Words whose 7th letter is R

Accelerate (v. t.) To cause to move faster; to quicken the motion of; to add to the speed of; -- opposed to retard.

Acceleration (n.) The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated; increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to retardation.

Acroceraunian (a.) Of or pertaining to the high mountain range of "thunder-smitten" peaks (now Kimara), between Epirus and Macedonia.

Aeriferous (a.) Conveying or containing air; air-bearing; as, the windpipe is an aeriferous tube.

Agistor (n.) Formerly, an officer of the king's forest, who had the care of cattle agisted, and collected the money for the same; -- hence called gisttaker, which in England is corrupted into guest-taker.

Alliteration (n.) The repetition of the same letter at the beginning of two or more words immediately succeeding each other, or at short intervals; as in the following lines: -

Allomorph (n.) Any one of two or more distinct crystalAllomorph (n.) A variety of pseudomorph which has undergone partial or complete change or substitution of material; -- thus limonite is frequently an allomorph after pyrite.

Almendron (n.) The lofty Brazil-nut tree.

Ambergris (n.) A substance of the consistence of wax, found floating in the Indian Ocean and other parts of the tropics, and also as a morbid secretion in the intestines of the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), which is believed to be in all cases its true origin. In color it is white, ash-gray, yellow, or black, and often variegated like marble. The floating masses are sometimes from sixty to two hundred and twenty-five pounds in weight. It is wholly volatilized as a white vapor at 212? F> Ambiparous (a.) Characterized by containing the rudiments of both flowers and leaves; -- applied to a bud.

Amelcorn (n.) A variety of wheat from which starch is produced; -- called also French rice.

Amphibrach (n.) A foot of three syllables, the middle one long, the first and last short (~ -- ~); as, h/b/r/. In modern prosody the accented syllable takes the place of the long and the unaccented of the short; as, pro-phet#ic.

Amphidromical (a.) Pertaining to an Attic festival at the naming of a child; -- so called because the friends of the parents carried the child around the hearth and then named it.

Anacharis (n.) A fresh-water weed of the frog's-bit family (Hydrocharidaceae), native to America. Transferred to England it became an obstruction to navigation. Called also waterweed and water thyme.

Anarthropoda (n. pl.) One of the divisions of Articulata in which there are no jointed legs, as the annelids; -- opposed to Arthropoda.

Ancistroid (a.) Hook-shaped.

Angular (a.) Relating to an angle or to angles; having an angle or angles; forming an angle or corner; sharp-cornered; pointed; as, an angular figure.

Angular (a.) Fig.: Lean; lank; raw-boned; ungraceful; sharp and stiff in character; as, remarkably angular in his habits and appearance; an angular female.

Annular (a.) Pertaining to, or having the form of, a ring; forming a ring; ringed; ring-shaped; as, annular fibers.

Antiperistaltic (a.) Opposed to, or checking motion; acting upward; -- applied to an inverted action of the intestinal tube.

Aperture (n.) The diameter of the exposed part of the object glass of a telescope or other optical instrument; as, a telescope of four-inch aperture.

Appropriate (v. t.) To set apart for, or assign to, a particular person or use, in exclusion of all others; -- with to or for; as, a spot of ground is appropriated for a garden; to appropriate money for the increase of the navy.

Aquiparous (a.) Secreting water; -- applied to certain glands.

Armature (n.) A piece of soft iron used to connect the two poles of a magnet, or electro-magnet, in order to complete the circuit, or to receive and apply the magnetic force. In the ordinary horseshoe magnet, it serves to prevent the dissipation of the magnetic force.

Auriferous (a.) Gold-bearing; containing or producing gold.

Auriform (a.) Having the form of the human ear; ear-shaped.

Aurivorous (a.) Gold-devouring.

Autochronograph (n.) An instrument for the instantaneous self-recording or printing of time.

Aventurine (n.) A kind of glass, containing gold-colored spangles. It was produced in the first place by the accidental (par aventure) dropping of some brass filings into a pot of melted glass.

Backwardation (n.) The seller's postponement of delivery of stock or shares, with the consent of the buyer, upon payment of a premium to the latter; -- also, the premium so paid. See Contango.

Barbiers (n.) A variety of paralysis, peculiar to India and the Malabar coast; -- considered by many to be the same as beriberi in chronic form.

Bayberry (n.) The fruit of Myrica cerifera (wax myrtle); the shrub itself; -- called also candleberry tree.

Bearberry (n.) A trailing plant of the heath family (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), having leaves which are tonic and astringent, and glossy red berries of which bears are said to be fond.

Belletristical (a.) Occupied with, or pertaining to, belles-lettres.

Bellwort (n.) A genus of plants (Uvularia) with yellowish bell-shaped flowers.

Bichloride (n.) A compound consisting of two atoms of chlorine with one or more atoms of another element; -- called also dichloride.

Bifilar (a.) Two-threaded; involving the use of two threads; as, bifilar suspension; a bifilar balance.

Billiards (n.) A game played with ivory balls o a cloth-covered, rectangular table, bounded by elastic cushions. The player seeks to impel his ball with his cue so that it shall either strike (carom upon) two other balls, or drive another ball into one of the pockets with which the table sometimes is furnished.

Bladder (n.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air.

Bloater (n.) The common herring, esp. when of large size, smoked, and half dried; -- called also bloat herring.

Bloomer (n.) A costume for women, consisting of a short dress, with loose trousers gathered round ankles, and (commonly) a broad-brimmed hat.

Blubber (v. t.) To give vent to (tears) or utter (broken words or cries); -- with forth or out.

Bluethroat (n.) A singing bird of northern Europe and Asia (Cyanecula Suecica), related to the nightingales; -- called also blue-throated robin and blue-throated warbler.

Boaster (n.) A stone mason's broad-faced chisel.

Bolster (n.) A long pillow or cushion, used to support the head of a person lying on a bed; -- generally laid under the pillows.

Bolster (v. t.) To support, hold up, or maintain with difficulty or unusual effort; -- often with up.

Boviform (a.) Resembling an ox in form; ox-shaped.

Brankursine (n.) Bear's-breech, or Acanthus.

Brassart (n.) Armor for the arm; -- generally used for the whole arm from the shoulder to the wrist, and consisting, in the 15th and 16th centuries, of many parts.

Breastrail (n.) The upper rail of any parapet of ordinary height, as of a balcony; the railing of a quarter-deck, etc.

Breviary (n.) A book containing the daily public or canonical prayers of the Roman Catholic or of the Greek Church for the seven canonical hours, namely, matins and lauds, the first, third, sixth, and ninth hours, vespers, and compline; -- distinguished from the missal.

Brinjaree (n.) A rough-haired East Indian variety of the greyhound.

Brother (n.) One related or closely united to another by some common tie or interest, as of rank, profession, membership in a society, toil, suffering, etc.; -- used among judges, clergymen, monks, physicians, lawyers, professors of religion, etc.

Brotherhood (n.) The whole body of persons engaged in the same business, -- especially those of the same profession; as, the legal or medical brotherhood.

Bubbler (n.) A fish of the Ohio river; -- so called from the noise it makes.

Buckler (n.) A block of wood or plate of iron made to fit a hawse hole, or the circular opening in a half-port, to prevent water from entering when the vessel pitches.

Bullwort (n.) See Bishop's-weed.

Calaverite (n.) A bronze-yellow massive mineral with metallic luster; a telluride of gold; -- first found in Calaveras County California.

Calipers (n. pl.) An instrument, usually resembling a pair of dividers or compasses with curved legs, for measuring the diameter or thickness of bodies, as of work shaped in a lathe or planer, timber, masts, shot, etc.; or the bore of firearms, tubes, etc.; -- called also caliper compasses, or caliber compasses.

Camisard (n.) One of the French Protestant insurgents who rebelled against Louis XIV, after the revocation of the edict of Nates; -- so called from the peasant's smock (camise) which they wore.

Camphor (n.) A gum resembling ordinary camphor, obtained from a tree (Dryobalanops camphora) growing in Sumatra and Borneo; -- called also Malay camphor, camphor of Borneo, or borneol. See Borneol.

Cantharidin (n.) The active principle of the cantharis, or Spanish fly, a volatile, acrid, bitter solid, crystallizing in four-sided prisms.

Cantharis (n.) A beetle (Lytta, / Cantharis, vesicatoria), havin1g an elongated cylindrical body of a brilliant green color, and a nauseous odor; the blister fly or blister beetle, of the apothecary; -- also called Spanish fly. Many other species of Lytta, used for the same purpose, take the same name. See Blister beetle, under Blister. The plural form in usually applied to the dried insects used in medicine.

Capybara (n.) A large South American rodent (Hydrochaerus capybara) Living on the margins of lakes and rivers. It is the largest extant rodent, being about three feet long, and half that in height. It somewhat resembles the Guinea pig, to which it is related; -- called also cabiai and water hog.

Carinaria (n.) A genus of oceanic heteropod Mollusca, having a thin, glassy, bonnet-shaped shell, which covers only the nucleus and gills.

Casehardened (a.) Hardened against, or insusceptible to, good influences; rendered callous by persistence in wrongdoing or resistance of good influences; -- said of persons.

Catachrestical (a.) Belonging to, or in the manner of, a catachresis; wrested from its natural sense or form; forced; far-fetched.

Catamaran (n.) A kind of raft or float, consisting of two or more logs or pieces of wood lashed together, and moved by paddles or sail; -- used as a surf boat and for other purposes on the coasts of the East and West Indies and South America. Modified forms are much used in the lumber regions of North America, and at life-saving stations.

Catamaran (n.) Any vessel with twin hulls, whether propelled by sails or by steam; esp., one of a class of double-hulled pleasure boats remarkable for speed.

Catastrophism (n.) The doctrine that the geological changes in the earth's crust have been caused by the sudden action of violent physical causes; -- opposed to the doctrine of uniformism.

Categorematic (a.) Capable of being employed by itself as a term; -- said of a word.

Catoptrics (n.) That part of optics which explains the properties and phenomena of reflected light, and particularly that which is reflected from mirrors or polished bodies; -- formerly called anacamptics.

Chamber (n.) That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from the rest of the bore; -- formerly, in guns, made smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in breech-loading guns.

Chatterer (n.) A bird of the family Ampelidae -- so called from its monotonous note. The Bohemion chatterer (Ampelis garrulus) inhabits the arctic regions of both continents. In America the cedar bird is a more common species. See Bohemian chatterer, and Cedar bird.

Checkerboard (n.) A board with sixty-four squares of alternate color, used for playing checkers or draughts.

Chickaree (n.) The American red squirrel (Sciurus Hudsonius); -- so called from its cry.

Chivalrous (a.) Pertaining to chivalry or knight-errantry; warlike; heroic; gallant; high-spirited; high-minded; magnanimous.

Chivalry (n.) The dignity or system of knighthood; the spirit, usages, or manners of knighthood; the practice of knight-errantry.

Cincture (n.) A belt, a girdle, or something worn round the body, -- as by an ecclesiastic for confining the alb.

Cineraria (n.) A Linnaean genus of free-flowering composite plants, mostly from South Africa. Several species are cultivated for ornament.

Clamber (v. i.) To climb with difficulty, or with hands and feet; -- also used figuratively.

Claymore (n.) A large two-handed sword used formerly by the Scottish Highlanders.

Cleavers (n.) A species of Galium (G. Aparine), having a fruit set with hooked bristles, which adhere to whatever they come in contact with; -- called also, goose grass, catchweed, etc.

Cocleariform (a.) Spoon-shaped.

Cockhorse (n.) A child's rocking-horse.

Concurrence (n.) A meeting of minds; agreement in opinion; union in design or act; -- implying joint approbation.

Concurrent (n.) One of the supernumerary days of the year over fifty-two complete weeks; -- so called because they concur with the solar cycle, the course of which they follow.

Conferruminated (a.) Closely united by the coalescence, or sticking together, of contiguous faces, as in the case of the cotyledons of the live-oak acorn.

Congiary (n.) A present, as of corn, wine, or oil, made by a Roman emperor to the soldiers or the people; -- so called because measured to each in a congius.

Coniform (a.) Cone-shaped; conical.

Connutritious (a.) Nutritious by force of habit; -- said of certain kinds of food.

Corchorus (n.) The common name of the Kerria Japonica or Japan globeflower, a yellow-flowered, perennial, rosaceous plant, seen in old-fashioned gardens.

Counter (v. t.) Money; coin; -- used in contempt.

Counter (adv.) Contrary; in opposition; in an opposite direction; contrariwise; -- used chiefly with run or go.

Counter (adv.) The after part of a vessel's body, from the water Counterbore (n.) A flat-bottomed cylindrical enlargement of the mouth of a hole, usually of slight depth, as for receiving a cylindrical screw head.

Counterbore (n.) A kind of pin drill with the cutting edge or edges normal to the axis; -- used for enlarging a hole, or for forming a flat-bottomed recess at its mouth.

Countercaster (n.) A caster of accounts; a reckoner; a bookkeeper; -- used contemptuously.

Counterflory (a.) Adorned with flowers (usually fleurs-de-lis) so divided that the tops appear on one side and the bottoms on the others; -- said of any ordinary.

Counterfoil (n.) That part of a tally, formerly in the exchequer, which was kept by an officer in that court, the other, called the stock, being delivered to the person who had lent the king money on the account; -- called also counterstock.

Counterjumper (n.) A salesman in a shop; a shopman; -- used contemptuously.

Counterpane (n.) A coverlet for a bed, -- originally stitched or woven in squares or figures.

Counterpane (n.) A coverlet for a bed, -- originally stitched or woven in squares or figures.

Counterpane (n.) A duplicate part or copy of an indenture, deed, etc., corresponding with the original; -- now called counterpart.

Counterpassant (a.) Passant in opposite directions; -- said of two animals.

Counterscarf (n.) The exterior slope or wall of the ditch; -- sometimes, the whole covered way, beyond the ditch, with its parapet and glacis; as, the enemy have lodged themselves on the counterscarp.

Counterscarf (n.) The exterior slope or wall of the ditch; -- sometimes, the whole covered way, beyond the ditch, with its parapet and glacis; as, the enemy have lodged themselves on the counterscarp.

Countersunk (p. p. & a.) Chamfered at the top; -- said of a hole.

Counterterm (n.) A term or word which is the opposite of, or antithesis to, another; an antonym; -- the opposite of synonym; as, "foe" is the counterterm of "friend".

Cowberry (n.) A species of Vaccinium (V. Vitis-idaea), which bears acid red berries which are sometimes used in cookery; -- locally called mountain cranberry.

Cracker (n.) A small firework, consisting of a little powder inclosed in a thick paper cylinder with a fuse, and exploding with a sharp noise; -- often called firecracker.

Crawford (n.) A Crawford peach; a well-known freestone peach, with yellow flesh, first raised by Mr. William Crawford, of New Jersey.

Creaser (n.) A tool, or a sewing-machine attachment, for making lines or creases on leather or cloth, as guides to sew by.

Creature (n.) Anything created; anything not self-existent; especially, any being created with life; an animal; a man.

Creeper (n.) A small bird of the genus Certhia, allied to the wrens. The brown or common European creeper is C. familiaris, a variety of which (var. Americana) inhabits America; -- called also tree creeper and creeptree. The American black and white creeper is Mniotilta varia.

Creeper (n.) A spurlike device strapped to the boot, which enables one to climb a tree or pole; -- called often telegraph creepers.

Croaker (n.) An American fresh-water fish (Aplodinotus grunniens); -- called also drum.

Crowberry (n.) A heathlike plant of the genus Empetrum, and its fruit, a black, scarcely edible berry; -- also called crakeberry.

Cruiser (n.) One who, or a vessel that, cruises; -- usually an armed vessel.

Cuniform (a.) Wedge-shaped; as, a cuneiform bone; -- especially applied to the wedge-shaped or arrowheaded characters of ancient Persian and Assyrian inscriptions. See Arrowheaded.

Cuniform (a.) Pertaining to, or versed in, the ancient wedge-shaped characters, or the inscriptions in them.

Cuniform (n.) The wedge-shaped characters used in ancient Persian and Assyrian inscriptions.

Cuniform (n.) One of the carpal bones usually articulating with the ulna; -- called also pyramidal and ulnare.

Curmurring (n.) Murmuring; grumbling; -- sometimes applied to the rumbling produced by a slight attack of the gripes.

Cylindroid (n.) A certain surface of the third degree, described by a moving straight line; -- used to illustrate the motions of a rigid body and also the forces acting on the body.

Damewort (n.) A cruciferrous plant (Hesperis matronalis), remarkable for its fragrance, especially toward the close of the day; -- called also rocket and dame's violet.

Dandiprat (n.) A little fellow; -- in sport or contempt.

Danewort (n.) A fetid European species of elder (Sambucus Ebulus); dwarf elder; wallwort; elderwort; -- called also Daneweed, Dane's weed, and Dane's-blood. [Said to grow on spots where battles were fought against the Danes.]

Dearborn (n.) A four-wheeled carriage, with curtained sides.

Death (v. i.) Personified: The destroyer of life, -- conventionally represented as a skeleton with a scythe.

Decacerata (n. pl.) The division of Cephalopoda which includes the squids, cuttlefishes, and others having ten arms or tentacles; -- called also Decapoda. [Written also Decacera.] See Dibranchiata.

Decameron (n.) A celebrated collection of tales, supposed to be related in ten days; -- written in the 14th century, by Boccaccio, an Italian.

Decentralize (v. t.) To prevent from centralizing; to cause to withdraw from the center or place of concentration; to divide and distribute (what has been united or concentrated); -- esp. said of authority, or the administration of public affairs.

Deerberry (n.) A shrub of the blueberry group (Vaccinium stamineum); also, its bitter, greenish white berry; -- called also squaw huckleberry.

Delaware (n.) An American grape, with compact bunches of small, amber-colored berries, sweet and of a good flavor.

Deliberate (a.) Weighing facts and arguments with a view to a choice or decision; carefully considering the probable consequences of a step; circumspect; slow in determining; -- applied to persons; as, a deliberate judge or counselor.

Deliberate (a.) Formed with deliberation; well-advised; carefully considered; not sudden or rash; as, a deliberate opinion; a deliberate measure or result.

Deliberate (v. i.) To take counsel with one's self; to weigh the arguments for and against a proposed course of action; to reflect; to consider; to hesitate in deciding; -- sometimes with on, upon, about, concerning.

Deliver (v. t.) To set free from restraint; to set at liberty; to release; to liberate, as from control; to give up; to free; to save; to rescue from evil actual or feared; -- often with from or out of; as, to deliver one from captivity, or from fear of death.

Deliver (v. t.) To give or transfer; to yield possession or control of; to part with (to); to make over; to commit; to surrender; to resign; -- often with up or over, to or into.

Deliver (v. t.) To free from, or disburden of, young; to relieve of a child in childbirth; to bring forth; -- often with of.

Despair (v. i.) To be hopeless; to have no hope; to give up all hope or expectation; -- often with of.

Devisor (n.) One who devises, or gives real estate by will; a testator; -- correlative to devisee.

Dextrorse (a.) Turning from the left to the right, in the ascending line, as in the spiral inclination of the stem of the common morning-glory.

Diaspore (n.) A hydrate of alumina, often occurring in white lamellar masses with brilliant pearly luster; -- so named on account of its decrepitating when heated before the blowpipe.

Diaster (n.) A double star; -- applied to the nucleus of a cell, when, during cell division, the loops of the nuclear network separate into two groups, preparatory to the formation of two daughter nuclei. See Karyokinesis.

Diathermanous (a.) Having the property of transmitting radiant heat; diathermal; -- opposed to athermanous.

Diathermometer (n.) An instrument for examining the thermal resistance or heat-conducting power of liquids.

Dicentra (n.) A genus of herbaceous plants, with racemes of two-spurred or heart-shaped flowers, including the Dutchman's breeches, and the more showy Bleeding heart (D. spectabilis).

Digastric (a.) Having two bellies; biventral; -- applied to muscles which are fleshy at each end and have a tendon in the middle, and esp. to the muscle which pulls down the lower jaw.

Digitorium (n.) A small dumb keyboard used by pianists for exercising the fingers; -- called also dumb piano.

Dilatory (a.) Marked by procrastination or delay; tardy; slow; sluggish; -- said of actions or measures.

Dinoceras (n.) A genus of large extinct Eocene mammals from Wyoming; -- called also Uintatherium. See Illustration in Appendix.

Disapprove (v. t.) To refuse official approbation to; to disallow; to decDisastrous (a.) Full of unpropitious stellar influences; unpropitious; ill-boding.

Disastrous (a.) Attended with suffering or disaster; very unfortunate; calamitous; ill-fated; as, a disastrous day; a disastrous termination of an undertaking.

Discharge (v. t.) To free of the missile with which anything is charged or loaded; to let go the charge of; as, to discharge a bow, catapult, etc.; especially, said of firearms, -- to fire off; to shoot off; also, to relieve from a state of tension, as a Leyden jar.

Discourage (v. t.) To extinguish the courage of; to dishearten; to depress the spirits of; to deprive of confidence; to deject; -- the opposite of encourage; as, he was discouraged in his undertaking; he need not be discouraged from a like attempt.

Disimprove (v. t.) To make worse; -- the opposite of improve.

Disspermous (a.) Containing only two seeds; two-seeded.

Dogberry (n.) The berry of the dogwood; -- called also dogcherry.

Doucker (v. t.) A grebe or diver; -- applied also to the golden-eye, pochard, scoter, and other ducks.

Dowager (n.) A title given in England to a widow, to distinguish her from the wife of her husband's heir bearing the same name; -- chiefly applied to widows of personages of rank.

Dredger (n.) A box with holes in its lid; -- used for sprinkling flour, as on meat or a breadboard; -- called also dredging box, drudger, and drudging box.

Dropper (n.) A dog which suddenly drops upon the ground when it sights game, -- formerly a common, and still an occasional, habit of the setter.

Earthdrake (n.) A mythical monster of the early Anglo-Saxon literature; a dragon.

Earthquake (n.) A shaking, trembling, or concussion of the earth, due to subterranean causes, often accompanied by a rumbling noise. The wave of shock sometimes traverses half a hemisphere, destroying cities and many thousand lives; -- called also earthdin, earthquave, and earthshock.

Eccentric (a.) Not having the same center; -- said of circles, ellipses, spheres, etc., which, though coinciding, either in whole or in part, as to area or volume, have not the same center; -- opposed to concentric.

Eccentricity (n.) The ratio of the distance between the center and the focus of an ellipse or hyperbola to its semi-transverse axis.

Eccentricity (n.) The ratio of the distance of the center of the orbit of a heavenly body from the center of the body round which it revolves to the semi-transverse axis of the orbit.

Ectoparasite (n.) Any parasite which lives on the exterior of animals; -- opposed to endoparasite.

Emperor (n.) The sovereign or supreme monarch of an empire; -- a title of dignity superior to that of king; as, the emperor of Germany or of Austria; the emperor or Czar of Russia.

Endoparasite (n.) Any parasite which lives in the internal organs of an animal, as the tapeworms, Trichina, etc.; -- opposed to ectoparasite. See Entozoon.

Ensiform (a.) Having the form of a sword blade; sword-shaped; as, an ensiform leaf.

Entoperipheral (a.) Being, or having its origin, within the external surface of the body; -- especially applied to feelings, such as hunger, produced by internal disturbances. Opposed to epiperipheral.

Eosphorite (n.) A hydrous phosphate of alumina and manganese. It is generally of a rose-pink color, -- whence the name.

Eparterial (a.) Situated upon or above an artery; -- applied esp. to the branches of the bronchi given off above the point where the pulmonary artery crosses the bronchus.

Ephemeral (a.) Short-lived; existing or continuing for a short time only.

Epichordal (a.) Upon or above the notochord; -- applied esp. to a vertebral column which develops upon the dorsal side of the notochord, as distinguished from a perichordal column, which develops around it.

Equator (n.) The great circle of the celestial sphere, coincident with the plane of the earth's equator; -- so called because when the sun is in it, the days and nights are of equal length; hence called also the equinoctial, and on maps, globes, etc., the equinoctial line.

Errantry (n.) The employment of a knight-errant.

Erucifrom (a.) Having the form of a caterpillar; -- said of insect larvae.

Evermore (adv.) During eternity; always; forever; for an indefinite period; at all times; -- often used substantively with for.

Excentrical (a.) One-sided; having the normally central portion not in the true center.

Extrabranchial (a.) Outside of the branchial arches; -- said of the cartilages thus placed in some fishes.

Extraordinary (n.) That which is extraordinary; -- used especially in the plural; as, extraordinaries excepted, there is nothing to prevent success.

Fatiferous (a.) Fate-bringing; deadly; mortal; destructive.

Fatling (n.) A calf, lamb, kid, or other young animal fattened for slaughter; a fat animal; -- said of such animals as are used for food.

Favorer (n.) One who favors; one who regards with kindness or friendship; a well-wisher; one who assists or promotes success or prosperity.

Feather (n.) Kind; nature; species; -- from the proverbial phrase, "Birds of a feather," that is, of the same species.

Feather (n.) The angular adjustment of an oar or paddle-wheel float, with reference to a horizontal axis, as it leaves or enters the water.

Feather (v. i.) To grow or form feathers; to become feathered; -- often with out; as, the birds are feathering out.

Feather (v. i.) To turn to a horizontal plane; -- said of oars.

Feathered (a.) Having feathers; -- said of an arrow, when the feathers are of a tincture different from that of the shaft.

February (n.) The second month in the year, said to have been introduced into the Roman calendar by Numa. In common years this month contains twenty-eight days; in the bissextile, or leap year, it has twenty-nine days.

Fenestration (n.) The arrangement and proportioning of windows; -- used by modern writers for the decorating of an architectural composition by means of the window (and door) openings, their ornaments, and proportions.

Fiddler (n.) A burrowing crab of the genus Gelasimus, of many species. The male has one claw very much enlarged, and often holds it in a position similar to that in which a musician holds a fiddle, hence the name; -- called also calling crab, soldier crab, and fighting crab.

Fiddler (n.) The common European sandpiper (Tringoides hypoleucus); -- so called because it continually oscillates its body.

Filacer (n.) A former officer in the English Court of Common Pleas; -- so called because he filed the writs on which he made out process.

Firewarden (n.) An officer who has authority to direct in the extinguishing of fires, or to order what precautions shall be taken against fires; -- called also fireward.

Fireworm (n.) The larva of a small tortricid moth which eats the leaves of the cranberry, so that the vines look as if burned; -- called also cranberry worm.

Flasher (n.) The European red-backed shrike (Lanius collurio); -- called also flusher.

Flatter (n.) A flat-faced fulling hammer.

Flatter (v. t.) To treat with praise or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.

Flesher (n.) A two-handled, convex, blunt-edged knife, for scraping hides; a fleshing knife.

Flicker (n.) The golden-winged woodpecker (Colaptes aurutus); -- so called from its spring note. Called also yellow-hammer, high-holder, pigeon woodpecker, and yucca.

Flittermouse (n.) A bat; -- called also flickermouse, flindermouse, and flintymouse.

Fluework (n.) A general name for organ stops in which the sound is caused by wind passing through a flue or fissure and striking an edge above; -- in distinction from reedwork.

Flusher (n.) The red-backed shrike. See Flasher.

Forbear (n.) An ancestor; a forefather; -- usually in the plural.

Forbearance (n.) The quality of being forbearing; indulgence toward offenders or enemies; long-suffering.

Forbearing (a.) Disposed or accustomed to forbear; patient; long-suffering.

Frippery (n.) Coast-off clothes.

Fromwards (prep.) A way from; -- the contrary of toward.

Garnierite (n.) An amorphous mineral of apple-green color; a hydrous silicate of nickel and magnesia. It is an important ore of nickel.

Geometrid (n.) One of numerous genera and species of moths, of the family Geometridae; -- so called because their larvae (called loopers, measuring worms, spanworms, and inchworms) creep in a looping manner, as if measuring. Many of the species are injurious to agriculture, as the cankerworms.

Gestour (n.) A reciter of gests or legendary tales; a story-teller.

Gnatworm (n.) The aquatic larva of a gnat; -- called also, colloquially, wiggler.

Goggler (n.) A carangoid oceanic fish (Trachurops crumenophthalmus), having very large and prominent eyes; -- called also goggle-eye, big-eyed scad, and cicharra.

Goutwort (n.) A coarse umbelliferous plant of Europe (Aegopodium Podagraria); -- called also bishop's weed, ashweed, and herb gerard.

Grainer (n.) An infusion of pigeon's dung used by tanners to neutralize the effects of lime and give flexibility to skins; -- called also grains and bate.

Gravigrade (a.) Slow-paced.

Grinder (n.) The restless flycatcher (Seisura inquieta) of Australia; -- called also restless thrush and volatile thrush. It makes a noise like a scissors grinder, to which the name alludes.

Growler (n.) The large-mouthed black bass.

Growler (n.) A four-wheeled cab.

Guacharo (n.) A nocturnal bird of South America and Trinidad (Steatornis Caripensis, or S. steatornis); -- called also oilbird.

Guelderrose' (n.) A cultivated variety of a species of Viburnum (V. Opulus), bearing large bunches of white flowers; -- called also snowball tree.

Guilder (n.) A Dutch silver coin worth about forty cents; -- called also florin and gulden.

Hamiform (n.) Hook-shaped.

Hangbird (n.) The Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula); -- so called because its nest is suspended from the limb of a tree. See Baltimore oriole.

Harikari (n.) See Hara-kiri.

Harrier (n.) One of several species of hawks or buzzards of the genus Circus which fly low and harry small animals or birds, -- as the European marsh harrier (Circus aerunginosus), and the hen harrier (C. cyaneus).

Hartford (n.) The Hartford grape, a variety of grape first raised at Hartford, Connecticut, from the Northern fox grape. Its large dark-colored berries ripen earlier than those of most other kinds.

Haste (n.) Celerity of motion; speed; swiftness; dispatch; expedition; -- applied only to voluntary beings, as men and other animals.

Headborrow (n.) The chief of a frankpledge, tithing, or decennary, consisting of ten families; -- called also borsholder, boroughhead, boroughholder, and sometimes tithingman. See Borsholder.

Heliotrope (n.) A plant of the genus Heliotropium; -- called also turnsole and girasole. H. Peruvianum is the commonly cultivated species with fragrant flowers.

Hemimorphic (a.) Having the two ends modified with unlike planes; -- said of a crystal.

Hereford (n.) One of a breed of cattle originating in Herefordshire, England. The Herefords are good working animals, and their beef-producing quality is excellent.

Hexandrian (a.) Alt. of Hex-androus

Hexapoda (n. pl.) The true, or six-legged, insects; insects other than myriapods and arachnids.

Hippocrepian (n.) One of an order of fresh-water Bryozoa, in which the tentacles are on a lophophore, shaped like a horseshoe. See Phylactolaema.

Holophrastic (a.) Expressing a phrase or sentence in a single word, -- as is the case in the aboriginal languages of America.

Homocercal (a.) Having the tail nearly or quite symmetrical, the vertebral column terminating near its base; -- opposed to heterocercal.

Homomorphism (n.) The possession, in one species of plants, of only one kind of flowers; -- opposed to heteromorphism, dimorphism, and trimorphism.

Honewort (n.) An umbelliferous plant of the genus Sison (S. Amomum); -- so called because used to cure a swelling called a hone.

Hostler (n.) The person who has the care of horses at an inn or stable; hence, any one who takes care of horses; a groom; -- so called because the innkeeper formerly attended to this duty in person.

Hotspur (n.) A rash, hot-headed man.

Hydrobromide (n.) A compound of hydrobromic acid with a base; -- distinguished from a bromide, in which only the bromine unites with the base.

Hypethral (a.) Exposed to the air; wanting a roof; -- applied to a building or part of a building.

Hypertrophy (n.) A condition of overgrowth or excessive development of an organ or part; -- the opposite of atrophy.

Idiomorphous (a.) Apperaing in distinct crystals; -- said of the mineral constituents of a rock.

Illiberal (a.) Indicating a lack of breeding, culture, and the like; ignoble; rude; narrow-minded; disingenuous.

Inaugurate (v. t.) To cause to begin, esp. with formality or solemn ceremony; hence, to set in motion, action, or progress; to initiate; -- used especially of something of dignity or worth or public concern; as, to inaugurate a new era of things, new methods, etc.

Incoherent (a.) Not coherent; wanting cohesion; loose; unconnected; physically disconnected; not fixed to each; -- said of material substances.

Incompressibility (n.) The quality of being incompressible, or incapable of reduction in volume by pressure; -- formerly supposed to be a property of liquids.

Indoctrinate (v. t.) To instruct in the rudiments or principles of learning, or of a branch of learning; to imbue with learning; to instruct in, or imbue with, principles or doctrines; to teach; -- often followed by in.

Industrious (a.) Given to industry; characterized by diligence; constantly, regularly, or habitually occupied; busy; assiduous; not slothful or idle; -- commonly implying devotion to lawful and useful labor.

Industry (n.) Habitual diligence in any employment or pursuit, either bodily or mental; steady attention to business; assiduity; -- opposed to sloth and idleness; as, industry pays debts, while idleness or despair will increase them.

Infiltrate (v. t.) To penetrate gradually; -- sometimes used reflexively.

Infrabranchial (a.) Below the gills; -- applied to the ventral portion of the pallial chamber in the lamellibranchs.

Infratrochlear (a.) Below a trochlea, or pulley; -- applied esp. to one of the subdivisions of the trigeminal nerve.

Infusory (n.) One of the Infusoria; -- usually in the pl.

Inseparable (a.) Invariably attached to some word, stem, or root; as, the inseparable particle un-.

Intercrural (a.) Between crura; -- applied especially to the interneural plates in the vertebral column of many cartilaginous fishes.

Interfretted (a.) Interlaced; linked together; -- said of charges or bearings. See Fretted.

Interpret (v. t.) To explain or tell the meaning of; to expound; to translate orally into intelligible or familiar language or terms; to decipher; to define; -- applied esp. to language, but also to dreams, signs, conduct, mysteries, etc.; as, to interpret the Hebrew language to an Englishman; to interpret an Indian speech.

Inveteracy (n.) Firm establishment by long continuance; firmness or deep-rooted obstinacy of any quality or state acquired by time; as, the inveteracy of custom, habit, or disease; -- usually in a bad sense; as, the inveteracy of prejudice or of error.

Inveterate (a.) Old; long-established.

Inveterate (a.) Firmly established by long continuance; obstinate; deep-rooted; of long standing; as, an inveterate disease; an inveterate abuse.

Ironbark tree () The Australian Eucalyptus Sideroxylon, used largely by carpenters and shipbuilders; -- called also ironwood.

Ironwork (n.) Anything made of iron; -- a general name of such parts or pieces of a building, vessel, carriage, etc., as consist of iron.

Janitor (n.) A door-keeper; a porter; one who has the care of a public building, or a building occupied for offices, suites of rooms, etc.

Jugular (a.) Having the ventral fins beneath the throat; -- said of certain fishes.

Jugular (a.) One of the large veins which return the blood from the head to the heart through two chief trunks, an external and an internal, on each side of the neck; -- called also the jugular vein.

Juneberry (n.) The small applelike berry of American trees of genus Amelanchier; -- also called service berry.

Juneberry (n.) The shrub or tree which bears this fruit; -- also called shad bush, and had tree.

Klipspringer (n.) A small, graceful South African antelope (Nanotragus oreotragus), which, like the chamois, springs from one crag to another with great agility; -- called also kainsi.

Knacker (n.) One of two or more pieces of bone or wood held loosely between the fingers, and struck together by moving the hand; -- called also clapper.

Knacker (n.) One who slaughters worn-out horses and sells their flesh for dog's meat.

Knoppern (n.) A kind of gall produced by a gallfly on the cup of an acorn, -- used in tanning and dyeing.

Knotberry (n.) The cloudberry (Rudus Chamaemorus); -- so called from its knotted stems.

Krumhorn (a.) A reed stop in the organ; -- sometimes called cremona.

Lacquer (n.) A varnish, consisting of a solution of shell-lac in alcohol, often colored with gamboge, saffron, or the like; -- used for varnishing metals, papier-mache, and wood. The name is also given to varnishes made of other ingredients, esp. the tough, solid varnish of the Japanese, with which ornamental objects are made.

Ladybird (n.) Any one of numerous species of small beetles of the genus Coccinella and allied genera (family Coccinellidae); -- called also ladybug, ladyclock, lady cow, lady fly, and lady beetle. Coccinella seplempunctata in one of the common European species. See Coccinella.

Laminarite (n.) A broad-leafed fossil alga.

Larboard (n.) The left-hand side of a ship to one on board facing toward the bow; port; -- opposed to starboard.

Larboard (a.) On or pertaining to the left-hand side of a vessel; port; as, the larboard quarter.

Laxator (n.) That which loosens; -- esp., a muscle which by its contraction loosens some part.

Leadwort (n.) A genus of maritime herbs (Plumbago). P. Europaea has lead-colored spots on the leaves, and nearly lead-colored flowers.

Leatherback (n.) A large sea turtle (Sphargis coriacea), having no bony shell on its back. It is common in the warm and temperate parts of the Atlantic, and sometimes weighs over a thousand pounds; -- called also leather turtle, leathery turtle, leather-backed tortoise, etc.

Leatherwood (n.) A small branching shrub (Dirca palustris), with a white, soft wood, and a tough, leathery bark, common in damp woods in the Northern United States; -- called also moosewood, and wicopy.

Ligustrin (n.) A bitter principle found in the bark of the privet (Ligustrum vulgare), and extracted as a white crystalLobster (n.) Any large macrurous crustacean used as food, esp. those of the genus Homarus; as the American lobster (H. Americanus), and the European lobster (H. vulgaris). The Norwegian lobster (Nephrops Norvegicus) is similar in form. All these have a pair of large unequal claws. The spiny lobsters of more southern waters, belonging to Palinurus, Panulirus, and allied genera, have no large claws. The fresh-water crayfishes are sometimes called lobsters.

Longhorn (n.) A long-horned animal, as a cow, goat, or beetle. See Long-horned.

Lucifer (n.) The planet Venus, when appearing as the morning star; -- applied in Isaiah by a metaphor to a king of Babylon.

Lucifer (n.) A match made of a sliver of wood tipped with a combustible substance, and ignited by friction; -- called also lucifer match, and locofoco. See Locofoco.

Lucifer (n.) A genus of free-swimming macruran Crustacea, having a slender body and long appendages.

Lungoor (n.) A long-tailed monkey (Semnopithecus schislaceus), from the mountainous districts of India.

Lungwort (n.) An herb of the genus Pulmonaria (P. officinalis), of Europe; -- so called because the spotted appearance of the leaves resembles that of a diseased lung.

Lyriferous (a.) Having a lyre-shaped shoulder girdle, as certain fishes.

Machairodus (n.) A genus of extinct mammals allied to the cats, and having in the upper jaw canine teeth of remarkable size and strength; -- hence called saber-toothed tigers.

Magistral (a.) Formulated extemporaneously, or for a special case; -- opposed to officinal, and said of prescriptions and medicines.

Magma (n.) The amorphous or homogenous matrix or ground mass, as distinguished from well-defined crystals; as, the magma of porphyry.

Malodor (n.) An Offensive to the sense of smell; ill-smelling.

Marguerite (n.) The daisy (Bellis perennis). The name is often applied also to the ox-eye daisy and to the China aster.

Massacre (n.) To kill in considerable numbers where much resistance can not be made; to kill with indiscriminate violence, without necessity, and contrary to the usages of nations; to butcher; to slaughter; -- limited to the killing of human beings.

Megaderm (n.) Any one of several species of Old World blood-sucking bats of the genus Megaderma.

Melanorrhoea (n.) An East Indian genus of large trees. Melanorrh/a usitatissima is the lignum-vitae of Pegu, and yelds a valuable black varnish.

Melanuric (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid obtained by decomposition of melam, or of urea, as a white crystalMelicerous (a.) Consisting of or containing matter like honey; -- said of certain encysted tumors.

Metamorphic (a.) Pertaining to, produced by, or exhibiting, certain changes which minerals or rocks may have undergone since their original deposition; -- especially applied to the recrystallization which sedimentary rocks have undergone through the influence of heat and pressure, after which they are called metamorphic rocks.

Metaphrase (n.) A verbal translation; a version or translation from one language into another, word for word; -- opposed to paraphrase.

Miargyrite (n.) A mineral of an iron-black color, and very sectile, consisting principally of sulphur, antimony, and silver.

Microorganism (n.) Any microscopic form of life; -- particularly applied to bacteria and similar organisms, esp. such are supposed to cause infectious diseases.

Milliard (n.) A thousand millions; -- called also billion. See Billion.

Misrepresentation (n.) Untrue representation; false or incorrect statement or account; -- usually unfavorable to the thing represented; as, a misrepresentation of a person's motives.

Monandry (n.) The possession by a woman of only one husband at the same time; -- contrasted with polyandry.

Monitor (n.) An ironclad war vessel, very low in the water, and having one or more heavily-armored revolving turrets, carrying heavy guns.

Monoceros (n.) A one-horned creature; a unicorn; a sea monster with one horn.

Monomerous (a.) Having but one joint; -- said of the foot of certain insects.

Monomorphous (a.) Having but a single form; retaining the same form throughout the various stages of development; of the same or of an essentially similar type of structure; -- opposed to dimorphic, trimorphic, and polymorphic.

Moonwort (n.) Any fern of the genus Botrychium, esp. B. Lunaria; -- so named from the crescent-shaped segments of its frond.

Morepork (n.) The Australian crested goatsucker (Aegotheles Novae-Hollandiae). Also applied to other allied birds, as Podargus Cuveiri.

Muckworm (n.) A larva or grub that lives in muck or manure; -- applied to the larvae of the tumbledung and allied beetles.

Muliebrity (n.) The state of being a woman or of possessing full womanly powers; womanhood; -- correlate of virility.

Mynchery (n.) A nunnery; -- a term still applied to the ruins of certain nunneries in England.

Napiform (a.) Turnip-shaped; large and round in the upper part, and very slender below.

Natatorious (a.) Adapted for swimming; -- said of the legs of certain insects.

Noctuary (n.) A record of what passes in the night; a nightly journal; -- distinguished from diary.

Northerner (n.) A native or inhabitant of the Northern States; -- contradistinguished from Southerner.

Nuciform (a.) Shaped like a nut; nut-shaped.

Ascocarp (n.) In ascomycetous fungi, the spherical, discoid, or cup-shaped body within which the asci are collected, and which constitutes the mature fructification. The different forms are known in mycology under distinct names. Called also spore fruit.

Asynchronous (a.) Not simultaneous; not concurrent in time; -- opposed to synchronous.

Aviator (n.) The driver or pilot of an aeroplane, or heavier-than-air flying machine.

Barnburner (n.) A member of the radical section of the Democratic party in New York, about the middle of the 19th century, which was hostile to extension of slavery, public debts, corporate privileges, etc., and supported Van Buren against Cass for president in 1848; -- opposed to Hunker.

Blather (n.) Voluble, foolish, or nonsensical talk; -- often in the pl.

Booster (n.) An instrument for regulating the electro-motive force in an alternating-current circuit; -- so called because used to "boost", or raise, the pressure in the circuit.

Cadaverine () Alt. of -in

California jack () A game at cards, a modification of seven-up, or all fours.

Ceinture (n.) A cincture, girdle, or belt; -- chiefly used in English as a dressmaking term.

Centauromachy (n.) A fight in which centaurs take part, -- a common theme for relief sculpture, as in the Parthenon metopes.

Coherer (n.) Any device in which an imperfectly conducting contact between pieces of metal or other conductors loosely resting against each other is materially improved in conductivity by the influence of Hertzian waves; -- so called by Sir O. J. Lodge in 1894 on the assumption that the impact of the electic waves caused the loosely connected parts to cohere, or weld together, a condition easily destroyed by tapping. A common form of coherer as used in wireless telegraphy consists of a tube co> Couleur (n.) Color; -- chiefly used in a few French phrases, as couler de rose, color of rose; and hence, adjectively, rose-colored; roseate.

Couleur (n.) A suit of cards, as hearts or clubs; -- used in some French games.

Cracker State () Georgia; -- a nickname. See Cracker, n. 5.

Cruiser (n.) A man-of-war less heavily armed and armored than a battle ship, having great speed, and generally of from two thousand to twelve thousand tons displacement.

Decembrist (n.) One of those who conspired for constitutional government against the Emperor Nicholas on his accession to the throne at the death of Alexander I., in December, 1825; -- called also Dekabrist.

Deerstalker (n.) A close-fitting hat, with a low crown, such as is worn in deerstalking; also, any stiff, round hat.

Diaspora (n.) Lit., "Dispersion." -- applied collectively: (a) To those Jews who, after the Exile, were scattered through the Old World, and afterwards to Jewish Christians living among heathen. Cf. James i. 1. (b) By extension, to Christians isolated from their own communion, as among the Moravians to those living, usually as missionaries, outside of the parent congregation.

Dictograph (n.) A telephonic instrument for office or other similar use, having a sound-magnifying device enabling the ordinary mouthpiece to be dispensed with. Much use has been made of it for overhearing, or for recording, conversations for the purpose of obtaining evidence for use in litigation.

Ejector (n.) That part of the mechanism of a breech-loading firearm which ejects the empty shell.

Exothermic (a.) Characterized by, or formed with, evolution of heat; as, an exothermic reaction; -- opposed to endothermic.

Fumatorium (n.) An air-tight compartment in which vapor may be generated to destroy germs or insects; esp., the apparatus used to destroy San Jose scale on nursery stock, with hydrocyanic acid vapor.

Granger roads () Certain railroads whose traffic largely consists in carrying the produce of farmers or grangers; -- specifically applied to the Chicago & Alton; Chicago, Burlington & Quincey; Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific; Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul; and Chicago & Northwestern, railroads.

Grolier (n.) The name by which Jean Grolier de Servier (1479-1565), a French bibliophile, is commonly known; -- used in naming a certain style of binding, a design, etc.

Heliography (n.) An early photographic process invented by Nicephore Niepce, and still used in photo-engraving. It consists essentially in exposing under a design or in a camera a polished metal plate coated with a preparation of asphalt, and subsequently treating the plate with a suitable solvent. The light renders insoluble those parts of the film which is strikes, and so a permanent image is formed, which can be etched upon the plate by the use of acid.

Hoosier State () Indiana; -- a nickname of obscure origin.

Knickerbocker (n.) A linsey-woolsey fabric having a rough knotted surface on the right side; used for women's dresses.

Koftgari (a.) Ornamental work produced by inlaying steel with gold, -- a variety of damascening much used in the arts of India.

Lautverschiebung (n.) The regular changes which the primitive Indo-European stops, or mute consonants, underwent in the Teutonic languages, probably as early as the 3d century b. c. , often called the first Lautverschiebung, sound shifting, or consonant shifting.

Matador (n.) A certain game of dominoes in which four dominoes (the 4-3, 5-2, 6-1, and double blank), called matadors, may be played at any time in any way.

Mediterranean fruit fly () A two-winged fly (Ceratitis capitata) with black and white markings, native of the Mediterranean countries, but now widely distributed. Its larva lives in ripening oranges, peaches, and other fruits, causing them to decay and fall.

Monitor nozzle () A nozzle capable of turning completely round in a horizontal plane and having a limited play in a vertical plane, used in hydraulic mining, fire-extinguishing apparatus, etc.

Muffler (n.) Any of various devices to deaden the noise of escaping gases or vapors, as a tube filled with obstructions, through which the exhaust gases of an internal-combustion engine, as on an automobile, are passed (called also silencer).

Multigraph (n.) A combined rotary type-setting and printing machine for office use. The type is transferred semi-automatically by means of keys from a type-supply drum to a printing drum. The printing may be done by means of an inked ribbon to print "typewritten" letters, or directly from inked type or a stereotype plate, as in a printing press.

Neoimpressionism (n.) A theory or practice which is a further development, on more rigorously scientific lines, of the theory and practice of Impressionism, originated by George Seurat (1859-91), and carried on by Paul Signac (1863- -) and others. Its method is marked by the laying of pure primary colors in minute dots upon a white ground, any given Pralltriller (n.) A melodic embellishment consisting of the quick alternation of a principal tone with an auxiliary tone above it, usually the next of the scale; -- called also the inverted mordente.

Pressure (n.) Electro-motive force.

Quartered (a.) Quarter-sawed; -- said of timber, commonly oak.

Quintroon (n.) The off-spring of an octoroon and a white person.

Reenforced concrete () Concrete having within its mass a system of strengthening iron or steel supports. = Ferro-concrete.

Seminar (n.) A group of students engaged, under the guidance of an instructor, in original research in a particular Tambourine (n.) A South American wild dove (Tympanistria tympanistria), mostly white, with black-tiped wings and tail. Its resonant note is said to be ventriloquous.

Tamworth (n.) One of a long-established English breed of large pigs. They are red, often spotted with black, with a long snout and erect or forwardly pointed ears, and are valued as bacon producers.

Telenergy (n.) Display of force or energy at a distance, or without contact; -- applied to mediumistic phenomena.

Trailer (n.) A car coupled to, and drawn by, a motor car in front of it; -- used esp. of such cars on street railroads. Called also trail car.

Vinegarroon (n.) A whip scorpion, esp. a large Mexican species (Thelyphonus giganteus) popularly supposed to be very venomous; -- from the odor that it emits when alarmed.

Weather station () A station for taking meteorological observations, making weather forecasts, or disseminating such information. Such stations are of the first order when they make observations of all the important elements either hourly or by self-registering instruments; of the second order when only important observations are taken; of the third order when simpler work is done, as to record rainfall and maximum and minimum temperatures.

Obcompressed (a.) Compressed or flattened antero-posteriorly, or in a way opposite to the usual one.

Obliterate (a.) Scarcely distinct; -- applied to the markings of insects.

October (n.) The tenth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

Octocerata (n.pl.) A suborder of Cephalopoda including Octopus, Argonauta, and allied genera, having eight arms around the head; -- called also Octopoda.

Omniferous (a.) All-bearing; producing all kinds.

Omniparient (a.) Producing or bringing forth all things; all-producing.

Omnivorous (a.) All-devouring; eating everything indiscriminately; as, omnivorous vanity; esp. (Zool.), eating both animal and vegetable food.

Omphalode (n.) The central part of the hilum of a seed, through which the nutrient vessels pass into the rhaphe or the chalaza; -- called also omphalodium.

Onagrarieous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a natural order of plants (Onagraceae or Onagrarieae), which includes the fuchsia, the willow-herb (Epilobium), and the evening primrose (/nothera).

Orangeroot (n.) An American ranunculaceous plant (Hidrastis Canadensis), having a yellow tuberous root; -- also called yellowroot, golden seal, etc.

Orthodromics (n.) The art of sailing in a direct course, or on the arc of a great circle, which is the shortest distance between any two points on the surface of the globe; great-circle sailing; orthodromy.

Orthotropic (a.) Having the longer axis vertical; -- said of erect stems.

Oryctere (n.) The aard-vark.

Oryctere (n.) The aard-vark.

Outboard (a. & adv.) Beyond or outside of the lines of a vessel's bulwarks or hull; in a direction from the hull or from the keel; -- opposed to inboard; as, outboard rigging; swing the davits outboard.

Outskirt (n.) A part remote from the center; outer edge; border; -- usually in the plural; as, the outskirts of a town.

Ovenbird (n.) Any species of the genus Furnarius, allied to the creepers. They inhabit South America and the West Indies, and construct curious oven-shaped nests.

Ovenbird (n.) In the United States, Seiurus aurocapillus; -- called also golden-crowned thrush.

Ovenbird (n.) In England, sometimes applied to the willow warbler, and to the long-tailed titmouse.

Overmorrow (n.) The day after or following to-morrow.

Overture () A composition, for a full orchestra, designed as an introduction to an oratorio, opera, or ballet, or as an independent piece; -- called in the latter case a concert overture.

Pandour (n.) One of a class of Hungarian mountaineers serving in the Austrian army; -- so called from Pandur, a principal town in the region from which they originally came.

Panspermy (n.) The doctrine that all organisms must come from living parents; biogenesis; -- the opposite of spontaneous generation.

Pantagruelism (n.) The theory or practice of the medical profession; -- used in burlesque or ridicule.

Panther (n.) A large dark-colored variety of the leopard, by some zoologists considered a distinct species. It is marked with large ringlike spots, the centers of which are darker than the color of the body.

Papaveraceous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a natural order of plants (Papaveraceae) of which the poppy, the celandine, and the bloodroot are well-known examples.

Paraphrase (n.) A restatement of a text, passage, or work, expressing the meaning of the original in another form, generally for the sake of its clearer and fuller exposition; a setting forth the signification of a text in other and ampler terms; a free translation or rendering; -- opposed to metaphrase.

Paregoric (n.) A medicine that mitigates pain; an anodyne; specifically, camphorated tincture of opium; -- called also paregoric elexir.

Passport (n.) A license granted in time of war for the removal of persons and effects from a hostile country; a safe-conduct.

Patriarch (n.) The father and ruler of a family; one who governs his family or descendants by paternal right; -- usually applied to heads of families in ancient history, especially in Biblical and Jewish history to those who lived before the time of Moses.

Pentacrostic (n.) A set of verses so disposed that the name forming the subject of the acrostic occurs five times -- the whole set of verses being divided into five different parts from top to bottom.

Percheron (n.) One of a breed of draught horses originating in Perche, an old district of France; -- called also Percheron-Norman.

Perpetration (n.) The act of perpetrating; a doing; -- commonly used of doing something wrong, as a crime.

Pickmire (n.) The pewit, or black-headed gull.

Pillwort (n.) Any plant of the genus Pilularia; minute aquatic cryptograms, with small pill-shaped fruit; -- sometimes called peppergrass.

Pinchers (n. pl.) An instrument having two handles and two grasping jaws working on a pivot; -- used for griping things to be held fast, drawing nails, etc.

Pipewort (n.) Any plant of a genus (Eriocaulon) of aquatic or marsh herbs with soft grass-like leaves.

Pipistrelle (n.) A small European bat (Vesperugo pipistrellus); -- called also flittermouse.

Pitcher (n.) A wide-mouthed, deep vessel for holding liquids, with a spout or protruding lip and a handle; a water jug or jar with a large ear or handle.

Pleasure (n.) The gratification of the senses or of the mind; agreeable sensations or emotions; the excitement, relish, or happiness produced by the expectation or the enjoyment of something good, delightful, or satisfying; -- opposed to pain, sorrow, etc.

Pleasure (n.) Amusement; sport; diversion; self-indulgence; frivolous or dissipating enjoyment; hence, sensual gratification; -- opposed to labor, service, duty, self-denial, etc.

Pledgor (n.) One who pledges, or delivers anything in pledge; a pledger; -- opposed to pledgee.

Plethora (n.) Overfullness; especially, excessive fullness of the blood vessels; repletion; that state of the blood vessels or of the system when the blood exceeds a healthy standard in quantity; hyperaemia; -- opposed to anaemia.

Plethoric (a.) Haeving a full habit of body; characterized by plethora or excess of blood; as, a plethoric constitution; -- used also metaphorically.

Pleurocarpous (a.) Side-fruited; -- said of those true mosses in which the pedicels or the capsules are from lateral archegonia; -- opposed to acrocarpous.

Poachard (n.) A common European duck (Aythya ferina); -- called also goldhead, poker, and fresh-water, / red-headed, widgeon.

Polemarch (n.) In Athens, originally, the military commanderin-chief; but, afterward, a civil magistrate who had jurisdiction in respect of strangers and sojourners. In other Grecian cities, a high military and civil officer.

Polycarpellary (a.) Composed of several or numerous carpels; -- said of such fruits as the orange.

Polychroite (n.) The coloring matter of saffron; -- formerly so called because of the change of color on treatment with certain acids; -- called also crocin, and safranin.

Polychrome (n.) Esculin; -- so called in allusion to its fluorescent solutions.

Polychromous (a.) Of or pertaining to polychromy; many-colored; polychromatic.

Polymeric (a.) Having the same percentage composition (that is, having the same elements united in the same proportion by weight), but different molecular weights; -- often used with with; thus, cyanic acid (CNOH), fulminic acid (C2N2O2H2), and cyanuric acid (C3N3O3H3), are polymeric with each other.

Polymorphosis (n.) The assumption of several structural forms without a corresponding difference in function; -- said of sponges, etc.

Polymorphous (a.) Having, or occurring in, several distinct forms; -- opposed to monomorphic.

Porifera (n. pl.) A grand division of the Invertebrata, including the sponges; -- called also Spongiae, Spongida, and Spongiozoa. The principal divisions are Calcispongiae, Keratosa or Fibrospongiae, and Silicea.

Porphyritic (a.) Relating to, or resembling, porphyry, that is, characterized by the presence of distinct crystals, as of feldspar, quartz, or augite, in a relatively fine-grained base, often aphanitic or cryptocrystalline.

Porphyry (n.) A term used somewhat loosely to designate a rock consisting of a fine-grained base (usually feldspathic) through which crystals, as of feldspar or quartz, are disseminated. There are red, purple, and green varieties, which are highly esteemed as marbles.

Portfire (n.) A case of strong paper filled with a composition of niter, sulphur, and mealed powder, -- used principally to ignite the priming in proving guns, and as an incendiary material in shells.

Postmark (v. t.) To mark with a post-office stamp; as, to postmark a letter or parcel.

Pounder (n.) A person or thing, so called with reference to a certain number of pounds in value, weight, capacity, etc.; as, a cannon carrying a twelve-pound ball is called a twelve pounder.

Premier (a.) Most ancient; -- said of the peer bearing the oldest title of his degree.

Pressor (a.) Causing, or giving rise to, pressure or to an increase of pressure; as, pressor nerve fibers, stimulation of which excites the vasomotor center, thus causing a stronger contraction of the arteries and consequently an increase of the arterial blood pressure; -- opposed to depressor.

Pricker (n.) A priming wire; a priming needle, -- used in blasting and gunnery.

Pricker (n.) A small marProchordal (a.) Situated in front of the notochord; -- applied especially to parts of the cartilaginous rudiments in the base of the skull.

Proctorage (n.) Management by a proctor, or as by a proctor; hence, control; superintendence; -- in contempt.

Psalter (n.) The Book of Psalms; -- often applied to a book containing the Psalms separately printed.

Pulmobranchiate (a. & n.) Same as Pulmonibranchiata, -ate.

Pupigerous (a.) Bearing or containing a pupa; -- said of dipterous larvae which do not molt when the pupa is formed within them.

Pupiparous (a.) Bearing, or containing, a pupa; -- said of the matured larvae, or larval skins, of certain Diptera.

Pyrethrin (n.) A substance resembling, and isomeric with, ordinary camphor, and extracted from the essential oil of feverfew; -- called also Pyrethrum camphor.

Pyriform (a.) Having the form of a pear; pear-shaped.

Pyromorphite (n.) Native lead phosphate with lead chloride, occurring in bright green and brown hexagonal crystals and also massive; -- so called because a fused globule crystallizes in cooling.

Quarter (n.) The fourth of a hundred-weight, being 25 or 28 pounds, according as the hundredweight is reckoned at 100 or 112 pounds.

Quarter (n.) The after-part of a vessel's side, generally corresponding in extent with the quarter-deck; also, the part of the yardarm outside of the slings.

Quarter (v. t.) A small upright timber post, used in partitions; -- in the United States more commonly called stud.

Quarter (v. t.) The fourth part of the distance from one point of the compass to another, being the fourth part of 11? 15', that is, about 2? 49'; -- called also quarter point.

Quarter (v. t.) A station at which officers and men are posted in battle; -- usually in the plural.

Quarter (v. t.) Place of lodging or temporary residence; shelter; entertainment; -- usually in the plural.

Quarterhung (a.) Having trunnions the axes of which lie below the bore; -- said of a cannon.

Quartering (a.) Coming from a point well abaft the beam, but not directly astern; -- said of waves or any moving object.

Quarterly (adv.) In quarters, or quarterings; as, to bear arms quarterly; in four or more parts; -- said of a shield thus divided by lines drawn through it at right angles.

Quartern (n.) A loaf of bread weighing about four pounds; -- called also quartern loaf.

Quarterstaff (n.) A long and stout staff formerly used as a weapon of defense and offense; -- so called because in holding it one hand was placed in the middle, and the other between the middle and the end.

Quatuor (n.) A quartet; -- applied chiefly to instrumental compositions.

Raspberry (n.) The thimble-shaped fruit of the Rubus Idaeus and other similar brambles; as, the black, the red, and the white raspberry.

Reabsorb (v. t.) To absorb again; to draw in, or imbibe, again what has been effused, extravasated, or thrown off; to swallow up again; as, to reabsorb chyle, lymph, etc.; -- used esp. of fluids.

Recover (v. t.) To overcome; to get the better of, -- as a state of mind or body.

Recover (v. i.) To regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; -- often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of poverty; to recover from fright.

Redsear (v. i.) To be brittle when red-hot; to be red-short.

Redstart (n.) A small, handsome European singing bird (Ruticilla phoenicurus), allied to the nightingale; -- called also redtail, brantail, fireflirt, firetail. The black redstart is P.tithys. The name is also applied to several other species of Ruticilla amnd allied genera, native of India.

Redstart (n.) An American fly-catching warbler (Setophaga ruticilla). The male is black, with large patches of orange-red on the sides, wings, and tail. The female is olive, with yellow patches.

Reedbird (n.) One of several small Asiatic singing birds of the genera Sch/nicola and Eurycercus; -- called also reed babbler.

Reexport (n.) Any commodity reexported; -- chiefly in the plural.

Regeneration (n.) The reproduction of a part which has been removed or destroyed; re-formation; -- a process especially characteristic of a many of the lower animals; as, the regeneration of lost feelers, limbs, and claws by spiders and crabs.

Regenerator (n.) A device used in connection with hot-air engines, gas-burning furnaces, etc., in which the incoming air or gas is heated by being brought into contact with masses of iron, brick, etc., which have been previously heated by the outgoing, or escaping, hot air or gas.

Registrant (n.) One who registers; esp., one who , by virtue of securing an official registration, obtains a certain right or title of possession, as to a trade-mark.

Regular (a.) A soldier belonging to a permanent or standing army; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Reimburse (v. t.) To make restoration or payment of an equivalent to (a person); to pay back to; to indemnify; -- often reflexive; as, to reimburse one's self by successful speculation.

Relator (n.) A private person at whose relation, or in whose behalf, the attorney-general allows an information in the nature of a quo warranto to be filed.

Retrograde (a.) Tending or moving backward; having a backward course; contrary; as, a retrograde motion; -- opposed to progressive.

Revivor (n.) Revival of a suit which is abated by the death or marriage of any of the parties, -- done by a bill of revivor.

Ribaldry (n.) The talk of a ribald; low, vulgar language; indecency; obscenity; lewdness; -- now chiefly applied to indecent language, but formerly, as by Chaucer, also to indecent acts or conduct.

Ringstraked (a.) Ring-streaked.

Ringworm (n.) A contagious affection of the skin due to the presence of a vegetable parasite, and forming ring-shaped discolored patches covered with vesicles or powdery scales. It occurs either on the body, the face, or the scalp. Different varieties are distinguished as Tinea circinata, Tinea tonsurans, etc., but all are caused by the same parasite (a species of Trichophyton).

Rotiform (a.) Wheel-shaped; as, rotiform appendages.

Saccharin (n.) A bitter white crystalSaccharonic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, saccharone; specifically, designating an unstable acid which is obtained from saccharone (a) by hydration, and forms a well-known series of salts.

Sagamore (n.) The head of a tribe among the American Indians; a chief; -- generally used as synonymous with sachem, but some writters distinguished between them, making the sachem a chief of the first rank, and a sagamore one of the second rank.

Samphire (n.) The species of glasswort (Salicornia herbacea); -- called in England marsh samphire.

Sauerkraut (n.) Cabbage cut fine and allowed to ferment in a brine made of its own juice with salt, -- a German dish.

Scauper (n.) A tool with a semicircular edge, -- used by engravers to clear away the spaces between the lines of an engraving.

Scepterellate (a.) Having a straight shaft with whorls of spines; -- said of certain sponge spicules. See Illust. under Spicule.

Schoharie grit () The formation belonging to the middle of the three subdivisions of the Corniferous period in the American Devonian system; -- so called from Schoharie, in New York, where it occurs. See the Chart of Geology.

Scolder (n.) The oyster catcher; -- so called from its shrill cries.

Scooper (n.) The avocet; -- so called because it scoops up the mud to obtain food.

Scriber (n.) A sharp-pointed tool, used by joiners for drawing lines on stuff; a marking awl.

Scupper (v.) An opening cut through the waterway and bulwarks of a ship, so that water falling on deck may flow overboard; -- called also scupper hole.

Seashore (n.) All the ground between the ordinary highwater and low-water marks.

Secularness (n.) The quality or state of being secular; worldliness; worldly-minded-ness.

Semihoral (a.) Half-hourly.

Septifragal (a.) Breaking from the partitions; -- said of a method of dehiscence in which the valves of a pod break away from the partitions, and these remain attached to the common axis.

Setiparous (a.) Producing setae; -- said of the organs from which the setae of annelids arise.

Sexenary (a.) Proceeding by sixes; sextuple; -- applied especially to a system of arithmetical computation in which the base is six.

Shagbark (n.) A rough-barked species of hickory (Carya alba), its nut. Called also shellbark. See Hickory.

Shagbark (n.) The West Indian Pithecolobium micradenium, a legiminous tree with a red coiled-up pod.

Shake (v.) To move or remove by agitating; to throw off by a jolting or vibrating motion; to rid one's self of; -- generally with an adverb, as off, out, etc.; as, to shake fruit down from a tree.

Shatter (n.) A fragment of anything shattered; -- used chiefly or soley in the phrase into shatters; as, to break a glass into shatters.

Shaveling (n.) A man shaved; hence, a monk, or other religious; -- used in contempt.

Shedder (n.) A crab in the act of casting its shell, or immediately afterwards while still soft; -- applied especially to the edible crabs, which are most prized while in this state.

Shelter (v. t.) To betake to cover, or to a safe place; -- used reflexively.

Shipworm (n.) Any long, slender, worm-shaped bivalve mollusk of Teredo and allied genera. The shipworms burrow in wood, and are destructive to wooden ships, piles of wharves, etc. See Teredo.

Shoehorn (n.) Alt. of Shoeing-horn

Shooter (n.) A firearm; as, a five-shooter.

Sinistral (a.) Of or pertaining to the left, inclining to the left; sinistrous; -- opposed to dextral.

Sinistral (a.) Having the whorls of the spire revolving or rising to the left; reversed; -- said of certain spiral shells.

Sinistrin (n.) A mucilaginous carbohydrate, resembling achroodextrin, extracted from squill as a colorless amorphous substance; -- so called because it is levorotatory.

Sinistrorse (a.) Turning to the left (of the spectator) in the ascending line; -- the opposite of dextrorse. See Dextrorse.

Skelter (v. i.) To run off helter-skelter; to hurry; to scurry; -- with away or off.

Skipper (n.) Any one of numerous species of small butterflies of the family Hesperiadae; -- so called from their peculiar short, jerking flight.

Skutterudite (n.) A mineral of a bright metallic luster and tin-white to pale lead-gray color. It consists of arsenic and cobalt.

Slattern (v. t.) To consume carelessly or wastefully; to waste; -- with away.

Sleeper (n.) A large fresh-water gobioid fish (Eleotris dormatrix).

Slender (superl.) Uttered with a thin tone; -- the opposite of broad; as, the slender vowels long e and i.

Slipper (n.) A piece, usually a plate, applied to a sliding piece, to receive wear and afford a means of adjustment; -- also called shoe, and gib.

Slopwork (n.) The manufacture of slops, or cheap ready-made clothing; also, such clothing; hence, hasty, slovenly work of any kind.

Snorter (n.) The wheather; -- so called from its cry.

Snowbird (n.) Any finch of the genus Junco which appears in flocks in winter time, especially J. hyemalis in the Eastern United States; -- called also blue snowbird. See Junco.

Soapberry tree () Any tree of the genus Sapindus, esp. Sapindus saponaria, the fleshy part of whose fruit is used instead of soap in washing linen; -- also called soap tree.

Soapwort (n.) A common plant (Saponaria officinalis) of the Pink family; -- so called because its bruised leaves, when agitated in water, produce a lather like that from soap. Called also Bouncing Bet.

Soldier (n.) A brave warrior; a man of military experience and skill, or a man of distinguished valor; -- used by way of emphasis or distinction.

Sombrero (n.) A kind of broad-brimmed hat, worn in Spain and in Spanish America.

Spanker (n.) The after sail of a ship or bark, being a fore-and-aft sail attached to a boom and gaff; -- sometimes called driver. See Illust. under Sail.

Spar (v. t.) Formerly, a piece of timber, in a general sense; -- still applied locally to rafters.

Spelter (n.) Zinc; -- especially so called in commerce and arts.

Spencer (n.) A fore-and-aft sail, abaft the foremast or the mainmast, hoisted upon a small supplementary mast and set with a gaff and no boom; a trysail carried at the foremast or mainmast; -- named after its inventor, Knight Spencer, of England [1802].

Spenserian (a.) Of or pertaining to the English poet Spenser; -- specifically applied to the stanza used in his poem "The Faerie Queene."

Sphalerite (n.) Zinc sulphide; -- called also blende, black-jack, false galena, etc. See Blende (a).

Spinner (n.) A goatsucker; -- so called from the peculiar noise it makes when darting through the air.

Sponger (n.) Fig.: A parasitical dependent; a hanger-on.

Spoondrift (n.) Spray blown from the tops waves during a gale at sea; also, snow driven in the wind at sea; -- written also spindrift.

Squarer (n.) One who squares, or quarrels; a hot-headed, contentious fellow.

Squaterole (n.) The black-bellied plover.

Stagger (n.) An unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing, as if one were about to fall; a reeling motion; vertigo; -- often in the plural; as, the stagger of a drunken man.

Stammer (v. t.) To utter or pronounce with hesitation or imperfectly; -- sometimes with out.

Stammering (n.) A disturbance in the formation of sounds. It is due essentially to long-continued spasmodic contraction of the diaphragm, by which expiration is preented, and hence it may be considered as a spasmodic inspiration.

Standergrass (n.) A plant (Orchis mascula); -- called also standerwort, and long purple. See Long purple, under Long.

Starwort (n.) A small plant of the genus Stellaria, having star-shaped flowers; star flower; chickweed.

Steller (n.) The rytina; -- called also stellerine.

Stentor (n.) Any species of ciliated Infusoria belonging to the genus Stentor and allied genera, common in fresh water. The stentors have a bell-shaped, or cornucopia-like, body with a circle of cilia around the spiral terminal disk. See Illust. under Heterotricha.

Stonebrash (n.) A subsoil made up of small stones or finely-broken rock; brash.

Stopper (n.) A short piece of rope having a knot at one or both ends, with a lanyard under the knot, -- used to secure something.

Storied (a.) Having (such or so many) stories; -- chiefly in composition; as, a two-storied house.

Stubborn (a.) Firm as a stub or stump; stiff; unbending; unyielding; persistent; hence, unreasonably obstinate in will or opinion; not yielding to reason or persuasion; refractory; harsh; -- said of persons and things; as, stubborn wills; stubborn ore; a stubborn oak; as stubborn as a mule.

Stuttering (n.) The act of one who stutters; -- restricted by some physiologists to defective speech due to inability to form the proper sounds, the breathing being normal, as distinguished from stammering.

Subumbrella (n.) The integument of the under surface of the bell, or disk-shaped body, of a jellyfish.

Sulphuryl (n.) The hypothetical radical SO2; -- called also sulphon.

Suprabranchial (a.) Situated above the branchiae; -- applied especially to the upper division of the gill cavity of bivalve mollusks.

Supratrochlear (a.) Situated over or above a trochlea or trochlear surface; -- applied esp. to one of the subdivisions of the trigeminal nerve.

Sweetbrier (n.) A kind of rose (Rosa rubiginosa) with minutely glandular and fragrant foliage. The small-flowered sweetbrier is Rosa micrantha.

Sycamore (n.) A large European species of maple (Acer Pseudo-Platanus).

Symmetrical (a.) Having an equal number of parts in the successive circles of floral organs; -- said of flowers.

Tambour (n.) A small frame, commonly circular, and somewhat resembling a tambourine, used for stretching, and firmly holding, a portion of cloth that is to be embroidered; also, the embroidery done upon such a frame; -- called also, in the latter sense, tambour work.

Tanager (n.) Any one of numerous species of bright-colored singing birds belonging to Tanagra, Piranga, and allied genera. The scarlet tanager (Piranga erythromelas) and the summer redbird (Piranga rubra) are common species of the United States.

Tardigrada (a.) An order of minute aquatic arachnids; -- called also bear animalcules, sloth animalcules, and water bears.

Tardigrade (a.) Moving or stepping slowly; slow-paced.

Tardigradous (a.) Moving slowly; slow-paced.

Tattler (n.) Any one of several species of large, long-legged sandpipers belonging to the genus Totanus.

Tattlery (n.) Idle talk or chat; tittle-tattle.

Terrier (n.) One of a breed of small dogs, which includes several distinct subbreeds, some of which, such as the Skye terrier and Yorkshire terrier, have long hair and drooping ears, while others, at the English and the black-and-tan terriers, have short, close, smooth hair and upright ears.

Tertiary (a.) Growing on the innermost joint of a bird's wing; tertial; -- said of quills.

Thesaurus (n.) A treasury or storehouse; hence, a repository, especially of knowledge; -- often applied to a comprehensive work, like a dictionary or cyclopedia.

Thiller (n.) The horse which goes between the thills, or shafts, and supports them; also, the last horse in a team; -- called also thill horse.

Thither (adv.) To that place; -- opposed to hither.

Thither (a.) Being on the farther side from the person speaking; farther; -- a correlative of hither; as, on the thither side of the water.

Thunder (n.) To produce thunder; to sound, rattle, or roar, as a discharge of atmospheric electricity; -- often used impersonally; as, it thundered continuously.

Thunderbird (n.) An Australian insectivorous singing bird (Pachycephala gutturalis). The male is conspicuously marked with black and yellow, and has a black crescent on the breast. Called also white-throated thickhead, orange-breasted thrust, black-crowned thrush, guttural thrush, and black-breasted flycatcher.

Thunderer (n.) One who thunders; -- used especially as a translation of L. tonans, an epithet applied by the Romans to several of their gods, esp. to Jupiter.

Thunderhead (n.) A rounded mass of cloud, with shining white edges; a cumulus, -- often appearing before a thunderstorm.

Thundering (a.) Very great; -- often adverbially.

Thunderstone (n.) A thunderbolt, -- formerly believed to be a stone.

Thunderstrike (v. t.) To astonish, or strike dumb, as with something terrible; -- rarely used except in the past participle.

Thunderworm (n.) A small, footless, burrowing, snakelike lizard (Rhineura Floridana) allied to Amphisbaena, native of Florida; -- so called because it leaves its burrows after a thundershower.

Timeserver (n.) One who adapts his opinions and manners to the times; one who obsequiously compiles with the ruling power; -- now used only in a bad sense.

Tippler (n.) One who keeps a tippling-house.

Tractarian (n.) One of the writers of the Oxford tracts, called "Tracts for the Times," issued during the period 1833-1841, in which series of papers the sacramental system and authority of the Church, and the value of tradition, were brought into prominence. Also, a member of the High Church party, holding generally the principles of the Tractarian writers; a Puseyite.

Transcribbler (n.) A transcriber; -- used in contempt.

Transcription (n.) An arrangement of a composition for some other instrument or voice than that for which it was originally written, as the translating of a song, a vocal or instrumental quartet, or even an orchestral work, into a piece for the piano; an adaptation; an arrangement; -- a name applied by modern composers for the piano to a more or less fanciful and ornate reproduction on their own instrument of a song or other piece not originally intended for it; as, Liszt's transcriptions of s> Transgressive (a.) Disposed or tending to transgress; faulty; culpable. -

Triflorous (a.) Three-flowered; having or bearing three flowers; as, a triflorous peduncle.

Trinitrocellulose (n.) Gun cotton; -- so called because regarded as containing three nitro groups.

Trisacramentarian (n.) One who recognizes three sacraments, and no more; -- namely, baptism, the Lord's Supper, and penance. See Sacrament.

Trispermous (a.) Containing three seeds; three-seeded; as, a trispermous capsule.

Truster (n.) One who makes a trust; -- the correlative of trustee.

Tubicorn (n.) Any ruminant having horns composed of a bony axis covered with a horny sheath; a hollow-horned ruminant.

Tubipora (n.) A genus of halcyonoids in which the skeleton, or coral (called organ-pipe coral), consists of a mass of parallel cylindrical tubes united at intervals by transverse plates. These corals are usually red or purple and form large masses. They are natives of the tropical parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Tubularida (n. pl.) An extensive division of Hydroidea; the tubularians; -- called also Athecata, Gymnoblastea, and Tubulariae.

Tumbler (n.) A drinking glass, without a foot or stem; -- so called because originally it had a pointed or convex base, and could not be set down with any liquor in it, thus compelling the drinker to finish his measure.

Twitter (v. i.) To make the sound of a half-suppressed laugh; to titter; to giggle.

Twitter (n.) A half-suppressed laugh; a fit of laughter partially restrained; a titter; a giggle.

Underbred (a.) Not thoroughly bred; ill-bred; as, an underbred fellow.

Unexperienced (a.) Untried; -- applied to things.

Upsyturvy (adv.) Upside down; topsy-turvy.

Vertebrally (adv.) At or within a vertebra or vertebrae; -- distinguished from interverterbrally.

Vertebrarterial (a.) Of or pertaining to a vertebrae and an artery; -- said of the foramina in the transverse processes of cervical vertebrae and of the canal which they form for the vertebral artery and vein.

Vertebrated (a.) Having movable joints resembling vertebrae; -- said of the arms ophiurans.

Vertebrated (a.) Of or pertaining to the Vertebrata; -- used only in the form vertebrate.

Vinaigrette (n.) A sauce, made of vinegar, oil, and other ingredients, -- used esp. for cold meats.

Vinaigrette (n.) A small perforated box for holding aromatic vinegar contained in a sponge, or a smelling bottle for smelling salts; -- called also vinegarette.

Vinaigrette (n.) A small, two-wheeled vehicle, like a Bath chair, to be drawn or pushed by a boy or man.

Vinegar (a.) Hence, anything sour; -- used also metaphorically.

Vivipara (n. pl.) An artificial division of vertebrates including those that produce their young alive; -- opposed to Ovipara.

Viviparous (a.) Producing young in a living state, as most mammals, or as those plants the offspring of which are produced alive, either by bulbs instead of seeds, or by the seeds themselves germinating on the plant, instead of falling, as they usually do; -- opposed to oviparous.

Volador (n.) A flying fish of California (Exoc/tus Californicus): -- called also volator.

Waister (n.) A seaman, usually a green hand or a broken-down man, stationed in the waist of a vessel of war.

Warbler (n.) One who, or that which, warbles; a singer; a songster; -- applied chiefly to birds.

Warbler (n.) Any one of numerous species of small Old World singing birds belonging to the family Sylviidae, many of which are noted songsters. The bluethroat, blackcap, reed warbler (see under Reed), and sedge warbler (see under Sedge) are well-known species.

Waxberry (n.) The wax-covered fruit of the wax myrtle, or bayberry. See Bayberry, and Candleberry tree.

Weather (a.) Being toward the wind, or windward -- opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc.

Weatherboard (n.) A clapboard or feather-edged board used in weatherboarding.

Weathercock (n.) A vane, or weather vane; -- so called because originally often in the figure of a cock, turning on the top of a spire with the wind, and showing its direction.

Whopper (n.) Something uncommonly large of the kind; something astonishing; -- applied especially to a bold lie.

Wheeler (n.) A steam vessel propelled by a paddle wheel or by paddle wheels; -- used chiefly in the terms side-wheeler and stern-wheeler.

Whether (pron.) Which (of two); which one (of two); -- used interrogatively and relatively.

Whether (conj.) In case; if; -- used to introduce the first or two or more alternative clauses, the other or others being connected by or, or by or whether. When the second of two alternatives is the simple negative of the first it is sometimes only indicated by the particle not or no after the correlative, and sometimes it is omitted entirely as being distinctly implied in the whether of the first.

Whinberry (n.) The English bilberry; -- so called because it grows on moors among the whins, or furze.

Whipcord (n.) A kind of hard-twisted or braided cord, sometimes used for making whiplashes.

Whipparee (n.) A large sting ray (Rhinoptera bonasus, or R. quadriloba) of the Atlantic coast of the United States. Its snout appears to be four-lobed when viewed in front, whence it is also called cow-nosed ray.

Whisker (n.) Formerly, the hair of the upper lip; a mustache; -- usually in the plural.

Whither (adv.) To what place; -- used interrogatively; as, whither goest thou?

Whither (adv.) To what or which place; -- used relatively.

Whither (adv.) To what point, degree, end, conclusion, or design; whereunto; whereto; -- used in a sense not physical.

Wiggler (n.) The young, either larva or pupa, of the mosquito; -- called also wiggletail.

Windward (n.) The point or side from which the wind blows; as, to ply to the windward; -- opposed to leeward.

Wink (v. i.) To avoid taking notice, as if by shutting the eyes; to connive at anything; to be tolerant; -- generally with at.

Wireworm (n.) One of the larvae of various species of snapping beetles, or elaters; -- so called from their slenderness and the uncommon hardness of the integument. Wireworms are sometimes very destructive to the roots of plants. Called also wire grub.

Wiseacre (v.) One who makes undue pretensions to wisdom; a would-be-wise person; hence, in contempt, a simpleton; a dunce.

Xylopyrography (n.) The art or practice of burning pictures on wood with a hot iron; -- called also poker painting. See Poker picture, under Poker.

Zonular (a.) Of or pertaining to a zone; zone-shaped.

Zoophorous (n.) The part between the architrave and cornice; the frieze; -- so called from the figures of animals carved upon it.

Zoospore (n.) A spore provided with one or more slender cilia, by the vibration of which it swims in the water. Zoospores are produced by many green, and by some olive-brown, algae. In certain species they are divided into the larger macrozoospores and the smaller microzoospores. Called also sporozoid, and swarmspore.

Zoospore (n.) A spore provided with one or more slender cilia, by the vibration of which it swims in the water. Zoospores are produced by many green, and by some olive-brown, algae. In certain species they are divided into the larger macrozoospores and the smaller microzoospores. Called also sporozoid, and swarmspore.

Zumbooruk (n.) A small cannon supported by a swiveled rest on the back of a camel, whence it is fired, -- used in the East.

Zygomorphous (a.) Symmetrical bilaterally; -- said of organisms, or parts of organisms, capable of division into two symmetrical halves only in a single plane.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved.