Words whose 7th letter is L

Abigail (n.) A lady's waiting-maid.

Accomplished (a.) Complete in acquirements as the result usually of training; -- commonly in a good sense; as, an accomplished scholar, an accomplished villain.

Accumulator (n.) A system of elastic springs for relieving the strain upon a rope, as in deep-sea dredging.

Acephala (n. pl.) That division of the Mollusca which includes the bivalve shells, like the clams and oysters; -- so called because they have no evident head. Formerly the group included the Tunicata, Brachiopoda, and sometimes the Bryozoa. See Mollusca.

Acephalocyst (n.) A larval entozoon in the form of a subglobular or oval vesicle, or hydatid, filled with fluid, sometimes found in the tissues of man and the lower animals; -- so called from the absence of a head or visible organs on the vesicle. These cysts are the immature stages of certain tapeworms. Also applied to similar cysts of different origin.

Acephalous (a.) Without a distinct head; -- a term applied to bivalve mollusks.

Aiguille (n.) A needle-shaped peak.

Amphiblastic (a.) Segmenting unequally; -- said of telolecithal ova with complete segmentation.

Amygdaliferous (a.) Almond-bearing.

Amygdaloidal (a.) Almond-shaped.

Anadiplosis (n.) A repetition of the last word or any prominent word in a sentence or clause, at the beginning of the next, with an adjunct idea; as, "He retained his virtues amidst all his misfortunes -- misfortunes which no prudence could foresee or prevent."

Anethol (n.) A substance obtained from the volatile oils of anise, fennel, etc., in the form of soft shining scales; -- called also anise camphor.

Anguilliform (a.) Eel-shaped.

Antisolar (a.) Opposite to the sun; -- said of the point in the heavens 180? distant from the sun.

Apteral (a.) Without lateral columns; -- applied to buildings which have no series of columns along their sides, but are either prostyle or amphiprostyle, and opposed to peripteral.

Assibilation (n.) Change of a non-sibilant letter to a sibilant, as of -tion to -shun, duke to ditch.

Atrabiliary (a.) Melancholic or hypohondriac; atrabilious; -- from the supposed predominance of black bile, to the influence of which the ancients attributed hypochondria, melancholy, and mania.

Auricula (n.) A species of Primula, or primrose, called also, from the shape of its leaves, bear's-ear.

Auricula (n.) A species of Hirneola (H. auricula), a membranaceous fungus, called also auricula Judae, or Jew's-ear.

Auricula (n.) A genus of air-breathing mollusks mostly found near the sea, where the water is brackish

Aurochloride (n.) The trichloride of gold combination with the chloride of another metal, forming a double chloride; -- called also chloraurate.

Badderlocks (n.) A large black seaweed (Alaria esculenta) sometimes eaten in Europe; -- also called murlins, honeyware, and henware.

Bailable (a.) Having the right or privilege of being admitted to bail, upon bond with sureties; -- used of persons.

Barnacle (sing.) Spectacles; -- so called from their resemblance to the barnacles used by farriers.

Barraclade (n.) A home-made woolen blanket without nap.

Barrelled (a.) Having a barrel; -- used in composition; as, a double-barreled gun.

Beggarly (a.) In the condition of, or like, a beggar; suitable for a beggar; extremely indigent; poverty-stricken; mean; poor; contemptible.

Bibliolatry (n.) Book worship, esp. of the Bible; -- applied by Roman Catholic divines to the exaltation of the authority of the Bible over that of the pope or the church, and by Protestants to an excessive regard to the letter of the Scriptures.

Bimetallism (n.) The legalized use of two metals (as gold and silver) in the currency of a country, at a fixed relative value; -- in opposition to monometallism.

Biocellate (a.) Having two ocelli (eyelike spots); -- said of a wing, etc.

Blandiloquious (a.) Fair-spoken; flattering.

Bluebell (n.) A plant of the genus Campanula, especially the Campanula rotundifolia, which bears blue bell-shaped flowers; the harebell.

Bonnyclabber (n.) Coagulated sour milk; loppered milk; curdled milk; -- sometimes called simply clabber.

Bowbell (n.) One born within hearing distance of Bow-bells; a cockney.

Boxhaul (v. t.) To put (a vessel) on the other tack by veering her short round on her heel; -- so called from the circumstance of bracing the head yards abox (i. e., sharp aback, on the wind).

Bretwalda (n.) The official title applied to that one of the Anglo-Saxon chieftains who was chosen by the other chiefs to lead them in their warfare against the British tribes.

Broadcloth (n.) A fine smooth-faced woolen cloth for men's garments, usually of double width (i.e., a yard and a half); -- so called in distinction from woolens three quarters of a yard wide.

Burgall (n.) A small marine fish; -- also called cunner.

Caboodle (n.) The whole collection; the entire quantity or number; -- usually in the phrase the whole caboodle.

Cabriolet (n.) A one-horse carriage with two seats and a calash top.

Calceolate (a.) Slipper-ahaped. See Calceiform.

Caravel (n.) A Turkish man-of-war.

Careful (a.) Taking care; giving good heed; watchful; cautious; provident; not indifferent, heedless, or reckless; -- often followed by of, for, or the infinitive; as, careful of money; careful to do right.

Carpellum (n.) A simple pistil or single-celled ovary or seed vessel, or one of the parts of a compound pistil, ovary, or seed vessel. See Illust of Carpaphore.

Catenulate (a.) Chainlike; -- said both or color marks and of indentations when arranged like the links of a chain, as on shells, etc.

Caulicle (n.) A short caulis or stem, esp. the rudimentary stem seen in the embryo of seed; -- otherwise called a radicle.

Centrolineal (a.) Converging to a center; -- applied to lines drawn so as to meet in a point or center.

Chapfallen (a.) Having the lower chap or jaw drooping, -- an indication of humiliation and dejection; crestfallen; discouraged. See Chopfallen.

Chrysolite (n.) A mineral, composed of silica, magnesia, and iron, of a yellow to green color. It is common in certain volcanic rocks; -- called also olivine and peridot. Sometimes used as a gem. The name was also early used for yellow varieties of tourmaComatula (n.) A crinoid of the genus Antedon and related genera. When young they are fixed by a stem. When adult they become detached and cling to seaweeds, etc., by their dorsal cirri; -- called also feather stars.

Conduplicate (a.) Folded lengthwise along the midrib, the upper face being within; -- said of leaves or petals in vernation or aestivation.

Cosmoplastic (a.) Pertaining to a plastic force as operative in the formation of the world independently of God; world-forming.

Crystal (n.) The material of quartz, in crystallization transparent or nearly so, and either colorless or slightly tinged with gray, or the like; -- called also rock crystal. Ornamental vessels are made of it. Cf. Smoky quartz, Pebble; also Brazilian pebble, under Brazilian.

Crystallogenical (a.) Pertaining to the production of crystals; crystal-producing; as, crystallogenic attraction.

Crystalloid (a.) Crystal-like; transparent like crystal.

Crystalloid (n.) A body which, in solution, diffuses readily through animal membranes, and generally is capable of being crystallized; -- opposed to colloid.

Crystalloid (n.) One of the microscopic particles resembling crystals, consisting of protein matter, which occur in certain plant cells; -- called also protein crystal.

Cuminol (n.) A liquid, C3H7.C6H4.CHO, obtained from oil of caraway; -- called also cuminic aldehyde.

Curricle (n.) A two-wheeled chaise drawn by two horses abreast.

Custrel (n.) An armor-bearer to a knight.

Cyamellone (n.) A complex derivative of cyanogen, regarded as an acid, and known chiefly in its salts; -- called also hydromellonic acid.

Cynical (a.) Given to sneering at rectitude and the conduct of life by moral principles; disbelieving in the reality of any human purposes which are not suggested or directed by self-interest or self-indulgence; as, a cynical man who scoffs at pretensions of integrity; characterized by such opinions; as, cynical views of human nature.

Demirelievo (n.) Half relief. See Demi-rilievo.

Demurely (adv.) In a demure manner; soberly; gravely; -- now, commonly, with a mere show of gravity or modesty.

Despoil (v. t.) To deprive for spoil; to plunder; to rob; to pillage; to strip; to divest; -- usually followed by of.

Dextrality (n.) The state of being on the right-hand side; also, the quality of being right-handed; right-handedness.

Diallel (a.) Meeting and intersecting, as lines; not parallel; -- opposed to parallel.

Diastole (n.) The rhythmical expansion or dilatation of the heart and arteries; -- correlative to systole, or contraction.

Dibutyl (n.) A liquid hydrocarbon, C8H18, of the marsh-gas series, being one of several octanes, and consisting of two butyl radicals. Cf. Octane.

Dipetalous (a.) Having two petals; two-petaled.

Disciflorous (a.) Bearing the stamens on a discoid outgrowth of the receptacle; -- said of a subclass of plants. Cf. Calycifloral.

Disciplinarian (n.) A Puritan or Presbyterian; -- because of rigid adherence to religious or church discipline.

Discipline (n.) Self-inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge.

Disepalous (a.) Having two sepals; two-sepaled.

Disqualify (v. t.) To deprive of the qualities or properties necessary for any purpose; to render unfit; to incapacitate; -- with for or from before the purpose, state, or act.

Dissyllable (n.) A word of two syllables; as, pa-per.

Diurnal (a.) Relating to the daytime; belonging to the period of daylight, distinguished from the night; -- opposed to nocturnal; as, diurnal heat; diurnal hours.

Diurnal (a.) Opening during the day, and closing at night; -- said of flowers or leaves.

Diurnal (a.) Active by day; -- applied especially to the eagles and hawks among raptorial birds, and to butterflies (Diurna) among insects.

Domiculture (n.) The art of house-keeping, cookery, etc.

Easterling (n.) A native of a country eastward of another; -- used, by the English, of traders or others from the coasts of the Baltic.

Embattled (a.) Having the edge broken like battlements; -- said of a bearing such as a fess, bend, or the like.

Epistyle (n.) A massive piece of stone or wood laid immediately on the abacus of the capital of a column or pillar; -- now called architrave.

Epithelioma (n.) A malignant growth containing epithelial cells; -- called also epithelial cancer.

Epithelium (n.) The superficial layer of cells lining the alimentary canal and all its appendages, all glands and their ducts, blood vessels and lymphatics, serous cavities, etc. It often includes the epidermis (i. e., keratin-producing epithelial cells), and it is sometimes restricted to the alimentary canal, the glands and their appendages, -- the term endothelium being applied to the lining membrane of the blood vessels, lymphatics, and serous cavities.

Equivalent (a.) Equal in measure but not admitting of superposition; -- applied to magnitudes; as, a square may be equivalent to a triangle.

Eristalis (n.) A genus of dipterous insects whose young (called rat-tailed larvae) are remarkable for their long tapering tail, which spiracles at the tip, and for their ability to live in very impure and salt waters; -- also called drone fly.

Eternal (a.) Exceedingly great or bad; -- used as a strong intensive.

Ethenyl (n.) A univalent hydrocarbon radical of the ethylene series, CH2:CH; -- called also vinyl. See Vinyl.

Evangelical (a.) Earnest for the truth taught in the gospel; strict in interpreting Christian doctrine; preeminetly orthodox; -- technically applied to that party in the Church of England, and in the Protestant Episcopal Church, which holds the doctrine of "Justification by Faith alone"; the Low Church party. The term is also applied to other religion bodies not regarded as orthodox.

Exannulate (a.) Having the sporangium destitute of a ring; -- said of certain genera of ferns.

Exarillate (a.) Having no aril; -- said of certain seeds, or of the plants producing them.

Exoptile (n.) A name given by Lestiboudois to dicotyledons; -- so called because the plumule is naked.

Fan palm () Any palm tree having fan-shaped or radiate leaves; as the Chamaerops humilis of Southern Europe; the species of Sabal and Thrinax in the West Indies, Florida, etc.; and especially the great talipot tree (Corypha umbraculifera) of Ceylon and Malaya. The leaves of the latter are often eighteen feet long and fourteen wide, and are used for umbrellas, tents, and roofs. When cut up, they are used for books and manuscripts.

Farewell (interj.) Go well; good-by; adieu; -- originally applied to a person departing, but by custom now applied both to those who depart and those who remain. It is often separated by the pronoun; as, fare you well; and is sometimes used as an expression of separation only; as, farewell the year; farewell, ye sweet groves; that is, I bid you farewell.

Farewell (n.) A wish of happiness or welfare at parting; the parting compliment; a good-by; adieu.

Farewell (n.) Act of departure; leave-taking; a last look at, or reference to something.

Fencible (n.) A soldier enlisted for home service only; -- usually in the pl.

Flabelliform (a.) Having the form of a fan; fan-shaped; flabellate.

Flabellinerved (a.) Having many nerves diverging radiately from the base; -- said of a leaf.

Flagellant (n.) One of a fanatical sect which flourished in Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries, and maintained that flagellation was of equal virtue with baptism and the sacrament; -- called also disciplinant.

Floccillation (n.) A delirious picking of bedclothes by a sick person, as if to pick off flocks of wool; carphology; -- an alarming symptom in acute diseases.

Fluavil (n.) A hydrocarbon extracted from gutta-percha, as a yellow, resinous substance; -- called also fluanil.

Fluosilicate (n.) A double fluoride of silicon and some other (usually basic) element or radical, regarded as a salt of fluosilicic acid; -- called also silicofluoride.

Frangulin (n.) A yellow crystalFrankalmoigne (a.) A tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs; -- called also tenure by free alms.

Franking (n.) A method of forming a joint at the intersection of window-sash bars, by cutting away only enough wood to show a miter.

Frankpledge (n.) A pledge or surety for the good behavior of freemen, -- each freeman who was a member of an ancient decennary, tithing, or friborg, in England, being a pledge for the good conduct of the others, for the preservation of the public peace; a free surety.

Fretful (a.) Disposed to fret; ill-humored; peevish; angry; in a state of vexation; as, a fretful temper.

Fritillaria (n.) A genus of liliaceous plants, of which the crown-imperial (Fritillaria imperialis) is one species, and the Guinea-hen flower (F. Meleagris) another. See Crown-imperial.

Fritillary (n.) A plant with checkered petals, of the genus Fritillaria: the Guinea-hen flower. See Fritillaria.

Fritillary (n.) One of several species of butterflies belonging to Argynnis and allied genera; -- so called because the coloring of their wings resembles that of the common Fritillaria. See Aphrodite.

Funeral (n.) The solemn rites used in the disposition of a dead human body, whether such disposition be by interment, burning, or otherwise; esp., the ceremony or solemnization of interment; obsequies; burial; -- formerly used in the plural.

Funeral (n.) A funeral sermon; -- usually in the plural.

Fungibles (n. pl.) Things which may be furnished or restored in kind, as distinguished from specific things; -- called also fungible things.

Gadwall (n.) A large duck (Anas strepera), valued as a game bird, found in the northern parts of Europe and America; -- called also gray duck.

Gambrel (n.) A stick crooked like a horse's hind leg; -- used by butchers in suspending slaughtered animals.

Garibaldi (n.) A jacket worn by women; -- so called from its resemblance in shape to the red shirt worn by the Italians patriot Garibaldi.

Gastrula (n.) An embryonic form having its origin in the invagination or pushing in of the wall of the planula or blastula (the blastosphere) on one side, thus giving rise to a double-walled sac, with one opening or mouth (the blastopore) which leads into the cavity (the archenteron) lined by the inner wall (the hypoblast). See Illust. under Invagination. In a more general sense, an ideal stage in embryonic development. See Gastraea.

General (a.) The whole; the total; that which comprehends or relates to all, or the chief part; -- opposed to particular.

Generalissimo (a.) The chief commander of an army; especially, the commander in chief of an army consisting of two or more grand divisions under separate commanders; -- a title used in most foreign countries.

Generalship (n.) The office of a general; the exercise of the functions of a general; -- sometimes, with the possessive pronoun, the personality of a general.

Genteel (a.) Possessing or exhibiting the qualities popularly regarded as belonging to high birth and breeding; free from vulgarity, or lowness of taste or behavior; adapted to a refined or cultivated taste; polite; well-bred; as, genteel company, manners, address.

Glacial (a.) Resembling ice; having the appearance and consistency of ice; -- said of certain solid compounds; as, glacial phosphoric or acetic acids.

Gladiole (n.) A lilylike plant, of the genus Gladiolus; -- called also corn flag.

Globeflower (n.) A plant of the genus Trollius (T. Europaeus), found in the mountainous parts of Europe, and producing handsome globe-shaped flowers.

Glyoxaline (n.) A white, crystalline, organic base, C3H4N2, produced by the action of ammonia on glyoxal, and forming the origin of a large class of derivatives hence, any one of the series of which glyoxaGrandiloquence (n.) The use of lofty words or phrases; bombast; -- usually in a bad sense.

Grapnel (n.) A small anchor, with four or five flukes or claws, used to hold boats or small vessels; hence, any instrument designed to grapple or hold; a grappling iron; a grab; -- written also grapline, and crapnel.

Grisaille (n.) Decorative painting in gray monochrome; -- used in English especially for painted glass.

Grossular (a.) A translucent garnet of a pale green color like that of the gooseberry; -- called also grossularite.

Gustful (a.) Tasteful; well-tasted.

Gymnoblastea (n. pl.) The Athecata; -- so called because the medusoid buds are not inclosed in a capsule.

Hamamelis (n.) A genus of plants which includes the witch-hazel (Hamamelis Virginica), a preparation of which is used medicinally.

Harebell (n.) A small, slender, branching plant (Campanula rotundifolia), having blue bell-shaped flowers; also, Scilla nutans, which has similar flowers; -- called also bluebell.

Hatchel (n.) An instrument with long iron teeth set in a board, for cleansing flax or hemp from the tow, hards, or coarse part; a kind of large comb; -- called also hackle and heckle.

Hawkbill (n.) A sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), which yields the best quality of tortoise shell; -- called also caret.

Hemimellitic (a.) Having half as many (three) carboxyl radicals as mellitic acid; -- said of an organic acid.

Heterologous (a.) Characterized by heterology; consisting of different elements, or of like elements in different proportions; different; -- opposed to homologous; as, heterologous organs.

Heterology (n.) The absence of correspondence, or relation, in type of structure; lack of analogy between parts, owing to their being composed of different elements, or of like elements in different proportions; variation in structure from the normal form; -- opposed to homology.

Hexavalent (p. pr.) Having a valence of six; -- said of hexads.

Highfaluting (n.) High-flown, bombastic language.

Hobnail (n.) A short, sharp-pointed, large-headed nail, -- used in shoeing houses and for studding the soles of heavy shoes.

Homomallous (a.) Uniformly bending or curving to one side; -- said of leaves which grow on several sides of a stem.

Hornbill (n.) Any bird of the family Bucerotidae, of which about sixty species are known, belonging to numerous genera. They inhabit the tropical parts of Asia, Africa, and the East Indies, and are remarkable for having a more or less horn-like protuberance, which is usually large and hollow and is situated on the upper side of the beak. The size of the hornbill varies from that of a pigeon to that of a raven, or even larger. They feed chiefly upon fruit, but some species eat dead animals.

Hyostylic (a.) Having the mandible suspended by the hyomandibular, or upper part of the hyoid arch, as in fishes, instead of directly articulated with the skull as in mammals; -- said of the skull.

Hypural (a.) Under the tail; -- applied to the bones which support the caudal fin rays in most fishes.

Imbecile (a.) Destitute of strength, whether of body or mind; feeble; impotent; esp., mentally wea; feeble-minded; as, hospitals for the imbecile and insane.

Incomplete (a.) Wanting any of the usual floral organs; -- said of a flower.

Indicolite (n.) A variety of tourmaInequilateral (a.) Having unequal sides; unsymmetrical; unequal-sided.

Infidel (a.) Not holding the faith; -- applied esp. to one who does not believe in the inspiration of the Scriptures, and the supernatural origin of Christianity.

Inhabile (a.) Unskilled; unready; awkward; incompetent; unqualified; -- said of person.

Interglobular (a.) Between globules; -- applied esp. to certain small spaces, surrounded by minute globules, in dentine.

Isosceles (a.) Having two legs or sides that are equal; -- said of a triangle.

Jonquille (n.) A bulbous plant of the genus Narcissus (N. Jonquilla), allied to the daffodil. It has long, rushlike leaves, and yellow or white fragrant flowers. The root has emetic properties. It is sometimes called the rush-leaved daffodil. See Illust. of Corona.

Juvenile (n.) A young person or youth; -- used sportively or familiarly.

Kamptulicon (n.) A kind of elastic floor cloth, made of India rubber, gutta-percha, linseed oil, and powdered cork.

Karpholite (n.) A fibrous mineral occurring in tufts of a straw-yellow color. It is a hydrous silicate of alumina and manganese.

Karyoplasma (n.) The protoplasmic substance of the nucleus of a cell: nucleoplasm; -- in opposition to kytoplasma, the protoplasm of the cell.

Katabolism (n.) Destructive or downward metabolism; regressive metamorphism; -- opposed to anabolism. See Disassimilation.

Lateral (a.) Lying at, or extending toward, the side; away from the mesial plane; external; -- opposed to mesial.

Leadhillite (n.) A mineral of a yellowish or greenish white color, consisting of the sulphate and carbonate of lead; -- so called from having been first found at Leadhills, Scotland.

Lepidolite (n.) A species of mica, of a lilac or rose-violet color, containing lithia. It usually occurs in masses consisting of small scales. See Mica.

Liberal (a.) Bestowing in a large and noble way, as a freeman; generous; bounteous; open-handed; as, a liberal giver.

Liberality (n.) A gift; a gratuity; -- sometimes in the plural; as, a prudent man is not impoverished by his liberalities.

Limicoline (a.) Shore-inhabiting; of or pertaining to the Limicolae.

Lingual (n.) A consonant sound formed by the aid of the tongue; -- a term especially applied to certain articulations (as those of t, d, th, and n) and to the letters denoting them.

Literal (a.) Giving a strict or literal construction; unimaginative; matter-of fast; -- applied to persons.

Literalize (v. t.) To make literal; to interpret or put in practice according to the strict meaning of the words; -- opposed to spiritualize; as, to literalize Scripture.

Loanable (a.) Such as can be lent; available for lending; as, loanable funds; -- used mostly in financial business and writings.

Loblolly (n.) Gruel; porridge; -- so called among seamen.

Logrolling (n.) Hence: A combining to assist another in consideration of receiving assistance in return; -- sometimes used of a disreputable mode of accomplishing political schemes or ends.

Lombard (n.) A money lender or banker; -- so called because the business of banking was first carried on in London by Lombards.

Lyrical (a.) Fitted to be sung to the lyre; hence, also, appropriate for song; -- said especially of poetry which expresses the individual emotions of the poet.

Maidenly (a.) Like a maid; suiting a maid; maiden-like; gentle, modest, reserved.

Mammillated (a.) Bounded like a nipple; -- said of the apex of some shells.

Mandible (n.) The bone, or principal bone, of the lower jaw; the inferior maxilla; -- also applied to either the upper or the lower jaw in the beak of birds.

Manifold (a.) Exhibited at divers times or in various ways; -- used to qualify nouns in the singular number.

Mantilla (n.) A kind of veil, covering the head and falling down upon the shoulders; -- worn in Spain, Mexico, etc.

Marseilles (n.) A general term for certain kinds of fabrics, which are formed of two series of threads interlacing each other, thus forming double cloth, quilted in the loom; -- so named because first made in Marseilles, France.

Martial (a.) Belonging to war, or to an army and navy; -- opposed to civil; as, martial law; a court-martial.

Marysole (n.) A large British fluke, or flounder (Rhombus megastoma); -- called also carter, and whiff.

Megavolt (n.) One of the larger measures of electro-motive force, amounting to one million volts.

Melaniline (n.) A complex nitrogenous hydrocarbon obtained artificially (as by the action of cyanogen chloride on aniline) as a white, crystalMenthol (n.) A white, crystalline, aromatic substance resembling camphor, extracted from oil of peppermint (Mentha); -- called also mint camphor or peppermint camphor.

Mimical (a.) Imitative; characterized by resemblance to other forms; -- applied to crystals which by twinning resemble simple forms of a higher grade of symmetry.

Mirabilis (n.) A genus of plants. See Four-o'clock.

Miraculous (a.) Wonder-working.

Miscellane (n.) A mixture of two or more sorts of grain; -- now called maslin and meslin.

Mitrailleuse (n.) A breech-loading machine gun consisting of a number of barrels fitted together, so arranged that the barrels can be fired simultaneously, or successively, and rapidly.

Monerula (n.) A germ in that stage of development in which its form is simply that of a non-nucleated mass of protoplasm. It precedes the one-celled germ. So called from its likeness to a moner.

Monosulphide (n.) A sulphide containing one atom of sulphur, and analogous to a monoxide; -- contrasted with a polysulphide; as, galena is a monosulphide.

Montgolfier (n.) A balloon which ascends by the buoyancy of air heated by a fire; a fire balloon; -- so called from two brothers, Stephen and Joseph Montgolfier, of France, who first constructed and sent up a fire balloon.

Moorball (n.) A fresh-water alga (Cladophora Aegagropila) which forms a globular mass.

Motherland (n.) The country of one's ancestors; -- same as fatherland.

Mudwall (n.) The European bee-eater. See Bee-eater.

Multiplication (n.) The process of repeating, or adding to itself, any given number or quantity a certain number of times; commonly, the process of ascertaining by a briefer computation the result of such repeated additions; also, the rule by which the operation is performed; -- the reverse of division.

Multiplication (n.) The art of increasing gold or silver by magic, -- attributed formerly to the alchemists.

Mycomelic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid of the alloxan group, obtained as a honey-yellow powder. Its solutions have a gelatinous consistency.

Myricyl (n.) A hypothetical radical regarded as the essential residue of myricin; -- called also melissyl.

Narrowly (adv.) With a little margin or space; by a small distance; hence, closely; hardly; barely; only just; -- often with reference to an avoided danger or misfortune; as, he narrowly escaped.

Narthex (n.) The portico in front of ancient churches; sometimes, the atrium or outer court surrounded by ambulatories; -- used, generally, for any vestibule, lobby, or outer porch, leading to the nave of a church.

Natural (a.) Springing from true sentiment; not artifical or exaggerated; -- said of action, delivery, etc.; as, a natural gesture, tone, etc.

Natural (a.) Resembling the object imitated; true to nature; according to the life; -- said of anything copied or imitated; as, a portrait is natural.

Natural (a.) Belonging to, to be taken in, or referred to, some system, in which the base is 1; -- said or certain functions or numbers; as, natural numbers, those commencing at 1; natural sines, cosines, etc., those taken in arcs whose radii are 1.

Neutral (a.) Having neither acid nor basic properties; unable to turn red litmus blue or blue litmus red; -- said of certain salts or other compounds. Contrasted with acid, and alkaline.

Nombril (n.) A point halfway between the fess point and the middle base point of an escutcheon; -- called also navel point. See Escutcheon.

Nuptial (n.) Marriage; wedding; nuptial ceremony; -- now only in the plural.

Nymphales (n. pl.) An extensive family of butterflies including the nymphs, the satyrs, the monarchs, the heliconias, and others; -- called also brush-footed butterflies.

Amyloplastic (a.) Starch-forming; amylogenic.

Bissell truck () A truck for railroad rolling stock, consisting of two ordinary axle boxes sliding in guides attached to a triangular frame; -- called also pony truck.

Cahenslyism (n.) A plan proposed to the Pope in 1891 by P. P. Cahensly, a member of the German parliament, to divide the foreign-born population of the United States, for ecclesiastical purposes, according to European nationalities, and to appoint bishops and priests of like race and speaking the same language as the majority of the members of a diocese or congregation. This plan was successfully opposed by the American party in the Church.

Control (n.) Any of the physical factors determining the climate of any particular place, as latitude,distribution of land and water, altitude, exposure, prevailing winds, permanent high- or low-barometric-pressure areas, ocean currents, mountain barriers, soil, and vegetation.

Controller (n.) A lever controlling the speed of an engine; -- applied esp. to the lever governing a throttle valve, as of a steam or gasoCoquille (n.) A shell or shell-like dish or mold in which viands are served.

Decathlon (n.) In the modern Olympic Games, a composite contest consisting of a 100-meter run, a broad jump, putting the shot, a running high-jump, a 400-meter run, throwing the discus, a 100-meter hurdle race, pole vaulting, throwing the javelin, and a 1500-meter run.

Friendly (n.) A friendly person; -- usually applied to natives friendly to foreign settlers or invaders.

Hinterland (n.) The land or region lying behind the coast district. The term is used esp. with reference to the so-called doctrine of the hinterland, sometimes advanced, that occupation of the coast supports a claim to an exclusive right to occupy, from time to time, the territory lying inland of the coast.

Holluschickie (n. sing. & pl.) A young male fur seal, esp. one from three to six years old; -- called also bachelor, because prevented from breeding by the older full-grow Lambkill (n.) A small American ericaceous shrub (Kalmia angustifolia); -- called also calfkill, sheepkill, sheep laurel, etc. It is supposed to poison sheep and other animals that eat it at times when the snow is deep and they cannot find other food.

Mudsill (n.) Fig.: A person of the lowest stratum of society; -- a term of opprobrium or contempt.

Naturalism (n.) Specif., the principles and characteristics professed or represented by a 19th-century school of realistic writers, notably by Zola and Maupassant, who aimed to give a literal transcription of reality, and laid special stress on the analytic study of character, and on the scientific and experimental nature of their observation of life.

Parnellite (n.) One of the adherents of Charles Stewart Parnell (1846-91) in his advocacy of home rule for Ireland.

Peachblow (a.) Of the delicate purplish pink color likened to that of peach blooms; -- applied esp. to a Chinese porcelain, small specimens of which bring great prices in the Western countries.

Pedrail (n.) A device intended to replace the wheel of a self-propelled vehicle for use on rough roads and to approximate to the smoothness in running of a wheel on a metal track. The tread consists of a number of rubber shod feet which are connected by ball-and-socket joints to the ends of sliding spokes. Each spoke has attached to it a small roller which in its turn runs under a short pivoted rail controlled by a powerful set of springs. This arrangement permits the feet to accomodate themse> Photoplay (n.) A play for representation or exhibition by moving pictures; also, the moving-picture representation of a play.

Rocaille (n.) The rococo system of scroll ornament, based in part on the forms of shells and water-worn rocks.

Tenderloin (n.) In New York City, the region which is the center of the night life of fashionable amusement, including the majority of the theaters, etc., centering on Broadway. The term orig. designates the old twenty-ninth police precinct, in this region, which afforded the police great opportunities for profit through conniving at vice and lawbreaking, one captain being reported to have said on being transferred there that whereas he had been eating chuck steak he would now eat tenderlion. > Octavalent (a.) Having a valence of eight; capable of being combined with, exchanged for, or compared with, eight atoms of hydrogen; -- said of certain atoms or radicals.

Oligoclase (n.) A triclinic soda-lime feldspar. See Feldspar.

Openbill (n.) A bird of the genus Anastomus, allied to the stork; -- so called because the two parts of the bill touch only at the base and tip. One species inhabits India, another Africa. Called also open-beak. See Illust. (m), under Beak.

Operculated (a.) Having an operculum, or an apparatus for protecting the gills; -- said of shells and of fishes.

Operculigenous (a.) Producing an operculum; -- said of the foot, or part of the foot, of certain mollusks.

Operculum (n.) Any lid-shaped structure closing the aperture of a tube or shell.

Organoleptic (a.) Making an impression upon an organ; plastic; -- said of the effect or impression produced by any substance on the organs of touch, taste, or smell, and also on the organism as a whole.

Orichalch (n.) A metallic substance, resembling gold in color, but inferior in value; a mixed metal of the ancients, resembling brass; -- called also aurichalcum, orichalcum, etc.

Orthoclastic (a.) Breaking in directions at right angles to each other; -- said of the monoclinic feldspars.

Outhaul (n.) A rope used for hauling out a sail upon a spar; -- opposite of inhaul.

Ovoidal (a.) Resembling an egg in shape; egg-shaped; ovate; as, an ovoidal apple.

Oxanillamide (n.) A white crystalOxindol (n.) A white crystalPachyglossal (a.) Having a thick tongue; -- applied to a group of lizards (Pachyglossae), including the iguanas and agamas.

Pailmall (n. & a.) See Pall-mall.

Palatal (a.) Uttered by the aid of the palate; -- said of certain sounds, as the sound of k in kirk.

Pastille (n.) A small cone or mass made of paste of gum, benzoin, cinnamon, and other aromatics, -- used for fumigating or scenting the air of a room.

Patrial (a.) Derived from the name of a country, and designating an inhabitant of the country; gentile; -- said of a noun.

Pedicellina (n.) A genus of Bryozoa, of the order Entoprocta, having a bell-shaped body supported on a slender pedicel. See Illust. under Entoprocta.

Penicillate (a.) Having the form of a pencil; furnished with a pencil of fine hairs; ending in a tuft of hairs like a camel's-hair brush, as the stigmas of some grasses.

Pentacle (n.) A figure composed of two equilateral triangles intersecting so as to form a six-pointed star, -- used in early ornamental art, and also with superstitious import by the astrologers and mystics of the Middle Ages.

Pentail (n.) A peculiar insectivore (Ptilocercus Lowii) of Borneo; -- so called from its very long, quill-shaped tail, which is scaly at the base and plumose at the tip.

Perihelium (n.) That point of the orbit of a planet or comet which is nearest to the sun; -- opposed to aphelion.

Piercel (n.) A kind of gimlet for making vents in casks; -- called also piercer.

Pimpillo (n.) A West Indian name for the prickly pear (Opuntia); -- called also pimploes.

Pinnacle (n.) An architectural member, upright, and generally ending in a small spire, -- used to finish a buttress, to constitute a part in a proportion, as where pinnacles flank a gable or spire, and the like. Pinnacles may be considered primarily as added weight, where it is necessary to resist the thrust of an arch, etc.

Pintail (n.) A northern duck (Dafila acuta), native of both continents. The adult male has a long, tapering tail. Called also gray duck, piketail, piket-tail, spike-tail, split-tail, springtail, sea pheasant, and gray widgeon.

Pintail (n.) The sharp-tailed grouse of the great plains and Rocky Mountains (Pediocaetes phasianellus); -- called also pintailed grouse, pintailed chicken, springtail, and sharptail.

Pipe (n.) A small bowl with a hollow steam, -- used in smoking tobacco, and, sometimes, other substances.

Pistillate (a.) Having a pistil or pistils; -- usually said of flowers having pistils but no stamens.

Pitchblende (n.) A pitch-black mineral consisting chiefly of the oxide of uranium; uraninite. See Uraninite.

Pitiful (a.) Full of pity; tender-hearted; compassionate; kind; merciful; sympathetic.

Planoblast (n.) Any free-swimming gonophore of a hydroid; a hydroid medusa.

Planorbis (n.) Any fresh-water air-breathing mollusk belonging to Planorbis and other allied genera, having shells of a discoidal form.

Podical (a.) Anal; -- applied to certain organs of insects.

Polygala (n.) A genus of bitter herbs or shrubs having eight stamens and a two-celled ovary (as the Seneca snakeroot, the flowering wintergreen, etc.); milkwort.

Polyhalite (n.) A mineral usually occurring in fibrous masses, of a brick-red color, being tinged with iron, and consisting chiefly of the sulphates of lime, magnesia, and soda.

Polysulphide (n.) A sulphide having more than one atom of sulphur in the molecule; -- contrasted with monosulphide.

Polysyllable (n.) A word of many syllables, or consisting of more syllables than three; -- words of less than four syllables being called monosyllables, dissyllables, and trisyllables.

Porcellaneous (a.) Having a smooth, compact shell without pores; -- said of certain Foraminifera.

Portcullis (n.) An English coin of the reign of Elizabeth, struck for the use of the East India Company; -- so called from its bearing the figure of a portcullis on the reverse.

Portend (v. t.) To indicate (events, misfortunes, etc.) as in future; to foreshow; to foretoken; to bode; -- now used esp. of unpropitious signs.

Possible (a.) Capable of existing or occurring, or of being conceived or thought of; able to happen; capable of being done; not contrary to the nature of things; -- sometimes used to express extreme improbability; barely able to be, or to come to pass; as, possibly he is honest, as it is possible that Judas meant no wrong.

Prevail (v. i.) To overcome; to gain the victory or superiority; to gain the advantage; to have the upper hand, or the mastery; to succeed; -- sometimes with over or against.

Prevail (v. i.) To persuade or induce; -- with on, upon, or with; as, I prevailedon him to wait.

Protoplasm (n.) The viscid and more or less granular material of vegetable and animal cells, possessed of vital properties by which the processes of nutrition, secretion, and growth go forward; the so-called " physical basis of life;" the original cell substance, cytoplasm, cytoblastema, bioplasm sarcode, etc.

Protoplast (n.) A first-formed organized body; the first individual, or pair of individuals, of a species.

Protoplasta (n. pl.) A division of fresh-water rhizopods including those that have a soft body and delicate branched pseudopodia. The genus Gromia is one of the best-known.

Protoplastic (a.) First-formed.

Prunello (n.) A smooth woolen stuff, generally black, used for making shoes; a kind of lasting; -- formerly used also for clergymen's gowns.

Prunelle (n.) A kind of small and very acid French plum; -- applied especially to the stoned and dried fruit.

Puffball (n.) A kind of ball-shaped fungus (Lycoperdon giganteum, and other species of the same genus) full of dustlike spores when ripe; -- called also bullfist, bullfice, puckfist, puff, and puffin.

Pulvillo (n.) A kind of perfume in the form of a powder, formerly much used, -- often in little bags.

Pyrochlore (n.) A niobate of calcium, cerium, and other bases, occurring usually in octahedrons of a yellowish or brownish color and resinous luster; -- so called from its becoming grass-green on being subjected to heat under the blowpipe.

Pyroxylic (a.) Derived from wood by distillation; -- formerly used in designating crude wood spirit.

Pyroxylin (n.) A substance resembling gun cotton in composition and properties, but distinct in that it is more highly nitrified and is soluble in alcohol, ether, etc.; -- called also pyroxyle.

Quadrillion (n.) According to the French notation, which is followed also upon the Continent and in the United States, a unit with fifteen ciphers annexed; according to the English notation, the number produced by involving a million to the fourth power, or the number represented by a unit with twenty-four ciphers annexed. See the Note under Numeration.

Quarrel (n.) An arrow for a crossbow; -- so named because it commonly had a square head.

Quarrel (n.) A square or lozenge-shaped paving tile.

Quarrel (n.) A four-sided cutting tool or chisel having a diamond-shaped end.

Quarrymen (pl. ) of Quarry-man

Radical (a.) Hence: Of or pertaining to the root or origin; reaching to the center, to the foundation, to the ultimate sources, to the principles, or the like; original; fundamental; thorough-going; unsparing; extreme; as, radical evils; radical reform; a radical party.

Radical (n.) One who advocates radical changes in government or social institutions, especially such changes as are intended to level class inequalities; -- opposed to conservative.

Radical (n.) Specifically, a group of two or more atoms, not completely saturated, which are so linked that their union implies certain properties, and are conveniently regarded as playing the part of a single atom; a residue; -- called also a compound radical. Cf. Residue.

Rapscallion (n.) A rascal; a good-for-nothing fellow.

Rascally (a.) Like a rascal; trickish or dishonest; base; worthless; -- often in humorous disparagement, without implication of dishonesty.

Recital (n.) A vocal or instrumental performance by one person; -- distinguished from concert; as, a song recital; an organ, piano, or violin recital.

Redtail (n.) The red-tailed hawk.

Rehabilitate (v. t.) To invest or clothe again with some right, authority, or dignity; to restore to a former capacity; to reinstate; to qualify again; to restore, as a delinquent, to a former right, rank, or privilege lost or forfeited; -- a term of civil and canon law.

Reticulum (n.) The second stomach of ruminants, in which folds of the mucous membrane form hexagonal cells; -- also called the honeycomb stomach.

Retinol (n.) A hydrocarbon oil obtained by the distillation of resin, -- used in printer's ink.

Retitelae (n. pl.) A group of spiders which spin irregular webs; -- called also Retitelariae.

Revival (n.) Reanimation from a state of langour or depression; -- applied to the health, spirits, and the like.

Rhabdolith (n.) A minute calcareous rodlike structure found both at the surface and the bottom of the ocean; -- supposed by some to be a calcareous alga.

Ricinoleate (n.) A salt of ricinoleic acid; -- formerly called palmate.

Ricinolein (n.) The glycerin salt of ricinoleic acid, occuring as a characteristic constituent of castor oil; -- formerly called palmin.

Ridicule (n.) Remarks concerning a subject or a person designed to excite laughter with a degree of contempt; wit of that species which provokes contemptuous laughter; disparagement by making a person an object of laughter; banter; -- a term lighter than derision.

Rigsdaler (n.) A Danish coin worth about fifty-four cents. It was the former unit of value in Denmark.

Riksdaler (n.) A Swedish coin worth about twenty-seven cents. It was formerly the unit of value in Sweden.

Ringbill (n.) The ring-necked scaup duck; -- called also ring-billed blackhead. See Scaup.

Ripidolite (n.) A translucent mineral of a green color and micaceous structure, belonging to the chlorite group; a hydrous silicate of alumina, magnesia, and iron; -- called also clinochlore.

Rupicoline (a.) Rock-inhabiting.

Saccholactate (n.) A salt of saccholactic acid; -- formerly called also saccholate.

Sacchulmic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a dark amorphous substance by the long-continued boiling of sucrose with very dilute sulphuric acid. It resembles humic acid.

Salicylite (n.) A compound of salicylal; -- named after the analogy of a salt.

Sarcelle (n.) The old squaw, or long-tailed duck.

Sarcocolla (n.) A gum resin obtained from certain shrubs of Africa (Penaea), -- formerly thought to cause healing of wounds and ulcers.

Saxicoline (a.) Stone-inhabiting; pertaining to, or having the characteristics of, the stonechats.

Scaffold (n.) An accumulation of adherent, partly fused material forming a shelf, or dome-shaped obstruction, above the tuyeres in a blast furnace.

Scalpel (n.) A small knife with a thin, keen blade, -- used by surgeons, and in dissecting.

Scammel (n.) The female bar-tailed godwit.

Scandalum magnatum () A defamatory speech or writing published to the injury of a person of dignity; -- usually abbreviated scan. mag.

Scutellated (a.) Having the tarsi covered with broad transverse scales, or scutella; -- said of certain birds.

Scutelliplantar (a.) Having broad scutella on the front, and small scales on the posterior side, of the tarsus; -- said of certain birds.

Semipalmated (a.) Having the anterior toes joined only part way down with a web; half-webbed; as, a semipalmate bird or foot. See Illust. k under Aves.

Septillion (n.) According to the French method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-four ciphers annexed. According to the English method, the number expressed by a unit with forty-two ciphers annexed. See Numeration.

Sextillion (n.) According to the method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-one ciphers annexed. According to the English method, a million raised to the sixth power, or the number expressed by a unit with thirty-six ciphers annexed. See Numeration.

Shillelah (n.) An oaken sapling or cudgel; any cudgel; -- so called from Shillelagh, a place in Ireland of that name famous for its oaks.

Shortclothes (n.) Coverings for the legs of men or boys, consisting of trousers which reach only to the knees, -- worn with long stockings.

Shorten (a.) To make deficient (as to); to deprive; -- with of.

Shrivel (v. i.) To draw, or be drawn, into wrinkles; to shrink, and form corrugations; as, a leaf shriveles in the hot sun; the skin shrivels with age; -- often with up.

Shrug (n.) A drawing up of the shoulders, -- a motion usually expressing dislike, dread, or doubt.

Sinapoline (n.) A nitrogenous base, CO.(NH.C3H5)2, related to urea, extracted from mustard oil, and also produced artifically, as a white crystalSkewbald (a.) Marked with spots and patches of white and some color other than black; -- usually distinguished from piebald, in which the colors are properly white and black. Said of horses.

Slopseller (n.) One who sells slops, or ready-made clothes. See 4th Slop, 3.

Snowball (n.) The Guelder-rose.

Sperrylite (n.) An arsenide of platinum occuring in grains and minute isometric crystals of tin-white color. It is found near Sudbury, Ontario Canada, and is the only known compound of platinum occuring in nature.

Spheral (a.) Rounded like a sphere; sphere-shaped; hence, symmetrical; complete; perfect.

Spiegel iron () A fusible white cast iron containing a large amount of carbon (from three and a half to six per cent) and some manganese. When the manganese reaches twenty-five per cent and upwards it has a granular structure, and constitutes the alloy ferro manganese, largely used in the manufacture of Bessemer steel. Called also specular pig iron, spiegel, and spiegeleisen.

Spirillum (n.) A genus of common motile microorganisms (Spirobacteria) having the form of spiral-shaped filaments. One species is said to be the cause of relapsing fever.

Spousal (n.) Marriage; nuptials; espousal; -- generally used in the plural; as, the spousals of Hippolita.

Squabble (v. t.) To disarrange, so that the letters or lines stand awry or are mixed and need careful readjustment; -- said of type that has been set up.

Squally (a.) Interrupted by unproductive spots; -- said of a flied of turnips or grain.

Stanielry (n.) Hawking with staniels, -- a base kind of falconry.

Stannel (n.) The kestrel; -- called also standgale, standgall, stanchel, stand hawk, stannel hawk, steingale, stonegall.

Statoblast (n.) One of a peculiar kind of internal buds, or germs, produced in the interior of certain Bryozoa and sponges, especially in the fresh-water species; -- also called winter buds.

Straddle (v. i.) To stand with the ends staggered; -- said of the spokes of a wagon wheel where they join the hub.

Strobile (n.) An individual asexually producing sexual individuals differing from itself also in other respects, as the tapeworm, -- one of the forms that occur in metagenesis.

Strockle (n.) A shovel with a turned-up edge, for frit, sand, etc.

Subduplicate (a.) Expressed by the square root; -- said of ratios.

Supraclavicle (n.) A bone which usually connects the clavicle with the post-temporal in the pectorial arch of fishes.

Supraglotic (a.) Situated above the glottis; -- applied to that part of the cavity of the larynx above the true vocal cords.

Tachyglossa (n. pl.) A division of monotremes which comprises the spiny ant-eaters of Australia and New Guinea. See Illust. under Echidna.

Tagtail (n.) A person who attaches himself to another against the will of the latter; a hanger-on.

Tartralic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a white amorphous deliquescent substance, C8H10O11; -- called also ditartaric, tartrilic, or tartrylic acid.

Terneplate (a.) Thin iron sheets coated with an alloy of lead and tin; -- so called because made up of three metals.

Thialol (n.) A colorless oily liquid, (C2H5)2S2, having a strong garlic odor; -- called also ethyl disulphide. By extension, any one of the series of related compounds.

Thiosulphate (n.) A salt of thiosulphuric acid; -- formerly called hyposulphite.

Thiotolene (n.) A colorless oily liquid, C4H3S.CH3, analogous to, and resembling, toluene; -- called also methyl thiophene.

Throstle (n.) A machine for spinning wool, cotton, etc., from the rove, consisting of a set of drawing rollers with bobbins and flyers, and differing from the mule in having the twisting apparatus stationary and the processes continuous; -- so called because it makes a singing noise.

Thurible (n.) A censer of metal, for burning incense, having various forms, held in the hand or suspended by chains; -- used especially at mass, vespers, and other solemn services.

Topazolite (n.) A topaz-yellow variety of garnet.

Topsail (n.) In a square-rigged vessel, the sail next above the lowermost sail on a mast. This sail is the one most frequently reefed or furled in working the ship. In a fore-and-aft rigged vessel, the sail set upon and above the gaff. See Cutter, Schooner, Sail, and Ship.

Totipalmate (a.) Having all four toes united by a web; -- said of certain sea birds, as the pelican and the gannet. See Illust. under Aves.

Tourmaline (n.) A mineral occurring usually in three-sided or six-sided prisms terminated by rhombohedral or scalenohedral planes. Black tourmaTrachelobranchiate (a.) Having the gills situated upon the neck; -- said of certain mollusks.

Trammeled (a.) Having blazes, or white marks, on the fore and hind foot of one side, as if marked by trammels; -- said of a horse.

Transalpine (a.) Being on the farther side of the Alps in regard to Rome, that is, on the north or west side of the Alps; of or pertaining to the region or the people beyond the Alps; as, transalpine Gaul; -- opposed to cisalpine.

Transfluent (a.) Passing or flowing through a bridge; -- said of water.

Traphole (n.) See Trou-de-loup.

Trefoil (n.) Any plant of the genus Trifolium, which includes the white clover, red clover, etc.; -- less properly, applied also to the nonesuch, or black medic. See Clover, and Medic.

Triangle (n.) A draughtsman's square in the form of a right-angled triangle.

Triangle (n.) A kind of frame formed of three poles stuck in the ground and united at the top, to which soldiers were bound when undergoing corporal punishment, -- now disused.

Tricycle (n.) A three-wheeled velocipede. See Illust. under Velocipede. Cf. Bicycle.

Triphylite (n.) A mineral of a grayish-green or bluish color, consisting of the phosphates of iron, manganese, and lithia.

Triphyllous (a.) Having three leaves; three-leaved.

Trisyllable (n.) A word consisting of three syllables only; as, a-ven-ger.

Trochilus (n.) An annular molding whose section is concave, like the edge of a pulley; -- called also scotia.

Trysail (n.) A fore-and-aft sail, bent to a gaff, and hoisted on a lower mast or on a small mast, called the trysail mast, close abaft a lower mast; -- used chiefly as a storm sail. Called also spencer.

Tuefall (n.) See To-fall.

Tufa () A soft or porous stone formed by depositions from water, usually calcareous; -- called also calcareous tufa.

Turnsole (a.) A plant of the genus Heliotropium; heliotrope; -- so named because its flowers are supposed to turn toward the sun.

Umbrella (n.) Any marine tectibranchiate gastropod of the genus Umbrella, having an umbrella-shaped shell; -- called also umbrella shell.

Uncomely (a.) Not comely. -- adv. In an uncomely manner.

Underglaze (a.) Applied under the glaze, that is, before the glaze, that is, before the glaze is put on; fitted to be so applied; -- said of colors in porcelain painting.

Undersleeve (n.) A sleeve of an under-garment; a sleeve worn under another,

Unequaled (a.) Not equaled; unmatched; unparalleled; unrivaled; exceeding; surpassing; -- in a good or bad sense; as, unequaled excellence; unequaled ingratitude or baseness.

Unmoral (a.) Having no moral perception, quality, or relation; involving no idea of morality; -- distinguished from both moral and immoral.

Urtical (a.) Resembling nettles; -- said of several natural orders allied to urticaceous plants.

Utricular (a.) Resembling a utricle or bag, whether large or minute; -- said especially with reference to the condition of certain substances, as sulphur, selenium, etc., when condensed from the vaporous state and deposited upon cold bodies, in which case they assume the form of small globules filled with liquid.

Valerylene (n.) A liquid hydrocarbon, C5H8; -- called also pentine.

Valuable (n.) A precious possession; a thing of value, especially a small thing, as an article of jewelry; -- used mostly in the plural.

Variable (n.) A quantity which may increase or decrease; a quantity which admits of an infinite number of values in the same expression; a variable quantity; as, in the equation x2 - y2 = R2, x and y are variables.

Variable (n.) Those parts of the sea where a steady wind is not expected, especially the parts between the trade-wind belts.

Vasodilator (a.) Causing dilation or relaxation of the blood vessels; as, the vasodilator nerves, stimulation of which causes dilation of the blood vessels to which they go. These nerves are also called vaso-inhibitory, and vasohypotonic nerves, since their stimulation causes relaxation and rest.

Ventail (n.) That part of a helmet which is intended for the admission of air, -- sometimes in the visor.

Ventral (a.) Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the belly, or ventral side, of an animal or of one of its parts; hemal; abdominal; as, the ventral fin of a fish; the ventral root of a spinal nerve; -- opposed to dorsal.

Veretillum (n.) Any one of numerous species of club-shaped, compound Alcyonaria belonging to Veretillum and allied genera, of the tribe Pennatulacea. The whole colony can move about as if it were a simple animal.

Victual (n.) Food; -- now used chiefly in the plural. See Victuals.

Vitriol (n.) Sulphuric acid; -- called also oil of vitriol. So called because first made by the distillation of green vitriol. See Sulphuric acid, under Sulphuric.

Vocabulary (n.) A list or collection of words arranged in alphabetical order and explained; a dictionary or lexicon, either of a whole language, a single work or author, a branch of science, or the like; a word-book.

Volatile (a.) Fig.: Light-hearted; easily affected by circumstances; airy; lively; hence, changeable; fickle; as, a volatile temper.

Wassail (n.) The liquor used for a wassail; esp., a beverage formerly much used in England at Christmas and other festivals, made of ale (or wine) flavored with spices, sugar, toast, roasted apples, etc.; -- called also lamb's wool.

Willful (a.) Of set purpose; self-determined; voluntary; as, willful murder.

Windgall (n.) A soft tumor or synovial swelling on the fetlock joint of a horse; -- so called from having formerly been supposed to contain air.

Wrawful (a.) Ill-tempered.

Xiphiplastron (n.) The posterior, or fourth, lateral plate in the plastron of turtles; -- called also xiphisternum.

Yellowlegs (n.) Any one of several species of long-legged sandpipers of the genus Totanus, in which the legs are bright yellow; -- called also stone snipe, tattler, telltale, yellowshanks; and yellowshins. See Tattler, 2.

Yourself (pron.) An emphasized or reflexive form of the pronoun of the second person; -- used as a subject commonly with you; as, you yourself shall see it; also, alone in the predicate, either in the nominative or objective case; as, you have injured yourself.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.