; -- applied to the corpuscles of lymph, blood, chyle, etc.

Dandie (n.) One of a breed of small terriers; -- called also Dandie Dinmont.

Dandiprat (n.) A little fellow; -- in sport or contempt.

Daubing (n.) A rough coat of mortar put upon a wall to give it the appearance of stone; rough-cast.

Daubing (n.) In currying, a mixture of fish oil and tallow worked into leather; -- called also dubbing.

DecDeclivity (n.) Deviation from a horizontal Deifical (a.) Making divine; producing a likeness to God; god-making.

Demoiselle (n.) The Numidian crane (Anthropoides virgo); -- so called on account of the grace and symmetry of its form and movements.

Density (n.) The quality of being dense, close, or thick; compactness; -- opposed to rarity.

Dentiform (a.) Having the form of a tooth or of teeth; tooth-shaped.

Dentil (n.) A small square block or projection in cornices, a number of which are ranged in an ornamental band; -- used particularly in the Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite orders.

Dentirostral (a.) Having a toothed bill; -- applied to a group of passerine birds, having the bill notched, and feeding chiefly on insects, as the shrikes and vireos. See Illust. (N) under Beak.

Deprive (v. t.) To dispossess; to bereave; to divest; to hinder from possessing; to debar; to shut out from; -- with a remoter object, usually preceded by of.

Derringer (n.) A kind of short-barreled pocket pistol, of very large caliber, often carrying a half-ounce ball.

Destine (v. t.) To determine the future condition or application of; to set apart by design for a future use or purpose; to fix, as by destiny or by an authoritative decree; to doom; to ordain or preordain; to appoint; -- often with the remoter object preceded by to or for.

Destitute (a.) Forsaken; not having in possession (something necessary, or desirable); deficient; lacking; devoid; -- often followed by of.

Destitute (v. t.) To make destitute; to cause to be in want; to deprive; -- followed by of.

Detail (n.) A minute portion; one of the small parts; a particular; an item; -- used chiefly in the plural; as, the details of a scheme or transaction.

Detriment (n.) That which injures or causes damage; mischief; harm; diminution; loss; damage; -- used very generically; as, detriments to property, religion, morals, etc.

Devoid (v. t.) Destitute; not in possession; -- with of; as, devoid of sense; devoid of pity or of pride.

Devoir (n.) Duty; service owed; hence, due act of civility or respect; -- now usually in the plural; as, they paid their devoirs to the ladies.

Diacid (a.) Divalent; -- said of a base or radical as capable of saturating two acid monad radicals or a dibasic acid. Cf. Dibasic, a., and Biacid.

Diamide (n.) Any compound containing two amido groups united with one or more acid or negative radicals, -- as distinguished from a diamine. Cf. Amido acid, under Amido, and Acid amide, under Amide.

Diesis (n.) The mark /; -- called also double dagger.

Difficulty (n.) The state of being difficult, or hard to do; hardness; arduousness; -- opposed to easiness or facility; as, the difficulty of a task or enterprise; a work of difficulty.

Difficulty (n.) Embarrassment of affairs, especially financial affairs; -- usually in the plural; as, to be in difficulties.

Diffidence (n.) Distrust of one's self or one's own powers; lack of self-reliance; modesty; modest reserve; bashfulness.

Diffident (a.) Wanting confidence in one's self; distrustful of one's own powers; not self-reliant; timid; modest; bashful; characterized by modest reserve.

Dignity (n.) Quality suited to inspire respect or reverence; loftiness and grace; impressiveness; stateDioxindol (n.) A white, crystalDisciflorous (a.) Bearing the stamens on a discoid outgrowth of the receptacle; -- said of a subclass of plants. Cf. Calycifloral.

Disciplinarian (n.) A Puritan or Presbyterian; -- because of rigid adherence to religious or church discipDiscipDisdiapason (n.) An interval of two octaves, or a fifteenth; -- called also bisdiapason.

Dishing (a.) Dish-shaped; concave.

Dislike (n.) A feeling of positive and usually permanent aversion to something unpleasant, uncongenial, or offensive; disapprobation; repugnance; displeasure; disfavor; -- the opposite of liking or fondness.

Dissipate (v. t.) To scatter completely; to disperse and cause to disappear; -- used esp. of the dispersion of things that can never again be collected or restored.

Distichous (n.) Disposed in two vertical rows; two-ranked.

Distinct (a.) Separate in place; not conjunct; not united by growth or otherwise; -- with from.

Distinct (a.) So separated as not to be confounded with any other thing; not liable to be misunderstood; not confused; well-defined; clear; as, we have a distinct or indistinct view of a prospect.

Distinguish (v. t.) To separate from others by a mark of honor; to make eminent or known; to confer distinction upon; -- with by or for.

Distinguish (v. i.) To make distinctions; to perceive the difference; to exercise discrimination; -- with between; as, a judge distinguishes between cases apparently similar, but differing in principle.

Distinguished (a.) Separated from others by distinct difference; having, or indicating, superiority; eminent or known; illustrious; -- applied to persons and deeds.

Ditrichotomous (a.) Dividing into double or treble ramifications; -- said of a leaf or stem.

Dittied (a.) Set, sung, or composed as a ditty; -- usually in composition.

Donnism (n) Self-importance; loftiness of carriage.

Dorsiferous () Bearing, or producing, on the back; -- applied to ferns which produce seeds on the back of the leaf, and to certain Batrachia, the ova of which become attached to the skin of the back of the parent, where they develop; dorsiparous.

Dulciana (n.) A sweet-toned stop of an organ.

Dunbird (n.) The pochard; -- called also dunair, and dunker, or dun-curre.

Dunlin (n.) A species of sandpiper (Tringa alpina); -- called also churr, dorbie, grass bird, and red-backed sandpiper. It is found both in Europe and America.

Earning (n.) That which is earned; wages gained by work or services; money earned; -- used commonly in the plural.

Eburin (n.) A composition of dust of ivory or of bone with a cement; -- used for imitations of valuable stones and in making moldings, seals, etc.

Edifice (n.) A building; a structure; an architectural fabric; -- chiefly applied to elegant houses, and other large buildings; as, a palace, a church, a statehouse.

Egotism (n.) The practice of too frequently using the word I; hence, a speaking or writing overmuch of one's self; self-exaltation; self-praise; the act or practice of magnifying one's self or parading one's own doings. The word is also used in the sense of egoism.

Ekasilicon (n.) The name of a hypothetical element predicted and afterwards discovered and named germanium; -- so called because it was a missing analogue of the silicon group. See Germanium, and cf. Ekabor.

Elative (a.) Raised; lifted up; -- a term applied to what is also called the absolute superlative, denoting a high or intense degree of a quality, but not excluding the idea that an equal degree may exist in other cases.

Eliminant (n.) The result of eliminating n variables between n homogeneous equations of any degree; -- called also resultant.

Elohistic (a.) Relating to Elohim as a name of God; -- said of passages in the Old Testament.

Emeritus (a.) Honorably discharged from the performance of public duty on account of age, infirmity, or long and faithful services; -- said of an officer of a college or pastor of a church.

Emodin (n.) An orange-red crystalEmpaistic (a.) Having to do with inlaid work; -- especially used with reference to work of the ancient Greeks.

Enceinte (n.) The Enclitical (v. i.) Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Encrinoidea (n. pl.) That order of the Crinoidea which includes most of the living and many fossil forms, having jointed arms around the margin of the oral disk; -- also called Brachiata and Articulata. See Illusts. under Comatula and Crinoidea.

Enepidermic (a.) Applied to the skin without friction; -- said of medicines.

Englishry (n.) A body of English or people of English descent; -- commonly applied to English people in Ireland.

Entail (n.) To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain Erinite (n.) A hydrous arseniate of copper, of an emerald-green color; -- so called from Erin, or Ireland, where it occurs.

Erucifrom (a.) Having the form of a caterpillar; -- said of insect larvae.

Escribed (a.) Drawn outside of; -- used to designate a circle that touches one of the sides of a given triangle, and also the other two sides produced.

Esodic (a.) Conveying impressions from the surface of the body to the spinal cord; -- said of certain nerves. Opposed to exodic.

Esquire (n.) Originally, a shield-bearer or armor-bearer, an attendant on a knight; in modern times, a title of dignity next in degree below knight and above gentleman; also, a title of office and courtesy; -- often shortened to squire.

Estoile (n.) A six-pointed star whose rays are wavy, instead of straight like those of a mullet.

Etesian (a.) Periodical; annual; -- applied to winds which annually blow from the north over the Mediterranean, esp. the eastern part, for an irregular period during July and August.

Ethnical (a.) Pertaining to the gentiles, or nations not converted to Christianity; heathen; pagan; -- opposed to Jewish and Christian.

Eucairite (n.) A metallic mineral, a selenide of copper and silver; -- so called by Berzelius on account of its being found soon after the discovery of the metal selenium.

Exarillate (a.) Having no aril; -- said of certain seeds, or of the plants producing them.

Exodic (a.) Conducting influences from the spinal cord outward; -- said of the motor or efferent nerves. Opposed to esodic.

Explicit (a.) Having no disguised meaning or reservation; unreserved; outspoken; -- applied to persons; as, he was earnest and explicit in his statement.

Exquisite (a.) Exceeding; extreme; keen; -- used in a bad or a good sense; as, exquisite pain or pleasure.

Extrinsic (a.) Not contained in or belonging to a body; external; outward; unessential; -- opposed to intrinsic.

Extrinsic (a.) Attached partly to an organ or limb and partly to some other part/ -- said of certain groups of muscles. Opposed to intrinsic.

Faction (n.) A party, in political society, combined or acting in union, in opposition to the government, or state; -- usually applied to a minority, but it may be applied to a majority; a combination or clique of partisans of any kind, acting for their own interests, especially if greedy, clamorous, and reckless of the common good.

Factious (a.) Given to faction; addicted to form parties and raise dissensions, in opposition to government or the common good; turbulent; seditious; prone to clamor against public measures or men; -- said of persons.

Factious (a.) Pertaining to faction; proceeding from faction; indicating, or characterized by, faction; -- said of acts or expressions; as, factious quarrels.

Falding (n.) A frieze or rough-napped cloth.

Falsism (n.) That which is evidently false; an assertion or statement the falsity of which is plainly apparent; -- opposed to truism.

Fascia (n.) A broad well-defined band of color.

Fashion (v. t.) To fit; to adapt; to accommodate; -- with to.

Fashionable (a.) Genteel; well-bred; as, fashionable society.

Fashionable (n.) A person who conforms to the fashions; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Fashioned (a.) Having a certain style or fashion; as old-fashioned; new-fashioned.

Fertile (a.) Capable of producing fruit; fruit-bearing; as, fertile flowers.

Fertile (a.) Containing pollen; -- said of anthers.

Fibrinoplastin (n.) An albuminous substance, existing in the blood, which in combination with fibrinogen forms fibrin; -- called also paraglobulin.

Fiction (n.) That which is feigned, invented, or imagined; especially, a feigned or invented story, whether oral or written. Hence: A story told in order to deceive; a fabrication; -- opposed to fact, or reality.

Fiftieth (a.) Next in order after the forty-ninth; -- the ordinal of fifty.

Filling (n.) That which is used to fill a cavity or any empty space, or to supply a deficiency; as, filling for a cavity in a tooth, a depression in a roadbed, the space between exterior and interior walls of masonry, the pores of open-grained wood, the space between the outer and inner planks of a vessel, etc.

Fiorite (n.) A variety of opal occuring in the cavities of volcanic tufa, in smooth and shining globular and botryoidal masses, having a pearly luster; -- so called from Fiora, in Ischia.

Firkin (n.) A small wooden vessel or cask of indeterminate size, -- used for butter, lard, etc.

Fissipedia (n. pl.) A division of the Carnivora, including the dogs, cats, and bears, in which the feet are not webbed; -- opposed to Pinnipedia.

Flagitious (a.) Disgracefully or shamefully criminal; grossly wicked; scandalous; shameful; -- said of acts, crimes, etc.

Flagitious (a.) Guilty of enormous crimes; corrupt; profligate; -- said of persons.

Flaming (a.) Of the color of flame; high-colored; brilliant; dazzling.

Flexion (n.) The bending of a limb or joint; that motion of a joint which gives the distal member a continually decreasing angle with the axis of the proximal part; -- distinguished from extension.

Florideae (n. pl.) A subclass of algae including all the red or purplish seaweeds; the Rhodospermeae of many authors; -- so called from the rosy or florid color of most of the species.

Floriform (a.) Having the form of a flower; flower-shaped.

Foreign (a.) Remote; distant; strange; not belonging; not connected; not pertaining or pertient; not appropriate; not harmonious; not agreeable; not congenial; -- with to or from; as, foreign to the purpose; foreign to one's nature.

Forging (n.) A piece of forged work in metal; -- a general name for a piece of hammered iron or steel.

Forgive (v. t.) To give up resentment or claim to requital on account of (an offense or wrong); to remit the penalty of; to pardon; -- said in reference to the act forgiven.

Forgive (v. t.) To cease to feel resentment against, on account of wrong committed; to give up claim to requital from or retribution upon (an offender); to absolve; to pardon; -- said of the person offending.

Formicary (n.) The nest or dwelling of a swarm of ants; an ant-hill.

Fortieth (a.) Following the thirty-ninth, or preceded by thirty-nine units, things, or parts.

Fortieth (n.) One of forty equal parts into which one whole is divided; the quotient of a unit divided by forty; one next in order after the thirty-ninth.

Foxfish (n.) The fox shark; -- called also sea fox. See Thrasher shark, under Shark.

Fraxin (n.) A colorless crystalFritillaria (n.) A genus of liliaceous plants, of which the crown-imperial (Fritillaria imperialis) is one species, and the Guinea-hen flower (F. Meleagris) another. See Crown-imperial.

Fritillary (n.) A plant with checkered petals, of the genus Fritillaria: the Guinea-hen flower. See Fritillaria.

Fritillary (n.) One of several species of butterflies belonging to Argynnis and allied genera; -- so called because the coloring of their wings resembles that of the common Fritillaria. See Aphrodite.

Fulminate (v. t.) To utter or send out with denunciations or censures; -- said especially of menaces or censures uttered by ecclesiastical authority.

Fungi (n. pl.) A group of thallophytic plants of low organization, destitute of chlorophyll, in which reproduction is mainly accomplished by means of asexual spores, which are produced in a great variety of ways, though sexual reproduction is known to occur in certain Phycomycetes, or so-called algal fungi.

Fungia (n.) A genus of simple, stony corals; -- so called because they are usually flat and circular, with radiating plates, like the gills of a mushroom. Some of them are eighteen inches in diameter.

Fungibles (n. pl.) Things which may be furnished or restored in kind, as distinguished from specific things; -- called also fungible things.

Fungivorous (a.) Eating fungi; -- said of certain insects and snails.

Furniture (v. t.) A mixed or compound stop in an organ; -- sometimes called mixture.

Fuscine (n.) A dark-colored substance obtained from empyreumatic animal oil.

Fustian (n.) An inflated style of writing; a kind of writing in which high-sounding words are used,' above the dignity of the thoughts or subject; bombast.

Fustic (n.) The wood of the Maclura tinctoria, a tree growing in the West Indies, used in dyeing yellow; -- called also old fustic.

Gaduin (n.) A yellow or brown amorphous substance, of indifferent nature, found in cod-liver oil.

Gaidic (a.) Pertaining to hypogeic acid; -- applied to an acid obtained from hypogeic acid.

Gallium (n.) A rare metallic element, found combined in certain zinc ores. It is white, hard, and malleable, resembling aluminium, and remarkable for its low melting point (86? F., 30? C.). Symbol, Ga; at. wt., 69.9. Gallium is chiefly trivalent, resembling aluminium and indium. It was predicted with most of its properties, under the name eka-aluminium, by Mendelyeev on the basis of the periodic law. This prediction was verified in its discovery (in 1875) by its characteristic spectrum (two vi> Gallinae (n.) An order of birds, including the common domestic fowls, pheasants, grouse, quails, and allied forms; -- sometimes called Rasores.

Gallivat (n.) A small armed vessel, with sails and oars, -- used on the Malabar coast.

Gannister (n.) A refractory material consisting of crushed or ground siliceous stone, mixed with fire clay; -- used for lining Bessemer converters; also used for macadamizing roads.

Ganoid (a.) Of or pertaining to Ganoidei. -- n. One of the Ganoidei.

Garcinia (n.) A genus of plants, including the mangosteen tree (Garcinia Mangostana), found in the islands of the Indian Archipelago; -- so called in honor of Dr. Garcin.

Garfish (n.) A European marine fish (Belone vulgaris); -- called also gar, gerrick, greenback, greenbone, gorebill, hornfish, longnose, mackerel guide, sea needle, and sea pike.

Garfish (n.) One of several species of similar fishes of the genus Tylosurus, of which one species (T. marinus) is common on the Atlantic coast. T. Caribbaeus, a very large species, and T. crassus, are more southern; -- called also needlefish. Many of the common names of the European garfish are also applied to the American species.

Garnierite (n.) An amorphous mineral of apple-green color; a hydrous silicate of nickel and magnesia. It is an important ore of nickel.

Garvie (n.) The sprat; -- called also garvie herring, and garvock.

Gelding (v. t.) A castrated animal; -- usually applied to a horse, but formerly used also of the human male.

Gentian (n.) Any one of a genus (Gentiana) of herbaceous plants with opposite leaves and a tubular four- or five-lobed corolla, usually blue, but sometimes white, yellow, or red. See Illust. of Capsule.

Gentile (a.) One of a non-Jewish nation; one neither a Jew nor a Christian; a worshiper of false gods; a heathen.

Gentility (n.) The quality or qualities appropriate to those who are well born, as self-respect, dignity, courage, courtesy, politeness of manner, a graceful and easy mien and behavior, etc.; good breeding.

Gentilize (v. i.) To act the gentleman; -- with it (see It, 5).

Gentisin (n.) A tasteless, yellow, crystalGermicide (a.) Destructive to germs; -- applied to any agent which has a destructive action upon living germs, particularly bacteria, or bacterial germs, which are considered the cause of many infectious diseases.

Germinal (n.) The seventh month of the French republican calendar [1792 -- 1806]. It began March 21 and ended April 19. See VendEmiaire.

Gestic (a.) Relating to bodily motion; consisting of gestures; -- said especially with reference to dancing.

Glacial (a.) Resembling ice; having the appearance and consistency of ice; -- said of certain solid compounds; as, glacial phosphoric or acetic acids.

Gladiate (a.) Sword-shaped; resembling a sword in form, as the leaf of the iris, or of the gladiolus.

Gladiole (n.) A lilylike plant, of the genus Gladiolus; -- called also corn flag.

Gloxinia (n.) American genus of herbaceous plants with very handsome bell-shaped blossoms; -- named after B. P. Gloxin, a German botanist.

Glucina (n.) A white or gray tasteless powder, the oxide of the element glucinum; -- formerly called glucine.

Glycide (n.) A colorless liquid, obtained from certain derivatives of glycerin, and regarded as a partially dehydrated glycerin; -- called also glycidic alcohol.

GobGodwit (n.) One of several species of long-billed, wading birds of the genus Limosa, and family Tringidae. The European black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa), the American marbled godwit (L. fedoa), the Hudsonian godwit (L. haemastica), and others, are valued as game birds. Called also godwin.

Gordius (n.) A genus of long, slender, nematoid worms, parasitic in insects until near maturity, when they leave the insect, and live in water, in which they deposit their eggs; -- called also hair eel, hairworm, and hair snake, from the absurd, but common and widely diffused, notion that they are metamorphosed horsehairs.

Gothic (a.) Of or pertaining to a style of architecture with pointed arches, steep roofs, windows large in proportion to the wall spaces, and, generally, great height in proportion to the other dimensions -- prevalent in Western Europe from about 1200 to 1475 a. d. See Illust. of Abacus, and Capital.

Gothic (n.) A kind of square-cut type, with no hair Graminivorous (a.) Feeding or subsisting on grass, and the like food; -- said of horses, cattle, and other animals.

Granite (n.) A crystalGrating (n.) A system of close equidistant and parallel Gravigrade (a.) Slow-paced.

Gravity (a.) Lowness of tone; -- opposed to acuteness.

Grolier (n.) The name by which Jean Grolier de Servier (1479-1565), a French bibliophile, is commonly known; -- used in naming a certain style of binding, a design, etc.

Gummiferous (a.) Producing gum; gum-bearing.

Gwiniad (n.) A fish (Coregonus ferus) of North Wales and Northern Europe, allied to the lake whitefish; -- called also powan, and schelly.

Gyroidal (a.) Having the planes arranged spirally, so that they incHadji (n.) A Mohammedan pilgrim to Mecca; -- used among Orientals as a respectful salutation or a title of honor.

Haidingerite (n.) A mineral consisting of the arseniate of lime; -- so named in honor of W. Haidinger, of Vienna.

Haloid (a.) Resembling salt; -- said of certain binary compounds consisting of a metal united to a negative element or radical, and now chiefly applied to the chlorides, bromides, iodides, and sometimes also to the fluorides and cyanides.

Hanging (n.) That which is hung as lining or drapery for the walls of a room, as tapestry, paper, etc., or to cover or drape a door or window; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Happiness (n.) Fortuitous elegance; unstudied grace; -- used especially of language.

Harridan (n.) A worn-out strumpet; a vixenish woman; a hag.

Harrier (n.) One of several species of hawks or buzzards of the genus Circus which fly low and harry small animals or birds, -- as the European marsh harrier (Circus aerunginosus), and the hen harrier (C. cyaneus).

Hastive (n.) Forward; early; -- said of fruits.

Haurient (a.) In pale, with the head in chief; -- said of the figure of a fish, as if rising for air.

Hawfinch (n.) The common European grosbeak (Coccothraustes vulgaris); -- called also cherry finch, and coble.

Herdic (n.) A kind of low-hung cab.

Heroic (a.) Larger than life size, but smaller than colossal; -- said of the representation of a human figure.

Hessite (n.) A lead-gray sectile mineral. It is a telluride of silver.

Hexeikosane (n.) A hydrocarbon, C26H54, resembling paraffine; -- so called because each molecule has twenty-six atoms of carbon.

Hircic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, mutton suet; -- applied by Chevreul to an oily acid which was obtained from mutton suet, and to which he attributed the peculiar taste and smell of that substance. The substance has also been called hircin.

Hobbism (n.) The philosophical system of Thomas Hobbes, an English materialist (1588-1679); esp., his political theory that the most perfect form of civil government is an absolute monarchy with despotic control over everything relating to law, morals, and religion.

Hogfish (n.) An American fresh-water fish; the log perch.

Hogfish (n.) A large, red, spiny-headed, European marine fish (Scorpaena scrofa).

Hogging (n.) Drooping at the ends; arching;-in distinction from sagging.

Homoiothermal (a.) Maintaining a uniform temperature; haematothermal; homothermic; -- applied to warm-bodied animals, because they maintain a nearly uniform temperature in spite of the great variations in the surrounding air; in distinct from the cold-blooded (poikilothermal) animals, whose body temperature follows the variations in temperature of the surrounding medium.

Homoiousian (n.) One of the semi-Arians of the 4th century, who held that the Son was of like, but not the same, essence or substance with the Father; -- opposed to homoousian.

Hoplite (n.) A heavy-armed infantry soldier.

Hornito (n.) A low, oven-shaped mound, common in volcanic regions, and emitting smoke and vapors from its sides and summit.

Houri (n.) A nymph of paradise; -- so called by the Mohammedans.

Hurricane (n.) A violent storm, characterized by extreme fury and sudden changes of the wind, and generally accompanied by rain, thunder, and lightning; -- especially prevalent in the East and West Indies. Also used figuratively.

Hushing (n.) The process of washing ore, or of uncovering mineral veins, by a heavy discharge of water from a reservoir; flushing; -- also called booming.

Husking (n.) A meeting of neighbors or friends to assist in husking maize; -- called also

Huswife (v. t.) To manage with frugality; -- said of a woman.

Hyacinth (n.) The name also given to Scilla Peruviana, a Mediterranean plant, one variety of which produces white, and another blue, flowers; -- called also, from a mistake as to its origin, Hyacinth of Peru.

Hyalite (n.) A pellucid variety of opal in globules looking like colorless gum or resin; -- called also Muller's glass.

Hydriodic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, hydrogen and iodine; -- said of an acid produced by the combination of these elements.

Hydriodide (n.) A compound of hydriodic acid with a base; -- distinguished from an iodide, in which only the iodine combines with the base.

Icositetrahedron (n.) A twenty-four-sided solid; a tetragonal trisoctahedron or trapezohedron.

Imagination (n.) The imagine-making power of the mind; the power to create or reproduce ideally an object of sense previously perceived; the power to call up mental imagines.

Implicate (v. t.) To bring into connection with; to involve; to connect; -- applied to persons, in an unfavorable sense; as, the evidence implicates many in this conspiracy; to be implicated in a crime, a discreditable transaction, a fault, etc.

Implied (a.) Virtually involved or included; involved in substance; inferential; tacitly conceded; -- the correlative of express, or expressed. See Imply.

Imprint (v. t.) Whatever is impressed or imprinted; the impress or mark left by something; specifically, the name of the printer or publisher (usually) with the time and place of issue, in the title-page of a book, or on any printed sheet.

Initiative (n.) The right or procedure by which legislation may be introduced or enacted directly by the people, as in the Swiss Confederation and in many of the States of the United States; -- chiefly used with the. The procedure of the initiative is essentially as follows: Upon the filing of a petition signed by a required number or percentage of qualified voters the desired measure must be submitted to a popular vote, and upon receiving the required majority (commonly a majority of those vo> Inanity (n.) An inane, useless thing or pursuit; a vanity; a silly object; -- chiefly in pl.; as, the inanities of the world.

IncInclinnometer (n.) An apparatus to determine the inclination of the earth's magnetic force to the plane of the horizon; -- called also inclination compass, and dip circle.

Infringe (v. i.) To encroach; to trespass; -- followed by on or upon; as, to infringe upon the rights of another.

Inimical (a.) Having the disposition or temper of an enemy; unfriendly; unfavorable; -- chiefly applied to private, as hostile is to public, enmity.

Inspiration (n.) The act of inspiring or breathing in; breath; specif. (Physiol.), the drawing of air into the lungs, accomplished in mammals by elevation of the chest walls and flattening of the diaphragm; -- the opposite of expiration.

Inspire (v. t.) To draw in by the operation of breathing; to inhale; -- opposed to expire.

Inspire (v. i.) To draw in breath; to inhale air into the lungs; -- opposed to expire.

Inspired (a.) Communicated or given as by supernatural or divine inspiration; having divine authority; hence, sacred, holy; -- opposed to uninspired, profane, or secular; as, the inspired writings, that is, the Scriptures.

Instigate (v. t.) To goad or urge forward; to set on; to provoke; to incite; -- used chiefly with reference to evil actions; as to instigate one to a crime.

Intrinsic (a.) Inward; internal; hence, true; genuine; real; essential; inherent; not merely apparent or accidental; -- opposed to extrinsic; as, the intrinsic value of gold or silver; the intrinsic merit of an action; the intrinsic worth or goodness of a person.

Intrinsic (a.) Included wholly within an organ or limb, as certain groups of muscles; -- opposed to extrinsic.

Intuition (n.) Direct apprehension or cognition; immediate knowledge, as in perception or consciousness; -- distinguished from "mediate" knowledge, as in reasoning; as, the mind knows by intuition that black is not white, that a circle is not a square, that three are more than two, etc.; quick or ready insight or apprehension.

Intuitionalism (n.) The doctrine that the perception or recognition of primary truth is intuitive, or direct and immediate; -- opposed to sensationalism, and experientialism.

Intuitive (a.) Received. reached, obtained, or perceived, by intuition; as, intuitive judgment or knowledge; -- opposed to deductive.

Inveigh (v. i.) To declaim or rail (against some person or thing); to utter censorious and bitter language; to attack with harsh criticism or reproach, either spoken or written; to use invectives; -- with against; as, to inveigh against character, conduct, manners, customs, morals, a law, an abuse.

Iridic (a.) Of or pertaining to iridium; -- said specifically of those compounds in which iridium has a relatively high valence.

Iridious (a.) Of or pertaining to iridium; -- applied specifically to compounds in which iridium has a low valence.

Iridium (n.) A rare metallic element, of the same group as platinum, which it much resembles, being silver-white, but harder, and brittle, and indifferent to most corrosive agents. With the exception of osmium, it is the heaviest substance known, its specific gravity being 22.4. Symbol Ir. Atomic weight 192.5.

Isodiametric (a.) Developed alike in the directions of the several lateral axes; -- said of crystals of both the tetragonal and hexagonal systems.

Isodiametric (a.) Having the several diameters nearly equal; -- said of the cells of ordinary parenchyma.

Italic (a.) Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; -- so called because dedicated to the States of Italy by the inventor, Aldus Manutius, about the year 1500.

Italic (n.) An Italic letter, character, or type (see Italic, a., 2.); -- often in the plural; as, the Italics are the author's. Italic letters are used to distinguish words for emphasis, importance, antithesis, etc. Also, collectively, Italic letters.

Jamaicine (n.) An alkaloid said to be contained in the bark of Geoffroya inermis, a leguminous tree growing in Jamaica and Surinam; -- called also jamacina.

Jesuitical (a.) Designing; cunning; deceitful; crafty; -- an opprobrious use of the word.

Jesuitism (n.) Cunning; deceit; deceptive practices to effect a purpose; subtle argument; -- an opprobrious use of the word.

Jigging (n.) The act or using a jig; the act of separating ore with a jigger, or wire-bottomed sieve, which is moved up and down in water.

Jinrikisha (n.) A small, two-wheeled, hooded vehicle drawn by one more men.

Jiujitsu () The Japanese art of self-defense without weapons, now widely used as a system of physical training. It depends for its efficiency largely upon the principle of making use of an opponent's strength and weight to disable or injure him, and by applying pressure so that his opposing movement will throw him out of balance, dislocate or break a joint, etc. It opposes knowledge and skill to brute strength, and demands an extensive practical knowledge of human anatomy.

Karaite (n.) A sect of Jews who adhere closely to the letter of the Scriptures, rejecting the oral law, and allowing the Talmud no binding authority; -- opposed to the Rabbinists.

Keelivine (n.) A pencil of black or red lead; -- called also keelyvine pen.

Khaki (a.) Of a dull brownish yellow, or drab color; -- applied to cloth, originally to a stout brownish cotton cloth, used in making uniforms in the Anglo-Indian army.

Khedive (n.) A governor or viceroy; -- a title granted in 1867 by the sultan of Turkey to the ruler of Egypt.

Kinnikinic (n.) Prepared leaves or bark of certain plants; -- used by the Indians of the Northwest for smoking, either mixed with tobacco or as a substitute for it. Also, a plant so used, as the osier cornel (Cornus stolonijra), and the bearberry (Arctostaphylus Uva-ursi).

Lacrimoso (a.) Plaintive; -- a term applied to a mournful or pathetic movement or style.

Lagging (n.) The clothing (esp., an outer, wooden covering), as of a steam cylinder, applied to prevent the radiation of heat; a covering of lags; -- called also deading and cleading.

Lamaism (n.) A modified form of Buddhism which prevails in Thibet, Mongolia, and some adjacent parts of Asia; -- so called from the name of its priests. See 2d Lama.

Lampic (a.) Pertaining to, or produced by, a lamp; -- formerly said of a supposed acid.

Lapling (n.) One who has been fondled to excess; one fond of ease and sensual delights; -- a term of contempt.

Larviparous (a.) Depositing living larvae, instead of eggs; -- said of certain insects.

Latria (n.) The highest kind of worship, or that paid to God; -- distinguished by the Roman Catholics from dulia, or the inferior worship paid to saints.

Latrine (n.) A privy, or water-closet, esp. in a camp, hospital, etc.

Laurinol (n.) Ordinary camphor; -- so called in allusion to the family name (Lauraceae) of the camphor trees. See Camphor.

Larrikin (n.) A rowdy street loafer; a rowdyish or noisy ill-bred fellow; -- variously applied, as to a street blackguard, a street Arab, a youth given to horse-play, etc.

Lenticel (n.) A small, lens-shaped gland on the under side of some leaves.

Lenticular (a.) Resembling a lentil in size or form; having the form of a double-convex lens.

Leonid (n.) One of the shooting stars which constitute the star shower that recurs near the fourteenth of November at intervals of about thirty-three years; -- so called because these shooting stars appear on the heavens to move in Leptiform (a.) Having a form somewhat like leptus; -- said of active insect larvae having three pairs of legs. See Larva.

Leucin (n.) A white, crystalLeucitoid (n.) The trapezohedron or tetragonal trisoctahedron; -- so called as being the form of the mineral leucite.

Liability (n.) the sum of one's pecuniary obligations; -- opposed to assets.

Ligniperdous (a.) Wood-destroying; -- said of certain insects.

Lindiform (a.) Resembling the genus Lindia; -- said of certain apodous insect larvae.

Lingism (n.) A mode of treating certain diseases, as obesity, by gymnastics; -- proposed by Pehr Henrik Ling, a Swede. See Kinesiatrics.

Lippitude (n.) Soreness of eyes; the state of being blear-eyed; blearedness.

Liquidambar (n.) A genus consisting of two species of tall trees having star-shaped leaves, and woody burlike fruit. Liquidambar styraciflua is the North American sweet qum, and L. Orientalis is found in Asia Minor.

Listing (n.) The throwing up of the soil into ridges, -- a method adopted in the culture of beets and some garden crops.

Lithic (a.) Pertaining to the formation of uric-acid concretions (stone) in the bladder and other parts of the body; as, lithic diathesis.

Lodging (n.) A place of rest, or of temporary habitation; esp., a sleeping apartment; -- often in the plural with a singular meaning.

Loggia (n.) A roofed open gallery. It differs from a veranda in being more architectural, and in forming more decidedly a part of the main edifice to which it is attached; from a porch, in being intended not for entrance but for an out-of-door sitting-room.

Longicorn (a.) Long-horned; pertaining to the Longicornia.

Longiloquence (n.) Long-windedness.

Longitude (n.) Length; measure or distance along the longest Looking (a.) Having a certain look or appearance; -- often compounded with adjectives; as, good-looking, grand-looking, etc.

Lophine (n.) A nitrogenous organic base obtained by the oxidation of amarine, and regarded as a derivative of benzoic aldehyde. It is obtained in long white crystalLuckily (adv.) In a lucky manner; by good fortune; fortunately; -- used in a good sense; as, they luckily escaped injury.

Luddite (n.) One of a number of riotous persons in England, who for six years (1811-17) tried to prevent the use of labor-saving machinery by breaking it, burning factories, etc.; -- so called from Ned Lud, a half-witted man who some years previously had broken stocking frames.

Mackintosh (n.) A waterproof outer garment; -- so called from the name of the inventor.

Magnificat (n.) The song of the Virgin Mary, Luke i. 46; -- so called because it commences with this word in the Vulgate.

Magnifico (n.) A grandee or nobleman of Venice; -- so called in courtesy.

Magnitude (n.) Extent of dimensions; size; -- applied to things that have length, breath, and thickness.

Mammillated (a.) Bounded like a nipple; -- said of the apex of some shells.

Mandible (n.) The bone, or principal bone, of the lower jaw; the inferior maxilla; -- also applied to either the upper or the lower jaw in the beak of birds.

Mandibuliform (a.) Having the form of a mandible; -- said especially of the maxillae of an insect when hard and adapted for biting.

Mannish (a.) Fond of men; -- said of a woman.

Mannite (n.) A white crystalMansion (n.) A dwelling place, -- whether a part or whole of a house or other shelter.

Mantilla (n.) A kind of veil, covering the head and falling down upon the shoulders; -- worn in Spain, Mexico, etc.

Marai (n.) A sacred inclosure or temple; -- so called by the islanders of the Pacific Ocean.

Marginicidal (a.) Dehiscent by the separation of united carpels; -- said of fruits.

Marlin (n.) The American great marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa). Applied also to the red-breasted godwit (Limosa haematica).

Martin (n.) A perforated stone-faced runner for grinding.

Martingal (n.) The act of doubling, at each stake, that which has been lost on the preceding stake; also, the sum so risked; -- metaphorically derived from the bifurcation of the martingale of a harness.

Martinmas (n.) The feast of St. Martin, the eleventh of November; -- often called martlemans.

Mastic (n.) A low shrubby tree of the genus Pistacia (P. Lentiscus), growing upon the islands and coasts of the Mediterranean, and producing a valuable resin; -- called also, mastic tree.

Mastigure (n.) Any one of several large spiny-tailed lizards of the genus Uromastix. They inhabit Southern Asia and North Africa.

Mauvine (a.) Mauve-colored.

Maybird (n.) The whimbrel; -- called also May fowl, May curlew, and May whaap.

Mealies (n. pl.) Maize or Indian corn; -- the common name in South Africa.

Meeting (n.) An assembly for worship; as, to attend meeting on Sunday; -- in England, applied distinctively and disparagingly to the worshiping assemblies of Dissenters.

Meetinghouse (n.) A house used as a place of worship; a church; -- in England, applied only to a house so used by Dissenters.

Melting (a.) Causing to melt; becoming melted; -- used literally or figuratively; as, a melting heat; a melting appeal; a melting mood.

Mention (n.) A speaking or notice of anything, -- usually in a brief or cursory manner. Used especially in the phrase to make mention of.

Merciless (a.) Destitute of mercy; cruel; unsparing; -- said of animate beings, and also, figuratively, of things; as, a merciless tyrant; merciless waves.

Messieurs (n. pl.) Sirs; gentlemen; -- abbreviated to Messrs., which is used as the plural of Mr.

Medjidieh (n.) A Turkish honorary order established in 1851 by Abdul-Mejid, having as its badge a medallion surrounded by seven silver rays and crescents. It is often conferred on foreigners.

Millimicron (n.) The thousandish part of a micron or the millionth part of a millimeter; -- a unit of length used in measuring light waves, etc.

Milliard (n.) A thousand millions; -- called also billion. See Billion.

Million (n.) The number of ten hundred thousand, or a thousand thousand, -- written 1,000, 000. See the Note under Hundred.

Million (n.) The mass of common people; -- with the article the.

Misgive (v. t.) Specifically: To give doubt and apprehension to, instead of confidence and courage; to impart fear to; to make irresolute; -- usually said of the mind or heart, and followed by the objective personal pronoun.

Missis (n.) A mistress; a wife; -- so used by the illiterate.

Monsignore (n.) My lord; -- an ecclesiastical dignity bestowed by the pope, entitling the bearer to social and domestic rank at the papal court. (Abbrev. Mgr.)

Mopsical (a.) Shortsighted; mope-eyed.

Mortification (n.) Hence: Deprivation or depression of self-approval; abatement or pride; humiliation; chagrin; vexation.

Mortification (n.) A gift to some charitable or religious institution; -- nearly synonymous with mortmain.

Mosaic (n.) A surface decoration made by inlaying in patterns small pieces of variously colored glass, stone, or other material; -- called also mosaic work.

Mostick (n.) A painter's maul-stick.

Mudsill (n.) Fig.: A person of the lowest stratum of society; -- a term of opprobrium or contempt.

Multigraph (n.) A combined rotary type-setting and printing machine for office use. The type is transferred semi-automatically by means of keys from a type-supply drum to a printing drum. The printing may be done by means of an inked ribbon to print "typewritten" letters, or directly from inked type or a stereotype plate, as in a printing press.

Mufti (n.) Citizen's dress when worn by a naval or military officer; -- a term derived from the British service in India.

Multicarinate (a.) Many-keeled.

Multicuspid (a.) Multicuspidate; -- said of teeth.

Multilateral (a.) Having many sides; many-sided.

Multiplication (n.) The process of repeating, or adding to itself, any given number or quantity a certain number of times; commonly, the process of ascertaining by a briefer computation the result of such repeated additions; also, the rule by which the operation is performed; -- the reverse of division.

Multiplication (n.) The art of increasing gold or silver by magic, -- attributed formerly to the alchemists.

Multipolar (a.) Having many poles; -- applied especially to those ganglionic nerve cells which have several radiating processes.

Multisect (a.) Divided into many similar segments; -- said of an insect or myriapod.

Multispiral (a.) Having numerous spiral coils round a center or nucleus; -- said of the opercula of certain shells.

Multivalvular (a.) Many-valved; having more than two valves; -- said of certain shells, as the chitons.

Mummichog (n.) Any one of several species of small American cyprinodont fishes of the genus Fundulus, and of allied genera; the killifishes; -- called also minnow.

Mummiform (a.) Having some resemblance to a mummy; -- in zoology, said of the pupae of certain insects.

Mundic (n.) Iron pyrites, or arsenical pyrites; -- so called by the Cornish miners.

Munjistin (n.) An orange-red coloring substance resembling alizarin, found in the root of an East Indian species of madder (Rubia munjista).

Munting (n.) Same as Mullion; -- especially used in joiner's work.

Mydriasis (n.) A long-continued or excessive dilatation of the pupil of the eye.

Myosis (n.) Long-continued contraction of the pupil of the eye.

Myrmidon (n.) A soldier or a subordinate civil officer who executes cruel orders of a superior without protest or pity; -- sometimes applied to bailiffs, constables, etc.

Nagging (a.) Fault-finding; teasing; persistently annoying; as, a nagging toothache.

Narcissus (n.) A genus of endogenous bulbous plants with handsome flowers, having a cup-shaped crown within the six-lobed perianth, and comprising the daffodils and jonquils of several kinds.

Nautilus (n.) The argonaut; -- also called paper nautilus. See Argonauta, and Paper nautilus, under Paper.

Negrita (n.) A blackish fish (Hypoplectrus nigricans), of the Sea-bass family. It is a native of the West Indies and Florida.

Nereis (n.) A genus, including numerous species, of marine chaetopod annelids, having a well-formed head, with two pairs of eyes, antennae, four pairs of tentacles, and a protrusile pharynx, armed with a pair of hooked jaws.

Neurine (n.) A poisonous organic base (a ptomaine) formed in the decomposition of protagon with boiling baryta water, and in the putrefraction of proteid matter. It was for a long time considered identical with choNippitate (a.) Peculiary strong and good; -- said of ale or liquor.

Noctiluca (n.) That which shines at night; -- a fanciful name for phosphorus.

Noctivagant (a.) Going about in the night; night-wandering.

Nothing (n.) Not anything; no thing (in the widest sense of the word thing); -- opposed to anything and something.

Nullifidian (a.) Of no faith; also, not trusting to faith for salvation; -- opposed to solifidian.

Nuptial (n.) Marriage; wedding; nuptial ceremony; -- now only in the plural.

Obelisk (n.) An upright, four-sided pillar, gradually tapering as it rises, and terminating in a pyramid called pyramidion. It is ordinarily monolithic. Egyptian obelisks are commonly covered with hieroglyphic writing from top to bottom.

Obelisk (n.) A mark of reference; -- called also dagger [/]. See Dagger, n., 2.

Obstinate (a.) Pertinaciously adhering to an opinion, purpose, or course; persistent; not yielding to reason, arguments, or other means; stubborn; pertinacious; -- usually implying unreasonableness.

Octoic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, octane; -- used specifically, to designate any one of a group of acids, the most important of which is called caprylic acid.

Oculinacea (n.pl.) A suborder of corals including many reef-building species, having round, starlike calicles.

Oligist (a.) Hematite or specular iron ore; -- prob. so called in allusion to its feeble magnetism, as compared with magnetite.

Olivil (n.) A white crystalOlivin (n.) A complex bitter gum, found on the leaves of the olive tree; -- called also olivite.

Onanism (n.) Self-pollution; masturbation.

Opetide (n.) Open time; -- applied to different things

Opinicus (n.) An imaginary animal borne as a charge, having wings, an eagle's head, and a short tail; -- sometimes represented without wings.

Oration (n.) An elaborate discourse, delivered in public, treating an important subject in a formal and dignified manner; especially, a discourse having reference to some special occasion, as a funeral, an anniversary, a celebration, or the like; -- distinguished from an argument in court, a popular harangue, a sermon, a lecture, etc.; as, Webster's oration at Bunker Hill.

Origin (n.) The point of attachment or end of a muscle which is fixed during contraction; -- in contradistinction to insertion.

Outwit (n.) The faculty of acquiring wisdom by observation and experience, or the wisdom so acquired; -- opposed to inwit.

Oxalis (n.) A genus of plants, mostly herbs, with acid-tasting trifoliolate or multifoliolate leaves; -- called also wood sorrel.

Oxanillamide (n.) A white crystalOxanilic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, oxalic acid and aniOxanilide (n.) a white crystalOxidize (v. t.) To subject to the action of oxygen or of an oxidizing agent, so as to bring to a higher grade, as an -ous compound to an -ic compound; as, to oxidize mercurous chloride to mercuric chloride.

Painim (n.) A pagan; an infidel; -- used also adjectively.

Palmic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, the castor-oil plant (Ricinus communis, or Palma Christi); -- formerly used to designate an acid now called ricinoleic acid.

Palmiped (a.) Web-footed, as a water fowl.

Palpicorn (n.) One of a group of aquatic beetles (Palpicornia) having short club-shaped antennae, and long maxillary palpi.

Palpitate (v. i.) To beat rapidly and more strongly than usual; to throb; to bound with emotion or exertion; to pulsate violently; to flutter; -- said specifically of the heart when its action is abnormal, as from excitement.

Pampiniform (a.) In the form of tendrils; -- applied especially to the spermatic and ovarian veins.

Panoistic (a.) Producing ova only; -- said of the ovaries of certain insects which do not produce vitelligenous cells.

Parsimony (n.) Closeness or sparingness in the expenditure of money; -- generally in a bad sense; excessive frugality; niggardParticipate (v. i.) To have a share in common with others; to take a part; to partake; -- followed by in, formely by of; as, to participate in a debate.

Participle (n.) A part of speech partaking of the nature both verb and adjective; a form of a verb, or verbal adjective, modifying a noun, but taking the adjuncts of the verb from which it is derived. In the sentences: a letter is written; being asleep he did not hear; exhausted by toil he will sleep soundly, -- written, being, and exhaustedare participles.

Particolored (a.) Same as Party-colored.

Particular (a.) Forming a part of a genus; relatively limited in extension; affirmed or denied of a part of a subject; as, a particular proposition; -- opposed to universal: e. g. (particular affirmative) Some men are wise; (particular negative) Some men are not wise.

Particular (n.) One of the details or items of grounds of claim; -- usually in the pl.; also, a bill of particulars; a minute account; as, a particular of premises.

Parting (n.) A separation; a leave-taking.

Parvise (n.) a court of entrance to, or an inclosed space before, a church; hence, a church porch; -- sometimes formerly used as place of meeting, as for lawyers.

Passion (n.) The state of being acted upon; subjection to an external agent or influence; a passive condition; -- opposed to action.

Passionate (a.) Capable or susceptible of passion, or of different passions; easily moved, excited or agitated; specifically, easily moved to anger; irascible; quick-tempered; as, a passionate nature.

Passivity (n.) Passiveness; -- opposed to activity.

Pastille (n.) A small cone or mass made of paste of gum, benzoin, cinnamon, and other aromatics, -- used for fumigating or scenting the air of a room.

Patrial (a.) Derived from the name of a country, and designating an inhabitant of the country; gentile; -- said of a noun.

Patriarch (n.) The father and ruler of a family; one who governs his family or descendants by paternal right; -- usually applied to heads of families in ancient history, especially in Biblical and Jewish history to those who lived before the time of Moses.

Paviin (n.) A glucoside found in species of the genus Pavia of the Horse-chestnut family.

Peabird (n.) The wryneck; -- so called from its note.

Pellile (n.) The redshank; -- so called from its note.

Pellitory (n.) The common name of the several species of the genus Parietaria, low, harmless weeds of the Nettle family; -- also called wall pellitory, and lichwort.

Pellitory (n.) The feverfew (Chrysanthemum Parthenium); -- so called because it resembles the above.

Pencil (n.) A slender cylinder or strip of black lead, colored chalk, slate etc., or such a cylinder or strip inserted in a small wooden rod intended to be pointed, or in a case, which forms a handle, -- used for drawing or writing. See Graphite.

Pendice (n.) A sloping roof; a lean-to; a penthouse.

Pension (v. t.) To grant a pension to; to pay a regular stipend to; in consideration of service already performed; -- sometimes followed by off; as, to pension off a servant.

Pensioner (n.) In the university of Cambridge, England, one who pays for his living in commons; -- corresponding to commoner at Oxford.

Perdifoil (n.) A deciduous plant; -- opposed to evergreen.

Perkinism (n.) A remedial treatment, by drawing the pointed extremities of two rods, each of a different metal, over the affected part; tractoration, -- first employed by Dr. Elisha Perkins of Norwich, Conn. See Metallotherapy.

Permit (v. t.) To grant (one) express license or liberty to do an act; to authorize; to give leave; -- followed by an infinitive.

Persist (v. i.) To stand firm; to be fixed and unmoved; to stay; to continue steadfastly; especially, to continue fixed in a course of conduct against opposing motives; to persevere; -- sometimes conveying an unfavorable notion, as of doggedness or obstinacy.

Persistent (a.) Remaining beyond the period when parts of the same kind sometimes fall off or are absorbed; permanent; as, persistent teeth or gills; a persistent calyx; -- opposed to deciduous, and caducous.

Pervious (a.) Open; -- used synonymously with perforate, as applied to the nostrils or birds.

Pessimism (n.) The opinion or doctrine that everything in nature is ordered for or tends to the worst, or that the world is wholly evil; -- opposed to optimism.

Pessimist (n.) One who advocates the doctrine of pessimism; -- opposed to optimist.

Pestiferous (a.) Pest-bearing; pestilential; noxious to health; malignant; infectious; contagious; as, pestiferous bodies.

Petticoat (n.) A loose under-garment worn by women, and covering the body below the waist.

Pettitoes (n. pl.) The toes or feet of a pig, -- often used as food; sometimes, in contempt, the human feet.

Pharisaical (a.) Addicted to external forms and ceremonies; making a show of religion without the spirit of it; ceremonial; formal; hypocritical; self-righteous.

Pharisaism (n.) Rigid observance of external forms of religion, without genuine piety; hypocrisy in religion; a censorious, self-righteous spirit in matters of morals or manners.

Philister (n.) A Philistine; -- a cant name given to townsmen by students in German universities.

Photics (n.) The science of light; -- a general term sometimes employed when optics is restricted to light as a producing vision.

Physicist (n.) A believer in the theory that the fundamental phenomena of life are to be explained upon purely chemical and physical principles; -- opposed to vitalist.

Physiophyly (n.) The tribal history of the functions, or the history of the paleontological development of vital activities, -- being a branch of phylogeny. See Morphophyly.

Pianissimo (a.) Very soft; -- a direction to execute a passage as softly as possible. (Abbrev. pp.)

Pietist (n.) One of a class of religious reformers in Germany in the 17th century who sought to revive declining piety in the Protestant churches; -- often applied as a term of reproach to those who make a display of religious feeling. Also used adjectively.

Pigfish (n.) Any one of several species of salt-water grunts; -- called also hogfish.

Piggin (n.) A small wooden pail or tub with an upright stave for a handle, -- often used as a dipper.

Pimpillo (n.) A West Indian name for the prickly pear (Opuntia); -- called also pimploes.

Pinfish (n.) The salt-water bream (Diplodus Holbrooki).

Pinnipedia (n. pl.) A suborder of aquatic carnivorous mammals including the seals and walruses; -- opposed to Fissipedia.

Pipsissewa (n.) A low evergreen plant (Chimaphila umbellata), with narrow, wedge-lanceolate leaves, and an umbel of pretty nodding fragrant blossoms. It has been used in nephritic diseases. Called also prince's pine.

Pistil (n.) The seed-bearing organ of a flower. It consists of an ovary, containing the ovules or rudimentary seeds, and a stigma, which is commonly raised on an elongated portion called a style. When composed of one carpel a pistil is simple; when composed of several, it is compound. See Illust. of Flower, and Ovary.

Pistillate (a.) Having a pistil or pistils; -- usually said of flowers having pistils but no stamens.

Pluviograph (n.) A self-registering rain gauge.

Plagionite (n.) A sulphide of lead and antimony, of a blackish lead-gray color and metallic luster.

Plagiostomi (n. pl.) An order of fishes including the sharks and rays; -- called also Plagiostomata.

Planifolious (a.) Flat-leaved.

Planimetry (n.) The mensuration of plane surfaces; -- distinguished from stereometry, or the mensuration of volumes.

Planipennia (n. pl.) A suborder of Neuroptera, including those that have broad, flat wings, as the ant-lion, lacewing, etc. Called also Planipennes.

Plating (n.) The art or process of covering anything with a plate or plates, or with metal, particularly of overlaying a base or dull metal with a thin plate of precious or bright metal, as by mechanical means or by electro-magnetic deposition.

Platinic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, platinum; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which the element has a higher valence, as contrasted with the platinous compounds; as, platinic chloride (PtCl4).

Platinocyanic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid compound of platinous cyanide and hydrocyanic acid. It is obtained as a cinnaber-red crystalPlatinoid (n.) An alloy of German silver containing tungsten; -- used for forming electrical resistance coils and standards.

Platinous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, platinum; -- used specifically to designate those compounds in which the element has a lower valence, as contrasted with the platinic compounds; as, platinous chloride (PtCl2).

Platinum (n.) A metallic element, intermediate in value between silver and gold, occurring native or alloyed with other metals, also as the platinum arsenide (sperrylite). It is heavy tin-white metal which is ductile and malleable, but very infusible, and characterized by its resistance to strong chemical reagents. It is used for crucibles, for stills for sulphuric acid, rarely for coin, and in the form of foil and wire for many purposes. Specific gravity 21.5. Atomic weight 194.3. Symbol Pt. > Plesiosauria (n. pl.) An extinct order of Mesozoic marine reptiles including the genera Plesiosaurus, and allied forms; -- called also Sauropterygia.

Podrida (n.) A miscellaneous dish of meats. See Olla-podrida.

Poecilitic (a.) Mottled with various colors; variegated; spotted; -- said of certain rocks.

Pollicate (a.) Having a curved projection or spine on the inner side of a leg joint; -- said of insects.

Polliwog (n.) A tadpole; -- called also purwiggy and porwigle.

Poplin (n.) A fabric of many varieties, usually made of silk and worsted, -- used especially for women's dresses.

Porpita (n.) A genus of bright-colored Siphonophora found floating in the warmer parts of the ocean. The individuals are round and disk-shaped, with a large zooid in the center of the under side, surrounded by smaller nutritive and reproductive zooids, and by slender dactylozooids near the margin. The disk contains a central float, or pneumatocyst.

Portionist (n.) A scholar at Merton College, Oxford, who has a certain academical allowance or portion; -- corrupted into postmaster.

Possible (a.) Capable of existing or occurring, or of being conceived or thought of; able to happen; capable of being done; not contrary to the nature of things; -- sometimes used to express extreme improbability; barely able to be, or to come to pass; as, possibly he is honest, as it is possible that Judas meant no wrong.

Prosit (interj.) Lit., may it do (you) good; -- a salutation used in well wishing, esp. among Germans, as in drinking healths.

Prasinous (a.) Grass-green; clear, lively green, without any mixture.

Pratique (n.) Primarily, liberty of converse; intercourse; hence, a certificate, given after compliance with quarantine regulations, permitting a ship to land passengers and crew; -- a term used particularly in the south of Europe.

Precinct (n.) The limit or exterior Precisian (n.) An overprecise person; one rigidly or ceremoniously exact in the observance of rules; a formalist; -- formerly applied to the English Puritans.

Predisposition (n.) The act of predisposing, or the state of being predisposed; previous inclination, tendency, or propensity; predilection; -- applied to the mind; as, a predisposition to anger.

Predisposition (n.) Previous fitness or adaptation to any change, impression, or purpose; susceptibility; -- applied to material things; as, the predisposition of the body to disease.

Prefix (n.) That which is prefixed; esp., one or more letters or syllables combined or united with the beginning of a word to modify its signification; as, pre- in prefix, con- in conjure.

Premier (a.) Most ancient; -- said of the peer bearing the oldest title of his degree.

Premium (n.) Something offered or given for the loan of money; bonus; -- sometimes synonymous with interest, but generally signifying a sum in addition to the capital.

Primitive (a.) Of or pertaining to a former time; old-fashioned; characterized by simplicity; as, a primitive style of dress.

Primitive (n.) An original or primary word; a word not derived from another; -- opposed to derivative.

Prodigality (n.) Extravagance in expenditure, particularly of money; excessive liberality; profusion; waste; -- opposed to frugality, economy, and parsimony.

Proficient (a.) Well advanced in any branch of knowledge or skill; possessed of considerable acquirements; well-skilled; versed; adept,

Proliferous (a.) Bearing offspring; -- applied to a flower from within which another is produced, or to a branch or frond from which another rises, or to a plant which is reproduced by buds or gemmae.

Proliferous (a.) Producing sexual zooids by budding; -- said of the blastostyle of a hydroid.

Proliferous (a.) Producing a cluster of branchlets from a larger branch; -- said of corals.

Prolific (a.) Having the quality of generating; producing young or fruit; generative; fruitful; productive; -- applied to plants producing fruit, animals producing young, etc.; -- usually with the implied idea of frequent or numerous production; as, a prolific tree, female, and the like.

Prolix (a.) Extending to a great length; unnecessarily long; minute in narration or argument; excessively particular in detail; -- rarely used except with reference to discourse written or spoken; as, a prolix oration; a prolix poem; a prolix sermon.

Prolix (a.) Indulging in protracted discourse; tedious; wearisome; -- applied to a speaker or writer.

Propidene (n.) The unsymmetrical hypothetical hydrocarbon radical, CH3.CH2.CH, analogous to ethylidene, and regarded as the type of certain derivatives of propane; -- called also propylidene.

Propithecus (n.) A genus including the long-tailed, or diadem, indris. See Indris.

Propitiatory (n.) The mercy seat; -- so called because a symbol of the propitiated Jehovah.

Propitious (a.) Hence, kind; gracious; merciful; helpful; -- said of a person or a divinity.

Provide (v. t.) To furnish; to supply; -- formerly followed by of, now by with.

Provide (v. i.) To procure supplies or means in advance; to take measures beforehand in view of an expected or a possible future need, especially a danger or an evil; -- followed by against or for; as, to provide against the inclemency of the weather; to provide for the education of a child.

Provided (conj.) On condition; by stipulation; with the understanding; if; -- usually followed by that; as, provided that nothing in this act shall prejudice the rights of any person whatever.

Provident (a.) Foreseeing wants and making provision to supply them; prudent in preparing for future exigencies; cautious; economical; -- sometimes followed by of; as, aprovident man; an animal provident of the future.

Provision (n.) Especially, a stock of food; any kind of eatables collected or stored; -- often in the plural.

Provisional (a.) Of the nature of a provision; serving as a provision for the time being; -- used of partial or temporary arrangements; as, a provisional government; a provisional treaty.

Proximo () In the next month after the present; -- often contracted to prox.; as, on the 3d proximo.

Public (a.) Of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; -- opposed to private; as, the public treasury.

Puffin (n.) An arctic sea bird Fratercula arctica) allied to the auks, and having a short, thick, swollen beak, whence the name; -- called also bottle nose, cockandy, coulterneb, marrot, mormon, pope, and sea parrot.

Pugging (v. t.) Mortar or the like, laid between the joists under the boards of a floor, or within a partition, to deaden sound; -- in the United States usually called deafening.

Pulpiteer (n.) One who speaks in a pulpit; a preacher; -- so called in contempt.

Pulsion (n.) The act of driving forward; propulsion; -- opposed to suction or traction.

Pulvil (n.) A sweet-scented powder; pulvillio.

Pulvillo (n.) A kind of perfume in the form of a powder, formerly much used, -- often in little bags.

Purfile (n.) A sort of ancient trimming of tinsel and thread for women's gowns; -- called also bobbinwork.

Putting (n.) The throwing of a heavy stone, shot, etc., with the hand raised or extended from the shoulder; -- originally, a Scottish game.

Pycnidium (n.) In certain fungi, a flask-shaped cavity from the surface of the inner walls of which spores are produced.

Qualify (v. t.) To soothe; to cure; -- said of persons.

Quasi () As if; as though; as it were; in a manner sense or degree; having some resemblance to; qualified; -- used as an adjective, or a prefix with a noun or an adjective; as, a quasi contract, an implied contract, an obligation which has arisen from some act, as if from a contract; a quasi corporation, a body that has some, but not all, of the peculiar attributes of a corporation; a quasi argument, that which resembles, or is used as, an argument; quasi historical, apparently historical, see> Rabbi (n.) Master; lord; teacher; -- a Jewish title of respect or honor for a teacher or doctor of the law.

Raising (n.) The operation of embossing sheet metal, or of forming it into cup-shaped or hollow articles, by hammering, stamping, or spinning.

Rampion (n.) A plant (Campanula Rapunculus) of the Bellflower family, with a tuberous esculent root; -- also called ramps.

Ratfish (n.) Same as Rat-tail.

Receipt (n.) That which is received; that which comes in, in distinction from what is expended, paid out, sent away, and the like; -- usually in the plural; as, the receipts amounted to a thousand dollars.

Receiver (n.) A vessel for receiving the exhaust steam from the high-pressure cylinder before it enters the low-pressure cylinder, in a compound engine.

Receiver (n.) That portion of a telephonic apparatus, or similar system, at which the message is received and made audible; -- opposed to transmitter.

Rectinerved (a.) Having the veins or nerves straight; -- said of leaves.

Rectiserial (a.) Arranged in exactly vertical ranks, as the leaves on stems of many kinds; -- opposed to curviserial.

Redfish (n.) The blueback salmon of the North Pacific; -- called also nerka. See Blueback (b).

Redfish (n.) A large California labroid food fish (Trochocopus pulcher); -- called also fathead.

Redwing (n.) A European thrush (Turdus iliacus). Its under wing coverts are orange red. Called also redwinged thrush. (b) A North American passerine bird (Agelarius ph/niceus) of the family Icteridae. The male is black, with a conspicuous patch of bright red, bordered with orange, on each wing. Called also redwinged blackbird, red-winged troupial, marsh blackbird, and swamp blackbird.

Reeding (n.) A small convex molding; a reed (see Illust. (i) of Molding); one of several set close together to decorate a surface; also, decoration by means of reedings; -- the reverse of fluting.

Reeding (n.) The nurling on the edge of a coin; -- commonly called milling.

Refrigerant (n.) That which makes to be cool or cold; specifically, a medicine or an application for allaying fever, or the symptoms of fever; -- used also figuratively.

Rejoin (v. t.) To state in reply; -- followed by an object clause.

Remain (n.) That which is left; relic; remainder; -- chiefly in the plural.

Rennin (n.) A milk-clotting enzyme obtained from the true stomach (abomasum) of a suckling calf. Mol. wt. about 31,000. Also called chymosin, rennase, and abomasal enzyme.

Reptilia (n. pl.) A class of air-breathing oviparous vertebrates, usually covered with scales or bony plates. The heart generally has two auricles and one ventricle. The development of the young is the same as that of birds.

Requin (n.) The man-eater, or white shark (Carcharodon carcharias); -- so called on account of its causing requiems to be sung.

Reseizer (n.) The taking of lands into the hands of the king where a general livery, or oustre le main, was formerly mis-sued, contrary to the form and order of law.

Restiform (a.) Formed like a rope; -- applied especially to several ropelike bundles or masses of fibers on the dorsal side of the medulla oblongata.

Restive (a.) Uneasy; restless; averse to standing still; fidgeting about; -- applied especially to horses.

Retail (v.) The sale of commodities in small quantities or parcels; -- opposed to wholesale; sometimes, the sale of commodities at second hand.

Retainer (n.) One who is retained or kept in service; an attendant; an adherent; a hanger-on.

Retainer (n.) A fee paid to engage a lawyer or counselor to maintain a cause, or to prevent his being employed by the opposing party in the case; -- called also retaining fee.

Retrieve (n.) The recovery of game once sprung; -- an old sporting term.

Retting (n.) The act or process of preparing flax for use by soaking, maceration, and kindred processes; -- also called rotting. See Ret.

Receiver (n.) In portable breech-loading firearms, the steel frame screwed to the breech end of the barrel, which receives the bolt or block, gives means of securing for firing, facilitates loading, and holds the ejector, cut-off, etc.

Rocking (a.) Having a swaying, rolling, or back-and-forth movement; used for rocking.

Romaic (n.) The modern Greek language, now usually called by the Greeks Hellenic or Neo-Hellenic.

Romeite (n.) A mineral of a hyacinth or honey-yellow color, occuring in square octahedrons. It is an antimonate of calcium.

Rubric (n.) The title of a statute; -- so called as being anciently written in red letters.

Rubric (n.) The directions and rules for the conduct of service, formerly written or printed in red; hence, also, an ecclesiastical or episcopal injunction; -- usually in the plural.

Running (a.) Successive; one following the other without break or intervention; -- said of periods of time; as, to be away two days running; to sow land two years running.

Sagoin (n.) A marmoset; -- called also sagouin.

Saltire (v.) A St. Andrew's cross, or cross in the form of an X, -- one of the honorable ordinaries.

Saltirewise (adv.) In the manner of a saltire; -- said especially of the blazoning of a shield divided by two Sandiver (n.) A whitish substance which is cast up, as a scum, from the materials of glass in fusion, and, floating on the top, is skimmed off; -- called also glass gall.

Scilicet (adv.) To wit; namely; videlicet; -- often abbreviated to sc., or ss.

Scimitar (n.) A saber with a much curved blade having the edge on the convex side, -- in use among Mohammedans, esp., the Arabs and persians.

Scimitar (n.) A long-handled billhook. See Billhook.

Scorifier (n.) One who, or that which, scorifies; specifically, a small flat bowl-shaped cup used in the first heating in assaying, to remove the earth and gangue, and to concentrate the gold and silver in a lead button.

Scutiform (a.) Shield-shaped; scutate.

Scutiped (a.) Having the anterior surface of the tarsus covered with scutella, or transverse scales, in the form of incomplete bands terminating at a groove on each side; -- said of certain birds.

Sechium (n.) The edible fruit of a West Indian plant (Sechium edule) of the Gourd family. It is soft, pear-shaped, and about four inches long, and contains a single large seed. The root of the plant resembles a yam, and is used for food.

Sectile (a.) Capable of being cut; specifically (Min.), capable of being severed by the knife with a smooth cut; -- said of minerals.

Section (n.) One of the portions, of one square mile each, into which the public lands of the United States are divided; one thirty-sixth part of a township. These sections are subdivided into quarter sections for sale under the homestead and preemption laws.

Section (n.) A division of a genus; a group of species separated by some distinction from others of the same genus; -- often indicated by the sign /.

Selfishness (n.) The quality or state of being selfish; exclusive regard to one's own interest or happiness; that supreme self-love or self-preference which leads a person to direct his purposes to the advancement of his own interest, power, or happiness, without regarding those of others.

Selfism (n.) Concentration of one's interests on one's self; self-love; selfishness.

Selvagee (n.) A skein or hank of rope yarns wound round with yarns or marSensibility (n.) The capacity of emotion or feeling, as distinguished from the intellect and the will; peculiar susceptibility of impression, pleasurable or painful; delicacy of feeling; quick emotion or sympathy; as, sensibility to pleasure or pain; sensibility to shame or praise; exquisite sensibility; -- often used in the plural.

Sensitivity (n.) The quality or state of being sensitive; -- used chiefly in science and the arts; as, the sensitivity of iodized silver.

Sentimental (a.) IncSentinel (n.) A marine crab (Podophthalmus vigil) native of the Indian Ocean, remarkable for the great length of its eyestalks; -- called also sentinel crab.

Sentisection (n.) Painful vivisection; -- opposed to callisection.

Septicidal (a.) Dividing the partitions; -- said of a method of dehiscence in which a pod splits through the partitions and is divided into its component carpels.

Septiferous (a.) Bearing a partition; -- said of the valves of a capsule.

Septifragal (a.) Breaking from the partitions; -- said of a method of dehiscence in which the valves of a pod break away from the partitions, and these remain attached to the common axis.

Septillion (n.) According to the French method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-four ciphers annexed. According to the English method, the number expressed by a unit with forty-two ciphers annexed. See Numeration.

Serpiginous (a.) Creeping; -- said of lesions which heal over one portion while continuing to advance at another.

Servile (n.) An element which forms no part of the original root; -- opposed to radical.

Sessile (a.) Permanently attached; -- said of the gonophores of certain hydroids which never became detached.

Sextillion (n.) According to the method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-one ciphers annexed. According to the English method, a million raised to the sixth power, or the number expressed by a unit with thirty-six ciphers annexed. See Numeration.

Shekinah (n.) The visible majesty of the Divine Presence, especially when resting or dwelling between the cherubim on the mercy seat, in the Tabernacle, or in the Temple of Solomon; -- a term used in the Targums and by the later Jews, and adopted by Christians.

Sherif (n.) A member of an Arab princely family descended from Mohammed through his son-in-law Ali and daughter Fatima. The Grand Shereef is the governor of Mecca.

Shining (a.) Having the surface smooth and polished; -- said of leaves, the surfaces of shells, etc.

Shooi (n.) The Richardson's skua (Stercorarius parasiticus);- so called from its cry.

Siskin (n.) A small green and yellow European finch (Spinus spinus, or Carduelis spinus); -- called also aberdevine.

Siskin (n.) The American pinefinch (S. pinus); -- called also pine siskin. See Pinefinch.

Sixtieth (a.) Next in order after the fifty-ninth.

Sixtieth (n.) The next in order after the fifty-ninth; the tenth after the fiftieth.

Spinifex (n.) Any of several Australian grasses of the genus Tricuspis, which often form dense, almost impassable growth, their leaves being stiff and sharp-pointed.

Soldier (n.) A brave warrior; a man of military experience and skill, or a man of distinguished valor; -- used by way of emphasis or distinction.

Solmization (n.) The act of sol-faing.

Sonties (n.) Probably from "saintes" saints, or from sanctities; -- used as an oath.

Sorbin (n.) An unfermentable sugar, isomeric with glucose, found in the ripe berries of the rowan tree, or sorb, and extracted as a sweet white crystalSoulili (n.) A long-tailed, crested Javan monkey (Semnopithecus mitratus). The head, the crest, and the upper surface of the tail, are black.

Spiciform (a.) Spike-shaped.

Spinigerous (a.) Bearing a spine or spines; thorn-bearing.

Spirillum (n.) A genus of common motile microorganisms (Spirobacteria) having the form of spiral-shaped filaments. One species is said to be the cause of relapsing fever.

Spirit (n.) Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; -- often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits.

Spirit (n.) Intent; real meaning; -- opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like.

Spirit (n.) Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): -- often in the plural.

Spirit (v. t.) To animate with vigor; to excite; to encourage; to inspirit; as, civil dissensions often spirit the ambition of private men; -- sometimes followed by up.

Spirit (v. t.) To convey rapidly and secretly, or mysteriously, as if by the agency of a spirit; to kidnap; -- often with away, or off.

Spiritoso (a. & adv.) Spirited; spiritedly; -- a direction to perform a passage in an animated, lively manner.

Spiritual (a.) Of or pertaining to the soul or its affections as influenced by the Spirit; controlled and inspired by the divine Spirit; proceeding from the Holy Spirit; pure; holy; divine; heavenly-minded; -- opposed to carnal.

Spiritualism (n.) The doctrine, in opposition to the materialists, that all which exists is spirit, or soul -- that what is called the external world is either a succession of notions impressed on the mind by the Deity, as maintained by Berkeley, or else the mere educt of the mind itself, as taught by Fichte.

Spirituality (n.) The quality or state of being spiritual; incorporeality; heavenly-mindedness.

Spiritualize (v. t.) To give a spiritual meaning to; to take in a spiritual sense; -- opposed to literalize.

Spiritualness (n.) The quality or state of being spiritual or spiritual-minded; spirituality.

Stability (a.) Fixedness; -- as opposed to fluidity.

Stadium (n.) A kind of telemeter for measuring the distance of an object of known dimensions, by observing the angle it subtends; especially (Surveying), a graduated rod used to measure the distance of the place where it stands from an instrument having a telescope, by observing the number of the graduations of the rod that are seen between certain parallel wires (stadia wires) in the field of view of the telescope; -- also called stadia, and stadia rod.

Stanielry (n.) Hawking with staniels, -- a base kind of falconry.

Statics (n.) That branch of mechanics which treats of the equilibrium of forces, or relates to bodies as held at rest by the forces acting on them; -- distinguished from dynamics.

Station (n.) One of the places at which ecclesiastical processions pause for the performance of an act of devotion; formerly, the tomb of a martyr, or some similarly consecrated spot; now, especially, one of those representations of the successive stages of our Lord's passion which are often placed round the naves of large churches and by the side of the way leading to sacred edifices or shrines, and which are visited in rotation, stated services being performed at each; -- called also Station> Stibic (a.) Antimonic; -- used with reference to certain compounds of antimony.

Straight (superl.) Composed of cards which constitute a regular sequence, as the ace, king, queen, jack, and ten-spot; as, a straight hand; a straight flush.

Straightedge (n.) A board, or piece of wood or metal, having one edge perfectly straight, -- used to ascertain whether a Strait (a.) A (comparatively) narrow passageway connecting two large bodies of water; -- often in the plural; as, the strait, or straits, of Gibraltar; the straits of Magellan; the strait, or straits, of Mackinaw.

Strait (a.) Fig.: A condition of narrowness or restriction; doubt; distress; difficulty; poverty; perplexity; -- sometimes in the plural; as, reduced to great straits.

Straiten (v. t.) To restrict; to distress or embarrass in respect of means or conditions of life; -- used chiefly in the past participle; -- as, a man straitened in his circumstances.

Studious (a.) Earnest in endeavors; aiming sedulously; attentive; observant; diligent; -- usually followed by an infinitive or by of; as, be studious to please; studious to find new friends and allies.

Stupid (a.) Very dull; insensible; senseless; wanting in understanding; heavy; sluggish; in a state of stupor; -- said of persons.

Stupid (a.) Resulting from, or evincing, stupidity; formed without skill or genius; dull; heavy; -- said of things.

Stylite (n.) One of a sect of anchorites in the early church, who lived on the tops of pillars for the exercise of their patience; -- called also pillarist and pillar saint.

Sublime (superl.) Distinguished by lofty or noble traits; eminent; -- said of persons.

Sublime (superl.) Awakening or expressing the emotion of awe, adoration, veneration, heroic resolve, etc.; dignified; grand; solemn; stately; -- said of an impressive object in nature, of an action, of a discourse, of a work of art, of a spectacle, etc.; as, sublime scenery; a sublime deed.

Sublime (n.) That which is sublime; -- with the definite article

Sublime (v. i.) To pass off in vapor, with immediate condensation; specifically, to evaporate or volatilize from the solid state without apparent melting; -- said of those substances, like arsenic, benzoic acid, etc., which do not exhibit a liquid form on heating, except under increased pressure.

Submit (v. t.) To yield, resign, or surrender to power, will, or authority; -- often with the reflexive pronoun.

Submit (v. t.) To leave or commit to the discretion or judgment of another or others; to refer; as, to submit a controversy to arbitrators; to submit a question to the court; -- often followed by a dependent proposition as the object.

Subriguous (a.) Watered or wet beneath; well-watered.

Sufficiency (n.) Conceit; self-confidence; self-sufficiency.

Sufficient (a.) Self-sufficient; self-satisfied; content.

Suicide (adv.) The act of taking one's own life voluntary and intentionally; self-murder; specifically (Law), the felonious killing of one's self; the deliberate and intentional destruction of one's own life by a person of years of discretion and of sound mind.

Suicide (adv.) One guilty of self-murder; a felo-de-se.

Suicidism (n.) The quality or state of being suicidal, or self-murdering.

Sumpitan (n.) A kind of blowgun for discharging arrows, -- used by the savages of Borneo and adjacent islands.

Sunfish (n.) Any one of numerous species of perch-like North American fresh-water fishes of the family Centrachidae. They have a broad, compressed body, and strong dorsal spines. Among the common species of the Eastern United States are Lepomis gibbosus (called also bream, pondfish, pumpkin seed, and sunny), the blue sunfish, or dollardee (L. pallidus), and the long-eared sunfish (L. auritus). Several of the species are called also pondfish.

Swaying (n.) An injury caused by violent strains or by overloading; -- said of the backs of horses.

Syndicalism (n.) The theory, plan, or practice of trade-union action (originally as advocated and practiced by the French Confederation Generale du Travail) which aims to abolish the present political and social system by means of the general strike (as distinguished from the local or sectional strike) and direct action of whatever kind (as distinguished from action which takes effect only through the medium of political action) -- direct action including any kind of action that is directly ef> Taenia (n.) A band; a structural Taenioglossa (n. pl.) An extensive division of gastropod mollusks in which the odontophore is long and narrow, and usually bears seven rows of teeth. It includes a large number of families both marine and fresh-water.

Taglioni (n.) A kind of outer coat, or overcoat; -- said to be so named after a celebrated Italian family of professional dancers.

Tagnicate (n.) The white-lipped peccary.

Taguicati (n.) The white-lipped peccary.

Tantivy (adv.) Swiftly; speedily; rapidly; -- a fox-hunting term; as, to ride tantivy.

Tardigrada (a.) An order of minute aquatic arachnids; -- called also bear animalcules, sloth animalcules, and water bears.

Tardigrade (a.) Moving or stepping slowly; slow-paced.

Tardigradous (a.) Moving slowly; slow-paced.

Tarsius (n.) A genus of nocturnal lemurine mammals having very large eyes and ears, a long tail, and very long proximal tarsal bones; -- called also malmag, spectral lemur, podji, and tarsier.

Taurine (n.) A body occurring in small quantity in the juices of muscle, in the lungs, and elsewhere, but especially in the bile, where it is found as a component part of taurocholic acid, from which it can be prepared by decomposition of the acid. It crystallizes in colorless, regular six-sided prisms, and is especially characterized by containing both nitrogen and sulphur, being chemically amido-isethionic acid, C2H7NSO3.

Taurid (n.) Any of a group of meteors appearing November 20-23; -- so called because they appear to radiate from a point in Taurus.

Terminal (n.) A town lying at the end of a railroad; -- more properly called a terminus.

Teatish (a.) Peevish; tettish; fretful; -- said of a child. See Tettish.

Tenuious (a.) Rare or subtile; tenuous; -- opposed to dense.

Tenuirostral (a.) Thin-billed; -- applied to birds with a slender bill, as the humming birds.

Tenuis (n.) One of the three surd mutes /, /, /; -- so called in relation to their respective middle letters, or medials, /, /, /, and their aspirates, /, /, /. The term is also applied to the corresponding letters and articulate elements in other languages.

Termite (n.) Any one of numerous species of pseudoneoropterous insects belonging to Termes and allied genera; -- called also white ant. See Illust. of White ant.

Terrier (n.) One of a breed of small dogs, which includes several distinct subbreeds, some of which, such as the Skye terrier and Yorkshire terrier, have long hair and drooping ears, while others, at the English and the black-and-tan terriers, have short, close, smooth hair and upright ears.

Tertian (n.) A liquid measure formerly used for wine, equal to seventy imperial, or eighty-four wine, gallons, being one third of a tun.

Tertiary (a.) Growing on the innermost joint of a bird's wing; tertial; -- said of quills.

Testify (v. i.) To declare a charge; to protest; to give information; to bear witness; -- with against.

Tetrinic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a complex ketonic acid, C5H6O3, obtained as a white crystalTeufit (n.) The lapwing; -- called also teuchit.

Tewhit (n.) The lapwing; -- called also teewheep.

Thaliacea (n. pl.) A division of Tunicata comprising the free-swimming species, such as Salpa and Doliolum.

Theriaca (n.) An ancient composition esteemed efficacious against the effects of poison; especially, a certain compound of sixty-four drugs, prepared, pulverized, and reduced by means of honey to an electuary; -- called also theriaca Andromachi, and Venice treacle.

Thesis (n.) The accented part of the measure, expressed by the downward beat; -- the opposite of arsis.

Thoria (n.) A rare white earthy substance, consisting of the oxide of thorium; -- formerly called also thorina.

Thorite (n.) A mineral of a brown to black color, or, as in the variety orangite, orange-yellow. It is essentially a silicate of thorium.

Thorium (n.) A metallic element found in certain rare minerals, as thorite, pyrochlore, monazite, etc., and isolated as an infusible gray metallic powder which burns in the air and forms thoria; -- formerly called also thorinum. Symbol Th. Atomic weight 232.0.

Thurible (n.) A censer of metal, for burning incense, having various forms, held in the hand or suspended by chains; -- used especially at mass, vespers, and other solemn services.

Thuringite (n.) A mineral occurring as an aggregation of minute scales having an olive-green color and pearly luster. It is a hydrous silicate of aluminia and iron.

Ticking (n.) A strong, closely woven Tiffin (n.) A lunch, or slight repast between breakfast and dinner; -- originally, a Provincial English word, but introduced into India, and brought back to England in a special sense.

Tinnitus (n.) A ringing, whistling, or other imaginary noise perceived in the ears; -- called also tinnitus aurium.

Tipping (n.) A distinct articulation given in playing quick notes on the flute, by striking the tongue against the roof of the mouth; double-tonguing.

Titling (n.) The hedge sparrow; -- called also titlene. Its nest often chosen by the cuckoo as a place for depositing its own eggs.

Titling (n.) Stockfish; -- formerly so called in customhouses.

ToiTonnihood (n.) The female of the bullfinch; -- called also tonyhoop.

Tossing (n.) A process which consists in washing ores by violent agitation in water, in order to separate the lighter or earhy particles; -- called also tozing, and treloobing, in Cornwall.

Tripitaka (n.) The three divisions, or "baskets" (pitakas), of buddhist scriptures, -- the Vinayapitaka [Skr. Vinayapi/aka] , or Basket of DiscipTraditional (a.) Observant of tradition; attached to old customs; old-fashioned.

Traditor (n.) A deliverer; -- a name of infamy given to Christians who delivered the Scriptures, or the goods of the church, to their persecutors to save their lives.

Tridiapason (n.) A triple octave, or twenty-second.

Trifid (a.) Cleft to the middle, or slightly beyond the middle, into three parts; three-cleft.

Trinitrocellulose (n.) Gun cotton; -- so called because regarded as containing three nitro groups.

Tripinnatifid (a.) Thrice pinnately cleft; -- said of a pinnatifid leaf when its segments are pinnatifid, and the subdivisions of these also are pinnatifid.

Trivium (n.) The three " liberal" arts, grammar, logic, and rhetoric; -- being a triple way, as it were, to eloquence.

Tubbing (n.) A lining of timber or metal around the shaft of a mine; especially, a series of cast-iron cylinders bolted together, used to enable those who sink a shaft to penetrate quicksand, water, etc., with safety.

Tullibee (n.) A whitefish (Coregonus tullibee) found in the Great Lakes of North America; -- called also mongrel whitefish.

Turbid (a.) Having the lees or sediment disturbed; roiled; muddy; thick; not clear; -- used of liquids of any kind; as, turbid water; turbid wine.

Turbinal (a.) Rolled in a spiral; scroll-like; turbinate; -- applied to the thin, plicated, bony or cartilaginous plates which support the olfactory and mucous membranes of the nasal chambers.

Turbinated (a.) Spiral with the whorls decreasing rapidly from a large base to a pointed apex; -- said of certain shells.

Turbine (n.) A water wheel, commonly horizontal, variously constructed, but usually having a series of curved floats or buckets, against which the water acts by its impulse or reaction in flowing either outward from a central chamber, inward from an external casing, or from above downward, etc.; -- also called turbine wheel.

Turgid (a.) Distended beyond the natural state by some internal agent or expansive force; swelled; swollen; bloated; inflated; tumid; -- especially applied to an enlarged part of the body; as, a turgid limb; turgid fruit.

Tutti (n. pl.) All; -- a direction for all the singers or players to perform together.

Twain (a. & n.) Two; -- nearly obsolete in common discourse, but used in poetry and burlesque.

Turbine (n.) A form of steam engine analogous in construction and action to the water turbine. There are practically only two distinct kinds, and they are typified in the de Laval and the Parsons and Curtis turbines. The de Laval turbine is an impulse turbine, in which steam impinges upon revolving blades from a flared nozzle. The flare of the nozzle causes expansion of the steam, and hence changes its pressure energy into kinetic energy. An enormous velocity (30,000 revolutions per minute in > Unalist (n.) An ecclesiastical who holds but one benefice; -- distinguished from pluralist.

Unamiable (a.) Not amiable; morose; ill-natured; repulsive.

Unisilicate (n.) A salt of orthosilicic acid, H4SiO4; -- so called because the ratio of the oxygen atoms united to the basic metals and silicon respectively is 1:1; for example, Mg2SiO4 or 2MgO.SiO2.

Uppricked (a.) Upraised; erect; -- said of the ears of an animal.

Uranin (n.) An alkaUranium (n.) An element of the chromium group, found in certain rare minerals, as pitchblende, uranite, etc., and reduced as a heavy, hard, nickel-white metal which is quite permanent. Its yellow oxide is used to impart to glass a delicate greenish-yellow tint which is accompanied by a strong fluorescence, and its black oxide is used as a pigment in porcelain painting. Symbol U. Atomic weight 239.

Urchin (n.) A pert or roguish child; -- now commonly used only of a boy.

Urchin (n.) One of a pair in a series of small card cylinders, arranged around a carding drum; -- so called from its fancied resemblance to the hedgehog.

Utility (n.) Happiness; the greatest good, or happiness, of the greatest number, -- the foundation of utilitarianism.

Uvitic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid, CH3C6H3(CO2H)2, obtained as a white crystalVacuist (n.) One who holds the doctrine that the space between the bodies of the universe, or the molecules and atoms of matter., is a vacuum; -- opposed to plenist.

Vampire (n.) A blood-sucking ghost; a soul of a dead person superstitiously believed to come from the grave and wander about by night sucking the blood of persons asleep, thus causing their death. This superstition is now prevalent in parts of Eastern Europe, and was especially current in Hungary about the year 1730.

Vampire (n.) Either one of two or more species of South American blood-sucking bats belonging to the genera Desmodus and Diphylla. These bats are destitute of molar teeth, but have strong, sharp cutting incisors with which they make punctured wounds from which they suck the blood of horses, cattle, and other animals, as well as man, chiefly during sleep. They have a caecal appendage to the stomach, in which the blood with which they gorge themselves is stored.

Ventilate (v. t.) To provide with a vent, or escape, for air, gas, etc.; as, to ventilate a mold, or a water-wheel bucket.

Verein (n.) A union, association, or society; -- used in names of German organizations.

Verdin (n.) A small yellow-headed bird (Auriparus flaviceps) of Lower California, allied to the titmice; -- called also goldtit.

Vermicelli (n.) The flour of a hard and small-grained wheat made into dough, and forced through small cylinders or pipes till it takes a slender, wormlike form, whence the Italian name. When the paste is made in larger tubes, it is called macaroni.

Vermilinguia (n. pl.) A tribe of edentates comprising the South American ant-eaters. The tongue is long, slender, exsertile, and very flexible, whence the name.

Villiform (a.) Having the form or appearance of villi; like close-set fibers, either hard or soft; as, the teeth of perch are villiform.

Vinaigrette (n.) A sauce, made of vinegar, oil, and other ingredients, -- used esp. for cold meats.

Vinaigrette (n.) A small perforated box for holding aromatic vinegar contained in a sponge, or a smelling bottle for smelling salts; -- called also vinegarette.

Vinaigrette (n.) A small, two-wheeled vehicle, like a Bath chair, to be drawn or pushed by a boy or man.

Virgin (n.) Any one of several species of gossamer-winged butterflies of the family Lycaenidae.

Virgin (v. i.) To act the virgin; to be or keep chaste; -- followed by it. See It, 5.

Vitric (a.) Having the nature and qualities of glass; glasslike; -- distinguished from ceramic.

Vitrina (n.) A genus of terrestrial gastropods, having transparent, very thin, and delicate shells, -- whence the name.

Vitriol (n.) Sulphuric acid; -- called also oil of vitriol. So called because first made by the distillation of green vitriol. See Sulphuric acid, under Sulphuric.

Vorticella (n.) Any one of numerous species of ciliated Infusoria belonging to Vorticella and many other genera of the family Vorticellidae. They have a more or less bell-shaped body with a circle of vibrating cilia around the oral disk. Most of the species have slender, contractile stems, either simple or branched.

Warling (n.) One often quarreled with; -- / word coined, perhaps, to rhyme with darling.

Warrin (n.) An Australian lorikeet (Trichoglossus multicolor) remarkable for the variety and brilliancy of its colors; -- called also blue-bellied lorikeet, and blue-bellied parrot.

Washing (n.) The operation of simultaneously buying and selling the same stock for the purpose of manipulating the market. The transaction is fictitious, and is prohibited by stock-exchange rules.

Weeping (a.) Having slender, pendent branches; -- said of trees; as, weeping willow; a weeping ash.

Whiting (n.) A common European food fish (Melangus vulgaris) of the Codfish family; -- called also fittin.

Whiting (n.) A North American fish (Merlucius vulgaris) allied to the preceding; -- called also silver hake.

Whiting (n.) Any one of several species of North American marine sciaenoid food fishes belonging to genus Menticirrhus, especially M. Americanus, found from Maryland to Brazil, and M. littoralis, common from Virginia to Texas; -- called also silver whiting, and surf whiting.

Winding (n.) a series winding, or one in which the armature coil, the field-magnet coil, and the external circuit form a continuous conductor; a shunt winding, or one of such a character that the armature current is divided, a portion of the current being led around the field-magnet coils.

Willing (v. t.) Spontaneous; self-moved.

Winding (n.) A Winning (n.) The money, etc., gained by success in competition or contest, esp, in gambling; -- usually in the plural.

Winninish (n.) The land-locked variety of the common salmon.

Xiphidium (n.) A genus of plants of the order Haemodraceae, having two-ranked, sword-shaped leaves.

Xiphiplastron (n.) The posterior, or fourth, lateral plate in the plastron of turtles; -- called also xiphisternum.

Xiphisternum (n.) The posterior segment, or extremity, of the sternum; -- sometimes called metasternum, ensiform cartilage, ensiform process, or xiphoid process.

Xyloidin (n.) A substance resembling pyroxylin, obtained by the action of nitric acid on starch; -- called also nitramidin.

Yttrium (n.) A rare metallic element of the boron-aluminium group, found in gadolinite and other rare minerals, and extracted as a dark gray powder. Symbol Y. Atomic weight, 89.

Zendik (n.) An atheist or unbeliever; -- name given in the East to those charged with disbelief of any revealed religion, or accused of magical heresies.

Zincite (n.) Native zinc oxide; a brittle, translucent mineral, of an orange-red color; -- called also red zinc ore, and red oxide of zinc.

Zinnia (n.) Any plant of the composite genus Zinnia, Mexican herbs with opposite leaves and large gay-colored blossoms. Zinnia elegans is the commonest species in cultivation.

Zootic (a.) Containing the remains of organized bodies; -- said of rock or soil.

Zolaism (n.) The literary theories and practices of the French novelist Emile Zola (1840-1902); naturalism, esp. in a derogatory sense.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.