Words whose 7th letter is W

Breastwork (n.) A railing on the quarter-deck and forecastle.

Bronzewing (n.) An Australian pigeon of the genus Phaps, of several species; -- so called from its bronze plumage.

Buttonwood (n.) The Platanus occidentalis, or American plane tree, a large tree, producing rough balls, from which it is named; -- called also buttonball tree, and, in some parts of the United States, sycamore. The California buttonwood is P. racemosa.

Buzzsaw () A circular saw; -- so called from the buzzing it makes when running at full speed.

Chippeways (n. pl.) A tribe of Indians formerly inhabiting the northern and western shores of Lake Superior; -- called also Objibways.

Copperworm (n.) The teredo; -- so called because it injures the bottoms of vessels, where not protected by copper.

Cumshaw (n.) A present or bonus; -- originally applied to that paid on ships which entered the port of Canton.

Cumulative (a.) Tending to prove the same point to which other evidence has been offered; -- said of evidence.

Fishhawk (n.) The osprey (Pandion haliaetus), found both in Europe and America; -- so called because it plunges into the water and seizes fishes in its talons. Called also fishing eagle, and bald buzzard.

Gorcrow (n.) The carrion crow; -- called also gercrow.

Kiwikiwi (n.) Any species of Apteryx, esp. A. australis; -- so called in imitation of its notes. Called also kiwi. See Apteryx.

Letterwood (n.) The beautiful and highly elastic wood of a tree of the genus Brosimum (B. Aubletii), found in Guiana; -- so called from black spots in it which bear some resemblance to hieroglyphics; also called snakewood, and leopardwood. It is much used for bows and for walking sticks.

Longbow (n.) The ordinary bow, not mounted on a stock; -- so called in distinction from the crossbow when both were used as weapons of war. Also, sometimes, such a bow of about the height of a man, as distinguished from a much shorter one.

Meadowwort (n.) The name of several plants of the genus Spiraea, especially the white- or pink-flowered S. salicifolia, a low European and American shrub, and the herbaceous S. Ulmaria, which has fragrant white flowers in compound cymes.

Nipplewort (n.) A yellow-flowered composite herb (Lampsana communis), formerly used as an external application to the nipples of women; -- called also dock-cress.

Rattlewings (n.) The golden-eye.

Scythewhet (n.) Wilson's thrush; -- so called from its note.

Setterwort (n.) The bear's-foot (Helleborus f/tidus); -- so called because the root was used in settering, or inserting setons into the dewlaps of cattle. Called also pegroots.

Sicklewort (n.) A plant of the genus Coronilla (C. scorpioides); -- so named from its curved pods.

Sneezeweed (n.) A yellow-flowered composite plant (Helenium autumnale) the odor of which is said to cause sneezing.

Sunflower (n.) Any plant of the genus Helianthus; -- so called probably from the form and color of its flower, which is large disk with yellow rays. The commonly cultivated sunflower is Helianthus annuus, a native of America.

Swallow (v. t.) To draw into an abyss or gulf; to ingulf; to absorb -- usually followed by up.

Swallow (v. t.) To engross; to appropriate; -- usually with up.

Swallowtail (n.) An outwork with converging sides, its head or front forming a reentrant angle; -- so called from its form. Called also priestcap.

Swallowtail (n.) A swallow-tailed coat.

Swallowwort (n.) A poisonous plant (Vincetoxicum officinale) of the Milkweed family, at one time used in medicine; -- also called white swallowwort.

Tetterwort (n.) A plant used as a remedy for tetter, -- in England the calendine, in America the bloodroot.

Throatwort (n.) A plant (Campanula Trachelium) formerly considered a remedy for sore throats because of its throat-shaped corolla.

Washerwoman (n.) The pied wagtail; -- so called in allusion to its beating the water with its tail while tripping along the leaves of water plants.

Yellowwort (n.) A European yellow-flowered, gentianaceous (Chlora perfoliata). The whole plant is intensely bitter, and is sometimes used as a tonic, and also in dyeing yellow.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

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