Words whose 5th letter is N

Ablen () A small fresh-water fish (Leuciscus alburnus); the bleak.

Abound (v. i.) To be copiously supplied; -- followed by in or with.

Absence (n.) A state of being absent or withdrawn from a place or from companionship; -- opposed to presence.

Absent (a.) Inattentive to what is passing; absent-minded; preoccupied; as, an absent air.

Absent (v. t.) To take or withdraw (one's self) to such a distance as to prevent intercourse; -- used with the reflexive pronoun.

Absentness (n.) The quality of being absent-minded.

Absonant (a.) Discordant; contrary; -- opposed to consonant.

Achenium (n.) A small, dry, indehiscent fruit, containing a single seed, as in the buttercup; -- called a naked seed by the earlier botanists.

Aclinic (a.) Without inclination or dipping; -- said the magnetic needle balances itself horizontally, having no dip. The aclinic Acorn (n.) A cone-shaped piece of wood on the point of the spindle above the vane, on the mast-head.

Acorn (n.) See Acorn-shell.

Acronychal (a.) Rising at sunset and setting at sunrise, as a star; -- opposed to cosmical.

Actinium (n.) A supposed metal, said by Phipson to be contained in commercial zinc; -- so called because certain of its compounds are darkened by exposure to light.

Admonish (v. t.) To counsel against wrong practices; to cation or advise; to warn against danger or an offense; -- followed by of, against, or a subordinate clause.

Advance (v.) The first step towards the attainment of a result; approach made to gain favor, to form an acquaintance, to adjust a difference, etc.; an overture; a tender; an offer; -- usually in the plural.

Advance (a.) Before in place, or beforehand in time; -- used for advanced; as, an advance guard, or that before the main guard or body of an army; advance payment, or that made before it is due; advance proofs, advance sheets, pages of a forthcoming volume, received in advance of the time of publication.

Advantage (n.) Superiority; mastery; -- with of or over.

Adventist (n.) One of a religious body, embracing several branches, who look for the proximate personal coming of Christ; -- called also Second Adventists.

Adventitious (a.) Accidentally or sparingly spontaneous in a country or district; not fully naturalized; adventive; -- applied to foreign plants.

Adventurous (n.) IncAdventurous (n.) Full of hazard; attended with risk; exposing to danger; requiring courage; rash; -- applied to acts; as, an adventurous undertaking, deed, song.

Aeronef (n.) A power-driven, heavier-than-air flying machine.

Affinity (n.) Relationship by marriage (as between a husband and his wife's blood relations, or between a wife and her husband's blood relations); -- in contradistinction to consanguinity, or relationship by blood; -- followed by with, to, or between.

Again (adv.) Once repeated; -- of quantity; as, as large again, half as much again.

Against (prep.) Abreast; opposite to; facing; towards; as, against the mouth of a river; -- in this sense often preceded by over.

Alban (n.) A white crystalAlien (a.) Wholly different in nature; foreign; adverse; inconsistent (with); incongruous; -- followed by from or sometimes by to; as, principles alien from our religion.

Alien (n.) A foreigner; one owing allegiance, or belonging, to another country; a foreign-born resident of a country in which he does not possess the privileges of a citizen. Hence, a stranger. See Alienage.

Alienate (a.) Estranged; withdrawn in affection; foreign; -- with from.

Alienate (v. t.) To withdraw, as the affections; to make indifferent of averse, where love or friendship before subsisted; to estrange; to wean; -- with from.

Alienee (n.) One to whom the title of property is transferred; -- opposed to alienor.

Alignment (n.) The ground-plan of a railway or other road, in distinction from the grades or profile.

Allantoin (n.) A crystalAllantoid (n.) A membranous appendage of the embryos of mammals, birds, and reptiles, -- in mammals serving to connect the fetus with the parent; the urinary vesicle.

Almendron (n.) The lofty Brazil-nut tree.

Ammonia (n.) A gaseous compound of hydrogen and nitrogen, NH3, with a pungent smell and taste: -- often called volatile alkali, and spirits of hartshorn.

Amount (n.) To rise or reach by an accumulation of particular sums or quantities; to come (to) in the aggregate or whole; -- with to or unto.

Ancone (n.) The corner or quoin of a wall, cross-beam, or rafter.

Anion (n.) An electro-negative element, or the element which, in electro-chemical decompositions, is evolved at the anode; -- opposed to cation.

Argon (n.) A colorless, odorless gas occurring in the air (of which it constitutes 0.93 per cent by volume), in volcanic gases, etc.; -- so named on account of its inertness by Rayleigh and Ramsay, who prepared and examined it in 1894-95. Symbol, A; at. wt., 39.9. Argon is condensible to a colorless liquid boiling at -186.1? C. and to a solid melting at -189.6? C. It has a characteristic spectrum. No compounds of it are known, but there is physical evidence that its molecule is monatomic. Weig> Antennule (n.) A small antenna; -- applied to the smaller pair of antennae or feelers of Crustacea.

Antinomy (n.) A contradiction or incompatibility of thought or language; -- in the Kantian philosophy, such a contradiction as arises from the attempt to apply to the ideas of the reason, relations or attributes which are appropriate only to the facts or the concepts of experience.

Antonym (n.) A word of opposite meaning; a counterterm; -- used as a correlative of synonym.

Aphanite (n.) A very compact, dark-colored /ock, consisting of hornblende, or pyroxene, and feldspar, but neither of them in perceptible grains.

Aphanitic (a.) Resembling aphanite; having a very fine-grained structure.

Aplanatic (a.) Having two or more parts of different curvatures, so combined as to remove spherical aberration; -- said of a lens.

Appendant (v. t.) Appended by prescription, that is, a personal usage for a considerable time; -- said of a thing of inheritance belonging to another inheritance which is superior or more worthy; as, an advowson, common, etc. , which may be appendant to a manor, common of fishing to a freehold, a seat in church to a house.

Appendicularia (n.) A genus of small free-swimming Tunicata, shaped somewhat like a tadpole, and remarkable for resemblances to the larvae of other Tunicata. It is the type of the order Copelata or Larvalia. See Illustration in Appendix.

Arcanum (n.) A secret; a mystery; -- generally used in the plural.

Argent (n.) The white color in coats of arms, intended to represent silver, or, figuratively, purity, innocence, beauty, or gentleness; -- represented in engraving by a plain white surface.

Argentic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, silver; -- said of certain compounds of silver in which this metal has its lowest proportion; as, argentic chloride.

Argentine (n.) A siliceous variety of calcite, or carbonate of lime, having a silvery-white, pearly luster, and a waving or curved lamellar structure.

Argentite (n.) Sulphide of silver; -- also called vitreous silver, or silver glance. It has a metallic luster, a lead-gray color, and is sectile like lead.

Argentous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, silver; -- said of certain silver compounds in which silver has a higher proportion than in argentic compounds; as, argentous chloride.

Arsenic (n.) One of the elements, a solid substance resembling a metal in its physical properties, but in its chemical relations ranking with the nonmetals. It is of a steel-gray color and brilliant luster, though usually dull from tarnish. It is very brittle, and sublimes at 356? Fahrenheit. It is sometimes found native, but usually combined with silver, cobalt, nickel, iron, antimony, or sulphur. Orpiment and realgar are two of its sulphur compounds, the first of which is the true arsenicum > Arsenic (n.) Arsenious oxide or arsenious anhydride; -- called also arsenious acid, white arsenic, and ratsbane.

Arsenic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, arsenic; -- said of those compounds of arsenic in which this element has its highest equivalence; as, arsenic acid.

Arsenide (n.) A compound of arsenic with a metal, or positive element or radical; -- formerly called arseniuret.

Arseniureted (a.) Combined with arsenic; -- said some elementary substances or radicals; as, arseniureted hydrogen.

Arsenopyrite (n.) A mineral of a tin-white color and metallic luster, containing arsenic, sulphur, and iron; -- also called arsenical pyrites and mispickel.

Aryan (n.) One of a primitive people supposed to have lived in prehistoric times, in Central Asia, east of the Caspian Sea, and north of the Hindoo Koosh and Paropamisan Mountains, and to have been the stock from which sprang the Hindoo, Persian, Greek, Latin, Celtic, Teutonic, Slavonic, and other races; one of that ethnological division of mankind called also Indo-European or Indo-Germanic.

Aryan (a.) Of or pertaining to the people called Aryans; Indo-European; Indo-Germanic; as, the Aryan stock, the Aryan languages.

Ascend (v. i.) To move upward; to mount; to go up; to rise; -- opposed to descend.

Ascendant (n.) An ancestor, or one who precedes in genealogy or degrees of kindred; a relative in the ascending Atlantes (n. pl.) Figures or half figures of men, used as columns to support an entablature; -- called also telamones. See Caryatides.

Attend (v. i.) To apply the mind, or pay attention, with a view to perceive, understand, or comply; to pay regard; to heed; to listen; -- usually followed by to.

Attend (v. i.) To accompany or be present or near at hand, in pursuance of duty; to be ready for service; to wait or be in waiting; -- often followed by on or upon.

Aubin (n.) A broken gait of a horse, between an amble and a gallop; -- commonly called a Canterbury gallop.

Aurin (n.) A red coloring matter derived from phenol; -- called also, in commerce, yellow corallin.

Autonomic (a.) Having the power of self-government; autonomous.

Autonomous (a.) Independent in government; having the right or power of self-government.

Autonomy (n.) The power or right of self-government; self-government, or political independence, of a city or a state.

Autunite (n.) A lemon-yellow phosphate of uranium and calcium occurring in tabular crystals with basal cleavage, and in micalike scales. H., 2-2.5. Sp. gr., 3.05-3.19.

Avaunt (interj.) Begone; depart; -- a word of contempt or abhorrence, equivalent to the phrase "Get thee gone."

Axminster (n.) An Axminster carpet, an imitation Turkey carpet, noted for its thick and soft pile; -- so called from Axminster, Eng.

Axminster carpet () A variety of Turkey carpet, woven by machine or, when more than 27 inches wide, on a hand loom, and consisting of strips of worsted chenille so colored as to produce a pattern on a stout jute backing. It has a fine soft pile. So called from Axminster, England, where it was formerly (1755 -- 1835) made.

Axminster carpet () A similar but cheaper machine-made carpet, resembling moquette in construction and appearance, but finer and of better material.

Balance (n.) An equality between the sums total of the two sides of an account; as, to bring one's accounts to a balance; -- also, the excess on either side; as, the balance of an account.

Balance (n.) To make the sums of the debits and credits of an account equal; -- said of an item; as, this payment, or credit, balances the account.

Balancereef (n.) The last reef in a fore-and-aft sail, taken to steady the ship.

Balanoid (a.) Resembling an acorn; -- applied to a group of barnacles having shells shaped like acorns. See Acornshell, and Barnacle.

Baroness (n.) A baron's wife; also, a lady who holds the baronial title in her own right; as, the Baroness Burdett-Coutts.

Basin (n.) An isolated or circumscribed formation, particularly where the strata dip inward, on all sides, toward a center; -- especially applied to the coal formations, called coal basins or coal fields.

Baton (n.) An ordinary with its ends cut off, borne sinister as a mark of bastardy, and containing one fourth in breadth of the bend sinister; -- called also bastard bar. See Bend sinister.

Begone (p. p.) Surrounded; furnished; beset; environed (as in woe-begone).

Begonia (n.) A genus of plants, mostly of tropical America, many species of which are grown as ornamental plants. The leaves are curiously one-sided, and often exhibit brilliant colors.

Biannual (a.) Occurring twice a year; half-yearly; semiannual.

Bidentate (a.) Having two teeth or two toothlike processes; two-toothed.

Bilander (n.) A small two-masted merchant vessel, fitted only for coasting, or for use in canals, as in Holland.

Bimana (n. pl.) Animals having two hands; -- a term applied by Cuvier to man as a special order of Mammalia.

Bimanous (a.) Having two hands; two-handed.

Bipinnaria (n.) The larva of certain starfishes as developed in the free-swimming stage.

Blenny (n.) A marine fish of the genus Blennius or family Blenniidae; -- so called from its coating of mucus. The species are numerous.

Bournonite (n.) A mineral of a steel-gray to black color and metallic luster, occurring crystallized, often in twin crystals shaped like cogwheels (wheel ore), also massive. It is a sulphide of antimony, lead, and copper.

Brain (n.) The whitish mass of soft matter (the center of the nervous system, and the seat of consciousness and volition) which is inclosed in the cartilaginous or bony cranium of vertebrate animals. It is simply the anterior termination of the spinal cord, and is developed from three embryonic vesicles, whose cavities are connected with the central canal of the cord; the cavities of the vesicles become the central cavities, or ventricles, and the walls thicken unequally and become the three s> Brainish (a.) Hot-headed; furious.

Brownback (n.) The dowitcher or red-breasted snipe. See Dowitcher.

Brownie (n.) An imaginary good-natured spirit, who was supposed often to perform important services around the house by night, such as thrashing, churning, sweeping.

Bruin (a.) A bear; -- so called in popular tales and fables.

Bufonite (n.) An old name for a fossil consisting of the petrified teeth and palatal bones of fishes belonging to the family of Pycnodonts (thick teeth), whose remains occur in the oolite and chalk formations; toadstone; -- so named from a notion that it was originally formed in the head of a toad.

Business (n.) Affair; concern; matter; -- used in an indefinite sense, and modified by the connected words.

Buxine (n.) An alkaloid obtained from the Buxus sempervirens, or common box tree. It is identical with bebeerine; -- called also buxina.

Cahenslyism (n.) A plan proposed to the Pope in 1891 by P. P. Cahensly, a member of the German parliament, to divide the foreign-born population of the United States, for ecclesiastical purposes, according to European nationalities, and to appoint bishops and priests of like race and speaking the same language as the majority of the members of a diocese or congregation. This plan was successfully opposed by the American party in the Church.

Cadence (n.) Harmony and proportion in motions, as of a well-managed horse.

Calmness (n.) The state of quality of being calm; quietness; tranquillity; self-repose.

Canon (n.) The largest size of type having a specific name; -- so called from having been used for printing the canons of the church.

Canon (n.) The part of a bell by which it is suspended; -- called also ear and shank.

Carinaria (n.) A genus of oceanic heteropod Mollusca, having a thin, glassy, bonnet-shaped shell, which covers only the nucleus and gills.

Carinatae (n. pl.) A grand division of birds, including all existing flying birds; -- So called from the carina or keel on the breastbone.

Catenulate (a.) Chainlike; -- said both or color marks and of indentations when arranged like the links of a chain, as on shells, etc.

Celandine (n.) A perennial herbaceous plant (Chelidonium majus) of the poppy family, with yellow flowers. It is used as a medicine in jaundice, etc., and its acrid saffron-colored juice is used to cure warts and the itch; -- called also greater celandine and swallowwort.

Cement (n.) The layer of bone investing the root and neck of a tooth; -- called also cementum.

Chain (n.) Iron links bolted to the side of a vessel to bold the dead-eyes connected with the shrouds; also, the channels.

Chinned (a.) Having a chin; -- used chiefly in compounds; as, short-chinned.

Choanoid (a.) Funnel-shaped; -- applied particularly to a hollow muscle attached to the ball of the eye in many reptiles and mammals.

Chronogram (n.) An inscription in which certain numeral letters, made to appear specially conspicuous, on being added together, express a particular date or epoch, as in the motto of a medal struck by Gustavus Adolphus in 1632: ChrIstVs DVX; ergo trIVMphVs.- the capitals of which give, when added as numerals, the sum 1632.

Chronometer (n.) A portable timekeeper, with a heavy compensation balance, and usually beating half seconds; -- intended to keep time with great accuracy for use an astronomical observations, in determining longitude, etc.

Chronoscope (n.) An instrument for measuring minute intervals of time; used in determining the velocity of projectiles, the duration of short-lived luminous phenomena, etc.

Clean (superl.) Well-proportioned; shapely; as, clean limbs.

Clown (n.) A man of coarse nature and manners; an awkward fellow; an ill-bred person; a boor.

Clown (v. i.) To act as a clown; -- with it.

Coign (n.) A var. spelling of Coin, Quoin, a corner, wedge; -- chiefly used in the phrase coign of vantage, a position advantageous for action or observation.

Cockney (n.) A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Comanches (n. pl.) A warlike, savage, and nomadic tribe of the Shoshone family of Indians, inhabiting Mexico and the adjacent parts of the United States; -- called also Paducahs. They are noted for plundering and cruelty.

Coolness (n.) Calm impudence; self-possession.

Coping (n.) The highest or covering course of masonry in a wall, often with sloping edges to carry off water; -- sometimes called capping.

Coronated (a.) Having the coronal feathers lengthened or otherwise distinguished; -- said of birds.

Coronated (a.) Girt about the spire with a row of tubercles or spines; -- said of spiral shells.

Corundum (n.) The earth alumina, as found native in a crystalCotinga (n.) A bird of the family Cotingidae, including numerous bright-colored South American species; -- called also chatterers.

Covenant (n.) An agreement made by the Scottish Parliament in 1638, and by the English Parliament in 1643, to preserve the reformed religion in Scotland, and to extirpate popery and prelacy; -- usually called the "Solemn League and Covenant."

Crown (n.) The person entitled to wear a regal or imperial crown; the sovereign; -- with the definite article.

Crown (n.) The vertex or top of an arch; -- applied generally to about one third of the curve, but in a pointed arch to the apex only.

Crown (n.) A coin stamped with the image of a crown; hence,a denomination of money; as, the English crown, a silver coin of the value of five shillings sterling, or a little more than $1.20; the Danish or Norwegian crown, a money of account, etc., worth nearly twenty-seven cents.

Crownland (n.) In Austria-Hungary, one of the provinces, or largest administrative divisions of the monarchy; as, the crownland of Lower Austria.

Cumene (n.) A colorless oily hydrocarbon, C6H5.C3H7, obtained by the distillation of cuminic acid; -- called also cumol.

Cuminol (n.) A liquid, C3H7.C6H4.CHO, obtained from oil of caraway; -- called also cuminic aldehyde.

Cylindroid (n.) A certain surface of the third degree, described by a moving straight Cymene (n.) A colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon, CH3.C6H4.C3H7, of pleasant odor, obtained from oil of cumin, oil of caraway, carvacrol, camphor, etc.; -- called also paracymene, and formerly camphogen.

Daman (n.) A small herbivorous mammal of the genus Hyrax. The species found in Palestine and Syria is Hyrax Syriacus; that of Northern Africa is H. Brucei; -- called also ashkoko, dassy, and rock rabbit. See Cony, and Hyrax.

Decani (a.) Used of the side of the choir on which the dean's stall is placed; decanal; -- correlative to cantoris; as, the decanal, or decani, side.

Decent (a.) Comely; shapely; well-formed.

Decentralize (v. t.) To prevent from centralizing; to cause to withdraw from the center or place of concentration; to divide and distribute (what has been united or concentrated); -- esp. said of authority, or the administration of public affairs.

Decine (n.) One of the higher hydrocarbons, C10H15, of the acetylene series; -- called also decenylene.

Deepness (n.) The state or quality of being deep, profound, mysterious, secretive, etc.; depth; profundity; -- opposed to shallowness.

Defend (v. t.) To repel danger or harm from; to protect; to secure against; attack; to maintain against force or argument; to uphold; to guard; as, to defend a town; to defend a cause; to defend character; to defend the absent; -- sometimes followed by from or against; as, to defend one's self from, or against, one's enemies.

Defendant (n.) A person required to make answer in an action or suit; -- opposed to plaintiff.

Defensive (a.) Carried on by resisting attack or aggression; -- opposed to offensive; as, defensive war.

Deign (v. t.) To esteem worthy; to consider worth notice; -- opposed to disdain.

Deign (v. i.) To think worthy; to vouchsafe; to condescend; - - followed by an infinitive.

Demantoid (n.) A yellow-green, transparent variety of garnet found in the Urals. It is valued as a gem because of its brilliancy of luster, whence the name.

Demonstration (n.) A course of reasoning showing that a certain result is a necessary consequence of assumed premises; -- these premises being definitions, axioms, and previously established propositions.

Depend (v. i.) To rely for support; to be conditioned or contingent; to be connected with anything, as a cause of existence, or as a necessary condition; -- followed by on or upon, formerly by of.

Depend (v. i.) To trust; to rest with confidence; to rely; to confide; to be certain; -- with on or upon; as, we depend on the word or assurance of our friends; we depend on the mail at the usual hour.

Dependent (a.) Relying on, or subject to, something else for support; not able to exist, or sustain itself, or to perform anything, without the will, power, or aid of something else; not self-sustaining; contingent or conditioned; subordinate; -- often with on or upon; as, dependent on God; dependent upon friends.

Dependent (n.) One who depends; one who is sustained by another, or who relies on another for support of favor; a hanger-on; a retainer; as, a numerous train of dependents.

Desynonymize (v. t.) To deprive of synonymous character; to discriminate in use; -- applied to words which have been employed as synonyms.

Dicentra (n.) A genus of herbaceous plants, with racemes of two-spurred or heart-shaped flowers, including the Dutchman's breeches, and the more showy Bleeding heart (D. spectabilis).

Digenesis (n.) The faculty of multiplying in two ways; -- by ova fecundated by spermatic fluid, and asexually, as by buds. See Parthenogenesis.

Dimension (n.) Measure in a single Diminish (v. t.) To make smaller in any manner; to reduce in bulk or amount; to lessen; -- opposed to augment or increase.

Diminuendo (adv.) In a gradually diminishing manner; with abatement of tone; decrescendo; -- expressed on the staff by Dim., or Dimin., or the sign.

Diminution (n.) The act of diminishing, or of making or becoming less; state of being diminished; reduction in size, quantity, or degree; -- opposed to augmentation or increase.

Diurna (n. pl.) A division of Lepidoptera, including the butterflies; -- so called because they fly only in the daytime.

Diurnal (a.) Relating to the daytime; belonging to the period of daylight, distinguished from the night; -- opposed to nocturnal; as, diurnal heat; diurnal hours.

Diurnal (a.) Opening during the day, and closing at night; -- said of flowers or leaves.

Diurnal (a.) Active by day; -- applied especially to the eagles and hawks among raptorial birds, and to butterflies (Diurna) among insects.

Domina (n.) Lady; a lady; -- a title formerly given to noble ladies who held a barony in their own right.

Domination (n.) A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; -- a meaning given by the schoolmen.

Domine (n.) A West Indian fish (Epinula magistralis), of the family Trichiuridae. It is a long-bodied, voracious fish.

Domineer (v. t.) To rule with insolence or arbitrary sway; to play the master; to be overbearing; to tyrannize; to bluster; to swell with conscious superiority or haughtiness; -- often with over; as, to domineer over dependents.

Domino (n.) A game played by two or more persons, with twenty-eight pieces of wood, bone, or ivory, of a flat, oblong shape, plain at the back, but on the face divided by a Dominus (n.) Master; sir; -- a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or a clergyman, and sometimes to the lord of a manor.

Doornail (n.) The nail or knob on which in ancient doors the knocker struck; -- hence the old saying, "As dead as a doornail."

Draintile (n.) A hollow tile used in making drains; -- called also draining tile.

Drown (v. t.) To overpower; to overcome; to extinguish; -- said especially of sound.

Earing (n.) A Earing (n.) A Easiness (n.) Freedom from effort, constraint, or formality; -- said of style, manner, etc.

Eccentric (a.) Not having the same center; -- said of circles, ellipses, spheres, etc., which, though coinciding, either in whole or in part, as to area or volume, have not the same center; -- opposed to concentric.

Eccentricity (n.) The ratio of the distance between the center and the focus of an ellipse or hyperbola to its semi-transverse axis.

Eccentricity (n.) The ratio of the distance of the center of the orbit of a heavenly body from the center of the body round which it revolves to the semi-transverse axis of the orbit.

Echinoidea (n. pl.) The class Echinodermata which includes the sea urchins. They have a calcareous, usually more or less spheroidal or disk-shaped, composed of many united plates, and covered with movable spines. See Spatangoid, Clypeastroid.

Echinus (n.) The quarter-round molding (ovolo) of the Roman Doric style. See Illust. of Column

Effendi (n.) Master; sir; -- a Turkish title of respect, applied esp. to a state official or man of learning, as one learned in the law, but often simply as the courtesy title of a gentleman.

Effendi (n.) Master; sir; -- a title of a Turkish state official and man of learning, especially one learned in the law.

Eikon (n.) An image or effigy; -- used rather in an abstract sense, and rarely for a work of art.

Embonpoint (n.) Plumpness of person; -- said especially of persons somewhat corpulent.

Engine (v. t.) To equip with an engine; -- said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another.

Enmanche (a.) Resembling, or covered with, a sleeve; -- said of the chief when Ensanguine (v. t.) To stain or cover with blood; to make bloody, or of a blood-red color; as, an ensanguined hue.

Eosin (n.) A yellow or brownish red dyestuff obtained by the action of bromine on fluorescein, and named from the fine rose-red which it imparts to silk. It is also used for making a fine red ink. Its solution is fluorescent.

Epignathous (a.) Hook-billed; having the upper mandible longer than the lower.

Equant (n.) A circle around whose circumference a planet or the center of ann epicycle was conceived to move uniformly; -- called also eccentric equator.

Ermine (n.) A valuable fur-bearing animal of the genus Mustela (M. erminea), allied to the weasel; the stoat. It is found in the northern parts of Asia, Europe, and America. In summer it is brown, but in winter it becomes white, except the tip of the tail, which is always black.

Errant (a.) Journeying; itinerant; -- formerly applied to judges who went on circuit and to bailiffs at large.

Errantry (n.) The employment of a knight-errant.

Erroneous (a.) Wandering; straying; deviating from the right course; -- hence, irregular; unnatural.

Essential (a.) Necessary; indispensable; -- said of those tones which constitute a chord, in distinction from ornamental or passing tones.

Eternal (a.) Exceedingly great or bad; -- used as a strong intensive.

Ethenyl (n.) A univalent hydrocarbon radical of the ethylene series, CH2:CH; -- called also vinyl. See Vinyl.

Eugenic (a.) Well-born; of high birth.

Eugenin (n.) A colorless, crystalExannulate (a.) Having the sporangium destitute of a ring; -- said of certain genera of ferns.

Excentrical (a.) One-sided; having the normally central portion not in the true center.

Expand (v. t.) To cause the particles or parts of to spread themselves or stand apart, thus increasing bulk without addition of substance; to make to occupy more space; to dilate; to distend; to extend every way; to enlarge; -- opposed to contract; as, to expand the chest; heat expands all bodies; to expand the sphere of benevolence.

Expansive (a.) Having a capacity or tendency to expand or dilate; diffusive; of much expanse; wide-extending; as, the expansive force of heat; the expansive quality of air.

Expense (n.) That which is expended, laid out, or consumed; cost; outlay; charge; -- sometimes with the notion of loss or damage to those on whom the expense falls; as, the expenses of war; an expense of time.

Exsanguinity (n.) Privation or destitution of blood; -- opposed to plethora.

Extensible (a.) Capable of being extended, whether in length or breadth; susceptible of enlargement; extensible; extendible; -- the opposite of contractible or compressible.

Extension (v. t.) Capacity of a concept or general term to include a greater or smaller number of objects; -- correlative of intension.

Extensor (n.) A muscle which serves to extend or straighten any part of the body, as an arm or a finger; -- opposed to flexor.

Extenuate (v. t.) To lessen; to palliate; to lessen or weaken the force of; to diminish the conception of, as crime, guilt, faults, ills, accusations, etc.; -- opposed to aggravate.

Facing (n.) The collar and cuffs of a military coat; -- commonly of a color different from that of the coat.

Facing (n.) The movement of soldiers by turning on their heels to the right, left, or about; -- chiefly in the pl.

Farandole (n.) A rapid dance in six-eight time in which a large number join hands and dance in various figures, sometimes moving from room to room. It originated in Provence.

Falanaka (n.) A viverrine mammal of Madagascar (Eupleres Goudotii), allied to the civet; -- called also Falanouc.

Feminine (a.) Having the qualities of a woman; becoming or appropriate to the female sex; as, in a good sense, modest, graceful, affectionate, confiding; or, in a bad sense, weak, nerveless, timid, pleasure-loving, effeminate.

Filanders (n. pl.) A disease in hawks, characterized by the presence of small threadlike worms, also of filaments of coagulated blood, from the rupture of a vein; -- called also backworm.

Flatness (n.) Depression of tone; the state of being below the true pitch; -- opposed to sharpness or acuteness.

Flown () p. p. of Fly; -- often used with the auxiliary verb to be; as, the birds are flown.

Fluent (a.) Ready in the use of words; voluble; copious; having words at command; and uttering them with facility and smoothness; as, a fluent speaker; hence, flowing; voluble; smooth; -- said of language; as, fluent speech.

Fluent (n.) A variable quantity, considered as increasing or diminishing; -- called, in the modern calculus, the function or integral.

Fluinity (n.) The quality of being fluid or capable of flowing; a liquid, aeriform. or gaseous state; -- opposed to solidity.

Foment (n.) State of excitation; -- perh. confused with ferment.

Foment (v. t.) To nurse to life or activity; to cherish and promote by excitements; to encourage; to abet; to instigate; -- used often in a bad sense; as, to foment ill humors.

Friendly (n.) A friendly person; -- usually applied to natives friendly to foreign settlers or invaders.

Friended (a.) IncFrounce (n.) A wrinkle, plait, or curl; a flounce; -- also, a frown.

Galangal (n.) The pungent aromatic rhizome or tuber of certain East Indian or Chinese species of Alpinia (A. Galanga and A. officinarum) and of the Kaempferia Galanga), -- all of the Ginger family.

Gapingstock (n.) One who is an object of open-mouthed wonder.

Geranine (n.) A valuable astringent obtained from the root of the Geranium maculatum or crane's-bill.

Geranine (n.) A liquid terpene, obtained from the crane's-bill (Geranium maculatum), and having a peculiar mulberry odor.

Geranium (n.) A genus of plants having a beaklike tours or receptacle, around which the seed capsules are arranged, and membranous projections, or stipules, at the joints. Most of the species have showy flowers and a pungent odor. Called sometimes crane's-bill.

Gerant (n.) The manager or acting partner of a company, joint-stock association, etc.

Gerund (n.) A verbal noun ending in -e, preceded by to and usually denoting purpose or end; -- called also the dative infinitive; as, "Ic haebbe mete to etanne" (I have meat to eat.) In Modern English the name has been applied to verbal or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive action; e. g., by throwing a stone.

Given (v.) Disposed; incGowdnook (n.) The saury pike; -- called also gofnick.

Grain (n.) The fruit of certain grasses which furnish the chief food of man, as corn, wheat, rye, oats, etc., or the plants themselves; -- used collectively.

Grain (n.) The unit of the English system of weights; -- so called because considered equal to the average of grains taken from the middle of the ears of wheat. 7,000 grains constitute the pound avoirdupois, and 5,760 grains the pound troy. A grain is equal to .0648 gram. See Gram.

Grainer (n.) An infusion of pigeon's dung used by tanners to neutralize the effects of lime and give flexibility to skins; -- called also grains and bate.

Graining (n.) A small European fresh-water fish (Leuciscus vulgaris); - called also dobule, and dace.

Grapnel (n.) A small anchor, with four or five flukes or claws, used to hold boats or small vessels; hence, any instrument designed to grapple or hold; a grappling iron; a grab; -- written also grapGreen (n.) Fresh leaves or branches of trees or other plants; wreaths; -- usually in the plural.

Greenback (n.) One of the legal tender notes of the United States; -- first issued in 1862, and having the devices on the back printed with green ink, to prevent alterations and counterfeits.

Greenfinch (n.) A European finch (Ligurinus chloris); -- called also green bird, green linnet, green grosbeak, green olf, greeny, and peasweep.

Greening (n.) A greenish apple, of several varieties, among which the Rhode Island greening is the best known for its fine-grained acid flesh and its excellent keeping quality.

Greenshank (n.) A European sandpiper or snipe (Totanus canescens); -- called also greater plover.

Ground (n.) One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which moldings, etc., are attached; -- usually in the plural.

Groundnut (n.) A European plant of the genus Bunium (B. flexuosum), having an edible root of a globular shape and sweet, aromatic taste; -- called also earthnut, earth chestnut, hawknut, and pignut.

Gyronny (a.) Covered with gyrons, or divided so as to form several gyrons; -- said of an escutcheon.

Habendum (n.) That part of a deed which follows the part called the premises, and determines the extent of the interest or estate granted; -- so called because it begins with the word Habendum.

Hardness (n.) The cohesion of the particles on the surface of a body, determined by its capacity to scratch another, or be itself scratched;-measured among minerals on a scale of which diamond and talc form the extremes.

Harengiform (a.) Herring-shaped.

Hemin (n.) A substance, in the form of reddish brown, microscopic, prismatic crystals, formed from dried blood by the action of strong acetic acid and common salt; -- called also Teichmann's crystals. Chemically, it is a hydrochloride of hematin.

Herrnhuter (n.) One of the Moravians; -- so called from the settlement of Herrnhut (the Lord's watch) made, about 1722, by the Moravians at the invitation of Nicholas Lewis, count of Zinzendorf, upon his estate in the circle of Bautzen.

Hexandrian (a.) Alt. of Hex-androus

Hexine (n.) A hydrocarbon, C6H10, of the acetylene series, obtained artificially as a colorless, volatile, pungent liquid; -- called also hexoylene.

Homing (p.a.) Home-returning.

Homing (a.) Home-returning; -- used specifically of carrier pigeons.

Homonymous (a.) Having the same name or designation; standing in the same relation; -- opposed to heteronymous.

Humanity (n.) The branches of polite or elegant learning; as language, rhetoric, poetry, and the ancient classics; belles-letters.

Humin (n.) A bitter, brownish yellow, amorphous substance, extracted from vegetable mold, and also produced by the action of acids on certain sugars and carbohydrates; -- called also humic acid, ulmin, gein, ulmic or geic acid, etc.

Hydantoin (n.) A derivative of urea, C3H4N2O2, obtained from allantion, as a white, crystalHymenium (n.) The spore-bearing surface of certain fungi, as that on the gills of a mushroom.

Ibsenism (n.) The dramatic practice or purpose characteristic of the writings of Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906), Norwegian poet and dramatist, whose best-known plays deal with conventional hypocrisies, the story in each play thus developing a definite moral problem.

Iguanodon (n.) A genus of gigantic herbivorous dinosaurs having a birdlike pelvis and large hind legs with three-toed feet capable of supporting the entire body. Its teeth resemble those of the iguana, whence its name. Several species are known, mostly from the Wealden of England and Europe. See Illustration in Appendix.

Immanation (n.) A flowing or entering in; -- opposed to emanation.

Immanent (a.) Remaining within; inherent; indwelling; abiding; intrinsic; internal or subjective; hence, limited in activity, agency, or effect, to the subject or associated acts; -- opposed to emanant, transitory, transitive, or objective.

Immanuel (n.) God with us; -- an appellation of the Christ.

Imminent (a.) Threatening to occur immediately; near at hand; impending; -- said especially of misfortune or peril.

Impanation (a.) Embodiment in bread; the supposed real presence and union of Christ's material body and blood with the substance of the elements of the eucharist without a change in their nature; -- distinguished from transubstantiation, which supposes a miraculous change of the substance of the elements. It is akin to consubstantiation.

Impinge (v. t.) To fall or dash against; to touch upon; to strike; to hit; to ciash with; -- with on or upon.

Indonesian (n.) A member of a race forming the chief pre-Malay population of the Malay Archipelago, and probably sprung from a mixture of Polynesian and Mongoloid immigrants. According to Keane, the autochthonous Negritos were largely expelled by the Caucasian Polynesians, themselves followed by Mongoloid peoples of Indo-Chinese affinities, from mixture with whom sprang the Indonesian race.

Intensive (a.) Designating, or pertaining to, any system of farming or horticulture, usually practiced on small pieces of land, in which the soil is thoroughly worked and fertilized so as to get as much return as possible; -- opposed to extensive.

Inconstant (a.) Not constant; not stable or uniform; subject to change of character, appearance, opinion, inclination, or purpose, etc.; not firm; unsteady; fickle; changeable; variable; -- said of persons or things; as, inconstant in love or friendship.

Incontinently (adv.) In an incontinent manner; without restraint, or without due restraint; -- used esp. of the passions or appetites.

Infancy (n.) The state or condition of one under age, or under the age of twenty-one years; nonage; minority.

Infant (n.) A person who is not of full age, or who has not attained the age of legal capacity; a person under the age of twenty-one years; a minor.

Infinite (a.) Without limit in power, capacity, knowledge, or excellence; boundless; immeasurably or inconceivably great; perfect; as, the infinite wisdom and goodness of God; -- opposed to finite.

Infinite (a.) Greater than any assignable quantity of the same kind; -- said of certain quantities.

Infinite (a.) Capable of endless repetition; -- said of certain forms of the canon, called also perpetual fugues, so constructed that their ends lead to their beginnings, and the performance may be incessantly repeated.

Infundibuliform (a.) Having the form of a funnel or cone; funnel-shaped.

Infundibulum (n.) A funnel-shaped or dilated organ or part; as, the infundibulum of the brain, a hollow, conical process, connecting the floor of the third ventricle with the pituitary body; the infundibula of the lungs, the enlarged terminations of the bronchial tubes.

Ingenuous (a.) Noble; generous; magnanimous; honorable; upright; high-minded; as, an ingenuous ardor or zeal.

Inning (n.) The state or turn of being in; specifically, in cricket, baseball, etc.,the turn or time of a player or of a side at the bat; -- often in the pl. Hence: The turn or time of a person, or a party, in power; as, the Whigs went out, and the Democrats had their innings.

Insensible (a.) Not susceptible of emotion or passion; void of feeling; apathetic; unconcerned; indifferent; as, insensible to danger, fear, love, etc.; -- often used with of or to.

Insincere (a.) Not being in truth what one appears to be; not sincere; dissembling; hypocritical; disingenuous; deceitful; false; -- said of persons; also of speech, thought; etc.; as, insincere declarations.

Insinuate (v. t.) To hint; to suggest by remote allusion; -- often used derogatorily; as, did you mean to insinuate anything?

Insinuate (v. t.) To push or work (one's self), as into favor; to introduce by slow, gentle, or artful means; to ingratiate; -- used reflexively.

Insinuation (n.) The act of gaining favor, affection, or influence, by gentle or artful means; -- formerly used in a good sense, as of friendly influence or interposition.

Intend (v. t.) To fix the mind upon (something to be accomplished); to be intent upon; to mean; to design; to plan; to purpose; -- often followed by an infinitely with to, or a dependent clause with that; as, he intends to go; he intends that she shall remain.

Intension (n.) The collective attributes, qualities, or marks that make up a complex general notion; the comprehension, content, or connotation; -- opposed to extension, extent, or sphere.

Intent (a.) Closely directed; strictly attentive; bent; -- said of the mind, thoughts, etc.; as, a mind intent on self-improvement.

Intent (a.) Having the mind closely directed to or bent on an object; sedulous; eager in pursuit of an object; -- formerly with to, but now with on; as, intent on business or pleasure.

Intentioned (a.) Having designs; -- chiefly used in composition; as, well-intentioned, having good designs; ill-intentioned, having ill designs.

Intonate (v. i.) To sound the tones of the musical scale; to practice the sol-fa.

Intonation (n.) Reciting in a musical prolonged tone; intonating, or singing of the opening phrase of a plain-chant, psalm, or canticle by a single voice, as of a priest. See Intone, v. t.

Invent (v. t.) To discover, as by study or inquiry; to find out; to devise; to contrive or produce for the first time; -- applied commonly to the discovery of some serviceable mode, instrument, or machine.

Invent (v. t.) To frame by the imagination; to fabricate mentally; to forge; -- in a good or a bad sense; as, to invent the machinery of a poem; to invent a falsehood.

Jejunum (n.) The middle division of the small intestine, between the duodenum and ileum; -- so called because usually found empty after death.

Johannes (n.) A Portuguese gold coin of the value of eight dollars, named from the figure of King John which it bears; -- often contracted into joe; as, a joe, or a half joe.

Journeyman (n.) Formerly, a man hired to work by the day; now, commonly, one who has mastered a handicraft or trade; -- distinguished from apprentice and from master workman.

Juvenile (n.) A young person or youth; -- used sportively or familiarly.

Koran (n.) The Scriptures of the Mohammedans, containing the professed revelations to Mohammed; -- called also Alcoran.

Ladino (n.) One of the half-breed descendants of whites and Indians; a mestizo; -- so called throughout Central America. They are usually of a yellowish orange tinge.

Lageniform (a.) Shaped like a bottle or flask; flag-shaped.

Lamentable (a.) Miserable; pitiful; paltry; -- in a contemptuous or ridiculous sense.

Lamina (n.) A thin plate or scale; a layer or coat lying over another; -- said of thin plates or platelike substances, as of bone or minerals.

Laminarite (n.) A broad-leafed fossil alga.

Laryngotracheotomy (n.) The operation of cutting into the larynx and the upper part of the trachea, -- a frequent operation for obstruction to breathing.

Laying (n.) The first coat on laths of plasterer's two-coat work.

Learned (a.) Of or pertaining to learning; possessing, or characterized by, learning, esp. scholastic learning; erudite; well-informed; as, a learned scholar, writer, or lawyer; a learned book; a learned theory.

Leman (n.) A sweetheart, of either sex; a gallant, or a mistress; -- usually in a bad sense.

Levant (a.) Rising or having risen from rest; -- said of cattle. See Couchant and levant, under Couchant.

Liking (n.) The state of being pleased with, or attracted toward, some thing or person; hence, inclination; desire; pleasure; preference; -- often with for, formerly with to; as, it is an amusement I have no liking for.

Limoniad (n.) A nymph of the meadows; -- called also Limniad.

Laving (v. i.) Active; lively; vigorous; -- said esp. of states of the mind, and sometimes of abstract things; as, a living faith; a living principle.

Laving (v. i.) Issuing continually from the earth; running; flowing; as, a living spring; -- opposed to stagnant.

Lozenge (n.) A diamond-shaped figure usually with the upper and lower angles slightly acute, borne upon a shield or escutcheon. Cf. Fusil.

Lozenge (n.) A small cake of sugar and starch, flavored, and often medicated. -- originally in the form of a lozenge.

Lozenged (a.) Alt. of Lozenge-shaped

Lycine (n.) A weak base identical with betaine; -- so called because found in the boxthorn (Lycium barbarum). See Betaine.

Lyken (v. t.) To please; -- chiefly used impersonally.

Marinism (n.) A bombastic literary style marked by the use of metaphors and antitheses characteristic of the Italian poet Giambattista Marini (1569-1625).

Madonna (n.) My lady; -- a term of address in Italian formerly used as the equivalent of Madame, but for which Signora is now substituted. Sometimes introduced into English.

Magenta (n.) An aniMaranatha (n.) "Our Lord cometh;" -- an expression used by St. Paul at the conclusion of his first Epistle to the Corinthians (xvi. 22). This word has been used in anathematizing persons for great crimes; as much as to say, "May the Lord come quickly to take vengeance of thy crimes." See Anathema maranatha, under Anathema.

Mason (v. t.) To build stonework or brickwork about, under, in, over, etc.; to construct by masons; -- with a prepositional suffix; as, to mason up a well or terrace; to mason in a kettle or boiler.

Mayonnaise (n.) A sauce compounded of raw yolks of eggs beaten up with olive oil to the consistency of a sirup, and seasoned with vinegar, pepper, salt, etc.; -- used in dressing salads, fish, etc. Also, a dish dressed with this sauce.

Melancholia (n.) A kind of mental unsoundness characterized by extreme depression of spirits, ill-grounded fears, delusions, and brooding over one particular subject or train of ideas.

Melanian (n.) One of a family of fresh-water pectinibranchiate mollusks, having a turret-shaped shell.

Melanic (a.) Of or pertaining to the black-haired races.

MelaniMelanin (n.) A black pigment found in the pigment-bearing cells of the skin (particularly in the skin of the negro), in the epithelial cells of the external layer of the retina (then called fuscin), in the outer layer of the choroid, and elsewhere. It is supposed to be derived from the decomposition of hemoglobin.

Melanism (n.) An undue development of dark-colored pigment in the skin or its appendages; -- the opposite of albinism.

Melanochroite (n.) A mineral of a red, or brownish or yellowish red color. It is a chromate of lead; -- called also phoenicocroite.

Melanocomous (a.) Having very dark or black hair; black-haired.

Melanorrhoea (n.) An East Indian genus of large trees. Melanorrh/a usitatissima is the lignum-vitae of Pegu, and yelds a valuable black varnish.

Melanuric (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid obtained by decomposition of melam, or of urea, as a white crystalMelene (n.) An unsaturated hydrocarbon, C30H60, of the ethylene series, obtained from beeswax as a white, scaly, crystalMelenite (n.) An explosive of great destructive power; -- so called from its color, which resembles honey.

Melanoma (n.) Development of dark-pigmented tumors.

Miting (n.) A little one; -- used as a term of endearment.

Monandry (n.) The possession by a woman of only one husband at the same time; -- contrasted with polyandry.

Monanthous (a.) Having but one flower; one-flowered.

Morin (n.) A yellow crystalMoringa (n.) A genus of trees of Southern India and Northern Africa. One species (Moringa pterygosperma) is the horse-radish tree, and its seeds, as well as those of M. aptera, are known in commerce as ben or ben nuts, and yield the oil called oil of ben.

Morintannic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a variety of tannic acid extracted from fustic (Maclura, formerly Morus, tinctoria) as a yellow crystalMoron (n.) An inferior olive size having a woody pulp and a large clingstone pit, growing in the mountainous and high-valley districts around the city of Moron, in Spain.

Mutandum (n.) A thing which is to be changed; something which must be altered; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Myronic (a.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, mustard; -- used specifically to designate a glucoside called myronic acid, found in mustard seed.

Nearness (n.) The state or quality of being near; -- used in the various senses of the adjective.

Nepenthe (n.) A drug used by the ancients to give relief from pain and sorrow; -- by some supposed to have been opium or hasheesh. Hence, anything soothing and comforting.

Nepenthes (n.) A genus of climbing plants found in India, Malaya, etc., which have the leaves prolonged into a kind of stout tendril terminating in a pitcherlike appendage, whence the plants are often called pitcher plants and monkey-cups. There are about thirty species, of which the best known is Nepenthes distillatoria. See Pitcher plant.

Nonunion (a.) Not recognizing or favoring trades unions or trades-unionists; as, a nonunion contractor.

Niding (n.) A coward; a dastard; -- a term of utmost opprobrium.

Nocent (a.) Guilty; -- the opposite of innocent.

Nominative (a.) Giving a name; naming; designating; -- said of that case or form of a noun which stands as the subject of a finite verb.

Nonane (n.) One of a group of metameric hydrocarbons C9H20 of the paraffin series; -- so called because of the nine carbon atoms in the molecule. Normal nonane is a colorless volatile liquid, an ingredient of ordinary kerosene.

Nonuniformist (n.) One who believes that past changes in the structure of the earth have proceeded from cataclysms or causes more violent than are now operating; -- called also nonuniformitarian.

Notandum (n.) A thing to be noted or observed; a notable fact; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Obtundent (n.) A substance which sheathes a part, or blunts irritation, usually some bland, oily, or mucilaginous matter; -- nearly the same as demulcent.

Ocean (n.) The whole body of salt water which covers more than three fifths of the surface of the globe; -- called also the sea, or great sea.

Oceanic (a.) Of or pertaining to the ocean; found or formed in or about, or produced by, the ocean; frequenting the ocean, especially mid-ocean.

Octangular (a.) Having eight angles; eight-angled.

Odeon (n.) A kind of theater in ancient Greece, smaller than the dramatic theater and roofed over, in which poets and musicians submitted their works to the approval of the public, and contended for prizes; -- hence, in modern usage, the name of a hall for musical or dramatic performances.

Offensive (a.) Making the first attack; assailant; aggressive; hence, used in attacking; -- opposed to defensive; as, an offensive war; offensive weapons.

Offensive (n.) The state or posture of one who offends or makes attack; aggressive attitude; the act of the attacking party; -- opposed to defensive.

Oleander (n.) A beautiful evergreen shrub of the Dogbane family, having clusters of fragrant red or white flowers. It is native of the East Indies, but the red variety has become common in the south of Europe. Called also rosebay, rose laurel, and South-sea rose.

Olein (n.) A fat, liquid at ordinary temperatures, but solidifying at temperatures below 0? C., found abundantly in both the animal and vegetable kingdoms (see Palmitin). It dissolves solid fats, especially at 30-40? C. Chemically, olein is a glyceride of oleic acid; and, as three molecules of the acid are united to one molecule of glyceryl to form the fat, it is technically known as triolein. It is also called elain.

Onion (n.) A liliaceous plant of the genus Allium (A. cepa), having a strong-flavored bulb and long hollow leaves; also, its bulbous root, much used as an article of food. The name is often extended to other species of the genus.

Ordinate (a.) Well-ordered; orderly; regular; methodical.

Organ (n.) A natural part or structure in an animal or a plant, capable of performing some special action (termed its function), which is essential to the life or well-being of the whole; as, the heart, lungs, etc., are organs of animals; the root, stem, foliage, etc., are organs of plants.

Organ (n.) A wind instrument containing numerous pipes of various dimensions and kinds, which are filled with wind from a bellows, and played upon by means of keys similar to those of a piano, and sometimes by foot keys or pedals; -- formerly used in the plural, each pipe being considired an organ.

Organic (a.) Pertaining to, or denoting, any one of the large series of substances which, in nature or origin, are connected with vital processes, and include many substances of artificial production which may or may not occur in animals or plants; -- contrasted with inorganic.

Organize (v. t.) To furnish with organs; to give an organic structure to; to endow with capacity for the functions of life; as, an organized being; organized matter; -- in this sense used chiefly in the past participle.

Organize (v. t.) To arrange or constitute in parts, each having a special function, act, office, or relation; to systematize; to get into working order; -- applied to products of the human intellect, or to human institutions and undertakings, as a science, a government, an army, a war, etc.

Organogenesis (n.) The germ history of the organs and systems of organs, -- a branch of morphogeny.

Organoleptic (a.) Making an impression upon an organ; plastic; -- said of the effect or impression produced by any substance on the organs of touch, taste, or smell, and also on the organism as a whole.

Organum (n.) An organ or instrument; hence, a method by which philosophical or scientific investigation may be conducted; -- a term adopted from the Aristotelian writers by Lord Bacon, as the title ("Novum Organon") of part of his treatise on philosophical method.

Organophyly (n.) The tribal history of organs, -- a branch of morphophyly.

Orient (a.) Bright; lustrous; superior; pure; perfect; pellucid; -- used of gems and also figuratively, because the most perfect jewels are found in the East.

Oriental (a.) Of or pertaining to the orient or east; eastern; concerned with the East or Orientalism; -- opposed to occidental; as, Oriental countries.

Orpine (n.) A low plant with fleshy leaves (Sedum telephium), having clusters of purple flowers. It is found on dry, sandy places, and on old walls, in England, and has become naturalized in America. Called also stonecrop, and live-forever.

Ostensible (a.) Shown; exhibited; declared; avowed; professed; apparent; -- often used as opposed to real or actual; as, an ostensible reason, motive, or aim.

Ostentation (n.) The act of ostentating or of making an ambitious display; unnecessary show; pretentious parade; -- usually in a detractive sense.

Ourang (n.) The orang-outang.

Paranoia (n.) A chronic form of insanity characterized by very gradual impairment of the intellect, systematized delusion, and usually by delusious of persecution or mandatory delusions producing homicidal tendency. In its mild form paranoia may consist in the well-marked crotchetiness exhibited in persons commonly called "cranks." Paranoiacs usually show evidences of bodily and nervous degeneration, and many have hallucinations, esp. of sight and hearing.

Palanquin (n.) An inclosed carriage or litter, commonly about eight feet long, four feet wide, and four feet high, borne on the shoulders of men by means of two projecting poles, -- used in India, China, etc., for the conveyance of a single person from place to place.

Palingenesy (n.) A new birth; a re-creation; a regeneration; a continued existence in different manner or form.

Palingenesy (n.) That form of evolution in which the truly ancestral characters conserved by heredity are reproduced in development; original simple descent; -- distinguished from kenogenesis. Sometimes, in zoology, the abrupt metamorphosis of insects, crustaceans, etc.

Paranaphthalene (n.) Anthracene; -- called also paranaphthaParonymous (a.) Having the same derivation; allied radically; conjugate; -- said of certain words, as man, mankind, manhood, etc.

Paronymous (a.) Having a similar sound, but different orthography and different meaning; -- said of certain words, as al/ and awl; hair and hare, etc.

Parsnip (n.) The aromatic and edible spindle-shaped root of the cultivated form of the Pastinaca sativa, a biennial umbelliferous plant which is very poisonous in its wild state; also, the plant itself.

Patent (a.) Open to public perusal; -- said of a document conferring some right or privilege; as, letters patent. See Letters patent, under 3d Letter.

Patonce (a.) Having the arms growing broader and floriated toward the end; -- said of a cross. See Illust. 9 of Cross.

Pavan (n.) A stately and formal Spanish dance for which full state costume is worn; -- so called from the resemblance of its movements to those of the peacock.

Pecan (n.) A species of hickory (Carya olivaeformis), growing in North America, chiefly in the Mississippi valley and in Texas, where it is one of the largest of forest trees; also, its fruit, a smooth, oblong nut, an inch or an inch and a half long, with a thin shell and well-flavored meat.

Perennibranchiate (a.) Having branchae, or gills, through life; -- said especially of certain Amphibia, like the menobranchus. Opposed to caducibranchiate.

Petunia (n.) A genus of solanaceous herbs with funnelform or salver-shaped corollas. Two species are common in cultivation, Petunia violacera, with reddish purple flowers, and P. nyctaginiflora, with white flowers. There are also many hybrid forms with variegated corollas.

Phainopepla (n.) A small crested passerine bird (Phainopepla nitens), native of Mexico and the Southern United States. The adult male is of a uniform glossy blue-black; the female is brownish. Called also black flycatcher.

Phrenitis (n.) Inflammation of the brain, or of the meninges of the brain, attended with acute fever and delirium; -- called also cephalitis.

Pimento (n.) Allspice; -- applied both to the tree and its fruit. See Allspice.

Piping (v.) Simmering; boiling; sizzling; hissing; -- from the sound of boiling fluids.

Piping (n.) A small cord covered with cloth, -- used as trimming for women's dresses.

Plaintiff (n.) One who commences a personal action or suit to obtain a remedy for an injury to his rights; -- opposed to defendant.

Pocan (n.) The poke (Phytolacca decandra); -- called also pocan bush.

Polonaise (n.) A stately Polish dance tune, in 3-4 measure, beginning always on the beat with a quaver followed by a crotchet, and closing on the beat after a strong accent on the second beat; also, a dance adapted to such music; a polacca.

Polynomial (n.) An expression composed of two or more terms, connected by the signs plus or minus; as, a2 - 2ab + b2.

Pomander (n.) A box to contain such perfume, formerly carried by ladies, as at the end of a chain; -- more properly pomander box.

Potential (n.) In the theory of gravitation, or of other forces acting in space, a function of the rectangular coordinates which determine the position of a point, such that its differential coefficients with respect to the coordinates are equal to the components of the force at the point considered; -- also called potential function, or force function. It is called also Newtonian potential when the force is directed to a fixed center and is inversely as the square of the distance from the cen> Potential (n.) The energy of an electrical charge measured by its power to do work; hence, the degree of electrification as referred to some standard, as that of the earth; electro-motive force.

Potentiometer (n.) An instrument for measuring or comparing electrial potentials or electro-motive forces.

Powen (n.) A small British lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeoides, or C. ferus); -- called also gwyniad and lake herring.

Preen (n.) To dress with, or as with, a preen; to trim or dress with the beak, as the feathers; -- said of birds.

Prehnitic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a tetrabasic acid of benzene obtained as a white crystalPrognathous (a.) Having the jaws projecting beyond the upper part of the face; -- opposed to orthognathous. See Gnathic index, under Gnathic.

Progne (n.) An American butterfly (Polygonia, / Vanessa, Progne). It is orange and black above, grayish beneath, with an L-shaped silver mark on the hind wings. Called also gray comma.

Pyrone (n.) An unsaturated cyclic compound, C5H4O2, of which two varieties are known, / and /. /-pyrone is the parent substance of several natural yellow dyestuffs.

Pusane (n.) A piece of armor for the breast; often, an addition to, or reenforcement of. the breastplate; -- called also pesane.

Queen (n.) A woman eminent in power or attractions; the highest of her kind; as, a queen in society; -- also used figuratively of cities, countries, etc.

Quern (n.) A mill for grinding grain, the upper stone of which was turned by hand; -- used before the invention of windmills and watermills.

Quinnat (n.) The California salmon (Oncorhynchus choicha); -- called also chouicha, king salmon, chinnook salmon, and Sacramento salmon. It is of great commercial importance.

Ranine (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a swelling under the tongue; also, pertaining to the region where the swelling occurs; -- applied especially to branches of the lingual artery and lingual vein.

Rasante (a.) Sweeping; grazing; -- applied to a style of fortification in which the command of the works over each other, and over the country, is kept very low, in order that the shot may more effectually sweep or graze the ground before them.

Reconcile (v. t.) To make consistent or congruous; to bring to agreement or suitableness; -- followed by with or to.

Redingote (n.) A long plain double-breasted outside coat for women.

Redintegration (n.) The law that objects which have been previously combined as part of a single mental state tend to recall or suggest one another; -- adopted by many philosophers to explain the phenomena of the association of ideas.

Regeneration (n.) The reproduction of a part which has been removed or destroyed; re-formation; -- a process especially characteristic of a many of the lower animals; as, the regeneration of lost feelers, limbs, and claws by spiders and crabs.

Regenerator (n.) A device used in connection with hot-air engines, gas-burning furnaces, etc., in which the incoming air or gas is heated by being brought into contact with masses of iron, brick, etc., which have been previously heated by the outgoing, or escaping, hot air or gas.

Remontant (a.) Rising again; -- applied to a class of roses which bloom more than once in a season; the hybrid perpetual roses, of which the Jacqueminot is a well-known example.

Repand (a.) Having a slightly undulating margin; -- said of leaves.

Repent (a.) Prostrate and rooting; -- said of stems.

Repent (v. t.) To feel regret or sorrow; -- used reflexively.

Repent (v. t.) To cause to have sorrow or regret; -- used impersonally.

Resent (v. t.) To recognize; to perceive, especially as if by smelling; -- associated in meaning with sent, the older spelling of scent to smell. See Resent, v. i.

Resonance (n.) A prolongation or increase of any sound, either by reflection, as in a cavern or apartment the walls of which are not distant enough to return a distinct echo, or by the production of vibrations in other bodies, as a sounding-board, or the bodies of musical instruments.

Retinol (n.) A hydrocarbon oil obtained by the distillation of resin, -- used in printer's ink.

Revenge (v. i.) To take vengeance; -- with

Reconcentrado (n.) Lit., one who has been reconcentrated; specif., in Cuba, the Philippines, etc., during the revolution of 1895-98, one of the rural noncombatants who were concentrated by the military authorities in areas surrounding the fortified towns, and later were reconcentrated in the smaller limits of the towns themselves.

Reconcentration (n.) The act of reconcentrating or the state of being reconcentrated; esp., the act or policy of concentrating the rural population in or about towns and villages for convenience in political or military administration, as in Cuba during the revolution of 1895-98.

Resonator (n.) Any of various apparatus for exhibiting or utilizing the effects of resonance in connection with open circuits, as a device having an oscillating circuit which includes a helix of bare copper wire, a variable number of coils of which can be connected in circuit with a condenser and spark gap excited with an induction coil. It is used to create high-frequency electric brush discharges.

Resonator (n.) The antenna system and other high-frequency circuits of a receiving apparatus.

Rhamnaceous (a.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of shrubs and trees (Rhamnaceae, or Rhamneae) of which the buckthorn (Rhamnus) is the type. It includes also the New Jersey tea, the supple-jack, and one of the plants called lotus (Zizyphus).

Riband (n.) See Rib-band.

Ricinine (n.) A bitter white crystalRicinoleate (n.) A salt of ricinoleic acid; -- formerly called palmate.

Ricinolein (n.) The glycerin salt of ricinoleic acid, occuring as a characteristic constituent of castor oil; -- formerly called palmin.

Ricinus (n.) A genus of plants of the Spurge family, containing but one species (R. communis), the castor-oil plant. The fruit is three-celled, and contains three large seeds from which castor oil iss expressed. See Palma Christi.

Riding (n.) One of the three jurisdictions into which the county of York, in England, is divided; -- formerly under the government of a reeve. They are called the North, the East, and the West, Riding.

Ringneck (n.) Any one of several species of small plovers of the genus Aegialitis, having a ring around the neck. The ring is black in summer, but becomes brown or gray in winter. The semipalmated plover (Ae. semipalmata) and the piping plover (Ae. meloda) are common North American species. Called also ring plover, and ring-necked plover.

Ringneck (n.) The ring-necked duck.

Robin (n.) A small European singing bird (Erythacus rubecula), having a reddish breast; -- called also robin redbreast, robinet, and ruddock.

Robin (n.) An American singing bird (Merula migratoria), having the breast chestnut, or dull red. The upper parts are olive-gray, the head and tail blackish. Called also robin redbreast, and migratory thrush.

Robin (n.) Any one of several species of Australian warblers of the genera Petroica, Melanadrays, and allied genera; as, the scarlet-breasted robin (Petroica mullticolor).

Robinet (n.) The chaffinch; -- called also roberd.

Roman (a.) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters.

Roman (a.) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc.

Roman (n.) Roman type, letters, or print, collectively; -- in distinction from Italics.

Romanesque (a.) Somewhat resembling the Roman; -- applied sometimes to the debased style of the later Roman empire, but esp. to the more developed architecture prevailing from the 8th century to the 12th.

Romanic (n.) Related to the Roman people by descent; -- said especially of races and nations speaking any of the Romanic tongues.

Romantic (a.) Characterized by strangeness or variety; suggestive of adventure; suited to romance; wild; picturesque; -- applied to scenery; as, a romantic landscape.

Romanticism (n.) A fondness for romantic characteristics or peculiarities; specifically, in modern literature, an aiming at romantic effects; -- applied to the productions of a school of writers who sought to revive certain medi/val forms and methods in opposition to the so-called classical style.

Rosin (n.) The hard, amber-colored resin left after distilling off the volatile oil of turpentine; colophony.

Rumination (n.) The regurgitation of food from the stomach after it has been swallowed, -- occasionally observed as a morbid phenomenon in man.

Rytina (n.) A genus of large edentulous sirenians, allied to the dugong and manatee, including but one species (R. Stelleri); -- called also Steller's sea cow.

Sagenitic (a.) Resembling sagenite; -- applied to quartz when containing acicular crystals of other minerals, most commonly rutile, also tourmaSaSandnecker (n.) A European flounder (Hippoglossoides limandoides); -- called also rough dab, long fluke, sand fluke, and sand sucker.

Satinwood (n.) The hard, lemon-colored, fragrant wood of an East Indian tree (Chloroxylon Swietenia). It takes a lustrous finish, and is used in cabinetwork. The name is also given to the wood of a species of prickly ash (Xanthoxylum Caribaeum) growing in Florida and the West Indies.

Savine (n.) A coniferous shrub (Juniperus Sabina) of Western Asia, occasionally found also in the northern parts of the United States and in British America. It is a compact bush, with dark-colored foliage, and produces small berries having a glaucous bloom. Its bitter, acrid tops are sometimes used in medicine for gout, amenorrhoea, etc.

Saxon (n.) Also used in the sense of Anglo-Saxon.

Saxon (n.) The language of the Saxons; Anglo-Saxon.

Saxon (a.) Anglo-Saxon.

Saxonic (a.) Relating to the Saxons or Anglo- Saxons.

Saxonism (n.) An idiom of the Saxon or Anglo-Saxon language.

Salon (n.) An apartment for the reception and exhibition of works of art; hence, an annual exhibition of paintings, sculptures, etc., held in Paris by the Society of French Artists; -- sometimes called the Old Salon. New Salon is a popular name for an annual exhibition of paintings, sculptures, etc., held in Paris at the Champs de Mars, by the Societe Nationale des Beaux-Arts (National Society of Fine Arts), a body of artists who, in 1890, seceded from the Societe des Artistes Francais (Societ> Schene (n.) An Egyptian or Persian measure of length, varying from thirty-two to sixty stadia.

Science (n.) Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical world and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and functions of living tissues, etc.; -- called also natural science, and physical science.

Second (n.) The second part in a concerted piece; -- often popularly applied to the alto.

Secondary (a.) Subsequent in origin; -- said of minerals produced by alteertion or deposition subsequent to the formation of the original rocks mass; also of characters of minerals (as secondary cleavage, etc.) developed by pressure or other causes.

Secundine (n.) The afterbirth, or placenta and membranes; -- generally used in the plural.

Sedan (n.) A portable chair or covered vehicle for carrying a single person, -- usually borne on poles by two men. Called also sedan chair.

Seeing (conj. (but originally a present participle)) In view of the fact (that); considering; taking into account (that); insmuch as; since; because; -- followed by a dependent clause; as, he did well, seeing that he was so young.

Selenate (n.) A salt of selenic acid; -- formerly called also seleniate.

Selenography (n.) The science that treats of the physical features of the moon; -- corresponding to physical geography in respect to the earth.

Seminiferous (a.) Seed-bearing; producing seed; pertaining to, or connected with, the formation of semen; as, seminiferous cells or vesicles.

Seminose (n.) A carbohydrate of the glucose group found in the thickened endosperm of certain seeds, and extracted as yellow sirup having a sweetish-bitter taste.

Semuncia (n.) A Roman coin equivalent to one twenty-fourth part of a Roman pound.

Serenade (n.) Music sung or performed in the open air at nights; -- usually applied to musical entertainments given in the open air at night, especially by gentlemen, in a spirit of gallantry, under the windows of ladies.

Seventieth (a.) Next in order after the sixty-ninth; as, a man in the seventieth year of his age.

Seventieth (n.) One next in order after the sixty-ninth.

Seventy (a.) Seven times ten; one more than sixty-nine.

Sexenary (a.) Proceeding by sixes; sextuple; -- applied especially to a system of arithmetical computation in which the base is six.

Seminar (n.) A group of students engaged, under the guidance of an instructor, in original research in a particular Shrine (n.) Short for Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, a secret order professedly originated by one Kalif Alu, a son-in-law of Mohammed, at Mecca, in the year of the Hegira 25 (about 646 a. d.) In the modern order, established in the United States in 1872, only Knights Templars or thirty-second degree Masons are eligible for admission, though the order itself is not Masonic.

Shanny (n.) The European smooth blenny (Blennius pholis). It is olive-green with irregular black spots, and without appendages on the head.

Shinney (n.) The game of hockey; -- so called because of the liability of the players to receive blows on the shin.

Silence (interj.) Be silent; -- used elliptically for let there be silence, or keep silence.

Siren (n.) One of three sea nymphs, -- or, according to some writers, of two, -- said to frequent an island near the coast of Italy, and to sing with such sweetness that they lured mariners to destruction.

Siren (n.) Any long, slender amphibian of the genus Siren or family Sirenidae, destitute of hind legs and pelvis, and having permanent external gills as well as lungs. They inhabit the swamps, lagoons, and ditches of the Southern United States. The more common species (Siren lacertina) is dull lead-gray in color, and becames two feet long.

Sivan (n.) The third month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year; -- supposed to correspond nearly with our month of June.

Silencer (n.) The muffler of an internal-combustion engine.

Skein (n.) A quantity of yarn, thread, or the like, put up together, after it is taken from the reel, -- usually tied in a sort of knot.

Softness (n.) The quality or state of being soft; -- opposed to hardness, and used in the various specific senses of the adjective.

Solanine (n.) A poisonous alkaloid glucoside extracted from the berries of common nightshade (Solanum nigrum), and of bittersweet, and from potato sprouts, as a white crystalSolanoid (a.) Resembling a potato; -- said of a kind of cancer.

Solon (n.) A celebrated Athenian lawmaker, born about 638 b. c.; hence, a legislator; a publicist; -- often used ironically.

Sonant (a.) Uttered, as an element of speech, with tone or proper vocal sound, as distinguished from mere breath sound; intonated; voiced; tonic; the opposite of nonvocal, or surd; -- sid of the vowels, semivowels, liquids, and nasals, and particularly of the consonants b, d, g hard, v, etc., as compared with their cognates p, t, k, f, etc., which are called nonvocal, surd, or aspirate.

Sorgne (n.) The three-beared rocking, or whistlefish.

Sowens (n. pl.) A nutritious article of food, much used in Scotland, made from the husk of the oat by a process not unlike that by which common starch is made; -- called flummery in England.

Spawn (v. t.) To bring forth; to generate; -- used in contempt.

Spawn (v. i.) To issue, as offspring; -- used contemptuously.

Spawn (v. t.) Any product or offspring; -- used contemptuously.

Sphene (n.) A mineral found usually in thin, wedge-shaped crystals of a yellow or green to black color. It is a silicate of titanium and calcium; titanite.

Sphenogram (n.) A cuneiform, or arrow-headed, character.

Sphenoid (a.) Wedge-shaped; as, a sphenoid crystal.

Sphenoid (n.) A wedge-shaped crystal bounded by four equal isosceles triangles. It is the hemihedral form of a square pyramid.

Sphinx (n.) On Greek art and mythology, a she-monster, usually represented as having the winged body of a lion, and the face and breast of a young woman.

Sphinx (n.) Any one of numerous species of large moths of the family Sphingidae; -- called also hawk moth.

Spinnaker (n.) A large triangular sail set upon a boom, -- used when running before the wind.

Spinner (n.) A goatsucker; -- so called from the peculiar noise it makes when darting through the air.

Splendiferous (a.) Splendor-bearing; splendid.

Splenium (n.) The thickened posterior border of the corpus callosum; -- so called in allusion to its shape.

Spooney (a.) Weak-minded; demonstratively fond; as, spooney lovers.

Spooney (n.) A weak-minded or silly person; one who is foolishly fond.

Spring (v. i.) To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; -often followed by up, forth, or out.

Spring (v. t.) To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; -- often with in, out, etc.; as, to spring in a slat or a bar.

Squinancy (n.) A European perennial herb (Asperula cynanchica) with narrowly Squinch (n.) A small arch thrown across the corner of a square room to support a superimposed mass, as where an octagonal spire or drum rests upon a square tower; -- called also sconce, and sconcheon.

Squint (a.) Looking obliquely. Specifically (Med.), not having the optic axes coincident; -- said of the eyes. See Squint, n., 2.

Squint (v. i.) To have the axes of the eyes not coincident; -- to be cross-eyed.

Stannel (n.) The kestrel; -- called also standgale, standgall, stanchel, stand hawk, stannel hawk, steingale, stonegall.

Stannite (n.) A mineral of a steel-gray or iron-black color; tin pyrites. It is a sulphide of tin, copper, and iron.

Starnose (n.) A curious American mole (Condylura cristata) having the nose expanded at the end into a stellate disk; -- called also star-nosed mole.

Steinbock (n.) A small South African antelope (Nanotragus tragulus) which frequents dry, rocky districts; -- called also steenbok.

Stern (v. t.) The tail of an animal; -- now used only of the tail of a dog.

Sterned (a.) Having a stern of a particular shape; -- used in composition; as, square-sterned.

Sternson (n.) The end of a ship's keelson, to which the sternpost is bolted; -- called also stern knee.

Sthenic (a.) Strong; active; -- said especially of morbid states attended with excessive action of the heart and blood vessels, and characterized by strength and activity of the muscular and nervous system; as, a sthenic fever.

Stibnite (n.) A mineral of a lead-gray color and brilliant metallic luster, occurring in prismatic crystals; sulphide of antimony; -- called also antimony glance, and gray antimony.

Strength (n.) Power to resist force; solidity or toughness; the quality of bodies by which they endure the application of force without breaking or yielding; -- in this sense opposed to frangibility; as, the strength of a bone, of a beam, of a wall, a rope, and the like.

Strength (n.) Vigor or style; force of expression; nervous diction; -- said of literary work.

Strength (n.) Intensity; -- said of light or color.

Strength (n.) Intensity or degree of the distinguishing and essential element; spirit; virtue; excellence; -- said of liquors, solutions, etc.; as, the strength of wine or of acids.

Strong (superl.) Pertaining to, or designating, a verb which forms its preterit (imperfect) by a variation in the root vowel, and the past participle (usually) by the addition of -en (with or without a change of the root vowel); as in the verbs strive, strove, striven; break, broke, broken; drink, drank, drunk. Opposed to weak, or regular. See Weak.

Strong (superl.) Applied to forms in Anglo-Saxon, etc., which retain the old declensional endings. In the Teutonic languages the vowel stems have held the original endings most firmly, and are called strong; the stems in -n are called weak other constant stems conform, or are irregular.

Strontium (n.) A radioactive isotope of strontium produced by certain nuclear reactions, and constituting one of the prominent harmful components of radioactive fallout from nuclear explosions; also called radiostrontium. It has a half-life of 28 years.

String (n.) The String (n.) A hoax; a trumped-up or "fake" story.

Supine (a.) Lying on the back, or with the face upward; -- opposed to prone.

Supine (n.) A verbal noun; or (according to C.F.Becker), a case of the infinitive mood ending in -um and -u, that in -um being sometimes called the former supine, and that in -u the latter supine.

Surangular (a.) Above the angular bone; supra-angular; -- applied to a bone of the lower jaw in many reptiles and birds.

Swain (n.) A young man dwelling in the country; a rustic; esp., a cuntry gallant or lover; -- chiefly in poetry.

Swoon (v. i.) To sink into a fainting fit, in which there is an apparent suspension of the vital functions and mental powers; to faint; -- often with away.

Synonym (n.) An incorrect or incorrectly applied scientific name, as a new name applied to a species or genus already properly named, or a specific name preoccupied by that of another species of the same genus; -- so used in the system of nomenclature (which see) in which the correct scientific names of certain natural groups (usually genera, species, and subspecies) are regarded as determined by priority.

Synanthous (a.) Having flowers and leaves which appear at the same time; -- said of certain plants.

Syringa (n.) The mock orange; -- popularly so called because its stems were formerly used as pipestems.

Syringe (n.) A kind of small hand-pump for throwing a stream of liquid, or for purposes of aspiration. It consists of a small cylindrical barrel and piston, or a bulb of soft elastic material, with or without valves, and with a nozzle which is sometimes at the end of a flexible tube; -- used for injecting animal bodies, cleansing wounds, etc.

Syringin (n.) A glucoside found in the bark of the lilac (Syringa) and extracted as a white crystalSyringotome (n.) A small blunt-pointed bistoury, -- used in syringotomy.

Syrinx (n.) A wind instrument made of reeds tied together; -- called also pandean pipes.

Talent (v. t.) Intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture parable of the talents (Matt. xxv. 14-30).

Talon (n.) A kind of molding, concave at the bottom and convex at the top; -- usually called an ogee.

Tamandu (n.) A small ant-eater (Tamandua tetradactyla) native of the tropical parts of South America.

Tamanoir (n.) The ant-bear.

Tarantass (n.) A low four-wheeled carriage used in Russia. The carriage box rests on two long, springy poles which run from the fore to the hind axletree. When snow falls, the wheels are taken off, and the body is mounted on a sledge.

Tarantella (n.) A rapid and delirious sort of Neapolitan dance in 6-8 time, which moves in whirling triplets; -- so called from a popular notion of its being a remedy against the poisonous bite of the tarantula. Some derive its name from Taranto in Apulia.

Taring (n.) The common tern; -- called also tarret, and tarrock.

Telenergy (n.) Display of force or energy at a distance, or without contact; -- applied to mediumistic phenomena.

Telengiscope (n.) An instrument of such focal length that it may be used as an observing telescope for objects close at hand or as a long-focused microscope.

Tenant (n.) One who holds or possesses lands, or other real estate, by any kind of right, whether in fee simple, in common, in severalty, for life, for years, or at will; also, one who has the occupation or temporary possession of lands or tenements the title of which is in another; -- correlative to landlord. See Citation from Blackstone, under Tenement, 2.

Terin (n.) A small yellow singing bird, with an ash-colored head; the European siskin. Called also tarin.

Tetanin (n.) A poisonous base (ptomaine) formed in meat broth through the agency of a peculiar microbe from the wound of a person who has died of tetanus; -- so called because it produces tetanus as one of its prominent effects.

Tetanus (n.) A painful and usually fatal disease, resulting generally from a wound, and having as its principal symptom persistent spasm of the voluntary muscles. When the muscles of the lower jaw are affected, it is called locked-jaw, or lickjaw, and it takes various names from the various incurvations of the body resulting from the spasm.

Thionine (n.) An artificial red or violet dyestuff consisting of a complex sulphur derivative of certain aromatic diamines, and obtained as a dark crystalThorn (n.) A hard and sharp-pointed projection from a woody stem; usually, a branch so transformed; a spine.

Thorn (n.) The name of the Anglo-Saxon letter /, capital form /. It was used to represent both of the sounds of English th, as in thin, then. So called because it was the initial letter of thorn, a spine.

Throne (n.) A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; -- a meaning given by the schoolmen.

Titanium (n.) An elementary substance found combined in the minerals manaccanite, rutile, sphene, etc., and isolated as an infusible iron-gray amorphous powder, having a metallic luster. It burns when heated in the air. Symbol Ti. Atomic weight 48.1.

Tolane (n.) A hydrocarbon, C14H10, related both to the acetylene and the aromatic series, and produced artificially as a white crystalTrain (v.) A roll train; as, a 12-inch train.

Trainband (n.) A band or company of an organized military force instituted by James I. and dissolved by Charles II.; -- afterwards applied to the London militia.

Triangle (n.) A draughtsman's square in the form of a right-angled triangle.

Triangle (n.) A kind of frame formed of three poles stuck in the ground and united at the top, to which soldiers were bound when undergoing corporal punishment, -- now disused.

Triangulate (v. t.) To make triangular, or three-cornered.

Trionychoidea (n. pl.) A division of chelonians which comprises Trionyx and allied genera; -- called also Trionychoides, and Trionychina.

Trionyx (n.) A genus of fresh-water or river turtles which have the shell imperfectly developed and covered with a soft leathery skin. They are noted for their agility and rapacity. Called also soft tortoise, soft-shell tortoise, and mud turtle.

Triune (a.) Being three in one; -- an epithet used to express the unity of a trinity of persons in the Godhead.

Turanian (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an extensive family of languages of simple structure and low grade (called also Altaic, Ural-Altaic, and Scythian), spoken in the northern parts of Europe and Asia and Central Asia; of pertaining to, or designating, the people who speak these languages.

Twain (a. & n.) Two; -- nearly obsolete in common discourse, but used in poetry and burlesque.

Tyrant (n.) Any one of numerous species of American clamatorial birds belonging to the family Tyrannidae; -- called also tyrant bird.

Unbending (a.) Not bending; not suffering flexure; not yielding to pressure; stiff; -- applied to material things.

Unbending (a.) Unyielding in will; not subject to persuasion or influence; inflexible; resolute; -- applied to persons.

Unbending (a.) Unyielding in nature; unchangeable; fixed; -- applied to abstract ideas; as, unbending truths.

Unconscious (a.) Having no knowledge by experience; -- followed by of; as, a mule unconscious of the yoke.

Unmanned (a.) Not tamed; not made familiar with, or subject to, man; -- also used figuratively.

Unmannerly (a.) Not mannerly; ill-bred; rude.

Upland (n.) High land; ground elevated above the meadows and intervals which lie on the banks of rivers, near the sea, or between hills; land which is generally dry; -- opposed to lowland, meadow, marsh, swamp, interval, and the like.

Vaginopennous (a.) Having elytra; sheath-winged.

Valency (n.) A unit of combining power; a so-called bond of affinity.

Valentinian (n.) One of a school of Judaizing Gnostics in the second century; -- so called from Valentinus, the founder.

Veranda (n.) An open, roofed gallery or portico, adjoining a dwelling house, forming an out-of-door sitting room. See Loggia.

Volante (n.) A two-wheeled carriage formerly much used in Cuba. The body is in front of the axle; the driver rides on the horse.

Voluntarism (n.) Any theory which conceives will to be the dominant factor in experience or in the constitution of the world; -- contrasted with intellectualism. Schopenhauer and Fichte are typical exponents of the two types of metaphysical voluntarism, Schopenhauer teaching that the evolution of the universe is the activity of a blind and irrational will, Fichte holding that the intelligent activity of the ego is the fundamental fact of reality.

Vidonia (n.) A dry white wine, of a tart flavor, produced in Teneriffe; -- called also Teneriffe.

Vigonia (a.) Of or pertaining to the vicu/a; characterizing the vicu/a; -- said of the wool of that animal, used in felting hats, and for other purposes.

Vixen (n.) A cross, ill-tempered person; -- formerly used of either sex, now only of a woman.

Volante (n.) A cumbrous two-wheeled pleasure carriage used in Cuba.

Volunteer (a.) One who enters into service voluntarily, but who, when in service, is subject to discipWapinschaw (n.) An exhibition of arms. according to the rank of the individual, by all persons bearing arms; -- formerly made at certain seasons in each district.

Wigan (n.) A kind of canvaslike cotton fabric, used to stiffen and protect the lower part of trousers and of the skirts of women's dresses, etc.; -- so called from Wigan, the name of a town in Lancashire, England.

Witenagemote (n.) A meeting of wise men; the national council, or legislature, of England in the days of the Anglo-Saxons, before the Norman Conquest.

Woman (n.) An adult female person; a grown-up female person, as distinguished from a man or a child; sometimes, any female person.

Woman (v. t.) To act the part of a woman in; -- with indefinite it.

Womanish (a.) Suitable to a woman, having the qualities of a woman; effeminate; not becoming a man; -- usually in a reproachful sense. See the Note under Effeminate.

Xenon (n.) A very heavy, inert gaseous element occurring in the atmosphere in the proportion of one volume is about 20 millions. It was discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898. It can be condensed to a liquid boiling at -109? C., and to a solid which volatilizes without melting. Symbol Xe or X; atomic weight 130.2.

Xeronic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid, C8H12O4, related to fumaric acid, and obtained from citraconic acid as an oily substance having a bittersweet taste; -- so called from its tendency to form its anhydride.

Xylanthrax (n.) Wood coal, or charcoal; -- so called in distinction from mineral coal.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.