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Path: C:\ File Mask: dictionary5.txt Regular Expression Processing file : C:\dictionary5.txt Abiogenesis (n.) The supposed origination of living organisms from lifeless matter; such genesis as does not involve the action of living parents; spontaneous generation; -- called also abiogeny, and opposed to biogenesis.

Abutment (n.) In breech-loading firearms, the block behind the barrel which receives the pressure due to recoil.

Accede (v. i.) To approach; to come forward; -- opposed to recede.

Accelerate (v. t.) To cause to move faster; to quicken the motion of; to add to the speed of; -- opposed to retard.

Acceleration (n.) The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated; increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to retardation.

Accuse (v. t.) to charge with an offense, judicially or by a public process; -- with of; as, to accuse one of a high crime or misdemeanor.

Acquiesce (v. i.) To rest satisfied, or apparently satisfied, or to rest without opposition and discontent (usually implying previous opposition or discontent); to accept or consent by silence or by omitting to object; -- followed by in, formerly also by with and to.

Acquiescence (n.) A silent or passive assent or submission, or a submission with apparent content; -- distinguished from avowed consent on the one hand, and on the other, from opposition or open discontent; quiet satisfaction.

Acroceraunian (a.) Of or pertaining to the high mountain range of "thunder-smitten" peaks (now Kimara), between Epirus and Macedonia.

Acropetal (a.) Developing from below towards the apex, or from the circumference towards the center; centripetal; -- said of certain inflorescence.

Active (a.) Having the power or quality of acting; causing change; communicating action or motion; acting; -- opposed to passive, that receives; as, certain active principles; the powers of the mind.

Active (a.) In action; actually proceeding; working; in force; -- opposed to quiescent, dormant, or extinct; as, active laws; active hostilities; an active volcano.

Active (a.) Given to action; constantly engaged in action; energetic; diligent; busy; -- opposed to dull, sluggish, indolent, or inert; as, an active man of business; active mind; active zeal.

Active (a.) Requiring or implying action or exertion; -- opposed to sedentary or to tranquil; as, active employment or service; active scenes.

Active (a.) Given to action rather than contemplation; practical; operative; -- opposed to speculative or theoretical; as, an active rather than a speculative statesman.

Active (a.) Applied to a form of the verb; -- opposed to passive. See Active voice, under Voice.

Acuate (a.) Sharpened; sharp-pointed.

Adducent (a.) Bringing together or towards a given point; -- a word applied to those muscles of the body which pull one part towards another. Opposed to abducent.

Admire (v. i.) To wonder; to marvel; to be affected with surprise; -- sometimes with at.

Adnate (a.) Growing together; -- said only of organic cohesion of unlike parts.

Adnate (a.) Growing with one side adherent to a stem; -- a term applied to the lateral zooids of corals and other compound animals.

Advice (n.) Information or notice given; intelligence; as, late advices from France; -- commonly in the plural.

Advise (v. t.) To give information or notice to; to inform; -- with of before the thing communicated; as, we were advised of the risk.

Advise (v. t.) To take counsel; to consult; -- followed by with; as, to advise with friends.

Aeronef (n.) A power-driven, heavier-than-air flying machine.

Aeriferous (a.) Conveying or containing air; air-bearing; as, the windpipe is an aeriferous tube.

Aesthesia (n.) Perception by the senses; feeling; -- the opposite of anaesthesia.

Aesthesodic (a.) Conveying sensory or afferent impulses; -- said of nerves.

Afferent (a.) Bearing or conducting inwards to a part or organ; -- opposed to efferent; as, afferent vessels; afferent nerves, which convey sensations from the external organs to the brain.

Aggrieve (v. t.) To give pain or sorrow to; to afflict; hence, to oppress or injure in one's rights; to bear heavily upon; -- now commonly used in the passive TO be aggrieved.

Alienee (n.) One to whom the title of property is transferred; -- opposed to alienor.

Alkekengi (n.) An herbaceous plant of the nightshade family (Physalis alkekengi) and its fruit, which is a well flavored berry, the size of a cherry, loosely inclosed in a enlarged leafy calyx; -- also called winter cherry, ground cherry, and strawberry tomato.

Alliteration (n.) The repetition of the same letter at the beginning of two or more words immediately succeeding each other, or at short intervals; as in the following Allude (v. i.) To refer to something indirectly or by suggestion; to have reference to a subject not specifically and plainly mentioned; -- followed by to; as, the story alludes to a recent transaction.

Ambidexter (n.) A double-dealer; one equally ready to act on either side in party disputes.

Ambidexterity (n.) Double-dealing.

Ambidextral (a.) Pertaining equally to the right-hand side and the left-hand side.

Ambilevous (a.) Left-handed on both sides; clumsy; -- opposed to ambidexter.

Ammite (n.) Oolite or roestone; -- written also hammite.

Ampere (n.) The unit of electric current; -- defined by the International Electrical Congress in 1893 and by U. S. Statute as, one tenth of the unit of current of the C. G. S. system of electro-magnetic units, or the practical equivalent of the unvarying current which, when passed through a standard solution of nitrate of silver in water, deposits silver at the rate of 0.001118 grams per second. Called also the international ampere.

Anatreptic (a.) Overthrowing; defeating; -- applied to Plato's refutative dialogues.

Ancile (n.) The sacred shield of the Romans, said to have-fallen from heaven in the reign of Numa. It was the palladium of Rome.

Ancone (n.) The corner or quoin of a wall, cross-beam, or rafter.

Antares (n.) The principal star in Scorpio: -- called also the Scorpion's Heart.

Antepenultima (n.) The last syllable of a word except two, as -syl- in monosyllable.

Antiperistaltic (a.) Opposed to, or checking motion; acting upward; -- applied to an inverted action of the intestinal tube.

Antirenter (n.) One opposed to the payment of rent; esp. one of those who in 1840-47 resisted the collection of rents claimed by the patroons from the settlers on certain manorial lands in the State of New York.

Appetency (n.) Natural tendency; affinity; attraction; -- used of inanimate objects.

Arable (a.) Fit for plowing or tillage; -- hence, often applied to land which has been plowed or tilled.

Archaeolithic (a.) Of or pertaining to the earliest Stone age; -- applied to a prehistoric period preceding the Paleolithic age.

Armament (n.) A body of forces equipped for war; -- used of a land or naval force.

Arrive (v. i.) To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from.

Ashore (adv.) On shore or on land; on the land adjacent to water; to the shore; to the land; aground (when applied to a ship); -- sometimes opposed to aboard or afloat.

Aspire (v. t.) To desire with eagerness; to seek to attain something high or great; to pant; to long; -- followed by to or after, and rarely by at; as, to aspire to a crown; to aspire after immorality.

Assize (n.) The periodical sessions of the judges of the superior courts in every county of England for the purpose of administering justice in the trial and determination of civil and criminal cases; -- usually in the plural.

Assize (n.) The time or place of holding the court of assize; -- generally in the plural, assizes.

Assumed (a.) Pretended; hypocritical; make-believe; as, an assumed character.

Augite (n.) A variety of pyroxene, usually of a black or dark green color, occurring in igneous rocks, such as basalt; -- also used instead of the general term pyroxene.

Aurated (a.) Resembling or containing gold; gold-colored; gilded.

Auriferous (a.) Gold-bearing; containing or producing gold.

Aurocephalous (a.) Having a gold-colored head.

Autogenetic (a.) Pertaining to, controlled by, or designating, a system of self-determined drainage.

Autofecundation (n.) Self-impregnation.

Autogeneal (a.) Self-produced; autogenous.

Autogenetic (a.) Relating to autogenesis; self-generated.

Autogenous (a.) Self-generated; produced independently.

Aviate (v. i.) To fly, or navigate the air, in an aeroplane or heavier-than-air flying machine.

Backset (v. i.) To plow again, in the fall; -- said of prairie land broken up in the spring.

Bakemeat (n.) Alt. of Baked-meat

Baldhead (n.) A white-headed variety of pigeon.

Barbiers (n.) A variety of paralysis, peculiar to India and the Malabar coast; -- considered by many to be the same as beriberi in chronic form.

Barque (n.) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.

Barometz (n.) The woolly-skinned rhizoma or rootstock of a fern (Dicksonia barometz), which, when specially prepared and inverted, somewhat resembles a lamb; -- called also Scythian lamb.

Baroness (n.) A baron's wife; also, a lady who holds the baronial title in her own right; as, the Baroness Burdett-Coutts.

Basque (n.) A part of a lady's dress, resembling a jacket with a short skirt; -- probably so called because this fashion of dress came from the Basques.

Batule (n.) A springboard in a circus or gymnasium; -- called also batule board.

Baffle (n.) A grating or plate across a channel or pipe conveying water, gas, or the like, by which the flow is rendered more uniform in different parts of the cross section of the stream; -- used in measuring the rate of flow, as by means of a weir.

Beadle (v.) A messenger or crier of a court; a servitor; one who cites or bids persons to appear and answer; -- called also an apparitor or summoner.

Bearberry (n.) A trailing plant of the heath family (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), having leaves which are tonic and astringent, and glossy red berries of which bears are said to be fond.

Become (v. t.) To suit or be suitable to; to be congruous with; to befit; to accord with, in character or circumstances; to be worthy of, or proper for; to cause to appear well; -- said of persons and things.

Beetle (v. t.) A machine in which fabrics are subjected to a hammering process while passing over rollers, as in cotton mills; -- called also beetling machine.

Beetlehead (n.) The black-bellied plover, or bullhead (Squatarola helvetica). See Plover.

Before (prep.) Preceding in time; earlier than; previously to; anterior to the time when; -- sometimes with the additional idea of purpose; in order that.

Before (adv.) On the fore part; in front, or in the direction of the front; -- opposed to in the rear.

Beforehand (adv.) In a state of anticipation ore preoccupation; in advance; -- often followed by with.

Begone (p. p.) Surrounded; furnished; beset; environed (as in woe-begone).

Behave (v. t.) To carry; to conduct; to comport; to manage; to bear; -- used reflexively.

Bellied (a.) Having (such) a belly; puffed out; -- used in composition; as, pot-bellied; shad-bellied.

Betake (v. t.) To have recourse to; to apply; to resort; to go; -- with a reflexive pronoun.

Bethlehem (n.) A hospital for lunatics; -- corrupted into bedlam.

Berseem (n.) An Egyptian clover (Trifolium alexandrinum) extensively cultivated as a forage plant and soil-renewing crop in the alkaBeurre (n.) A beurre (or buttery) pear, one with the meat soft and melting; -- used with a distinguishing word; as, Beurre d'Anjou; Beurre Clairgeau.

Beware (v. i.) To be on one's guard; to be cautious; to take care; -- commonly followed by of or lest before the thing that is to be avoided.

Birdie (n.) A pretty or dear little bird; -- a pet name.

Bladder (n.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air.

Blather (n.) Voluble, foolish, or nonsensical talk; -- often in the pl.

Blather (n.) Voluble, foolish, or nonsensical talk; -- often in the pl.

Bleareyedness (n.) The state of being blear-eyed.

Blende (n.) A mineral, called also sphalerite, and by miners mock lead, false galena, and black-jack. It is a zinc sulphide, but often contains some iron. Its color is usually yellow, brown, or black, and its luster resinous.

Bloater (n.) The common herring, esp. when of large size, smoked, and half dried; -- called also bloat herring.

Blonde (v. t.) Of a fair color; light-colored; as, blond hair; a blond complexion.

Blonde (n.) A kind of silk lace originally of the color of raw silk, now sometimes dyed; -- called also blond lace.

Bloomer (n.) A costume for women, consisting of a short dress, with loose trousers gathered round ankles, and (commonly) a broad-brimmed hat.

Blouse (n.) A light, loose over-garment, like a smock frock, worn especially by workingmen in France; also, a loose coat of any material, as the undress uniform coat of the United States army.

Blowze (n.) A ruddy, fat-faced woman; a wench.

Blowzed (a.) Having high color from exposure to the weather; ruddy-faced; blowzy; disordered.

Blubber (v. t.) To give vent to (tears) or utter (broken words or cries); -- with forth or out.

Bluebeard (n.) The hero of a mediaeval French nursery legend, who, leaving home, enjoined his young wife not to open a certain room in his castle. She entered it, and found the murdered bodies of his former wives. -- Also used adjectively of a subject which it is forbidden to investigate.

Bluebell (n.) A plant of the genus Campanula, especially the Campanula rotundifolia, which bears blue bell-shaped flowers; the harebell.

Boaster (n.) A stone mason's broad-faced chisel.

Bodice (n.) A close-fitting outer waist or vest forming the upper part of a woman's dress, or a portion of it.

Bolometer (n.) An instrument for measuring minute quantities of radiant heat, especially in different parts of the spectrum; -- called also actinic balance, thermic balance.

Bolster (n.) A long pillow or cushion, used to support the head of a person lying on a bed; -- generally laid under the pillows.

Bolster (v. t.) To support, hold up, or maintain with difficulty or unusual effort; -- often with up.

Bolthead (n.) A long, straight-necked, glass vessel for chemical distillations; -- called also a matrass or receiver.

Bonesetter (n.) One who sets broken or dislocated bones; -- commonly applied to one, not a regular surgeon, who makes an occupation of setting bones.

Borele (n.) The smaller two-horned rhinoceros of South Africa (Atelodus bicornis).

Boride (n.) A binary compound of boron with a more positive or basic element or radical; -- formerly called boruret.

Bottlehead (n.) A cetacean allied to the grampus; -- called also bottle-nosed whale.

Bottleholder (n.) One who attends a pugilist in a prize fight; -- so called from the bottle of water of which he has charge.

Booster (n.) An instrument for regulating the electro-motive force in an alternating-current circuit; -- so called because used to "boost", or raise, the pressure in the circuit.

Bracket (n.) One of two characters [], used to inclose a reference, explanation, or note, or a part to be excluded from a sentence, to indicate an interpolation, to rectify a mistake, or to supply an omission, and for certain other purposes; -- called also crotchet.

Breeze (n.) A light, gentle wind; a fresh, soft-blowing wind.

Briarean (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, Briareus, a giant fabled to have a hundred hands; hence, hundred-handed or many-handed.

Bridge (n.) A low wall or vertical partition in the fire chamber of a furnace, for deflecting flame, etc.; -- usually called a bridge wall.

Bridge (v. t.) To find a way of getting over, as a difficulty; -- generally with over.

Bridgehead (n.) A fortification commanding the extremity of a bridge nearest the enemy, to insure the preservation and usefulness of the bridge, and prevent the enemy from crossing; a tete-de-pont.

Bridle (v. i.) To hold up the head, and draw in the chin, as an expression of pride, scorn, or resentment; to assume a lofty manner; -- usually with up.

Brimmed (a.) Having a brim; -- usually in composition.

Brocket (n.) A male red deer two years old; -- sometimes called brock.

Bronzewing (n.) An Australian pigeon of the genus Phaps, of several species; -- so called from its bronze plumage.

Brother (n.) One related or closely united to another by some common tie or interest, as of rank, profession, membership in a society, toil, suffering, etc.; -- used among judges, clergymen, monks, physicians, lawyers, professors of religion, etc.

Brotherhood (n.) The whole body of persons engaged in the same business, -- especially those of the same profession; as, the legal or medical brotherhood.

Browse (n.) To eat or nibble off, as the tender branches of trees, shrubs, etc.; -- said of cattle, sheep, deer, and some other animals.

Bracket (n.) A figure determined by firing a projectile beyond a target and another short of it, as a basis for ascertaining the proper elevation of the piece; -- only used in the phrase, to establish a bracket. After the bracket is established shots are fired with intermediate elevations until the exact range is obtained. In the United States navy it is called fork.

Broche (a.) Stitched; -- said of a book with no cover or only a paper one.

Bubbler (n.) A fish of the Ohio river; -- so called from the noise it makes.

Buckle (n.) To prepare for action; to apply with vigor and earnestness; -- generally used reflexively.

Buckler (n.) A block of wood or plate of iron made to fit a hawse hole, or the circular opening in a half-port, to prevent water from entering when the vessel pitches.

Bullhead (n.) A fresh-water fish of many species, of the genus Uranidea, esp. U. gobio of Europe, and U. Richardsoni of the United States; -- called also miller's thumb.

Bullhead (n.) In America, several species of Amiurus; -- called also catfish, horned pout, and bullpout.

Bullhead (n.) The black-bellied plover (Squatarola helvetica); -- called also beetlehead.

Bumblebee (n.) A large bee of the genus Bombus, sometimes called humblebee; -- so named from its sound.

Bundle (v. i.) To sleep on the same bed without undressing; -- applied to the custom of a man and woman, especially lovers, thus sleeping.

Bungle (v. t.) To make or mend clumsily; to manage awkwardly; to botch; -- sometimes with up.

Burgee (n.) A swallow-tailed flag; a distinguishing pennant, used by cutters, yachts, and merchant vessels.

Business (n.) Affair; concern; matter; -- used in an indefinite sense, and modified by the connected words.

Bustle (n.) A kind of pad or cushion worn on the back below the waist, by women, to give fullness to the skirts; -- called also bishop, and tournure.

Buxine (n.) An alkaloid obtained from the Buxus sempervirens, or common box tree. It is identical with bebeerine; -- called also buxina.

Cabaret (n.) a type of restaurant where liquor and dinner is served, and entertainment is provided, as by musicians, dancers, or comedians, and providing space for dancing by the patrons; -- similar to a nightclub. The term cabaret is often used in the names of such an establishment.

Cadaverine () Alt. of -in

Candlepin (n.) The game played with such pins; -- in form candlepins, used as a singular.

Calaverite (n.) A bronze-yellow massive mineral with metallic luster; a telluride of gold; -- first found in Calaveras County California.

Calipers (n. pl.) An instrument, usually resembling a pair of dividers or compasses with curved legs, for measuring the diameter or thickness of bodies, as of work shaped in a lathe or planer, timber, masts, shot, etc.; or the bore of firearms, tubes, etc.; -- called also caliper compasses, or caliber compasses.

Calmness (n.) The state of quality of being calm; quietness; tranquillity; self-repose.

Candlefish (n.) A marine fish (Thaleichthys Pacificus), allied to the smelt, found on the north Pacific coast; -- called also eulachon. It is so oily that, when dried, it may be used as a candle, by drawing a wick through it

Candlemas (n.) The second day of February, on which is celebrated the feast of the Purification of the Virgin Mary; -- so called because the candles for the altar or other sacred uses are blessed on that day.

Capape (adv.) See Cap-a-pie.

Carafe (n.) A glass water bottle for the table or toilet; -- called also croft.

Caravel (n.) A Turkish man-of-war.

Careless (a.) Free from care or anxiety. hence, cheerful; light-hearted.

Centreboard (n.) A movable or sliding keel formed of a broad board or slab of wood or metal which may be raised into a water-tight case amidships, when in shallow water, or may be lowered to increase the area of lateral resistance and prevent leeway when the vessel is beating to windward. It is used in vessels of all sizes along the coast of the United States

Cerise (a.) Cherry-colored; a light bright red; -- applied to textile fabrics, especially silk.

Cerite (n.) A gastropod shell belonging to the family Cerithiidae; -- so called from its hornlike form.

Cerite (n.) A mineral of a brownish of cherry-red color, commonly massive. It is a hydrous silicate of cerium and allied metals.

Cerulean (a.) Sky-colored; blue; azure.

Chasse (n.) A small potion of spirituous liquor taken to remove the taste of coffee, tobacco, or the like; -- originally chasse-cafe, lit., "coffee chaser."

Chasse (n.) A small potion of spirituous liquor taken to remove the taste of coffee, tobacco, or the like; -- originally chasse-cafe, lit., "coffee chaser."

Chaise (n.) A two-wheeled carriage for two persons, with a calash top, and the body hung on leather straps, or thorough-braces. It is usually drawn by one horse.

Chaldean (n.) A learned man, esp. an astrologer; -- so called among the Eastern nations, because astrology and the kindred arts were much cultivated by the Chaldeans.

Chamber (n.) That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from the rest of the bore; -- formerly, in guns, made smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in breech-loading guns.

Chance (n.) A supposed material or psychical agent or mode of activity other than a force, law, or purpose; fortune; fate; -- in this sense often personified.

Chance (n.) A possibility; a likelihood; an opportunity; -- with reference to a doubtful result; as, a chance to escape; a chance for life; the chances are all against him.

Chance (v. t.) To take the chances of; to venture upon; -- usually with it as object.

Change (v. t.) To give and take reciprocally; to exchange; -- followed by with; as, to change place, or hats, or money, with another.

Change (v. i.) To pass from one phase to another; as, the moon changes to-morrow night.

Charge (v. t.) Whatever constitutes a burden on property, as rents, taxes, Charge (n.) Thirty-six pigs of lead, each pig weighing about seventy pounds; -- called also charre.

Chassepot (n.) A kind of breechloading, center-fire rifle, or improved needle gun.

Chatterer (n.) A bird of the family Ampelidae -- so called from its monotonous note. The Bohemion chatterer (Ampelis garrulus) inhabits the arctic regions of both continents. In America the cedar bird is a more common species. See Bohemian chatterer, and Cedar bird.

Checkerboard (n.) A board with sixty-four squares of alternate color, used for playing checkers or draughts.

Cheeked (a.) Having a cheek; -- used in composition.

Cheese (n.) A low courtesy; -- so called on account of the cheese form assumed by a woman's dress when she stoops after extending the skirts by a rapid gyration.

Chested (a.) Having (such) a chest; -- in composition; as, broad-chested; narrow-chested.

Chinned (a.) Having a chin; -- used chiefly in compounds; as, short-chinned.

Chippeways (n. pl.) A tribe of Indians formerly inhabiting the northern and western shores of Lake Superior; -- called also Objibways.

Chisley (a.) Having a large admixture of small pebbles or gravel; -- said of a soil.

Chouse (v. t.) To cheat, trick, defraud; -- followed by of, or out of; as, to chouse one out of his money.

Cinereous (a.) Like ashes; ash-colored; grayish.

Cinquefoil (n.) The name of several different species of the genus Potentilla; -- also called five-finger, because of the resemblance of its leaves to the fingers of the hand.

Cloche (n.) An apparatus used in controlling certain kinds of aeroplanes, and consisting principally of a steering column mounted with a universal joint at the base, which is bellshaped and has attached to it the cables for controlling the wing-warping devices, elevator planes, and the like.

Clamber (v. i.) To climb with difficulty, or with hands and feet; -- also used figuratively.

Cleavers (n.) A species of Galium (G. Aparine), having a fruit set with hooked bristles, which adhere to whatever they come in contact with; -- called also, goose grass, catchweed, etc.

Cleche (a.) Charged with another bearing of the same figure, and of the color of the field, so large that only a narrow border of the first bearing remains visible; -- said of any heraldic bearing. Compare Voided.

Clique (v. i.) A narrow circle of persons associated by common interests or for the accomplishment of a common purpose; -- generally used in a bad sense.

Clique (v. i.) To To associate together in a clannish way; to act with others secretly to gain a desired end; to plot; -- used with together.

Coarse (superl.) Large in bulk, or composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture; gross; thick; rough; -- opposed to fine; as, coarse sand; coarse thread; coarse cloth; coarse bread.

Coherer (n.) Any device in which an imperfectly conducting contact between pieces of metal or other conductors loosely resting against each other is materially improved in conductivity by the influence of Hertzian waves; -- so called by Sir O. J. Lodge in 1894 on the assumption that the impact of the electic waves caused the loosely connected parts to cohere, or weld together, a condition easily destroyed by tapping. A common form of coherer as used in wireless telegraphy consists of a tube co> Cobblestone (n.) A large pebble; a rounded stone not too large to be handled; a small boulder; -- used for paving streets and for other purposes.

Cockle (n.) A bivalve mollusk, with radiating ribs, of the genus Cardium, especially C. edule, used in Europe for food; -- sometimes applied to similar shells of other genera.

Cockle (n.) The mineral black tourmaCockle (n.) A hop-drying kiln; an oast.

Cocklebur (n.) A coarse, composite weed, having a rough or prickly fruit; one of several species of the genus Xanthium; -- called also clotbur.

Cockney (n.) A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Coherent (a.) Logically consistent; -- applied to persons; as, a coherent thinker.

Cointension (n.) The condition of being of equal in intensity; -- applied to relations; as, 3:6 and 6:12 are relations of cointension.

Collie (n.) The Scotch shepherd dog. There are two breeds, the rough-haired and smooth-haired. It is remarkable for its intelligence, displayed especially in caring for flocks.

Complement (v. t.) The interval wanting to complete the octave; -- the fourth is the complement of the fifth, the sixth of the third.

Complexioned (a.) Having (such) a complexion; -- used in composition; as, a dark-complexioned or a ruddy-complexioned person.

Compressor (n.) An apparatus for confining or flattening between glass plates an object to be examined with the microscope; -- called also compressorium.

Concrete (a.) Standing for an object as it exists in nature, invested with all its qualities, as distinguished from standing for an attribute of an object; -- opposed to abstract.

Concrete (a.) Applied to a specific object; special; particular; -- opposed to general. See Abstract, 3.

Congregation (n.) The whole body of the Jewish people; -- called also Congregation of the Lord.

Congress (n.) A sudden encounter; a collision; a shock; -- said of things.

Coolness (n.) Calm impudence; self-possession.

Corbiestep (n.) One of the steps in which a gable wall is often finished in place of a continuous slope; -- also called crowstep.

Corpse (n.) A human body in general, whether living or dead; -- sometimes contemptuously.

Corpse (n.) The dead body of a human being; -- used also Fig.

Cotquean (n.) A she-cuckold; a cucquean; a henhussy.

Couche (v. t.) Not erect; incCounter (v. t.) Money; coin; -- used in contempt.

Counter (adv.) Contrary; in opposition; in an opposite direction; contrariwise; -- used chiefly with run or go.

Counter (adv.) The after part of a vessel's body, from the water Counterbore (n.) A flat-bottomed cylindrical enlargement of the mouth of a hole, usually of slight depth, as for receiving a cylindrical screw head.

Counterbore (n.) A kind of pin drill with the cutting edge or edges normal to the axis; -- used for enlarging a hole, or for forming a flat-bottomed recess at its mouth.

Countercaster (n.) A caster of accounts; a reckoner; a bookkeeper; -- used contemptuously.

Counterflory (a.) Adorned with flowers (usually fleurs-de-lis) so divided that the tops appear on one side and the bottoms on the others; -- said of any ordinary.

Counterfoil (n.) That part of a tally, formerly in the exchequer, which was kept by an officer in that court, the other, called the stock, being delivered to the person who had lent the king money on the account; -- called also counterstock.

Counterjumper (n.) A salesman in a shop; a shopman; -- used contemptuously.

Counterpane (n.) A duplicate part or copy of an indenture, deed, etc., corresponding with the original; -- now called counterpart.

Counterpassant (a.) Passant in opposite directions; -- said of two animals.

Countersunk (p. p. & a.) Chamfered at the top; -- said of a hole.

Counterterm (n.) A term or word which is the opposite of, or antithesis to, another; an antonym; -- the opposite of synonym; as, "foe" is the counterterm of "friend".

Couple (a.) One of the pairs of plates of two metals which compose a voltaic battery; -- called a voltaic couple or galvanic couple.

Course (n.) The lowest sail on any mast of a square-rigged vessel; as, the fore course, main course, etc.

Courtehouse (n.) A county town; -- so called in Virginia and some others of the Southern States.

Coyote (n.) A carnivorous animal (Canis latrans), allied to the dog, found in the western part of North America; -- called also prairie wolf. Its voice is a snapping bark, followed by a prolonged, shrill howl.

Crabbed (n.) Characterized by or manifesting, sourness, peevishness, or moroseness; harsh; cross; cynical; -- applied to feelings, disposition, or manners.

Crabbed (n.) Characterized by harshness or roughness; unpleasant; -- applied to things; as, a crabbed taste.

Cracker (n.) A small firework, consisting of a little powder inclosed in a thick paper cylinder with a fuse, and exploding with a sharp noise; -- often called firecracker.

Cradle (n.) A machine on rockers, used in washing out auriferous earth; -- also called a rocker.

Craspedota (n. pl.) The hydroid or naked-eyed medusae. See Hydroidea.

Creaser (n.) A tool, or a sewing-machine attachment, for making Creeper (n.) A small bird of the genus Certhia, allied to the wrens. The brown or common European creeper is C. familiaris, a variety of which (var. Americana) inhabits America; -- called also tree creeper and creeptree. The American black and white creeper is Mniotilta varia.

Creeper (n.) A spurlike device strapped to the boot, which enables one to climb a tree or pole; -- called often telegraph creepers.

Crescendo (a. & adv.) With a constantly increasing volume of voice; with gradually increasing strength and fullness of tone; -- a direction for the performance of music, indicated by the mark, or by writing the word on the score.

Crescent (n.) The emblem of the increasing moon with horns directed upward, when used in a coat of arms; -- often used as a mark of cadency to distinguish a second son and his descendants.

Crescentic (a.) Crescent-shaped.

Croaker (n.) An American fresh-water fish (Aplodinotus grunniens); -- called also drum.

Crookes tube () A vacuum tube in which the exhaustion is carried to a very high degree, with the production of a distinct class of effects; -- so called from W. Crookes who introduced it.

Croquet (n.) An open-air game in which two or more players endeavor to drive wooden balls, by means of mallets, through a series of hoops or arches set in the ground according to some pattern.

Crossette (n.) A return in one of the corners of the architrave of a door or window; -- called also ancon, ear, elbow.

Crosslet (a.) Crossed again; -- said of a cross the arms of which are crossed. SeeCross-crosslet.

Crouse (a.) Brisk; lively; bold; self-complacent.

Crowberry (n.) A heathlike plant of the genus Empetrum, and its fruit, a black, scarcely edible berry; -- also called crakeberry.

Cruiser (n.) One who, or a vessel that, cruises; -- usually an armed vessel.

Crease (n.) The combination of four Cruiser (n.) A man-of-war less heavily armed and armored than a battle ship, having great speed, and generally of from two thousand to twelve thousand tons displacement.

Cumene (n.) A colorless oily hydrocarbon, C6H5.C3H7, obtained by the distillation of cuminic acid; -- called also cumol.

Custrel (n.) An armor-bearer to a knight.

Cuttlefish (n.) A foul-mouthed fellow.

Cymene (n.) A colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon, CH3.C6H4.C3H7, of pleasant odor, obtained from oil of cumin, oil of caraway, carvacrol, camphor, etc.; -- called also paracymene, and formerly camphogen.

Cymogene (n.) A highly volatile liquid, condensed by cold and pressure from the first products of the distillation of petroleum; -- used for producing low temperatures.

Cytogenous (a.) Producing cells; -- applied esp. to lymphatic, or adenoid, tissue.

Dandie (n.) One of a breed of small terriers; -- called also Dandie Dinmont.

Dartle (v. t. & i.) To pierce or shoot through; to dart repeatedly: -- frequentative of dart.

Dasewe (v. i.) To become dim-sighted; to become dazed or dazzled.

Dative (a.) Removable, as distinguished from perpetual; -- said of an officer.

Decadent (n.) One that is decadent, or deteriorating; esp., one characterized by, or exhibiting, the qualities of those who are degenerating to a lower type; -- specif. applied to a certain school of modern French writers.

Deadbeat (a.) Making a beat without recoil; giving indications by a single beat or excursion; -- said of galvanometers and other instruments in which the needle or index moves to the extent of its deflection and stops with little or no further oscillation.

Debate (v. i.) To contend in words; to dispute; hence, to deliberate; to consider; to discuss or examine different arguments in the mind; -- often followed by on or upon.

Debtee (n.) One to whom a debt is due; creditor; -- correlative to debtor.

Decameron (n.) A celebrated collection of tales, supposed to be related in ten days; -- written in the 14th century, by Boccaccio, an Italian.

Decine (n.) One of the higher hydrocarbons, C10H15, of the acetylene series; -- called also decenylene.

Decree (v. i.) To make decrees; -- used absolutely.

Deduce (v. t.) To derive or draw; to derive by logical process; to obtain or arrive at as the result of reasoning; to gather, as a truth or opinion, from what precedes or from premises; to infer; -- with from or out of.

Deepness (n.) The state or quality of being deep, profound, mysterious, secretive, etc.; depth; profundity; -- opposed to shallowness.

Deerberry (n.) A shrub of the blueberry group (Vaccinium stamineum); also, its bitter, greenish white berry; -- called also squaw huckleberry.

Deliberate (a.) Weighing facts and arguments with a view to a choice or decision; carefully considering the probable consequences of a step; circumspect; slow in determining; -- applied to persons; as, a deliberate judge or counselor.

Deliberate (a.) Formed with deliberation; well-advised; carefully considered; not sudden or rash; as, a deliberate opinion; a deliberate measure or result.

Deliberate (v. i.) To take counsel with one's self; to weigh the arguments for and against a proposed course of action; to reflect; to consider; to hesitate in deciding; -- sometimes with on, upon, about, concerning.

Deliver (v. t.) To set free from restraint; to set at liberty; to release; to liberate, as from control; to give up; to free; to save; to rescue from evil actual or feared; -- often with from or out of; as, to deliver one from captivity, or from fear of death.

Deliver (v. t.) To give or transfer; to yield possession or control of; to part with (to); to make over; to commit; to surrender; to resign; -- often with up or over, to or into.

Deliver (v. t.) To free from, or disburden of, young; to relieve of a child in childbirth; to bring forth; -- often with of.

Demisemiquaver (n.) A short note, equal in time to the half of a semiquaver, or the thirty-second part of a whole note.

Demurely (adv.) In a demure manner; soberly; gravely; -- now, commonly, with a mere show of gravity or modesty.

Dengue (n.) A specific epidemic disease attended with high fever, cutaneous eruption, and severe pains in the head and limbs, resembling those of rheumatism; -- called also breakbone fever. It occurs in India, Egypt, the West Indies, etc., is of short duration, and rarely fatal.

Dephlegmate (v. t.) To deprive of superabundant water, as by evaporation or distillation; to clear of aqueous matter; to rectify; -- used of spirits and acids.

Dephlegmation (n.) The operation of separating water from spirits and acids, by evaporation or repeated distillation; -- called also concentration, especially when acids are the subject of it.

Depose (v. t.) To testify under oath; to bear testimony to; -- now usually said of bearing testimony which is officially written down for future use.

Derive (v. t.) To turn the course of, as water; to divert and distribute into subordinate channels; to diffuse; to communicate; to transmit; -- followed by to, into, on, upon.

Derive (v. t.) To receive, as from a source or origin; to obtain by descent or by transmission; to draw; to deduce; -- followed by from.

Derive (v. t.) To trace the origin, descent, or derivation of; to recognize transmission of; as, he derives this word from the Anglo-Saxon.

Devise (v. t.) To give by will; -- used of real estate; formerly, also, of chattels.

Devise (n.) The act of giving or disposing of real estate by will; -- sometimes improperly applied to a bequest of personal estate.

Devote (v. t.) To give up wholly; to addict; to direct the attention of wholly or compound; to attach; -- often with a reflexive pronoun; as, to devote one's self to science, to one's friends, to piety, etc.

Diallel (a.) Meeting and intersecting, as Diaster (n.) A double star; -- applied to the nucleus of a cell, when, during cell division, the loops of the nuclear network separate into two groups, preparatory to the formation of two daughter nuclei. See Karyokinesis.

Diathermanous (a.) Having the property of transmitting radiant heat; diathermal; -- opposed to athermanous.

Diathermometer (n.) An instrument for examining the thermal resistance or heat-conducting power of liquids.

Diencephalon (n.) The interbrain or thalamencephalon; -- sometimes abbreviated to dien. See Thalamencephalon.

Digenesis (n.) The faculty of multiplying in two ways; -- by ova fecundated by spermatic fluid, and asexually, as by buds. See Parthenogenesis.

Dilate (v. t.) To expand; to distend; to enlarge or extend in all directions; to swell; -- opposed to contract; as, the air dilates the lungs; air is dilated by increase of heat.

Dilate (v. i.) To speak largely and copiously; to dwell in narration; to enlarge; -- with on or upon.

Diligence (n.) The quality of being diligent; carefulness; careful attention; -- the opposite of negligence.

Diligence (n.) A four-wheeled public stagecoach, used in France.

Dinoceras (n.) A genus of large extinct Eocene mammals from Wyoming; -- called also Uintatherium. See Illustration in Appendix.

Dipyre (n.) A mineral of the scapolite group; -- so called from the double effect of fire upon it, in fusing it, and rendering it phosphorescent.

Discredit (n.) Hence, some degree of dishonor or disesteem; ill repute; reproach; -- applied to persons or things.

Discretion (n.) The quality of being discreet; wise conduct and management; cautious discernment, especially as to matters of propriety and self-control; prudence; circumspection; wariness.

Disgregate (v. t.) To disperse; to scatter; -- opposite of congregate.

Disobedient (a.) Neglecting or refusing to obey; omitting to do what is commanded, or doing what is prohibited; refractory; not observant of duty or rules prescribed by authority; -- applied to persons and acts.

Disspermous (a.) Containing only two seeds; two-seeded.

Displease (v. t.) To make not pleased; to excite a feeling of disapprobation or dislike in; to be disagreeable to; to offend; to vex; -- often followed by with or at. It usually expresses less than to anger, vex, irritate, or provoke.

Disthene (n.) Cyanite or kyanite; -- so called in allusion to its unequal hardness in two different directions. See Cyanite.

Disuse (v. t.) To disaccustom; -- with to or from; as, disused to toil.

Dittied (a.) Set, sung, or composed as a ditty; -- usually in composition.

Divide (v. t.) To separate into species; -- said of a genus or generic term.

Divided (a.) Cut into distinct parts, by incisions which reach the midrib; -- said of a leaf.

Dividend (n.) A sum of money to be divided and distributed; the share of a sum divided that falls to each individual; a distribute sum, share, or percentage; -- applied to the profits as appropriated among shareholders, and to assets as apportioned among creditors; as, the dividend of a bank, a railway corporation, or a bankrupt estate.

Document (n.) An original or official paper relied upon as the basis, proof, or support of anything else; -- in its most extended sense, including any writing, book, or other instrument conveying information in the case; any material substance on which the thoughts of men are represented by any species of conventional mark or symbol.

Double (n.) A person or thing that is the counterpart of another; a duplicate; copy; (Obs.) transcript; -- now chiefly used of persons. Hence, a wraith.

Domine (n.) A West Indian fish (Epinula magistralis), of the family Trichiuridae. It is a long-bodied, voracious fish.

Domineer (v. t.) To rule with insolence or arbitrary sway; to play the master; to be overbearing; to tyrannize; to bluster; to swell with conscious superiority or haughtiness; -- often with over; as, to domineer over dependents.

Domite (n.) A grayish variety of trachyte; -- so called from the Puy-de-Dome in Auvergne, France, where it is found.

Double (a.) To make of two thicknesses or folds by turning or bending together in the middle; to fold one part upon another part of; as, to double the leaf of a book, and the like; to clinch, as the fist; -- often followed by up; as, to double up a sheet of paper or cloth.

Doublet (a.) A close-fitting garment for men, covering the body from the neck to the waist or a little below. It was worn in Western Europe from the 15th to the 17th century.

Doublethreaded (a.) Having two screw threads instead of one; -- said of a screw in which the pitch is equal to twice the distance between the centers of adjacent threads.

Doucker (v. t.) A grebe or diver; -- applied also to the golden-eye, pochard, scoter, and other ducks.

Dowager (n.) A title given in England to a widow, to distinguish her from the wife of her husband's heir bearing the same name; -- chiefly applied to widows of personages of rank.

Downhearted (a.) Dejected; low-spirited.

Dracaena (n.) A genus of liliaceous plants with woody stems and funnel-shaped flowers.

Dragees (n. pl.) Sugar-coated medicines.

Drawbench (n.) A machine in which strips of metal are drawn through a drawplate; especially, one in which wire is thus made; -- also called drawing bench.

Drawee (n.) The person on whom an order or bill of exchange is drawn; -- the correlative of drawer.

Dredger (n.) A box with holes in its lid; -- used for sprinkling flour, as on meat or a breadboard; -- called also dredging box, drudger, and drudging box.

Dropper (n.) A dog which suddenly drops upon the ground when it sights game, -- formerly a common, and still an occasional, habit of the setter.

Drudge (v. t.) To consume laboriously; -- with away.

Drunkenness (n.) The state of being drunken with, or as with, alcoholic liquor; intoxication; inebriety; -- used of the casual state or the habit.

Duckmeat (n.) Alt. of Duck's-meat

Duckweed (n.) A genus (Lemna) of small plants, seen floating in great quantity on the surface of stagnant pools fresh water, and supposed to furnish food for ducks; -- called also duckmeat.

Easiness (n.) Freedom from effort, constraint, or formality; -- said of style, manner, etc.

Ectype (n.) A work sculptured in relief, as a cameo, or in bas-relief (in this sense used loosely).

Efferent (a.) Conveying outward, or discharging; -- applied to certain blood vessels, lymphatics, nerves, etc.

Efferent (a.) Conveyed outward; as, efferent impulses, i. e., such as are conveyed by the motor or efferent nerves from the central nervous organ outwards; -- opposed to afferent.

Effuse (a.) Having the lips, or edges, of the aperture abruptly spreading; -- said of certain shells.

Elapse (v. i.) To slip or glide away; to pass away silently, as time; -- used chiefly in reference to time.

Encore (adv. / interj.) Once more; again; -- used by the auditors and spectators of plays, concerts, and other entertainments, to call for a repetition of a particular part.

Engine (v. t.) To equip with an engine; -- said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another.

Ensate (a.) Having sword-shaped leaves, or appendages; ensiform.

Entire (a.) Not gelded; -- said of a horse.

Entireness (n.) Oneness; unity; -- applied to a condition of intimacy or close association.

Entoperipheral (a.) Being, or having its origin, within the external surface of the body; -- especially applied to feelings, such as hunger, produced by internal disturbances. Opposed to epiperipheral.

Eparterial (a.) Situated upon or above an artery; -- applied esp. to the branches of the bronchi given off above the point where the pulmonary artery crosses the bronchus.

Ephemeral (a.) Short-lived; existing or continuing for a short time only.

Epithelioma (n.) A malignant growth containing epithelial cells; -- called also epithelial cancer.

Epithelium (n.) The superficial layer of cells lining the alimentary canal and all its appendages, all glands and their ducts, blood vessels and lymphatics, serous cavities, etc. It often includes the epidermis (i. e., keratin-producing epithelial cells), and it is sometimes restricted to the alimentary canal, the glands and their appendages, -- the term endothelium being applied to the lining membrane of the blood vessels, lymphatics, and serous cavities.

Equipedal (a.) Equal-footed; having the pairs of feet equal.

Equisetum (n.) A genus of vascular, cryptogamic, herbaceous plants; -- also called horsetails.

Ermine (n.) A valuable fur-bearing animal of the genus Mustela (M. erminea), allied to the weasel; the stoat. It is found in the northern parts of Asia, Europe, and America. In summer it is brown, but in winter it becomes white, except the tip of the tail, which is always black.

Erroneous (a.) Wandering; straying; deviating from the right course; -- hence, irregular; unnatural.

Erumpent (a.) Breaking out; -- said of certain fungi which burst through the texture of leaves.

Erythema (n.) A disease of the skin, in which a diffused inflammation forms rose-colored patches of variable size.

Escape (v. i.) To flee, and become secure from danger; -- often followed by from or out of.

Escape (v. i.) To get free from that which confines or holds; -- used of persons or things; as, to escape from prison, from arrest, or from slavery; gas escapes from the pipes; electricity escapes from its conductors.

Escapement (n.) The contrivance in a timepiece which connects the train of wheel work with the pendulum or balance, giving to the latter the impulse by which it is kept in vibration; -- so called because it allows a tooth to escape from a pallet at each vibration.

Estate (n.) The state; the general body politic; the common-wealth; the general interest; state affairs.

Ethylene (n.) A colorless, gaseous hydrocarbon, C2H4, forming an important ingredient of illuminating gas, and also obtained by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid in alcohol. It is an unsaturated compound and combines directly with chlorine and bromine to form oily liquids (Dutch liquid), -- hence called olefiant gas. Called also ethene, elayl, and formerly, bicarbureted hydrogen.

Euchre (n.) A game at cards, that may be played by two, three, or four persons, the highest card (except when an extra card called the Joker is used) being the knave of the same suit as the trump, and called right bower, the lowest card used being the seven, or frequently, in two-handed euchre, the nine spot. See Bower.

Evangelical (a.) Earnest for the truth taught in the gospel; strict in interpreting Christian doctrine; preeminetly orthodox; -- technically applied to that party in the Church of England, and in the Protestant Episcopal Church, which holds the doctrine of "Justification by Faith alone"; the Low Church party. The term is also applied to other religion bodies not regarded as orthodox.

Excite (v. t.) To energize (an electro-magnet); to produce a magnetic field in; as, to excite a dynamo.

Exothermic (a.) Characterized by, or formed with, evolution of heat; as, an exothermic reaction; -- opposed to endothermic.

Expire (v. t.) To breathe out; to emit from the lungs; to throw out from the mouth or nostrils in the process of respiration; -- opposed to inspire.

Expire (v. i.) To come to an end; to cease; to terminate; to perish; to become extinct; as, the flame expired; his lease expires to-day; the month expired on Saturday.

Fangle (v. t.) Something new-fashioned; a foolish innovation; a gewgaw; a trifling ornament.

Farewell (interj.) Go well; good-by; adieu; -- originally applied to a person departing, but by custom now applied both to those who depart and those who remain. It is often separated by the pronoun; as, fare you well; and is sometimes used as an expression of separation only; as, farewell the year; farewell, ye sweet groves; that is, I bid you farewell.

Farewell (n.) A wish of happiness or welfare at parting; the parting compliment; a good-by; adieu.

Farewell (n.) Act of departure; leave-taking; a last look at, or reference to something.

Fatiferous (a.) Fate-bringing; deadly; mortal; destructive.

Favored (a.) Having a certain favor or appearance; featured; as, well-favored; hard-favored, etc.

Favorer (n.) One who favors; one who regards with kindness or friendship; a well-wisher; one who assists or promotes success or prosperity.

Feather (n.) Kind; nature; species; -- from the proverbial phrase, "Birds of a feather," that is, of the same species.

Feather (n.) The angular adjustment of an oar or paddle-wheel float, with reference to a horizontal axis, as it leaves or enters the water.

Feather (v. i.) To grow or form feathers; to become feathered; -- often with out; as, the birds are feathering out.

Feather (v. i.) To turn to a horizontal plane; -- said of oars.

Feathered (a.) Having feathers; -- said of an arrow, when the feathers are of a tincture different from that of the shaft.

Fiddle (n.) A kind of dock (Rumex pulcher) with fiddle-shaped leaves; -- called also fiddle dock.

Fiddler (n.) A burrowing crab of the genus Gelasimus, of many species. The male has one claw very much enlarged, and often holds it in a position similar to that in which a musician holds a fiddle, hence the name; -- called also calling crab, soldier crab, and fighting crab.

Fiddler (n.) The common European sandpiper (Tringoides hypoleucus); -- so called because it continually oscillates its body.

Fifteenth (a.) Next in order after the fourteenth; -- the ordinal of fifteen.

Fiftieth (a.) Next in order after the forty-ninth; -- the ordinal of fifty.

Figure (n.) A diagram or drawing; made to represent a magnitude or the relation of two or more magnitudes; a surface or space inclosed on all sides; -- called superficial when inclosed by Filacer (n.) A former officer in the English Court of Common Pleas; -- so called because he filed the writs on which he made out process.

Filipendulous (a.) Suspended by, or strung upon, a thread; -- said of tuberous swellings in the middle or at the extremities of slender, threadlike rootlets.

Finite (a.) Having a limit; limited in quantity, degree, or capacity; bounded; -- opposed to infinite; as, finite number; finite existence; a finite being; a finite mind; finite duration.

Fireweed (n.) The great willow-herb (Epilobium spicatum).

Flacket (n.) A barrel-shaped bottle; a flagon.

Flambeau (n.) A flaming torch, esp. one made by combining together a number of thick wicks invested with a quick-burning substance (anciently, perhaps, wax; in modern times, pitch or the like); hence, any torch.

Flasher (n.) The European red-backed shrike (Lanius collurio); -- called also flusher.

Flambe (a.) Decorated by glaze splashed or irregularly spread upon the surface, or apparently applied at the top and allowed to run down the sides; -- said of pieces of Chinese porcelain.

Fluorescence (n.) A property possessed by fluor spar, uranium glass, sulphide of calcium, and many other substances, of glowing without appreciable rise of temperature when exposed to light or to ultra-violet rays, cathode rays, X rays, etc.

Flatness (n.) Depression of tone; the state of being below the true pitch; -- opposed to sharpness or acuteness.

Flatter (n.) A flat-faced fulling hammer.

Flatter (v. t.) To treat with praise or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.

Flesher (n.) A two-handled, convex, blunt-edged knife, for scraping hides; a fleshing knife.

Flicker (n.) The golden-winged woodpecker (Colaptes aurutus); -- so called from its spring note. Called also yellow-hammer, high-holder, pigeon woodpecker, and yucca.

Flittermouse (n.) A bat; -- called also flickermouse, flindermouse, and flintymouse.

Floured (p. a.) Finely granulated; -- said of quicksilver which has been granulated by agitation during the amalgamation process.

Fluorescein (n.) A yellowish red, crystalFlusher (n.) The red-backed shrike. See Flasher.

Foible (n.) The half of a sword blade or foil blade nearest the point; -- opposed to forte.

Forkbeard (n.) A European fish (Raniceps raninus), having a large flat head; -- also called tadpole fish, and lesser forked beard.

Forkbeard (n.) The European forked hake or hake's-dame (Phycis blennoides); -- also called great forked beard.

Fortieth (a.) Following the thirty-ninth, or preceded by thirty-nine units, things, or parts.

Fortieth (n.) One of forty equal parts into which one whole is divided; the quotient of a unit divided by forty; one next in order after the thirty-ninth.

Fracted (a.) Having a part displaced, as if broken; -- said of an ordinary.

Fraulein (n.sing. & pl.) In Germany, a young lady; an unmarried woman; -- as a title, equivalent to Miss.

Fretted (p. p. & a.) Interlaced one with another; -- said of charges and ordinaries.

Fretten (a.) Rubbed; marked; as, pock-fretten, marked with the smallpox.

Fringe (n.) One of a number of light or dark bands, produced by the interference of light; a diffraction band; -- called also interference fringe.

Frippery (n.) Coast-off clothes.

Frosted (a.) Covered with hoarfrost or anything resembling hoarfrost; ornamented with frosting; also, frost-bitten; as, a frosted cake; frosted glass.

Fructed (a.) Bearing fruit; -- said of a tree or plant so represented upon an escutcheon.

Future (a.) The possibilities of the future; -- used especially of prospective success or advancement; as, he had great future before him.

Galilean (n.) One of the party among the Jews, who opposed the payment of tribute to the Romans; -- called also Gaulonite.

Galilean (n.) A Christian in general; -- used as a term of reproach by Mohammedans and Pagans.

Gamble (v. t.) To lose or squander by gaming; -- usually with away.

Gambrel (n.) A stick crooked like a horse's hind leg; -- used by butchers in suspending slaughtered animals.

Gamogenesis (n.) The production of offspring by the union of parents of different sexes; sexual reproduction; -- the opposite of agamogenesis.

Garnierite (n.) An amorphous mineral of apple-green color; a hydrous silicate of nickel and magnesia. It is an important ore of nickel.

Garvie (n.) The sprat; -- called also garvie herring, and garvock.

Gauche (n.) Winding; twisted; warped; -- applied to curves and surfaces.

Gelose (n.) An amorphous, gummy carbohydrate, found in Gelidium, agar-agar, and other seaweeds.

Gemote (v. t.) A meeting; -- used in combination, as, Witenagemote, an assembly of the wise men.

Genteel (a.) Possessing or exhibiting the qualities popularly regarded as belonging to high birth and breeding; free from vulgarity, or lowness of taste or behavior; adapted to a refined or cultivated taste; polite; well-bred; as, genteel company, manners, address.

Gentle (superl.) Well-born; of a good family or respectable birth, though not noble.

Gentle (n.) A trained falcon. See Falcon-gentil.

Gentleman (n.) One of gentle or refined manners; a well-bred man.

Gentleman (n.) A man, irrespective of condition; -- used esp. in the plural (= citizens; people), in addressing men in popular assemblies, etc.

Gentlemanly (a.) Of, pertaining to, resembling, or becoming, a gentleman; well-behaved; courteous; polite.

Gentleness (n.) The quality or state of being gentle, well-born, mild, benevolent, docile, etc.; gentility; softness of manners, disposition, etc.; mildness.

Gilthead (n.) The Pagrus, / Chrysophrys, auratus, a valuable food fish common in the Mediterranean (so named from its golden-colored head); -- called also giltpoll.

Gilthead (n.) The Crenilabrus melops, of the British coasts; -- called also golden maid, conner, sea partridge.

Girdle (n.) The Glaive (n.) A weapon formerly used, consisting of a large blade fixed on the end of a pole, whose edge was on the outside curve; also, a light lance with a long sharp-pointed head.

Glaive (n.) A sword; -- used poetically and loosely.

Glance (n.) A name given to some sulphides, mostly dark-colored, which have a brilliant metallic luster, as the sulphide of copper, called copper glance.

Glance (v. i.) To make an incidental or passing reflection; to allude; to hint; -- often with at.

Glasseye (n.) A fish of the great lakes; the wall-eyed pike.

Glockenspiel (n.) An instrument, originally a series of bells on an iron rod, now a set of flat metal bars, diatonically tuned, giving a bell-like tone when played with a mallet; a carillon.

Goggle (a.) Full and rolling, or staring; -- said of the eyes.

Goggler (n.) A carangoid oceanic fish (Trachurops crumenophthalmus), having very large and prominent eyes; -- called also goggle-eye, big-eyed scad, and cicharra.

Goolde (n.) An old English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), according to Dr. Prior, but in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.

Goldseed (n.) Dog's-tail grass.

Gourde (n.) A silver dollar; -- so called in Cuba, Hayti, etc.

Grainer (n.) An infusion of pigeon's dung used by tanners to neutralize the effects of lime and give flexibility to skins; -- called also grains and bate.

Grapnel (n.) A small anchor, with four or five flukes or claws, used to hold boats or small vessels; hence, any instrument designed to grapple or hold; a grappling iron; a grab; -- written also grapGreave (n.) Armor for the leg below the knee; -- usually in the plural.

Grieve (v. i.) To feel grief; to be in pain of mind on account of an evil; to sorrow; to mourn; -- often followed by at, for, or over.

Grimme (n.) A West African antelope (Cephalophus rufilotus) of a deep bay color, with a broad dorsal stripe of black; -- called also conquetoon.

Grinder (n.) The restless flycatcher (Seisura inquieta) of Australia; -- called also restless thrush and volatile thrush. It makes a noise like a scissors grinder, to which the name alludes.

Grouse (n. sing. & pl.) Any of the numerous species of gallinaceous birds of the family Tetraonidae, and subfamily Tetraoninae, inhabiting Europe, Asia, and North America. They have plump bodies, strong, well-feathered legs, and usually mottled plumage. The group includes the ptarmigans (Lagopus), having feathered feet.

Growler (n.) The large-mouthed black bass.

Growler (n.) A four-wheeled cab.

Grudge (v. t.) To look upon with desire to possess or to appropriate; to envy (one) the possession of; to begrudge; to covet; to give with reluctance; to desire to get back again; -- followed by the direct object only, or by both the direct and indirect objects.

Grolier (n.) The name by which Jean Grolier de Servier (1479-1565), a French bibliophile, is commonly known; -- used in naming a certain style of binding, a design, etc.

Guimpe (n.) A kind of short chemisette, worn with a low-necked dress.

Guelderrose' (n.) A cultivated variety of a species of Viburnum (V. Opulus), bearing large bunches of white flowers; -- called also snowball tree.

Guilder (n.) A Dutch silver coin worth about forty cents; -- called also florin and gulden.

Hackle (n.) One of the peculiar, long, narrow feathers on the neck of fowls, most noticeable on the cock, -- often used in making artificial flies; hence, any feather so used.

Haecceity () Literally, this-ness. A scholastic term to express individuality or singleness; as, this book.

Halfbeak (n.) Any slender, marine fish of the genus Hemirhamphus, having the upper jaw much shorter than the lower; -- called also balahoo.

Halogen (n.) An electro-negative element or radical, which, by combination with a metal, forms a haloid salt; especially, chlorine, bromine, and iodine; sometimes, also, fluorine and cyanogen. See Chlorine family, under Chlorine.

Hamamelis (n.) A genus of plants which includes the witch-hazel (Hamamelis Virginica), a preparation of which is used medicinally.

Hamite (n.) A descendant of Ham, Noah's second son. See Gen. x. 6-20.

Hardness (n.) The cohesion of the particles on the surface of a body, determined by its capacity to scratch another, or be itself scratched;-measured among minerals on a scale of which diamond and talc form the extremes.

Harebell (n.) A small, slender, branching plant (Campanula rotundifolia), having blue bell-shaped flowers; also, Scilla nutans, which has similar flowers; -- called also bluebell.

Harrier (n.) One of several species of hawks or buzzards of the genus Circus which fly low and harry small animals or birds, -- as the European marsh harrier (Circus aerunginosus), and the hen harrier (C. cyaneus).

Hatchel (n.) An instrument with long iron teeth set in a board, for cleansing flax or hemp from the tow, hards, or coarse part; a kind of large comb; -- called also hackle and heckle.

Hatchettite (n.) Mineral t/ low; a waxy or spermaceti-like substance, commonly of a greenish yellow color.

Haurient (a.) In pale, with the head in chief; -- said of the figure of a fish, as if rising for air.

Hawkweed (n.) A plant of the genus Hieracium; -- so called from the ancient belief that birds of prey used its juice to strengthen their vision.

Heddle (v. t.) To draw (the warp thread) through the heddle-eyes, in weaving.

Helpless (a.) Unsupplied; destitute; -- with of.

Hemimellitic (a.) Having half as many (three) carboxyl radicals as mellitic acid; -- said of an organic acid.

Hexine (n.) A hydrocarbon, C6H10, of the acetylene series, obtained artificially as a colorless, volatile, pungent liquid; -- called also hexoylene.

Holstein (n.) One of a breed of cattle, originally from Schleswig-Holstein, valued for the large amount of milk produced by the cows. The color is usually black and white in irregular patches.

Hoarse (superl.) Harsh; grating; discordant; -- said of any sound.

Hobble (n. i.) To move roughly or irregularly; -- said of style in writing.

Holocephali (n. pl.) An order of elasmobranch fishes, including, among living species, only the chimaeras; -- called also Holocephala. See Chimaera; also Illustration in Appendix.

Holohedral (a.) Having all the planes required by complete symmetry, -- in opposition to hemihedral.

Holometabolic (a.) Having a complete metamorphosis;-said of certain insects, as the butterflies and bees.

Homocercal (a.) Having the tail nearly or quite symmetrical, the vertebral column terminating near its base; -- opposed to heterocercal.

Homogeneous (a.) Of the same kind of nature; consisting of similar parts, or of elements of the like nature; -- opposed to heterogeneous; as, homogeneous particles, elements, or principles; homogeneous bodies.

Homogenesis (n.) That method of reproduction in which the successive generations are alike, the offspring, either animal or plant, running through the same cycle of existence as the parent; gamogenesis; -- opposed to heterogenesis.

Homogenetic (a.) Homogenous; -- applied to that class of homologies which arise from similarity of structure, and which are taken as evidences of common ancestry.

Homogenous (a.) Having a resemblance in structure, due to descent from a common progenitor with subsequent modification; homogenetic; -- applied both to animals and plants. See Homoplastic.

Homogeny (n.) The correspondence of common descent; -- a term used to supersede homology by Lankester, who also used homoplasy to denote any superinduced correspondence of position and structure in parts embryonically distinct (other writers using the term homoplasmy). Thus, there is homogeny between the fore limb of a mammal and the wing of a bird; but the right and left ventricles of the heart in both are only in homoplasy with each other, these having arisen independently since the divergen> Hopple (n.) A fetter for horses, or cattle, when turned out to graze; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Hostler (n.) The person who has the care of horses at an inn or stable; hence, any one who takes care of horses; a groom; -- so called because the innkeeper formerly attended to this duty in person.

Humble (superl.) Thinking lowly of one's self; claiming little for one's self; not proud, arrogant, or assuming; thinking one's self ill-deserving or unworthy, when judged by the demands of God; lowly; waek; modest.

Humble (v. t.) To make humble or lowly in mind; to abase the pride or arrogance of; to reduce the self-sufficiently of; to make meek and submissive; -- often used rexlexively.

Hypogene (a.) Formed or crystallized at depths the earth's surface; -- said of granite, gneiss, and other rocks, whose crystallization is believed of have taken place beneath a great thickness of overlying rocks. Opposed to epigene.

Ignite (v. t.) To subject to the action of intense heat; to heat strongly; -- often said of incombustible or infusible substances; as, to ignite iron or platinum.

Ignore (v. t.) To throw out or reject as false or ungrounded; -- said of a bill rejected by a grand jury for want of evidence. See Ignoramus.

Illiberal (a.) Indicating a lack of breeding, culture, and the like; ignoble; rude; narrow-minded; disingenuous.

Immanent (a.) Remaining within; inherent; indwelling; abiding; intrinsic; internal or subjective; hence, limited in activity, agency, or effect, to the subject or associated acts; -- opposed to emanant, transitory, transitive, or objective.

Imminent (a.) Threatening to occur immediately; near at hand; impending; -- said especially of misfortune or peril.

Imphee (n.) The African sugar cane (Holcus saccharatus), -- resembling the sorghum, or Chinese sugar cane.

Implied (a.) Virtually involved or included; involved in substance; inferential; tacitly conceded; -- the correlative of express, or expressed. See Imply.

Impose (v. t.) To arrange in proper order on a table of stone or metal and lock up in a chase for printing; -- said of columns or pages of type, forms, etc.

Impotency (n.) Want of self-restraint or self-control.

Impotent (a.) Wanting the power of self-restraint; incontrolled; ungovernable; violent.

Impure (a.) Defiled by sin or guilt; unholy; unhallowed; -- said of persons or things.

Impute (v. t.) To charge; to ascribe; to attribute; to set to the account of; to charge to one as the author, responsible originator, or possessor; -- generally in a bad sense.

Indonesian (n.) A member of a race forming the chief pre-Malay population of the Malay Archipelago, and probably sprung from a mixture of Polynesian and Mongoloid immigrants. According to Keane, the autochthonous Negritos were largely expelled by the Caucasian Polynesians, themselves followed by Mongoloid peoples of Indo-Chinese affinities, from mixture with whom sprang the Indonesian race.

Incoherent (a.) Not coherent; wanting cohesion; loose; unconnected; physically disconnected; not fixed to each; -- said of material substances.

Income (n.) That which is taken into the body as food; the ingesta; -- sometimes restricted to the nutritive, or digestible, portion of the food. See Food. Opposed to output.

Independence (n.) The state or quality of being independent; freedom from dependence; exemption from reliance on, or control by, others; self-subsistence or maintenance; direction of one's own affairs without interference.

Independent (a.) Not subject to bias or influence; not obsequious; self-directing; as, a man of an independent mind.

Independent (a.) Not dependent upon another quantity in respect to value or rate of variation; -- said of quantities or functions.

Independent (n.) One who believes that an organized Christian church is complete in itself, competent to self-government, and independent of all ecclesiastical authority.

Indigent (a.) Wanting; void; free; destitute; -- used with of.

Indigested (a.) Not in a state suitable for healing; -- said of wounds.

Indigested (a.) Not ripened or suppurated; -- said of an abscess or its contents.

Induce (v. t.) To generalize or conclude as an inference from all the particulars; -- the opposite of deduce.

Infare (n.) A house-warming; especially, a reception, party, or entertainment given by a newly married couple, or by the husband upon receiving the wife to his house.

Infidel (a.) Not holding the faith; -- applied esp. to one who does not believe in the inspiration of the Scriptures, and the supernatural origin of Christianity.

Infuse (v. t.) To inspire; to inspirit or animate; to fill; -- followed by with.

Inhale (v. t.) To breathe or draw into the lungs; to inspire; as, to inhale air; -- opposed to exhale.

Injure (v. t.) To do harm to; to impair the excellence and value of; to hurt; to damage; -- used in a variety of senses; as: (a) To hurt or wound, as the person; to impair soundness, as of health. (b) To damage or lessen the value of, as goods or estate. (c) To slander, tarnish, or impair, as reputation or character. (d) To impair or diminish, as happiness or virtue. (e) To give pain to, as the sensibilities or the feelings; to grieve; to annoy. (f) To impair, as the intellect or mind.

Inknee (n.) Same as Knock-knee.

Inkneed (a.) See Knock-kneed.

Intake (n.) The place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; -- opposed to outlet.

Interest (n.) To be concerned with or engaged in; to affect; to concern; to excite; -- often used impersonally.

Interest (n.) Premium paid for the use of money, -- usually reckoned as a percentage; as, interest at five per cent per annum on ten thousand dollars.

Invade (v. t.) To go into or upon; to pass within the confines of; to enter; -- used of forcible or rude ingress.

Inveteracy (n.) Firm establishment by long continuance; firmness or deep-rooted obstinacy of any quality or state acquired by time; as, the inveteracy of custom, habit, or disease; -- usually in a bad sense; as, the inveteracy of prejudice or of error.

Inveterate (a.) Old; long-established.

Inveterate (a.) Firmly established by long continuance; obstinate; deep-rooted; of long standing; as, an inveterate disease; an inveterate abuse.

Ipomoea (n.) A genus of twining plants with showy monopetalous flowers, including the morning-glory, the sweet potato, and the cypress vine.

Ironheads (n.) A European composite herb (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the resemblance of its knobbed head to an iron ball fixed on a long handle.

Irredeemable (a.) Not redeemable; that can not be redeemed; not payable in gold or silver, as a bond; -- used especially of such government notes, issued as currency, as are not convertible into coin at the pleasure of the holder.

Isosceles (a.) Having two legs or sides that are equal; -- said of a triangle.

Jacqueminot (n.) A half-hardy, deep crimson rose of the remontant class; -- so named after General Jacqueminot, of France.

jubilee () One celebrated upon the completion of sixty, or, according to some, seventy-five, years from the beginning of the thing commemorated.

Journeyman (n.) Formerly, a man hired to work by the day; now, commonly, one who has mastered a handicraft or trade; -- distinguished from apprentice and from master workman.

Jubilee (n.) A church solemnity or ceremony celebrated at Rome, at stated intervals, originally of one hundred years, but latterly of twenty-five; a plenary and extraordinary indulgence grated by the sovereign pontiff to the universal church. One invariable condition of granting this indulgence is the confession of sins and receiving of the eucharist.

Jumble (v. t.) To mix in a confused mass; to put or throw together without order; -- often followed by together or up.

Jumble (n.) A small, thin, sugared cake, usually ring-shaped.

Juneberry (n.) The small applelike berry of American trees of genus Amelanchier; -- also called service berry.

Juneberry (n.) The shrub or tree which bears this fruit; -- also called shad bush, and had tree.

Kenogenesis (n.) Modified evolution, in which nonprimitive characters make their appearance in consequence of a secondary adaptation of the embryo to the peculiar conditions of its environment; -- distinguished from palingenesis.

Kerite (n.) A compound in which tar or asphaltum combined with animal or vegetable oils is vulcanized by sulphur, the product closely resembling rubber; -- used principally as an insulating material in telegraphy.

Knacker (n.) One of two or more pieces of bone or wood held loosely between the fingers, and struck together by moving the hand; -- called also clapper.

Knacker (n.) One who slaughters worn-out horses and sells their flesh for dog's meat.

Knapweed (n.) The black centaury (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the knoblike heads of flowers. Called also bullweed.

Knoppern (n.) A kind of gall produced by a gallfly on the cup of an acorn, -- used in tanning and dyeing.

Knotberry (n.) The cloudberry (Rudus Chamaemorus); -- so called from its knotted stems.

Knowledge (v. i.) That which is or may be known; the object of an act of knowing; a cognition; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Knowledge (v. i.) Sexual intercourse; -- usually preceded by carnal; as, carnal knowledge.

Knickerbocker (n.) A linsey-woolsey fabric having a rough knotted surface on the right side; used for women's dresses.

Lacquer (n.) A varnish, consisting of a solution of shell-lac in alcohol, often colored with gamboge, saffron, or the like; -- used for varnishing metals, papier-mache, and wood. The name is also given to varnishes made of other ingredients, esp. the tough, solid varnish of the Japanese, with which ornamental objects are made.

Lamprey (n.) An eel-like marsipobranch of the genus Petromyzon, and allied genera. The lampreys have a round, sucking mouth, without jaws, but set with numerous minute teeth, and one to three larger teeth on the palate (see Illust. of Cyclostomi). There are seven small branchial openings on each side.

Latidentate (a.) Broad-toothed.

Learned (a.) Of or pertaining to learning; possessing, or characterized by, learning, esp. scholastic learning; erudite; well-informed; as, a learned scholar, writer, or lawyer; a learned book; a learned theory.

Leatherback (n.) A large sea turtle (Sphargis coriacea), having no bony shell on its back. It is common in the warm and temperate parts of the Atlantic, and sometimes weighs over a thousand pounds; -- called also leather turtle, leathery turtle, leather-backed tortoise, etc.

Leatherwood (n.) A small branching shrub (Dirca palustris), with a white, soft wood, and a tough, leathery bark, common in damp woods in the Northern United States; -- called also moosewood, and wicopy.

Ledgment (n.) A string-course or horizontal suit of moldings, such as the base moldings of a building.

Lernaea (n.) A Linnaean genus of parasitic Entomostraca, -- the same as the family Lernaeidae.

Levite (n.) A priest; -- so called in contempt or ridicule.

Liable (v. t.) Exposed to a certain contingency or casualty, more or less probable; -- with to and an infinitive or noun; as, liable to slip; liable to accident.

Ligule (n.) A strap-shaped corolla of flowers of Compositae.

Linnaeite (n.) A mineral of pale steel-gray color and metallic luster, occurring in isometric crystals, and also massive. It is a sulphide of cobalt containing some nickel or copper.

Lionced (a.) Adorned with lions' heads; having arms terminating in lions' heads; -- said of a cross.

Little (a.) Small in size or extent; not big; diminutive; -- opposed to big or large; as, a little body; a little animal; a little piece of ground; a little hill; a little distance; a little child.

Little (adv.) In a small quantity or degree; not much; slightly; somewhat; -- often with a preceding it.

Lobated (a.) Having lobes; -- said of the tails of certain fishes having the integument continued to the bases of the fin rays.

Lobster (n.) Any large macrurous crustacean used as food, esp. those of the genus Homarus; as the American lobster (H. Americanus), and the European lobster (H. vulgaris). The Norwegian lobster (Nephrops Norvegicus) is similar in form. All these have a pair of large unequal claws. The spiny lobsters of more southern waters, belonging to Palinurus, Panulirus, and allied genera, have no large claws. The fresh-water crayfishes are sometimes called lobsters.

Lorikeet (n.) Any one numerous species of small brush-tongued parrots or lories, found mostly in Australia, New Guinea and the adjacent islands, with some forms in the East Indies. They are arboreal in their habits and feed largely upon the honey of flowers. They belong to Trichoglossus, Loriculus, and several allied genera.

Lucifer (n.) The planet Venus, when appearing as the morning star; -- applied in Isaiah by a metaphor to a king of Babylon.

Lucifer (n.) A match made of a sliver of wood tipped with a combustible substance, and ignited by friction; -- called also lucifer match, and locofoco. See Locofoco.

Lucifer (n.) A genus of free-swimming macruran Crustacea, having a slender body and long appendages.

Lunated (a.) Crescent-shaped; as, a lunate leaf; a lunate beak; a lunated cross.

Lunule (n.) Anything crescent-shaped; a crescent-shaped part or mark; a lunula, a lune.

Lunule (n.) A special area in front of the beak of many bivalve shells. It sometimes has the shape of a double crescent, but is oftener heart-shaped. See Illust. of Bivalve.

Lunulet (n.) A small spot, shaped like a half-moon or crescent; as, the lunulet on the wings of many insects.

Lustre (n.) A fabric of wool and cotton with a lustrous surface, -- used for women's dresses.

Lycine (n.) A weak base identical with betaine; -- so called because found in the boxthorn (Lycium barbarum). See Betaine.

Lyencephala (n. pl.) A group of Mammalia, including the marsupials and monotremes; -- so called because the corpus callosum is rudimentary.

Lyrated (a.) Lyre-shaped, or spatulate and oblong, with small lobes toward the base; as, a lyrate leaf.

Lyriferous (a.) Having a lyre-shaped shoulder girdle, as certain fishes.

Madame (n.) My lady; -- a French title formerly given to ladies of quality; now, in France, given to all married women.

Management (v.) Judicious use of means to accomplish an end; conduct directed by art or address; skillful treatment; cunning practice; -- often in a bad sense.

Manatee (n.) Any species of Trichechus, a genus of sirenians; -- called alsosea cow.

Manifest (a.) Detected; convicted; -- with of.

Manifest (v. t.) To show plainly; to make to appear distinctly, -- usually to the mind; to put beyond question or doubt; to display; to exhibit.

Mantle (v. i.) To unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; -- said of hawks. Also used figuratively.

Mantle (v. i.) To spread out; -- said of wings.

Marguerite (n.) The daisy (Bellis perennis). The name is often applied also to the ox-eye daisy and to the China aster.

Martlet (n.) A bird without beak or feet; -- generally assumed to represent a martin. As a mark of cadency it denotes the fourth son.

Mascled (a.) Composed of, or covered with, lozenge-shaped scales; having lozenge-shaped divisions.

Mature (superl.) Brought by natural process to completeness of growth and development; fitted by growth and development for any function, action, or state, appropriate to its kind; full-grown; ripe.

Matweed (n.) A name of several maritime grasses, as the sea sand-reed (Ammophila arundinacea) which is used in Holland to bind the sand of the seacoast dikes (see Beach grass, under Beach); also, the Lygeum Spartum, a Mediterranean grass of similar habit.

Mazame (n.) A goatlike antelope (Haplocerus montanus) which inhabits the Rocky Mountains, frequenting the highest parts; -- called also mountain goat.

Mealies (n. pl.) Maize or Indian corn; -- the common name in South Africa.

Meddle (v. i.) To interest or engage one's self; to have to do; -- / a good sense.

Meddle (v. i.) To interest or engage one's self unnecessarily or impertinently, to interfere or busy one's self improperly with another's affairs; specifically, to handle or distrub another's property without permission; -- often followed by with or in.

Megacephalous (a.) Large headed; -- applied to animals, and to plants when they have large flower heads.

Megaderm (n.) Any one of several species of Old World blood-sucking bats of the genus Megaderma.

Megaseme (a.) Having the orbital index relatively large; having the orbits narrow transversely; -- opposed to microseme.

Melene (n.) An unsaturated hydrocarbon, C30H60, of the ethylene series, obtained from beeswax as a white, scaly, crystalMelicerous (a.) Consisting of or containing matter like honey; -- said of certain encysted tumors.

Melodeon (n.) A kind of small reed organ; -- a portable form of the seraphine.

Menace (n.) To express or show an intention to inflict, or to hold out a prospect of inflicting, evil or injury upon; to threaten; -- usually followed by with before the harm threatened; as, to menace a country with war.

Messieurs (n. pl.) Sirs; gentlemen; -- abbreviated to Messrs., which is used as the plural of Mr.

Mestee (n.) The offspring of a white person and a quadroon; -- so called in the West Indies.

Metacenter (n.) Alt. of -tre

Metacetone (n.) A colorless liquid of an agreeable odor, C6H10O, obtained by distilling a mixture of sugar and lime; -- so called because formerly regarded as a polymeric modification of acetone.

Metagenesis (n.) Alternation of sexual and asexual or gemmiparous generations; -- in distinction from heterogamy.

Mettle (n.) Substance or quality of temperament; spirit, esp. as regards honor, courage, fortitude, ardor, etc.; disposition; -- usually in a good sense.

Mettled (a.) Having mettle; high-spirited; ardent; full of fire.

Middleman (n.) An agent between two parties; a broker; a go-between; any dealer between the producer and the consumer; in Ireland, one who takes land of the proprietors in large tracts, and then rents it out in small portions to the peasantry.

Mistressship (n.) Ladyship, a style of address; -- with the personal pronoun.

Mobile (a.) Characterized by an extreme degree of fluidity; moving or flowing with great freedom; as, benzine and mercury are mobile liquids; -- opposed to viscous, viscoidal, or oily.

Module (n.) The size of some one part, as the diameter of semi-diameter of the base of a shaft, taken as a unit of measure by which the proportions of the other parts of the composition are regulated. Generally, for columns, the semi-diameter is taken, and divided into a certain number of parts, called minutes (see Minute), though often the diameter is taken, and any dimension is said to be so many modules and minutes in height, breadth, or projection.

Moebles (n. pl.) Movables; furniture; -- also used in the singular (moeble).

Monocephalous (a.) Having a solitary head; -- said of unbranched composite plants.

Monoceros (n.) A one-horned creature; a unicorn; a sea monster with one horn.

Monogenesis (n.) Oneness of origin; esp. (Biol.), development of all beings in the universe from a single cell; -- opposed to polygenesis. Called also monism.

Monogenesis (n.) The direct development of an embryo, without metamorphosis, into an organism similar to the parent organism; -- opposed to metagenesis.

Monogenetic (a.) One in genesis; resulting from one process of formation; -- used of a mountain range.

Monogenist (n.) One who maintains that the human races are all of one species; -- opposed to polygenist.

Monomerous (a.) Having but one joint; -- said of the foot of certain insects.

Moonseed (n.) A climbing plant of the genus Menispermum; -- so called from the crescentlike form of the seeds.

Morose (a.) Of a sour temper; sullen and austere; ill-humored; severe.

Motile (a.) Having powers of self-motion, though unconscious; as, the motile spores of certain seaweeds.

Mousse (n.) A frozen dessert of a frothy texture, made of sweetened and flavored whipped cream, sometimes with the addition of egg yolks and gelatin. Mousse differs from ice cream in being beaten before -- not during -- the freezing process.

Muffler (n.) Any of various devices to deaden the noise of escaping gases or vapors, as a tube filled with obstructions, through which the exhaust gases of an internal-combustion engine, as on an automobile, are passed (called also silencer).

Muffle (n.) The bare end of the nose between the nostrils; -- used esp. of ruminants.

Muffle (v. t.) To wrap up in something that conceals or protects; to wrap, as the face and neck, in thick and disguising folds; hence, to conceal or cover the face of; to envelop; to inclose; -- often with up.

Mugweed (n.) A slender European weed (Galium Cruciata); -- called also crossweed.

Muride (n.) Bromine; -- formerly so called from its being obtained from sea water.

Mycomelic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid of the alloxan group, obtained as a honey-yellow powder. Its solutions have a gelatinous consistency.

Mynchery (n.) A nunnery; -- a term still applied to the ruins of certain nunneries in England.

Myohaematin (n.) A red-colored respiratory pigment found associated with hemoglobin in the muscle tissue of a large number of animals, both vertebrate and invertebrate.

Myrtle (n.) A species of the genus Myrtus, especially Myrtus communis. The common myrtle has a shrubby, upright stem, eight or ten feet high. Its branches form a close, full head, thickly covered with ovate or lanceolate evergreen leaves. It has solitary axillary white or rosy flowers, followed by black several-seeded berries. The ancients considered it sacred to Venus. The flowers, leaves, and berries are used variously in perfumery and as a condiment, and the beautifully mottled wood is used> Native (a.) Of or pertaining to one's birth; natal; belonging to the place or the circumstances in which one is born; -- opposed to foreign; as, native land, language, color, etc.

Nature (n.) The personified sum and order of causes and effects; the powers which produce existing phenomena, whether in the total or in detail; the agencies which carry on the processes of creation or of being; -- often conceived of as a single and separate entity, embodying the total of all finite agencies and forces as disconnected from a creating or ordering intelligence.

Natured (a.) Having (such) a nature, temper, or disposition; disposed; -- used in composition; as, good-natured, ill-natured, etc.

Nazarene (n.) A native or inhabitant of Nazareth; -- a term of contempt applied to Christ and the early Christians.

Nearness (n.) The state or quality of being near; -- used in the various senses of the adjective.

Neckweed (n.) The hemp; -- so called as furnishing ropes for hanging criminals.

Needle (n.) A small instrument of steel, sharply pointed at one end, with an eye to receive a thread, -- used in sewing.

Needle (n.) One of the needle-shaped secondary leaves of pine trees. See Pinus.

Needlebook (n.) A book-shaped needlecase, having leaves of cloth into which the needles are stuck.

Needlefish (n.) The European great pipefich (Siphostoma, / Syngnathus, acus); -- called also earl, and tanglefish.

Noyade (n.) A drowning of many persons at once, -- a method of execution practiced at Nantes in France during the Reign of Terror, by Jean Baptiste Carrier.

Nickle (n.) The European woodpecker, or yaffle; -- called also nicker pecker.

Nipplewort (n.) A yellow-flowered composite herb (Lampsana communis), formerly used as an external application to the nipples of women; -- called also dock-cress.

Noddle (n.) The head; -- used jocosely or contemptuously.

Nonane (n.) One of a group of metameric hydrocarbons C9H20 of the paraffin series; -- so called because of the nine carbon atoms in the molecule. Normal nonane is a colorless volatile liquid, an ingredient of ordinary kerosene.

Northerner (n.) A native or inhabitant of the Northern States; -- contradistinguished from Southerner.

Nozzle (n.) A short outlet, or inlet, pipe projecting from the end or side of a hollow vessel, as a steam-engine cylinder or a steam boiler.

Nucamentaceous (a.) Like a nut either in structure or in being indehiscent; bearing one-seeded nutlike fruits.

Nuddle (v. i.) To walk quickly with the head bent forward; -- often with along.

Nycthemeron (n.) The natural day and night, or space of twenty-four hours.

Oblate (a.) Offered up; devoted; consecrated; dedicated; -- used chiefly or only in the titles of Roman Catholic orders. See Oblate, n.

Obliterate (a.) Scarcely distinct; -- applied to the markings of insects.

Obsolete (a.) No longer in use; gone into disuse; disused; neglected; as, an obsolete word; an obsolete statute; -- applied chiefly to words, writings, or observances.

Obtuse (superl.) Not pointed or acute; blunt; -- applied esp. to angles greater than a right angle, or containing more than ninety degrees.

Occident (n.) The part of the horizon where the sun last appears in the evening; that part of the earth towards the sunset; the west; -- opposed to orient. Specifically, in former times, Europe as opposed to Asia; now, also, the Western hemisphere.

Occidental (a.) Of, pertaining to, or situated in, the occident, or west; western; -- opposed to oriental; as, occidental climates, or customs; an occidental planet.

Occidental (a.) Possessing inferior hardness, brilliancy, or beauty; -- used of inferior precious stones and gems, because those found in the Orient are generally superior.

Octameter (n.) A verse containing eight feet; as, --//Deep# in|to# the | dark#ness | peer#ing, | long# I | stood# there | wond'#ring, | fear#ing.

October (n.) The tenth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

Octocerata (n.pl.) A suborder of Cephalopoda including Octopus, Argonauta, and allied genera, having eight arms around the head; -- called also Octopoda.

Octodecimo (n.) A book composed of sheets each of which is folded into eighteen leaves; hence; indicating more or less definitely a size of book, whose sheets are so folded; -- usually written 18mo or 18?, and called eighteenmo.

Office (n.) That which is performed, intended, or assigned to be done, by a particular thing, or that which anything is fitted to perform; a function; -- answering to duty in intelligent beings.

Omniferous (a.) All-bearing; producing all kinds.

Ontogeny (n.) The history of the individual development of an organism; the history of the evolution of the germ; the development of an individual organism, -- in distinction from phylogeny, or evolution of the tribe. Called also henogenesis, henogeny.

Ophite (n.) A greenish spotted porphyry, being a diabase whose pyroxene has been altered to uralite; -- first found in the Pyreness. So called from the colored spots which give it a mottled appearance.

Ophite (a.) A mamber of a Gnostic serpent-worshiping sect of the second century.

Oppose (v. i.) To act adversely or in opposition; -- with against or to; as, a servant opposed against the act.

Oracle (n.) The communications, revelations, or messages delivered by God to the prophets; also, the entire sacred Scriptures -- usually in the plural.

Orangeman (n.) One of a secret society, organized in the north of Ireland in 1795, the professed objects of which are the defense of the regning sovereign of Great Britain, the support of the Protestant religion, the maintenance of the laws of the kingdom, etc.; -- so called in honor of William, Prince of Orange, who became William III. of England.

Orangeroot (n.) An American ranunculaceous plant (Hidrastis Canadensis), having a yellow tuberous root; -- also called yellowroot, golden seal, etc.

Orangetawny (a. & n.) Deep orange-yellow; dark yellow.

Orpiment (n.) Arsenic sesquisulphide, produced artificially as an amorphous lemonyellow powder, and occurring naturally as a yellow crystalOrpine (n.) A low plant with fleshy leaves (Sedum telephium), having clusters of purple flowers. It is found on dry, sandy places, and on old walls, in England, and has become naturalized in America. Called also stonecrop, and live-forever.

Overreach (v. i.) To strike the toe of the hind foot against the heel or shoe of the forefoot; -- said of horses.

Overreach (n.) The act of striking the heel of the fore foot with the toe of the hind foot; -- said of horses.

Paddle (v. i.) A small gate in sluices or lock gates to admit or let off water; -- also called clough.

Paddle (v. i.) A paddle-shaped foot, as of the sea turtle.

Paddle (v. i.) A paddle-shaped implement for string or mixing.

Paddlefish (n.) A large ganoid fish (Polyodon spathula) found in the rivers of the Mississippi Valley. It has a long spatula-shaped snout. Called also duck-billed cat, and spoonbill sturgeon.

Parfleche (n.) A kind of rawhide consisting of hide, esp. of the buffalo, which has been soaked in crude wood-ash lye to remove the hairs, and then dried.

Parquet (n.) In various European public bourses, the railed-in space within which the "agents de change," or privileged brokers, conduct business; also, the business conducted by them; -- distinguished from the coulisse, or outside market.

Palate (n.) Relish; taste; liking; -- a sense originating in the mistaken notion that the palate is the organ of taste.

Pallbearer (n.) One of those who attend the coffin at a funeral; -- so called from the pall being formerly carried by them.

Panacea (n.) A remedy for all diseases; a universal medicine; a cure-all; catholicon; hence, a relief or solace for affliction.

Pancreas (n.) The sweetbread, a gland connected with the intestine of nearly all vertebrates. It is usually elongated and light-colored, and its secretion, called the pancreatic juice, is discharged, often together with the bile, into the upper part of the intestines, and is a powerful aid in digestion. See Illust. of Digestive apparatus.

Panspermy (n.) The doctrine that all organisms must come from living parents; biogenesis; -- the opposite of spontaneous generation.

Panther (n.) A large dark-colored variety of the leopard, by some zoologists considered a distinct species. It is marked with large ringlike spots, the centers of which are darker than the color of the body.

Papaveraceous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a natural order of plants (Papaveraceae) of which the poppy, the celandine, and the bloodroot are well-known examples.

Paragenic (a.) Originating in the character of the germ, or at the first commencement of an individual; -- said of peculiarities of structure, character, etc.

Parament (n.) Ornamental hangings, furniture, etc., as of a state apartment; rich and elegant robes worn by men of rank; -- chiefly in the plural.

Parkleaves (n.) A European species of Saint John's-wort; the tutsan. See Tutsan.

Parole (n.) A watchword given only to officers of guards; -- distinguished from countersign, which is given to all guards.

Parquetry (n.) A species of joinery or cabinet-work consisting of an inlay of geometric or other patterns, generally of different colors, -- used especially for floors.

Parakeet (n.) Any one of numerous species of small parrots having a graduated tail, which is frequently very long; -- called also paroquet and paraquet.

Partlet (n.) A hen; -- so called from the ruffing of her neck feathers.

Pattee (a.) Narrow at the inner, and very broad at the other, end, or having its arms of that shape; -- said of a cross. See Illust. (8) of Cross.

Payndemain (n.) The finest and whitest bread made in the Middle Ages; -- called also paynemain, payman.

Pebble (n.) Transparent and colorless rock crystal; as, Brazilian pebble; -- so called by opticians.

Pedage (n.) A toll or tax paid by passengers, entitling them to safe-conduct and protection.

Pedate (a.) Palmate, with the lateral lobes cleft into two or more segments; -- said of a leaf.

Penitential (n.) A book formerly used by priests hearing confessions, containing rules for the imposition of penances; -- called also penitential book.

Pentremites (n.) A genus of crinoids belonging to the Blastoidea. They have five petal-like ambulacra.

People (n.) Persons, generally; an indefinite number of men and women; folks; population, or part of population; as, country people; -- sometimes used as an indefinite subject or verb, like on in French, and man in German; as, people in adversity.

Percheron (n.) One of a breed of draught horses originating in Perche, an old district of France; -- called also Percheron-Norman.

Perigeum (n.) That point in the orbit of the moon which is nearest to the earth; -- opposed to apogee. It is sometimes, but rarely, used of the nearest points of other orbits, as of a comet, a planet, etc. Called also epigee, epigeum.

Perihelium (n.) That point of the orbit of a planet or comet which is nearest to the sun; -- opposed to aphelion.

Perspective (a.) The art and the science of so dePestle (n.) A constable's or bailiff's staff; -- so called from its shape.

Petaled (a.) Having petals; as, a petaled flower; -- opposed to apetalous, and much used in compounds; as, one-petaled, three-petaled, etc.

Phosgene (a.) Producing, or produced by, the action of light; -- formerly used specifically to designate a gas now called carbonyl chloride. See Carbonyl.

Pickle (v. t.) To give an antique appearance to; -- said of copies or imitations of paintings by the old masters.

Piddle (v. i.) To urinate; -- child's word.

Pierce (v. i.) To enter; to penetrate; to make a way into or through something, as a pointed instrument does; -- used literally and figuratively.

Piercel (n.) A kind of gimlet for making vents in casks; -- called also piercer.

Pigweed (n.) A name of several annual weeds. See Goosefoot, and Lamb's-quarters.

Pinchers (n. pl.) An instrument having two handles and two grasping jaws working on a pivot; -- used for griping things to be held fast, drawing nails, etc.

Pitcher (n.) A wide-mouthed, deep vessel for holding liquids, with a spout or protruding lip and a handle; a water jug or jar with a large ear or handle.

Pitiless (a.) Destitute of pity; hard-hearted; merciless; as, a pitilessmaster; pitiless elements.

Pizzle (n.) The penis; -- so called in some animals, as the bull.

Placket (n.) The opening or slit left in a petticoat or skirt for convenience in putting it on; -- called also placket hole.

Please (v. t.) To be the will or pleasure of; to seem good to; -- used impersonally.

Ployment (n.) The act or movement of forming a column from a Polygeny (n.) The theory that living organisms originate in cells or embryos of different kinds, instead of coming from a single cell; -- opposed to monogenesis.

Polygenist (n.) One who maintains that animals of the same species have sprung from more than one original pair; -- opposed to monogenist.

Polymeniscous (a.) Having numerous facets; -- said of the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans.

Polymeric (a.) Having the same percentage composition (that is, having the same elements united in the same proportion by weight), but different molecular weights; -- often used with with; thus, cyanic acid (CNOH), fulminic acid (C2N2O2H2), and cyanuric acid (C3N3O3H3), are polymeric with each other.

Polytechnic (a.) Comprehending, or relating to, many arts and sciences; -- applied particularly to schools in which many branches of art and science are taught with especial reference to their practical application; also to exhibitions of machinery and industrial products.

Pomacentroid (a.) Pertaining to the Pomacentridae, a family of bright-colored tropical fishes having spiny opercula; -- often called coral fishes.

Pomade (n.) Perfumed ointment; esp., a fragrant unguent for the hair; pomatum; -- originally made from apples.

Pondweed (n.) Any aquatic plant of the genus Potamogeton, of which many species are found in ponds or slow-moving rivers.

Pontee (n.) An iron rod used by glass makers for manipulating the hot glass; -- called also, puntil, puntel, punty, and ponty. See Fascet.

Porifera (n. pl.) A grand division of the Invertebrata, including the sponges; -- called also Spongiae, Spongida, and Spongiozoa. The principal divisions are Calcispongiae, Keratosa or Fibrospongiae, and Silicea.

Porime (n.) A theorem or proposition so easy of demonstration as to be almost self-evident.

Porites (n.) An important genus of reef-building corals having small twelve-rayed calicles, and a very porous coral. Some species are branched, others grow in large massive or globular forms.

Postgeniture (n.) The condition of being born after another in the same family; -- distinguished from primogeniture.

Pounce (n.) Charcoal dust, or some other colored powder for making patterns through perforated designs, -- used by embroiderers, lace makers, etc.

Pounce (v. i.) To fall suddenly and seize with the claws; -- with on or upon; as, a hawk pounces upon a chicken. Also used figuratively.

Pounder (n.) A person or thing, so called with reference to a certain number of pounds in value, weight, capacity, etc.; as, a cannon carrying a twelve-pound ball is called a twelve pounder.

Praise (v.) To commend; to applaud; to express approbation of; to laud; -- applied to a person or his acts.

Praise (v.) To extol in words or song; to magnify; to glorify on account of perfections or excellent works; to do honor to; to display the excellence of; -- applied especially to the Divine Being.

Premier (a.) Most ancient; -- said of the peer bearing the oldest title of his degree.

Priapean (n.) A species of hexameter verse so constructed as to be divisible into two portions of three feet each, having generally a trochee in the first and the fourth foot, and an amphimacer in the third; -- applied also to a regular hexameter verse when so constructed as to be divisible into two portions of three feet each.

Pricker (n.) A priming wire; a priming needle, -- used in blasting and gunnery.

Pricker (n.) A small marPrince (a.) The one of highest rank; one holding the highest place and authority; a sovereign; a monarch; -- originally applied to either sex, but now rarely applied to a female.

Princesse (a.) A term applied to a lady's long, close-fitting dress made with waist and skirt in one.

Progne (n.) An American butterfly (Polygonia, / Vanessa, Progne). It is orange and black above, grayish beneath, with an L-shaped silver mark on the hind wings. Called also gray comma.

Progress (n.) Toward ideal completeness or perfection in respect of quality or condition; -- applied to individuals, communities, or the race; as, social, moral, religious, or political progress.

Progressionist (n.) One who maintains the doctrine of progression in organic forms; -- opposed to uniformitarian.

Progressive (a.) Moving forward; proceeding onward; advancing; evincing progress; increasing; as, progressive motion or course; -- opposed to retrograde.

Pronged (a.) Having prongs or projections like the tines of a fork; as, a three-pronged fork.

Prophetical (a.) Containing, or pertaining to, prophecy; foretelling events; as, prophetic writings; prophetic dreams; -- used with of before the thing foretold.

Prospective (n.) Looking forward in time; acting with foresight; -- opposed to retrospective.

Prothesis (n.) A credence table; -- so called by the Eastern or Greek Church.

Psalter (n.) The Book of Psalms; -- often applied to a book containing the Psalms separately printed.

Pyrone (n.) An unsaturated cyclic compound, C5H4O2, of which two varieties are known, / and /. /-pyrone is the parent substance of several natural yellow dyestuffs.

Pungled (a.) Shriveled or shrunken; -- said especially of grain which has lost its juices from the ravages of insects, such as the wheat midge, or Trips (Thrips cerealium).

Pupigerous (a.) Bearing or containing a pupa; -- said of dipterous larvae which do not molt when the pupa is formed within them.

Purple (a.) Imperial; regal; -- so called from the color having been an emblem of imperial authority.

Purple (a.) Blood-red; bloody.

Pusane (n.) A piece of armor for the breast; often, an addition to, or reenforcement of. the breastplate; -- called also pesane.

Puzzle (v. t.) To solve by ingenuity, as a puzzle; -- followed by out; as, to puzzle out a mystery.

Pyrite (n.) A common mineral of a pale brass-yellow color and brilliant metallic luster, crystallizing in the isometric system; iron pyrites; iron disulphide.

Pyrogenic (a.) Producing heat; -- said of substances, as septic poisons, which elevate the temperature of the body and cause fever.

Pyrope (n.) A variety of garnet, of a poppy or blood-red color, frequently with a tinge of orange. It is used as a gem. See the Note under Garnet.

Quaere (v. imperative.) Inquire; question; see; -- used to signify doubt or to suggest investigation.

Quarrel (n.) An arrow for a crossbow; -- so named because it commonly had a square head.

Quarrel (n.) A square or lozenge-shaped paving tile.

Quarrel (n.) A four-sided cutting tool or chisel having a diamond-shaped end.

Quartenylic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid of the acrylic acid series, metameric with crotonic acid, and obtained as a colorless liquid; -- so called from having four carbon atoms in the molecule. Called also isocrotonic acid.

Quarter (n.) The fourth of a hundred-weight, being 25 or 28 pounds, according as the hundredweight is reckoned at 100 or 112 pounds.

Quarter (n.) The after-part of a vessel's side, generally corresponding in extent with the quarter-deck; also, the part of the yardarm outside of the slings.

Quarter (v. t.) A small upright timber post, used in partitions; -- in the United States more commonly called stud.

Quarter (v. t.) The fourth part of the distance from one point of the compass to another, being the fourth part of 11? 15', that is, about 2? 49'; -- called also quarter point.

Quarter (v. t.) A station at which officers and men are posted in battle; -- usually in the plural.

Quarter (v. t.) Place of lodging or temporary residence; shelter; entertainment; -- usually in the plural.

Quarterhung (a.) Having trunnions the axes of which lie below the bore; -- said of a cannon.

Quartering (a.) Coming from a point well abaft the beam, but not directly astern; -- said of waves or any moving object.

Quarterly (adv.) In quarters, or quarterings; as, to bear arms quarterly; in four or more parts; -- said of a shield thus divided by Quartern (n.) A loaf of bread weighing about four pounds; -- called also quartern loaf.

Quarterstaff (n.) A long and stout staff formerly used as a weapon of defense and offense; -- so called because in holding it one hand was placed in the middle, and the other between the middle and the end.

Quicken tree () The European rowan tree; -- called also quickbeam, and quickenbeam. See Rowan tree.

Quintette (n.) A composition for five voices or instruments; also, the set of five persons who sing or play five-part music.

Quartered (a.) Quarter-sawed; -- said of timber, commonly oak.

Raiffeisen (a.) Designating, or pertaining to, a form of cooperative bank founded among the German agrarian population by Friedrich Wilhelm Raiffeisen (1818-88); as, Raiffeisen banks, the Raiffeisen system, etc. The banks are unlimited-liability institutions making small loans at a low rate of interest, for a designated purpose, to worthy members only.

Raceme (n.) A flower cluster with an elongated axis and many one-flowered lateral pedicels, as in the currant and chokecherry.

Raddle (n.) A hedge or fence made with raddles; -- called also raddle hedge.

Raffle (v. t.) To dispose of by means of a raffle; -- often followed by off; as, to raffle off a horse.

Ramsted (n.) A yellow-flowered weed; -- so named from a Mr. Ramsted who introduced it into Pennsylvania. See Toad flax. Called also Ramsted weed.

Ranine (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a swelling under the tongue; also, pertaining to the region where the swelling occurs; -- applied especially to branches of the lingual artery and lingual vein.

Rankle (a.) To become, or be, rank; to grow rank or strong; to be inflamed; to fester; -- used literally and figuratively.

Rankle (a.) To produce a festering or inflamed effect; to cause a sore; -- used literally and figuratively; as, a splinter rankles in the flesh; the words rankled in his bosom.

Raspberry (n.) The thimble-shaped fruit of the Rubus Idaeus and other similar brambles; as, the black, the red, and the white raspberry.

Rattle (v. i.) To make a clatter with the voice; to talk rapidly and idly; to clatter; -- with on or away; as, she rattled on for an hour.

Rattle (n.) The noise in the throat produced by the air in passing through mucus which the lungs are unable to expel; -- chiefly observable at the approach of death, when it is called the death rattle. See R/le.

Rattlebox (n.) Any species of Crotalaria, a genus of yellow-flowered herbs, with inflated, many-seeded pods.

Rattlewings (n.) The golden-eye.

Recover (v. t.) To overcome; to get the better of, -- as a state of mind or body.

Recover (v. i.) To regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; -- often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of poverty; to recover from fright.

Redbreast (n.) The knot, or red-breasted snipe; -- called also robin breast, and robin snipe. See Knot.

Redbreast (n.) The long-eared pondfish. See Pondfish.

Redeye (n.) The goggle-eye, or fresh-water rock bass.

Redirect (a.) Applied to the examination of a witness, by the party calling him, after the cross-examination.

Reduce (n.) To bring to the metallic state by separating from impurities; hence, in general, to remove oxygen from; to deoxidize; to combine with, or to subject to the action of, hydrogen; as, ferric iron is reduced to ferrous iron; or metals are reduced from their ores; -- opposed to oxidize.

Reference (n.) That which refers to something; a specific direction of the attention; as, a reference in a text-book.

Regeneration (n.) The reproduction of a part which has been removed or destroyed; re-formation; -- a process especially characteristic of a many of the lower animals; as, the regeneration of lost feelers, limbs, and claws by spiders and crabs.

Regenerator (n.) A device used in connection with hot-air engines, gas-burning furnaces, etc., in which the incoming air or gas is heated by being brought into contact with masses of iron, brick, etc., which have been previously heated by the outgoing, or escaping, hot air or gas.

Regimen (n.) a systematic course of diet, etc., pursed with a view to improving or preserving the health, or for the purpose of attaining some particular effect, as a reduction of flesh; -- sometimes used synonymously with hygiene.

Regimentals (n. pl.) The uniform worn by the officers and soldiers of a regiment; military dress; -- formerly used in the singular in the same sense.

Relate (v. i.) To stand in some relation; to have bearing or concern; to pertain; to refer; -- with to.

Remiped (a.) Having feet or legs that are used as oars; -- said of certain crustaceans and insects.

Remote (superl.) Removed to a distance; not near; far away; distant; -- said in respect to time or to place; as, remote ages; remote lands.

Remote (superl.) Hence, removed; not agreeing, according, or being related; -- in various figurative uses.

Remove (n.) The transfer of one's business, or of one's domestic belongings, from one location or dwelling house to another; -- in the United States usually called a move.

Repetend (n.) That part of a circulating decimal which recurs continually, ad infinitum: -- sometimes indicated by a dot over the first and last figures; thus, in the circulating decimal .728328328 + (otherwise .7/8/), the repetend is 283.

Repose (v.) To lay at rest; to cause to be calm or quiet; to compose; to rest, -- often reflexive; as, to repose one's self on a couch.

Repose (v.) That harmony or moderation which affords rest for the eye; -- opposed to the scattering and division of a subject into too many unconnected parts, and also to anything which is overstrained; as, a painting may want repose.

Repute (n.) Specifically: Good character or reputation; credit or honor derived from common or public opinion; -- opposed to disrepute.

Residence (n.) The residing of an incumbent on his benefice; -- opposed to nonresidence.

Resident (a.) Dwelling, or having an abode, in a place for a continued length of time; residing on one's own estate; -- opposed to nonresident; as, resident in the city or in the country.

Resident (n.) A diplomatic representative who resides at a foreign court; -- a term usualy applied to ministers of a rank inferior to that of ambassadors. See the Note under Minister, 4.

Retire (v. t.) To withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively.

Retitelae (n. pl.) A group of spiders which spin irregular webs; -- called also Retitelariae.

Retrieve (n.) The recovery of game once sprung; -- an old sporting term.

Reverence (n.) A person entitled to be revered; -- a title applied to priests or other ministers with the pronouns his or your; sometimes poetically to a father.

Rejuvenated (p. a.) Stimulated by uplift to renewed erosive activity; -- said of streams.

Rejuvenated (p. a.) Developed with steep slopes inside a district previously worn down nearly to base level; -- said of topography, or features of topography, as valleys, hills, etc.

Remise (n.) A livery carriage of a kind superior to an ordinary fiacre; -- so called because kept in a remise.

Richweed (n.) An herb (Pilea pumila) of the Nettle family, having a smooth, juicy, pellucid stem; -- called also clearweed.

Ringneck (n.) Any one of several species of small plovers of the genus Aegialitis, having a ring around the neck. The ring is black in summer, but becomes brown or gray in winter. The semipalmated plover (Ae. semipalmata) and the piping plover (Ae. meloda) are common North American species. Called also ring plover, and ring-necked plover.

Ringneck (n.) The ring-necked duck.

Robinet (n.) The chaffinch; -- called also roberd.

Rockweed (n.) Any coarse seaweed growing on sea-washed rocks, especially Fucus.

Romanesque (a.) Somewhat resembling the Roman; -- applied sometimes to the debased style of the later Roman empire, but esp. to the more developed architecture prevailing from the 8th century to the 12th.

Rosehead (n.) A many-sided pyramidal head upon a nail; also a nail with such a head.

Rotate (a.) Having the parts spreading out like a wheel; wheel-shaped; as, a rotate spicule or scale; a rotate corolla, i.e., a monopetalous corolla with a flattish border, and no tube or a very short one.

Rotated (a.) Turned round, as a wheel; also, wheel-shaped; rotate.

Rotche (n.) A very small arctic sea bird (Mergulus alle, or Alle alle) common on both coasts of the Atlantic in winter; -- called also little auk, dovekie, rotch, rotchie, and sea dove.

Rounce (n.) The handle by which the bed of a hand press, holding the form of type, etc., is run in under the platen and out again; -- sometimes applied to the whole apparatus by which the form is moved under the platen.

Rounceval (a.) Large; strong; -- from the gigantic bones shown at Roncesvalles, and alleged to be those of old heroes.

Roussette (n.) Any small shark of the genus Scyllium; -- called also dogfish. See Dogfish.

Rubble (n.) Water-worn or rough broken stones; broken bricks, etc., used in coarse masonry, or to fill up between the facing courses of walls.

Ruffle (v. t. & i.) A low, vibrating beat of a drum, not so loud as a roll; -- called also ruff.

Rurales (n. pl.) The gossamer-winged butterflies; a family of small butterflies, including the hairstreaks, violets, and theclas.

Saddle (n.) A seat for a rider, -- usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle.

Saddle (n.) The threshold of a door, when a separate piece from the floor or landing; -- so called because it spans and covers the joint between two floors.

Saddleback (a.) Same as Saddle-backed.

Saddleback (n.) Anything saddle-backed; esp., a hill or ridge having a concave outSaddleback (n.) The larva of a bombycid moth (Empretia stimulea) which has a large, bright green, saddle-shaped patch of color on the back.

Sainted (a.) Entered into heaven; -- a euphemism for dead.

Saligenin (n.) A phenol alcohol obtained, by the decomposition of salicin, as a white crystalSaSandnecker (n.) A European flounder (Hippoglossoides limandoides); -- called also rough dab, long fluke, sand fluke, and sand sucker.

Savine (n.) A coniferous shrub (Juniperus Sabina) of Western Asia, occasionally found also in the northern parts of the United States and in British America. It is a compact bush, with dark-colored foliage, and produces small berries having a glaucous bloom. Its bitter, acrid tops are sometimes used in medicine for gout, amenorrhoea, etc.

Saddle (n.) A formation of gold-bearing quartz occurring along the crest of an anticlinal fold, esp. in Australia.

Scalpel (n.) A small knife with a thin, keen blade, -- used by surgeons, and in dissecting.

Scammel (n.) The female bar-tailed godwit.

Scarce (superl.) Scantily supplied (with); deficient (in); -- with of.

Scarlet (n.) A deep bright red tinged with orange or yellow, -- of many tints and shades; a vivid or bright red color.

Scauper (n.) A tool with a semicircular edge, -- used by engravers to clear away the spaces between the Scepterellate (a.) Having a straight shaft with whorls of spines; -- said of certain sponge spicules. See Illust. under Spicule.

Schene (n.) An Egyptian or Persian measure of length, varying from thirty-two to sixty stadia.

Scolder (n.) The oyster catcher; -- so called from its shrill cries.

Scooper (n.) The avocet; -- so called because it scoops up the mud to obtain food.

Scrape (v. t.) To collect by, or as by, a process of scraping; to gather in small portions by laborious effort; hence, to acquire avariciously and save penuriously; -- often followed by together or up; as, to scrape money together.

Scrape (v. t.) To express disapprobation of, as a play, or to silence, as a speaker, by drawing the feet back and forth upon the floor; -- usually with down.

Scribe (v. t.) To cut (anything) in such a way as to fit closely to a somewhat irregular surface, as a baseboard to a floor which is out of level, a board to the curves of a molding, or the like; -- so called because the workman marks, or scribe, with the compasses the Scriber (n.) A sharp-pointed tool, used by joiners for drawing Scupper (v.) An opening cut through the waterway and bulwarks of a ship, so that water falling on deck may flow overboard; -- called also scupper hole.

Scythe (n.) A scythe-shaped blade attached to ancient war chariots.

Scythewhet (n.) Wilson's thrush; -- so called from its note.

Secure (a.) Confident in opinion; not entertaining, or not having reason to entertain, doubt; certain; sure; -- commonly with of; as, secure of a welcome.

Secure (a.) Net exposed to danger; safe; -- applied to persons and things, and followed by against or from.

Secure (v. t.) To put beyond hazard of losing or of not receiving; to make certain; to assure; to insure; -- frequently with against or from, rarely with of; as, to secure a creditor against loss; to secure a debt by a mortgage.

Semble (a.) It seems; -- chiefly used impersonally in reports and judgments to express an opinion in reference to the law on some point not necessary to be decided, and not intended to be definitely settled in the cause.

Semidemiquaver (n.) A demisemiquaver; a thirty-second note.

Settee (n.) A long seat with a back, -- made to accommodate several persons at once.

Settee (n.) A vessel with a very long, sharp prow, carrying two or three masts with lateen sails, -- used in the Mediterranean.

Settle (n.) To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; -- said of a liquid; as, to settle coffee, or the grounds of coffee.

Settle (n.) To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; -- said of the ground, of roads, and the like; as, clear weather settles the roads.

Sexagesima (n.) The second Sunday before Lent; -- so called as being about the sixtieth day before Easter.

Shrine (n.) Short for Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, a secret order professedly originated by one Kalif Alu, a son-in-law of Mohammed, at Mecca, in the year of the Hegira 25 (about 646 a. d.) In the modern order, established in the United States in 1872, only Knights Templars or thirty-second degree Masons are eligible for admission, though the order itself is not Masonic.

Shafted (a.) Having a shaft; -- applied to a spear when the head and the shaft are of different tinctures.

Shatter (n.) A fragment of anything shattered; -- used chiefly or soley in the phrase into shatters; as, to break a glass into shatters.

Shedder (n.) A crab in the act of casting its shell, or immediately afterwards while still soft; -- applied especially to the edible crabs, which are most prized while in this state.

Shelter (v. t.) To betake to cover, or to a safe place; -- used reflexively.

Sherbet (n.) A preparation of bicarbonate of soda, tartaric acid, sugar, etc., variously flavored, for making an effervescing drink; -- called also sherbet powder.

Shillelah (n.) An oaken sapling or cudgel; any cudgel; -- so called from Shillelagh, a place in Ireland of that name famous for its oaks.

Shinney (n.) The game of hockey; -- so called because of the liability of the players to receive blows on the shin.

Shirred (a.) Broken into an earthen dish and baked over the fire; -- said of eggs.

Shooter (n.) A firearm; as, a five-shooter.

Shopkeeper (n.) A trader who sells goods in a shop, or by retail; -- in distinction from one who sells by wholesale.

Shrive (v. t.) To hear or receive the confession of; to administer confession and absolution to; -- said of a priest as the agent.

Shrive (v. t.) To confess, and receive absolution; -- used reflexively.

Shrivel (v. i.) To draw, or be drawn, into wrinkles; to shrink, and form corrugations; as, a leaf shriveles in the hot sun; the skin shrivels with age; -- often with up.

Sicklebill (n.) Any one of three species of humming birds of the genus Eutoxeres, native of Central and South America. They have a long and strongly curved bill. Called also the sickle-billed hummer.

Sicklewort (n.) A plant of the genus Coronilla (C. scorpioides); -- so named from its curved pods.

Sifilet (n.) The six-shafted bird of paradise. See Paradise bird, under Paradise.

Sighted (a.) Having sight, or seeing, in a particular manner; -- used in composition; as, long-sighted, short-sighted, quick-sighted, sharp-sighted, and the like.

Simple (a.) Consisting of a single individual or zooid; as, a simple ascidian; -- opposed to compound.

Simple (a.) A medicinal plant; -- so called because each vegetable was supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy.

Sinewed (a.) Furnished with sinews; as, a strong-sinewed youth.

Single (v. i.) To take the irrregular gait called single-foot;- said of a horse. See Single-foot.

Single (n.) A game with but one player on each side; -- usually in the plural.

Singlet (n.) An unSixtieth (a.) Next in order after the fifty-ninth.

Sixtieth (n.) The next in order after the fifty-ninth; the tenth after the fiftieth.

Skelter (v. i.) To run off helter-skelter; to hurry; to scurry; -- with away or off.

Skilled (a.) Having familiar knowledge united with readiness and dexterity in its application; familiarly acquainted with; expert; skillful; -- often followed by in; as, a person skilled in drawing or geometry.

Skipper (n.) Any one of numerous species of small butterflies of the family Hesperiadae; -- so called from their peculiar short, jerking flight.

Skutterudite (n.) A mineral of a bright metallic luster and tin-white to pale lead-gray color. It consists of arsenic and cobalt.

Slattern (v. t.) To consume carelessly or wastefully; to waste; -- with away.

Sleave (n.) Silk not yet twisted; floss; -- called also sleave silk.

Sleave (v. t.) To separate, as threads; to divide, as a collection of threads; to sley; -- a weaver's term.

Sledge (n.) A game at cards; -- called also old sledge, and all fours.

Sledge (v. t.) A large, heavy hammer, usually wielded with both hands; -- called also sledge hammer.

Sleeved (a.) Having sleeves; furnished with sleeves; -- often in composition; as, long-sleeved.

Slender (superl.) Uttered with a thin tone; -- the opposite of broad; as, the slender vowels long e and i.

Sludge (n.) Anything resembling mud or slush; as: (a) A muddy or slimy deposit from sweage. (b) Mud from a drill hole in boring. (c) Muddy sediment in a steam boiler. (d) Settling of cottonseed oil, used in making soap, etc. (e) A residuum of crude paraffin-oil distillation.

Slopseller (n.) One who sells slops, or ready-made clothes. See 4th Slop, 3.

Sluice (n.) A long box or trough through which water flows, -- used for washing auriferous earth.

Smarten (v. t.) To make smart or spruce; -- usually with up.

Smicket (n.) A woman's under-garment; a smock.

Sneezeweed (n.) A yellow-flowered composite plant (Helenium autumnale) the odor of which is said to cause sneezing.

Snorter (n.) The wheather; -- so called from its cry.

Soapberry tree () Any tree of the genus Sapindus, esp. Sapindus saponaria, the fleshy part of whose fruit is used instead of soap in washing Softness (n.) The quality or state of being soft; -- opposed to hardness, and used in the various specific senses of the adjective.

Solace (n.) To cheer in grief or under calamity; to comfort; to relieve in affliction, solitude, or discomfort; to console; -- applied to persons; as, to solace one with the hope of future reward.

Soldier (n.) A brave warrior; a man of military experience and skill, or a man of distinguished valor; -- used by way of emphasis or distinction.

Solute (a.) Not adhering; loose; -- opposed to adnate; as, a solute stipule.

Sombrero (n.) A kind of broad-brimmed hat, worn in Spain and in Spanish America.

Sonties (n.) Probably from "saintes" saints, or from sanctities; -- used as an oath.

Sorgne (n.) The three-beared rocking, or whistlefish.

Spalpeen (n.) A scamp; an Irish term for a good-for-nothing fellow; -- often used in good-humored contempt or ridicule.

Spanker (n.) The after sail of a ship or bark, being a fore-and-aft sail attached to a boom and gaff; -- sometimes called driver. See Illust. under Sail.

Sparse (superl.) Placed irregularly and distantly; scattered; -- applied to branches, leaves, peduncles, and the like.

Sparteine (n.) A narcotic alkaloid extracted from the tops of the common broom (Cytisus scoparius, formerly Spartium scoparium), as a colorless oily liquid of aniSpelter (n.) Zinc; -- especially so called in commerce and arts.

Spencer (n.) A fore-and-aft sail, abaft the foremast or the mainmast, hoisted upon a small supplementary mast and set with a gaff and no boom; a trysail carried at the foremast or mainmast; -- named after its inventor, Knight Spencer, of England [1802].

Spenserian (a.) Of or pertaining to the English poet Spenser; -- specifically applied to the stanza used in his poem "The Faerie Queene."

Sphalerite (n.) Zinc sulphide; -- called also blende, black-jack, false galena, etc. See Blende (a).

Sphene (n.) A mineral found usually in thin, wedge-shaped crystals of a yellow or green to black color. It is a silicate of titanium and calcium; titanite.

Spiegel iron () A fusible white cast iron containing a large amount of carbon (from three and a half to six per cent) and some manganese. When the manganese reaches twenty-five per cent and upwards it has a granular structure, and constitutes the alloy ferro manganese, largely used in the manufacture of Bessemer steel. Called also specular pig iron, spiegel, and spiegeleisen.

Spinner (n.) A goatsucker; -- so called from the peculiar noise it makes when darting through the air.

Spitted (a.) Shot out long; -- said of antlers.

Splice (v. t.) To unite, as two ropes, or parts of a rope, by a particular manner of interweaving the strands, -- the union being between two ends, or between an end and the body of a rope.

Sponger (n.) Fig.: A parasitical dependent; a hanger-on.

Spooney (a.) Weak-minded; demonstratively fond; as, spooney lovers.

Spooney (n.) A weak-minded or silly person; one who is foolishly fond.

Spruce (n.) Neat, without elegance or dignity; -- formerly applied to things with a serious meaning; now chiefly applied to persons.

Spurge (v. t.) To emit foam; to froth; -- said of the emission of yeast from beer in course of fermentation.

Square (n.) A certain number of Square (n.) An instrument having at least one right angle and two or more straight edges, used to lay out or test square work. It is of several forms, as the T square, the carpenter's square, the try-square., etc.

Square (a.) At right angles with the mast or the keel, and parallel to the horizon; -- said of the yards of a square-rigged vessel when they are so braced.

Square (v. i.) To take a boxing attitude; -- often with up, sometimes with off.

Squarer (n.) One who squares, or quarrels; a hot-headed, contentious fellow.

Squaterole (n.) The black-bellied plover.

Squire (n.) A shield-bearer or armor-bearer who attended a knight.

Squireen (n.) One who is half squire and half farmer; -- used humorously.

Squitee (n.) The squeteague; -- called also squit.

Stagger (n.) An unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing, as if one were about to fall; a reeling motion; vertigo; -- often in the plural; as, the stagger of a drunken man.

Stammer (v. t.) To utter or pronounce with hesitation or imperfectly; -- sometimes with out.

Stammering (n.) A disturbance in the formation of sounds. It is due essentially to long-continued spasmodic contraction of the diaphragm, by which expiration is preented, and hence it may be considered as a spasmodic inspiration.

Stampede (v. i.) To run away in a panic; -- said droves of cattle, horses, etc., also of armies.

Standergrass (n.) A plant (Orchis mascula); -- called also standerwort, and long purple. See Long purple, under Long.

Stanielry (n.) Hawking with staniels, -- a base kind of falconry.

Stannel (n.) The kestrel; -- called also standgale, standgall, stanchel, stand hawk, stannel hawk, steingale, stonegall.

Statuette (n.) A small statue; -- usually applied to a figure much less than life size, especially when of marble or bronze, or of plaster or clay as a preparation for the marble or bronze, as distinguished from a figure in terra cotta or the like. Cf. Figurine.

Steeve (v. i.) To project upward, or make an angle with the horizon or with the Steeve (v. t.) To elevate or fix at an angle with the horizon; -- said of the bowsprit, etc.

Steeve (n.) The angle which a bowsprit makes with the horizon, or with the Steller (n.) The rytina; -- called also stellerine.

Sterned (a.) Having a stern of a particular shape; -- used in composition; as, square-sterned.

Stifle (n.) The joint next above the hock, and near the flank, in the hind leg of the horse and allied animals; the joint corresponding to the knee in man; -- called also stifle joint. See Illust. under Horse.

Stilbene (n.) A hydrocarbon, C14H12, produced artificially in large, fine crystals; -- called also diphenyl ethylene, toluylene, etc.

Stopped (a.) Made by complete closure of the mouth organs; shut; -- said of certain consonants (p, b, t, d, etc.).

Stopper (n.) A short piece of rope having a knot at one or both ends, with a lanyard under the knot, -- used to secure something.

Strike (v. t.) To advance; to cause to go forward; -- used only in past participle.

Strike (v. i.) To break forth; to commence suddenly; -- with into; as, to strike into reputation; to strike into a run.

Strike (v. i.) To become attached to something; -- said of the spat of oysters.

Strive (v. i.) To struggle in opposition; to be in contention or dispute; to contend; to contest; -- followed by against or with before the person or thing opposed; as, strive against temptation; strive for the truth.

Stroke (v. t.) The oar nearest the stern of a boat, by which the other oars are guided; -- called also stroke oar.

Stromeyerite (n.) A steel-gray mineral of metallic luster. It is a sulphide of silver and copper.

Stuttering (n.) The act of one who stutters; -- restricted by some physiologists to defective speech due to inability to form the proper sounds, the breathing being normal, as distinguished from stammering.

Stable (a.) So placed as to resist forces tending to cause motion; of such structure as to resist distortion or molecular or chemical disturbance; -- said of any body or substance.

Strike (n.) Same as Ten-strike.

Subtle (superl.) Sly in design; artful; cunning; insinuating; subtile; -- applied to persons; as, a subtle foe.

Subtle (superl.) Characterized by refinement and niceness in drawing distinctions; nicely discriminating; -- said of persons; as, a subtle logician; refined; tenuous; sinuous; insinuating; hence, penetrative or pervasive; -- said of the mind; its faculties, or its operations; as, a subtle intellect; a subtle imagination; a subtle process of thought; also, difficult of apprehension; elusive.

Succeed (v. i.) To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; -- often with to.

Supine (a.) Lying on the back, or with the face upward; -- opposed to prone.

Supine (n.) A verbal noun; or (according to C.F.Becker), a case of the infinitive mood ending in -um and -u, that in -um being sometimes called the former supine, and that in -u the latter supine.

Suppression (n.) Complete stoppage of a natural secretion or excretion; as, suppression of urine; -- used in contradiction to retention, which signifies that the secretion or excretion is retained without expulsion.

Suttee (n.) A Hindoo widow who immolates herself, or is immolated, on the funeral pile of her husband; -- so called because this act of self-immolation is regarded as envincing excellence of wifely character.

Sutteeism (n.) The practice of self-immolation of widows in Hindostan.

Swallet (n.) Water breaking in upon the miners at their work; -- so called among tin miners.

Sweeten (a.) To make warm and fertile; -- opposed to sour; as, to dry and sweeten soils.

Symplectic (a.) Plaiting or joining together; -- said of a bone next above the quadrate in the mandibular suspensorium of many fishes, which unites together the other bones of the suspensorium.

Syneresis (n.) The union, or drawing together into one syllable, of two vowels that are ordinarily separated in syllabification; synecphonesis; -- the opposite of diaeresis.

Synthesis (n.) The combination of separate elements of thought into a whole, as of simple into complex conceptions, species into genera, individual propositions into systems; -- the opposite of analysis.

Synthetical (a.) Comprising within itself structural or other characters which are usually found only in two or more diverse groups; -- said of species, genera, and higher groups. See the Note under Comprehensive, 3.

Tabaret (n.) A stout silk having satin stripes, -- used for furniture.

Tanager (n.) Any one of numerous species of bright-colored singing birds belonging to Tanagra, Piranga, and allied genera. The scarlet tanager (Piranga erythromelas) and the summer redbird (Piranga rubra) are common species of the United States.

Tangle (v.) An instrument consisting essentially of an iron bar to which are attached swabs, or bundles of frayed rope, or other similar substances, -- used to capture starfishes, sea urchins, and other similar creatures living at the bottom of the sea.

Tattler (n.) Any one of several species of large, long-legged sandpipers belonging to the genus Totanus.

Tattlery (n.) Idle talk or chat; tittle-tattle.

Telenergy (n.) Display of force or energy at a distance, or without contact; -- applied to mediumistic phenomena.

Teague (n.) An Irishman; -- a term used in contempt.

Teetee (n.) Any one of several species of small, soft-furred South American monkeys belonging to Callithrix, Chrysothrix, and allied genera; as, the collared teetee (Callithrix torquatus), and the squirrel teetee (Chrysothrix sciurea). Called also pinche, titi, and saimiri. See Squirrel monkey, under Squirrel.

Tenement (n.) Any species of permanent property that may be held, so as to create a tenancy, as lands, houses, rents, commons, an office, an advowson, a franchise, a right of common, a peerage, and the like; -- called also free / frank tenements.

Terebene (n.) A polymeric modification of terpene, obtained as a white crystalTerrier (n.) One of a breed of small dogs, which includes several distinct subbreeds, some of which, such as the Skye terrier and Yorkshire terrier, have long hair and drooping ears, while others, at the English and the black-and-tan terriers, have short, close, smooth hair and upright ears.

Thallene (n.) A hydrocarbon obtained from coal-tar residues, and remarkable for its intense yellowish green fluorescence.

Thermetograph (n.) A self-registering thermometer, especially one that registers the maximum and minimum during long periods.

Thiller (n.) The horse which goes between the thills, or shafts, and supports them; also, the last horse in a team; -- called also thill horse.

Thirteenth (a.) Next in order after the twelfth; the third after the tenth; -- the ordinal of thirteen; as, the thirteenth day of the month.

Thither (adv.) To that place; -- opposed to hither.

Thither (a.) Being on the farther side from the person speaking; farther; -- a correlative of hither; as, on the thither side of the water.

Thorpe (n.) A group of houses in the country; a small village; a hamlet; a dorp; -- now chiefly occurring in names of places and persons; as, Althorp, Mablethorpe.

Thrave (n.) Twenty-four (in some places, twelve) sheaves of wheat; a shock, or stook.

Throne (n.) A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; -- a meaning given by the schoolmen.

Thunder (n.) To produce thunder; to sound, rattle, or roar, as a discharge of atmospheric electricity; -- often used impersonally; as, it thundered continuously.

Thunderbird (n.) An Australian insectivorous singing bird (Pachycephala gutturalis). The male is conspicuously marked with black and yellow, and has a black crescent on the breast. Called also white-throated thickhead, orange-breasted thrust, black-crowned thrush, guttural thrush, and black-breasted flycatcher.

Thunderer (n.) One who thunders; -- used especially as a translation of L. tonans, an epithet applied by the Romans to several of their gods, esp. to Jupiter.

Thunderhead (n.) A rounded mass of cloud, with shining white edges; a cumulus, -- often appearing before a thunderstorm.

Thundering (a.) Very great; -- often adverbially.

Thunderstone (n.) A thunderbolt, -- formerly believed to be a stone.

Thunderstrike (v. t.) To astonish, or strike dumb, as with something terrible; -- rarely used except in the past participle.

Thunderworm (n.) A small, footless, burrowing, snakelike lizard (Rhineura Floridana) allied to Amphisbaena, native of Florida; -- so called because it leaves its burrows after a thundershower.

Tiddledywinks (n.) A game in which the object is to snap small disks of bone, ivory, or the like, from a flat surface, as of a table, into a small cup or basket; -- called also tiddlywinks.

Tierce (n.) A cask whose content is one third of a pipe; that is, forty-two wine gallons; also, a liquid measure of forty-two wine, or thirty-five imperial, gallons.

Tierce (n.) A sequence of three playing cards of the same suit. Tierce of ace, king, queen, is called tierce-major.

Tierce (a.) Divided into three equal parts of three different tinctures; -- said of an escutcheon.

Timeserver (n.) One who adapts his opinions and manners to the times; one who obsequiously compiles with the ruling power; -- now used only in a bad sense.

Tippler (n.) One who keeps a tippling-house.

Tittlebat (n.) The three-spined stickleback.

Tolane (n.) A hydrocarbon, C14H10, related both to the acetylene and the aromatic series, and produced artificially as a white crystalTomaley (n.) The liver of the lobster, which becomes green when boiled; -- called also tomalTongue (n.) Speech; words or declarations only; -- opposed to thoughts or actions.

Tonguester (n.) One who uses his tongue; a talker; a story-teller; a gossip.

Torqued (a.) Twisted; bent; -- said of a dolphin haurient, which forms a figure like the letter S.

Trailer (n.) A car coupled to, and drawn by, a motor car in front of it; -- used esp. of such cars on street railroads. Called also trail car.

Triplex (a.) Havingthree principal operative parts or motions, so as to produce a three-fold effect.

Truite (a.) Having a delicately crackled surface; -- applied to porcelian, etc.

Trustee stock () High-grade stock in which trust funds may be legally invested.

Trachelobranchiate (a.) Having the gills situated upon the neck; -- said of certain mollusks.

Tracheobranchia (n.) One of the gill-like breathing organs of certain aquatic insect larvae. They contain tracheal tubes somewhat similar to those of other insects.

Tracheobronchial (a.) Pertaining both to the tracheal and bronchial tubes, or to their junction; -- said of the syrinx of certain birds.

Trammeled (a.) Having blazes, or white marks, on the fore and hind foot of one side, as if marked by trammels; -- said of a horse.

Treebeard (n.) A pendulous branching lichen (Usnea barbata); -- so called from its resemblance to hair.

Trefle (n.) A species of time; -- so called from its resemblance in form to a trefoil.

Trefle (a.) Having a three-lobed extremity or extremities, as a cross; also, more rarely, ornamented with trefoils projecting from the edges, as a bearing.

Trinket (n.) A three-cornered sail formerly carried on a ship's foremast, probably on a lateen yard.

Trispermous (a.) Containing three seeds; three-seeded; as, a trispermous capsule.

Triune (a.) Being three in one; -- an epithet used to express the unity of a trinity of persons in the Godhead.

Tropaeolin (n.) A name given to any one of a series of orange-red dyestuffs produced artificially from certain complex sulphonic acid derivatives of azo and diazo hydrocarbons of the aromatic series; -- so called because of the general resemblance to the shades of nasturtium (Tropaeolum).

Trumpeter (n.) Any one of several species of long-legged South American birds of the genus Psophia, especially P. crepitans, which is abundant, and often domesticated and kept with other poultry by the natives. They are allied to the cranes. So called from their loud cry. Called also agami, and yakamik.

Trumpetwood (n.) A tropical American tree (Cecropia peltata) of the Breadfruit family, having hollow stems, which are used for wind instruments; -- called also snakewood, and trumpet tree.

Truster (n.) One who makes a trust; -- the correlative of trustee.

Tsetse (n.) A venomous two-winged African fly (Glossina morsitans) whose bite is very poisonous, and even fatal, to horses and cattle, but harmless to men. It renders extensive districts in which it abounds uninhabitable during certain seasons of the year.

Tumble (v. t.) To turn over; to turn or throw about, as for examination or search; to roll or move in a rough, coarse, or unceremonious manner; to throw down or headlong; to precipitate; -- sometimes with over, about, etc.; as, to tumble books or papers.

Turnkey (n.) An instrument with a hinged claw, -- used for extracting teeth with a twist.

Turtle (n.) The curved plate in which the form is held in a type-revolving cylinder press.

Twaite (n.) A European shad; -- called also twaite shad. See Shad.

Twelvepence (n.) A shilling sterling, being about twenty-four cents.

Twitter (v. i.) To make the sound of a half-suppressed laugh; to titter; to giggle.

Twitter (n.) A half-suppressed laugh; a fit of laughter partially restrained; a titter; a giggle.

Unassented (a.) Not assented; -- said specif. of stocks or bonds the holders of which refuse to deposit them by way of assent to an agreement altering their status, as in a readjustment.

Unable (a.) Not able; not having sufficient strength, means, knowledge, skill, or the like; impotent' weak; helpless; incapable; -- now usually followed by an infinitive or an adverbial phrase; as, unable for work; unable to bear fatigue.

Unappealable (a.) Not to be appealed from; -- said of a judge or a judgment that can not be overruled.

Uncared (a.) Not cared for; not heeded; -- with for.

Uncomely (a.) Not comely. -- adv. In an uncomely manner.

Unexperienced (a.) Untried; -- applied to things.

Unguled (a.) Hoofed, or bearing hoofs; -- used only when these are of a tincture different from the body.

Unlawed (a.) Not having the claws and balls of the forefeet cut off; -- said of dogs.

Unwares (adv.) Unawares; unexpectedly; -- sometimes preceded by at.

Urohaematin (n.) Urinary haematin; -- applied to the normal coloring matter of the urine, on the supposition that it is formed either directly or indirectly (through bilirubin) from the haematin of the blood. See Urochrome, and Urobilin.

Vendee (n.) The person to whom a thing is vended, or sold; -- the correlative of vendor.

Viable (a.) Capable of living; born alive and with such form and development of organs as to be capable of living; -- said of a newborn, or a prematurely born, infant.

Vielle (n.) An old stringed instrument played upon with a wheel; a hurdy-gurdy.

Vilayet (n.) One of the chief administrative divisions or provinces of the Ottoman Empire; -- formerly called eyalet.

Virile (a.) Having the nature, properties, or qualities, of an adult man; characteristic of developed manhood; hence, masterful; forceful; specifically, capable of begetting; -- opposed to womanly, feminine, and puerile; as, virile age, virile power, virile organs.

Viroled (a.) Furnished with a virole or viroles; -- said of a horn or a bugle when the rings are of different tincture from the rest of the horn.

Visage (n.) The face, countenance, or look of a person or an animal; -- chiefly applied to the human face.

Vivace (a. & adv.) Brisk; vivacious; with spirit; -- a direction to perform a passage in a brisk and lively manner.

Voyageur (n.) A traveler; -- applied in Canada to a man employed by the fur companies in transporting goods by the rivers and across the land, to and from the remote stations in the Northwest.

Wabble (v. i.) To move staggeringly or unsteadily from one side to the other; to vacillate; to move the manner of a rotating disk when the axis of rotation is incWaister (n.) A seaman, usually a green hand or a broken-down man, stationed in the waist of a vessel of war.

Warbler (n.) Any one of numerous species of small Old World singing birds belonging to the family Sylviidae, many of which are noted songsters. The bluethroat, blackcap, reed warbler (see under Reed), and sedge warbler (see under Sedge) are well-known species.

Wattmeter (n.) An instrument for measuring power in watts, -- much used in measuring the energy of an electric current.

Wattle (n.) The astringent bark of several Australian trees of the genus Acacia, used in tanning; -- called also wattle bark.

Wattle (n.) In Australasia, any tree of the genus Acacia; -- so called from the wattles, or hurdles, which the early settlers made of the long, pliable branches or of the split stems of the slender species.

Wattless (a.) Without any power (cf. Watt); -- said of an alternating current or component of current when it differs in phase by ninety degrees from the electromotive force which produces it, or of an electromotive force or component thereof when the current it produces differs from it in phase by 90 degrees.

Weedless (a.) Free from weeds; -- said of a kind of motor-boat propeller the blades of which curve backwardly, as respects the direction of rotation, so that they draw through the water, and so do not gather weeds with which they come in contact.

Weetweet (n.) A throwing toy, or implement, of the Australian aborigines, consisting of a cigar-shaped stick fastened at one end to a flexible twig. It weighs in all about two ounces, and is about two feet long.

Weather (a.) Being toward the wind, or windward -- opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc.

Weatherboard (n.) A clapboard or feather-edged board used in weatherboarding.

Weathercock (n.) A vane, or weather vane; -- so called because originally often in the figure of a cock, turning on the top of a spire with the wind, and showing its direction.

Wentletrap (n.) Any one of numerous species of elegant, usually white, marine shells of the genus Scalaria, especially Scalaria pretiosa, which was formerly highly valued; -- called also staircase shell. See Scalaria.

Whopper (n.) Something uncommonly large of the kind; something astonishing; -- applied especially to a bold lie.

Wheeled (a.) Having wheels; -- used chiefly in composition; as, a four-wheeled carriage.

Wheeler (n.) A steam vessel propelled by a paddle wheel or by paddle wheels; -- used chiefly in the terms side-wheeler and stern-wheeler.

Whence (adv.) From what place; hence, from what or which source, origin, antecedent, premise, or the like; how; -- used interrogatively.

Whence (adv.) From what or which place, source, material, cause, etc.; the place, source, etc., from which; -- used relatively.

Whether (pron.) Which (of two); which one (of two); -- used interrogatively and relatively.

Whether (conj.) In case; if; -- used to introduce the first or two or more alternative clauses, the other or others being connected by or, or by or whether. When the second of two alternatives is the simple negative of the first it is sometimes only indicated by the particle not or no after the correlative, and sometimes it is omitted entirely as being distinctly implied in the whether of the first.

Whinberry (n.) The English bilberry; -- so called because it grows on moors among the whins, or furze.

Whisker (n.) Formerly, the hair of the upper lip; a mustache; -- usually in the plural.

Whither (adv.) To what place; -- used interrogatively; as, whither goest thou?

Whither (adv.) To what or which place; -- used relatively.

Whither (adv.) To what point, degree, end, conclusion, or design; whereunto; whereto; -- used in a sense not physical.

Wiggler (n.) The young, either larva or pupa, of the mosquito; -- called also wiggletail.

Windlestraw (n.) A grass used for making ropes or for plaiting, esp. Agrostis Spica-ventis.

Windward (n.) The point or side from which the wind blows; as, to ply to the windward; -- opposed to leeward.

Wink (v. i.) To avoid taking notice, as if by shutting the eyes; to connive at anything; to be tolerant; -- generally with at.

Woolsey (n.) Linsey-woolsey.

Worsted (n.) Well-twisted yarn spun of long-staple wool which has been combed to lay the fibers parallel, used for carpets, cloth, hosiery, gloves, and the like.

Wrasse (n.) Any one of numerous edible, marine, spiny-finned fishes of the genus Labrus, of which several species are found in the Mediterranean and on the Atlantic coast of Europe. Many of the species are bright-colored.

Ycleped (p. p.) Called; named; -- obsolete, except in archaic or humorous writings.

Yenite (n.) A silicate of iron and lime occurring in black prismatic crystals; -- also called ilvaite.

Yestreen (n.) Yester-evening; yesternight; last night.

Yokelet (n.) A small farm; -- so called as requiring but one yoke of oxen to till it.

Yourself (pron.) An emphasized or reflexive form of the pronoun of the second person; -- used as a subject commonly with you; as, you yourself shall see it; also, alone in the predicate, either in the nominative or objective case; as, you have injured yourself.

Zaphrentis (n.) An extinct genus of cyathophylloid corals common in the Paleozoic formations. It is cup-shaped with numerous septa, and with a deep pit in one side of the cup.

Zouave (n.) Hence, one of a body of soldiers who adopt the dress and drill of the Zouaves, as was done by a number of volunteer regiments in the army of the United States in the Civil War, 1861-65.

Zymogen (n.) A mother substance, or antecedent, of an enzyme or chemical ferment; -- applied to such substances as, not being themselves actual ferments, may by internal changes give rise to a ferment.

Zymogene (n.) One of a physiological group of globular bacteria which produces fermentations of diverse nature; -- distinguished from pathogene.

Zymome (n.) A glutinous substance, insoluble in alcohol, resembling legumin; -- now called vegetable fibrin, vegetable albumin, or gluten casein.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.