Words whose 5th letter is W

Archwise (adv.) Arch-shaped.

Arrowhead (n.) An aquatic plant of the genus Sagittaria, esp. S. sagittifolia, -- named from the shape of the leaves.

Arrowwood (n.) A shrub (Viburnum dentatum) growing in damp woods and thickets; -- so called from the long, straight, slender shoots.

Askew (adv. & a.) Awry; askance; asquint; oblique or obliquely; -- sometimes indicating scorn, or contempt, or entry.

Backwardation (n.) The seller's postponement of delivery of stock or shares, with the consent of the buyer, upon payment of a premium to the latter; -- also, the premium so paid. See Contango.

Bellwort (n.) A genus of plants (Uvularia) with yellowish bell-shaped flowers.

Bluewing (n.) The blue-winged teal. See Teal.

Bretwalda (n.) The official title applied to that one of the Anglo-Saxon chieftains who was chosen by the other chiefs to lead them in their warfare against the British tribes.

Bullwort (n.) See Bishop's-weed.

Catawba (n.) A light-colored, sprightly American wine from the Catawba grape.

Damewort (n.) A cruciferrous plant (Hesperis matronalis), remarkable for its fragrance, especially toward the close of the day; -- called also rocket and dame's violet.

Danewort (n.) A fetid European species of elder (Sambucus Ebulus); dwarf elder; wallwort; elderwort; -- called also Daneweed, Dane's weed, and Dane's-blood. [Said to grow on spots where battles were fought against the Danes.]

Dasewe (v. i.) To become dim-sighted; to become dazed or dazzled.

Delaware (n.) An American grape, with compact bunches of small, amber-colored berries, sweet and of a good flavor.

Duckweed (n.) A genus (Lemna) of small plants, seen floating in great quantity on the surface of stagnant pools fresh water, and supposed to furnish food for ducks; -- called also duckmeat.

Endow (v. t.) To enrich or furnish with anything of the nature of a gift (as a quality or faculty); -- followed by with, rarely by of; as, man is endowed by his Maker with reason; to endow with privileges or benefits.

Endowment (n.) That which is given or bestowed upon the person or mind; gift of nature; accomplishment; natural capacity; talents; -- usually in the plural.

Farewell (interj.) Go well; good-by; adieu; -- originally applied to a person departing, but by custom now applied both to those who depart and those who remain. It is often separated by the pronoun; as, fare you well; and is sometimes used as an expression of separation only; as, farewell the year; farewell, ye sweet groves; that is, I bid you farewell.

Farewell (n.) A wish of happiness or welfare at parting; the parting compliment; a good-by; adieu.

Farewell (n.) Act of departure; leave-taking; a last look at, or reference to something.

Firewarden (n.) An officer who has authority to direct in the extinguishing of fires, or to order what precautions shall be taken against fires; -- called also fireward.

Fireweed (n.) The great willow-herb (Epilobium spicatum).

Fireworm (n.) The larva of a small tortricid moth which eats the leaves of the cranberry, so that the vines look as if burned; -- called also cranberry worm.

Flyaway (a.) Disposed to fly away; flighty; unrestrained; light and free; -- used of both persons and things.

Fluework (n.) A general name for organ stops in which the sound is caused by wind passing through a flue or fissure and striking an edge above; -- in distinction from reedwork.

Forewit (n.) A leader, or would-be leader, in matters of knowledge or taste.

Freewheel (v. i.) To operate like a freewheel, so that one part moves freely over another which normally moves with it; -- said of a clutch.

Fromwards (prep.) A way from; -- the contrary of toward.

Gangway (v. i.) That part of the spar deck of a vessel on each side of the booms, from the quarter-deck to the forecastle; -- more properly termed the waist.

Gnatworm (n.) The aquatic larva of a gnat; -- called also, colloquially, wiggler.

Goutwort (n.) A coarse umbelliferous plant of Europe (Aegopodium Podagraria); -- called also bishop's weed, ashweed, and herb gerard.

Hawkweed (n.) A plant of the genus Hieracium; -- so called from the ancient belief that birds of prey used its juice to strengthen their vision.

Headwater (n.) The source and upper part of a stream; -- commonly used in the plural; as, the headwaters of the Missouri.

Honewort (n.) An umbelliferous plant of the genus Sison (S. Amomum); -- so called because used to cure a swelling called a hone.

Ironwork (n.) Anything made of iron; -- a general name of such parts or pieces of a building, vessel, carriage, etc., as consist of iron.

Knapweed (n.) The black centaury (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the knoblike heads of flowers. Called also bullweed.

Leadwort (n.) A genus of maritime herbs (Plumbago). P. Europaea has lead-colored spots on the leaves, and nearly lead-colored flowers.

Lungwort (n.) An herb of the genus Pulmonaria (P. officinalis), of Europe; -- so called because the spotted appearance of the leaves resembles that of a diseased lung.

Moonwort (n.) Any fern of the genus Botrychium, esp. B. Lunaria; -- so named from the crescent-shaped segments of its frond.

Muckworm (n.) A larva or grub that lives in muck or manure; -- applied to the larvae of the tumbledung and allied beetles.

Neckweed (n.) The hemp; -- so called as furnishing ropes for hanging criminals.

Papaw (n.) A tree (Carica Papaya) of tropical America, belonging to the order Passifloreae. It has a soft, spongy stem, eighteen or twenty feet high, crowned with a tuft of large, long-stalked, palmately lobed leaves. The milky juice of the plant is said to have the property of making meat tender. Also, its dull orange-colored, melon-shaped fruit, which is eaten both raw and cooked or pickled.

Pillwort (n.) Any plant of the genus Pilularia; minute aquatic cryptograms, with small pill-shaped fruit; -- sometimes called peppergrass.

Pipewort (n.) Any plant of a genus (Eriocaulon) of aquatic or marsh herbs with soft grass-like leaves.

Pockwood (n.) Lignum-vitae.

Poldway (n.) A kind of coarse bagging, -- used for coal sacks.

Polewig (n.) The European spotted goby (Gobius minutus); -- called also pollybait.

Pondweed (n.) Any aquatic plant of the genus Potamogeton, of which many species are found in ponds or slow-moving rivers.

Porkwood (n.) The coarse-grained brownish yellow wood of a small tree (Pisonia obtusata) of Florida and the West Indies. Also called pigeon wood, beefwood, and corkwood.

Pshaw (interj.) Pish! pooch! -- an exclamation used as an expression of contempt, disdain, dislike, etc.

Redowa (n.) A Bohemian dance of two kinds, one in triple time, like a waltz, the other in two-four time, like a polka. The former is most in use.

Renown (v.) The state of being much known and talked of; exalted reputation derived from the extensive praise of great achievements or accomplishments; fame; celebrity; -- always in a good sense.

Richweed (n.) An herb (Pilea pumila) of the Nettle family, having a smooth, juicy, pellucid stem; -- called also clearweed.

Ringworm (n.) A contagious affection of the skin due to the presence of a vegetable parasite, and forming ring-shaped discolored patches covered with vesicles or powdery scales. It occurs either on the body, the face, or the scalp. Different varieties are distinguished as Tinea circinata, Tinea tonsurans, etc., but all are caused by the same parasite (a species of Trichophyton).

Rockweed (n.) Any coarse seaweed growing on sea-washed rocks, especially Fucus.

Screw (n.) A cylinder, or a cylindrical perforation, having a continuous rib, called the thread, winding round it spirally at a constant inclination, so as to leave a continuous spiral groove between one turn and the next, -- used chiefly for producing, when revolved, motion or pressure in the direction of its axis, by the sliding of the threads of the cylinder in the grooves between the threads of the perforation adapted to it, the former being distinguished as the external, or male screw, or> Screw (n.) Specifically, a kind of nail with a spiral thread and a head with a nick to receive the end of the screw-driver. Screws are much used to hold together pieces of wood or to fasten something; -- called also wood screws, and screw nails. See also Screw bolt, below.

Screw (n.) An unsound or worn-out horse, useful as a hack, and commonly of good appearance.

Shipworm (n.) Any long, slender, worm-shaped bivalve mollusk of Teredo and allied genera. The shipworms burrow in wood, and are destructive to wooden ships, piles of wharves, etc. See Teredo.

Shrewd (superl.) Able or clever in practical affairs; sharp in business; astute; sharp-witted; sagacious; keen; as, a shrewd observer; a shrewd design; a shrewd reply.

Sinewed (a.) Furnished with sinews; as, a strong-sinewed youth.

Slopwork (n.) The manufacture of slops, or cheap ready-made clothing; also, such clothing; hence, hasty, slovenly work of any kind.

Soapwort (n.) A common plant (Saponaria officinalis) of the Pink family; -- so called because its bruised leaves, when agitated in water, produce a lather like that from soap. Called also Bouncing Bet.

Squaw (n.) A female; a woman; -- in the language of Indian tribes of the Algonquin family, correlative of sannup.

Squawroot (n.) A scaly parasitic plant (Conopholis Americana) found in oak woods in the United States; -- called also cancer root.

Starwort (n.) A small plant of the genus Stellaria, having star-shaped flowers; star flower; chickweed.

Strew (v. t.) To scatter; to spread by scattering; to cast or to throw loosely apart; -- used of solids, separated or separable into parts or particles; as, to strew seed in beds; to strew sand on or over a floor; to strew flowers over a grave.

Strewing (n.) Anything that is, or may be, strewed; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Throw (v. t.) To fling, cast, or hurl with a certain whirling motion of the arm, to throw a ball; -- distinguished from to toss, or to bowl.

Throw (v. t.) To bring forth; to produce, as young; to bear; -- said especially of rabbits.

Throw (v. t.) To twist two or more filaments of, as silk, so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; -- sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.

Throw (n.) The amount of vertical displacement produced by a fault; -- according to the direction it is designated as an upthrow, or a downthrow.

Unlawed (a.) Not having the claws and balls of the forefeet cut off; -- said of dogs.

Volow (v. t.) To baptize; -- used in contempt by the Reformers.

Weetweet (n.) A throwing toy, or implement, of the Australian aborigines, consisting of a cigar-shaped stick fastened at one end to a flexible twig. It weighs in all about two ounces, and is about two feet long.

Widow (v. t.) To reduce to the condition of a widow; to bereave of a husband; -- rarely used except in the past participle.

Windward (n.) The point or side from which the wind blows; as, to ply to the windward; -- opposed to leeward.

Wink (v. i.) To avoid taking notice, as if by shutting the eyes; to connive at anything; to be tolerant; -- generally with at.

Wireworm (n.) One of the larvae of various species of snapping beetles, or elaters; -- so called from their slenderness and the uncommon hardness of the integument. Wireworms are sometimes very destructive to the roots of plants. Called also wire grub.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.