Words whose 8th letter is G

Advantage (n.) Superiority; mastery; -- with of or over.

Alarming (a.) Exciting, or calculated to excite, alarm; causing apprehension of danger; as, an alarming crisis or report. -- A*larm"ing*ly, adv.

Alkekengi (n.) An herbaceous plant of the nightshade family (Physalis alkekengi) and its fruit, which is a well flavored berry, the size of a cherry, loosely inclosed in a enlarged leafy calyx; -- also called winter cherry, ground cherry, and strawberry tomato.

Anthology (n.) A collection of flowers of literature, that is, beautiful passages from authors; a collection of poems or epigrams; -- particularly applied to a collection of ancient Greek epigrams.

Anything (n.) Expressing an indefinite comparison; -- with as or like.

Atheling (n.) An Anglo-Saxon prince or nobleman; esp., the heir apparent or a prince of the royal family.

Bluewing (n.) The blue-winged teal. See Teal.

Bullfrog (n.) A very large species of frog (Rana Catesbiana), found in North America; -- so named from its loud bellowing in spring.

Butlerage (n.) A duty of two shillings on every tun of wine imported into England by merchant strangers; -- so called because paid to the king's butler for the king.

Chondroganoidea (n.) An order of ganoid fishes, including the sturgeons; -- so called on account of their cartilaginous skeleton.

Cleistogamous (a.) Having, beside the usual flowers, other minute, closed flowers, without petals or with minute petals; -- said of certain species of plants which possess flowers of two or more kinds, the closed ones being so constituted as to insure self-fertilization.

Clothing (n.) A covering of non-conducting material on the outside of a boiler, or steam chamber, to prevent radiation of heat.

Coerulignone (n.) A bluish violet, crystalCorreligionist (n.) A co-religion/ist.

Cribbing (n.) A vicious habit of a horse; crib-biting. The horse lays hold of the crib or manger with his teeth and draws air into the stomach with a grunting sound.

Deuterogamy (n.) A second marriage, after the death of the first husband of wife; -- in distinction from bigamy, as defined in the old canon law. See Bigamy.

Deuterogenic (a.) Of secondary origin; -- said of certain rocks whose material has been derived from older rocks.

Dipterygian (a.) Having two dorsal fins; -- said of certain fishes.

Discharge (v. t.) To free of the missile with which anything is charged or loaded; to let go the charge of; as, to discharge a bow, catapult, etc.; especially, said of firearms, -- to fire off; to shoot off; also, to relieve from a state of tension, as a Leyden jar.

Disparagement (n.) Injurious comparison with an inferior; a depreciating or dishonoring opinion or insinuation; diminution of value; dishonor; indignity; reproach; disgrace; detraction; -- commonly with to.

Dressing (n.) Manure or compost over land. When it remains on the surface, it is called a top-dressing.

Dressing (n.) Castigation; scolding; -- often with down.

Ellipsograph (n.) An instrument for describing ellipses; -- called also trammel.

Elohist (n.) The writer, or one of the writers, of the passages of the Old Testament, notably those of Elohim instead of Jehovah, as the name of the Supreme Being; -- distinguished from Jehovist.

Encourage (v. t.) To give courage to; to inspire with courage, spirit, or hope; to raise, or to increase, the confidence of; to animate; enhearten; to incite; to help forward; -- the opposite of discourage.

Enduring (a.) Lasting; durable; long-suffering; as, an enduring disposition.

Erythrogen (n.) Carbon disulphide; -- so called from certain red compounds which it produces in combination with other substances.

Erythrogen (n.) A crystalFactorage (n.) The allowance given to a factor, as a compensation for his services; -- called also a commission.

Flashing (n.) The creation of an artifical flood by the sudden letting in of a body of water; -- called also flushing.

Fleshings (n. pl.) Flesh-colored tights, worn by actors dancers.

Floating (n.) The second coat of three-coat plastering.

Flushing (n.) A heavy, coarse cloth manufactured from shoddy; -- commonly in the /

Franking (n.) A method of forming a joint at the intersection of window-sash bars, by cutting away only enough wood to show a miter.

Graining (n.) A small European fresh-water fish (Leuciscus vulgaris); - called also dobule, and dace.

Grayling (a.) A European fish (Thymallus vulgaris), allied to the trout, but having a very broad dorsal fin; -- called also umber. It inhabits cold mountain streams, and is valued as a game fish.

Greening (n.) A greenish apple, of several varieties, among which the Rhode Island greening is the best known for its fine-grained acid flesh and its excellent keeping quality.

Greenlet (n.) l. (Zool.) One of numerous species of small American singing birds, of the genus Vireo, as the solitary, or blue-headed (Vireo solitarius); the brotherly-love (V. Philadelphicus); the warbling greenlet (V. gilvus); the yellow-throated greenlet (V. flavifrons) and others. See Vireo.

Hatching (n.) A mode of execution in engraving, drawing, and miniature painting, in which shading is produced by lines crossing each other at angles more or less acute; -- called also crosshatching.

Heddling (vb. n.) The act of drawing the warp threads through the heddle-eyes of a weaver's harness; the harness itself.

Hedgehog (n.) A species of Medicago (M. intertexta), the pods of which are armed with short spines; -- popularly so called.

Histology (n.) That branch of biological science, which treats of the minute (microscopic) structure of animal and vegetable tissues; -- called also histiology.

Homogangliate (a.) Having the ganglia of the nervous system symmetrically arranged, as in certain invertebrates; -- opposed to heterogangliate.

Hypnagogic (a.) Leading to sleep; -- applied to the illusions of one who is half asleep.

Intelligence (n.) An intelligent being or spirit; -- generally applied to pure spirits; as, a created intelligence.

Jelerang (n.) A large, handsome squirrel (Sciurus Javensis), native of Java and Southern Asia; -- called also Java squirrel.

Knowledge (v. i.) That which is or may be known; the object of an act of knowing; a cognition; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Knowledge (v. i.) Sexual intercourse; -- usually preceded by carnal; as, carnal knowledge.

Knuckle (n.) The kneejoint, or middle joint, of either leg of a quadruped, especially of a calf; -- formerly used of the kneejoint of a human being.

Lacewing (n.) Any one of several species of neuropterous insects of the genus Chrysopa and allied genera. They have delicate, lacelike wings and brilliant eyes. Their larvae are useful in destroying aphids. Called also lace-winged fly, and goldeneyed fly.

Latching (n.) A loop or eye formed on the head rope of a bonnet, by which it is attached to the foot of a sail; -- called also latch and lasket.

Livelong (a.) Whole; entire; long in passing; -- used of time, as day or night, in adverbial phrases, and usually with a sense of tediousness.

Loellingite (n.) A tin-white arsenide of iron, isomorphous with arsenopyrite.

Lotophagi (n. pl.) A people visited by Ulysses in his wanderings. They subsisted on the lotus. See Lotus (b), and Lotus-eater.

Malashaganay (n.) The fresh-water drumfish (Haploidonotus grunniens).

Mantling (n.) The representation of a mantle, or the drapery behind and around a coat of arms: -- called also lambrequin.

Meliphagan (n.) Any bird of the genus Meliphaga and allied genera; a honey eater; -- called also meliphagidan.

Microorganism (n.) Any microscopic form of life; -- particularly applied to bacteria and similar organisms, esp. such are supposed to cause infectious diseases.

Middlings (n. pl.) A combination of the coarser parts of ground wheat the finest bran, separated from the fine flour and coarse bran in bolting; -- formerly regarded as valuable only for feed; but now, after separation of the bran, used for making the best quality of flour. Middlings contain a large proportion of gluten.

Middlings (n. pl.) In the southern and western parts of the United States, the portion of the hog between the ham and the shoulder; bacon; -- called also middles.

Noctivagant (a.) Going about in the night; night-wandering.

Northing (n.) Distance northward from any point of departure or of reckoning, measured on a meridian; -- opposed to southing.

Autosuggestion (n.) Self-suggestion as distinguished from suggestion coming from another, esp. in hypnotism. Autosuggestion is characteristic of certain mental conditions in which expectant belief tends to produce disturbance of function of one or more organs.

Dingdong theory () The theory which maintains that the primitive elements of language are reflex expressions induced by sensory impressions; that is, as stated by Max Muller, the creative faculty gave to each general conception as it thrilled for the first time through the brain a phonetic expression; -- jocosely so called from the analogy of the sound of a bell induced by the stroke of the clapper.

Floating (n.) The process of rendering oysters and scallops plump by placing them in fresh or brackish water; -- called also fattening, plumping, and laying out.

Oscillograph (n.) An apparatus for recording or indicating alternating-current wave forms or other electrical oscillations, usually consisting of a galvanometer with strong field, in which the mass of the moving part is very small and frequency of vibration very high.

Stocking (n.) Any of various things resembling, or likened to, a stocking; as: (a) A broad ring of color, differing from the general color, on the lower part of the leg of a quadruped; esp., a white ring between the coronet and the hock or knee of a dark-colored horse. (b) A knitted hood of cotton thread which is eventually converted by a special process into an incandescent mantle for gas lighting.

Telenergy (n.) Display of force or energy at a distance, or without contact; -- applied to mediumistic phenomena.

Throwing stick () An instrument used by various savage races for throwing a spear; -- called also throw stick and spear thrower. One end of the stick receives the butt of the spear, as upon a hook or thong, and the other end is grasped with the hand, which also holds the spear, toward the middle, above it with the finger and thumb, the effect being to bring the place of support nearer the center of the spear, and practically lengthen the arm in the act of throwing.

Ossifragous (a.) Serving to break bones; bone-breaking.

Partridge (n.) Any one of several species of quail-like birds belonging to Colinus, and allied genera.

Passacaglio (n.) An old Italian or Spanish dance tune, in slow three-four measure, with divisions on a ground bass, resembling a chaconne.

Phanerogamous (a.) Having visible flowers containing distinct stamens and pistils; -- said of plants.

Phaneroglossal (a.) Having a conspicious tongue; -- said of certain reptiles and insects.

Piddling (a.) Trifling; trivial; frivolous; paltry; -- applied to persons and things.

Piercing (a.) Forcibly entering, or adapted to enter, at or by a point; perforating; penetrating; keen; -- used also figuratively; as, a piercing instrument, or thrust.

Polliwog (n.) A tadpole; -- called also purwiggy and porwigle.

Predesignate (a.) A term used by Sir William Hamilton to define propositions having their quantity indicated by a verbal sign; as, all, none, etc.; -- contrasted with preindesignate, defining propositions of which the quantity is not so indicated.

Proterogynous (a.) Having the pistil come to maturity before the stamens; protogynous; -- opposed to proterandrous.

Quandong (n.) The edible drupaceous fruit of an Australian tree (Fusanus acuminatus) of the Sandalwood family; -- called also quandang.

Redintegration (n.) The law that objects which have been previously combined as part of a single mental state tend to recall or suggest one another; -- adopted by many philosophers to explain the phenomena of the association of ideas.

Reedling (n.) The European bearded titmouse (Panurus biarmicus); -- called also reed bunting, bearded pinnock, and lesser butcher bird.

Rhyparography (n.) In ancient art, the painting of genre or still-life pictures.

Roughleg (n.) Any one of several species of large hawks of the genus Archibuteo, having the legs feathered to the toes. Called also rough-legged hawk, and rough-legged buzzard.

Roughtail (n.) Any species of small ground snakes of the family Uropeltidae; -- so called from their rough tails.

Rounding (n.) Small rope, or strands of rope, or spun yarn, wound round a rope to keep it from chafing; -- called also service.

Saibling (n.) A European mountain trout (Salvelinus alpinus); -- called also Bavarian charr.

Scumming (n.) That which is scummed off; skimmings; scum; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Seagoing (a.) Going upon the sea; especially, sailing upon the deep sea; -- used in distinction from coasting or river, as applied to vessels.

Shilling (n.) A silver coin, and money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency.

Shilling (n.) The Spanish real, of the value of one eight of a dollar, or 12/ cets; -- formerly so called in New York and some other States. See Note under 2.

Skimming (n.) That which is skimmed from the surface of a liquid; -- chiefly used in the plural; as, the skimmings of broth.

Skirling (n.) A small trout or salmon; -- a name used loosely.

Sounding (n.) Any place or part of the ocean, or other water, where a sounding Southing (n.) Distance southward from any point departure or of reckoning, measured on a meridian; -- opposed to northing.

Spelding (n.) A haddock or other small fish split open and dried in the sun; -- called also speldron.

Standergrass (n.) A plant (Orchis mascula); -- called also standerwort, and long purple. See Long purple, under Long.

Standing (a.) Not movable; fixed; as, a standing bed (distinguished from a trundle-bed).

Starling (n.) A structure of piles driven round the piers of a bridge for protection and support; -- called also sterling.

Starmonger (n.) A fortune teller; an astrologer; -- used in contempt.

Steading (n.) The brans, stables, cattle-yards, etc., of a farm; -- called also onstead, farmstead, farm offices, or farmery.

Stealing (n.) That which is stolen; stolen property; -- chiefly used in the plural.

Sterling (a.) Belonging to, or relating to, the standard British money of account, or the British coinage; as, a pound sterling; a shilling sterling; a penny sterling; -- now chiefly applied to the lawful money of England; but sterling cost, sterling value, are used.

Stocking (n.) A close-fitting covering for the foot and leg, usually knit or woven.

Strewing (n.) Anything that is, or may be, strewed; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Studding sail () A light sail set at the side of a principal or square sail of a vessel in free winds, to increase her speed. Its head is bent to a small spar which is called the studding-sail boom. See Illust. of Sail.

Sweeting (n.) A darling; -- a word of endearment.

Syncategorematic (a.) Not capable of being used as a term by itself; -- said of words, as an adverb or preposition.

Tautology (n.) A repetition of the same meaning in different words; needless repetition of an idea in different words or phrases; a representation of anything as the cause, condition, or consequence of itself, as in the following lines: --//The dawn is overcast, the morning lowers,/And heavily in clouds brings on the day. Addison.

Trimming (n.) That which serves to trim, make right or fitting, adjust, ornament, or the like; especially, the necessary or the ornamental appendages, as of a garment; hence, sometimes, the concomitants of a dish; a relish; -- usually in the pluraltrimmings. --.

Tripping (a.) Having the right forefoot lifted, the others remaining on the ground, as if he were trotting; trippant; -- said of an animal, as a hart, buck, and the like, used as a bearing.

Trithing (n.) One of three ancient divisions of a county in England; -- now called riding.

Vitelligenous (a.) Producing yolk, or vitelWhigling (n.) A petty or inferior Whig; -- used in contempt.

Xylophagous (a.) Eating, boring in, or destroying, wood; -- said especially of certain insect larvae, crustaceans, and mollusks.

Yearling (n.) An animal one year old, or in the second year of its age; -- applied chiefly to cattle, sheep, and horses.

Yeorling (n.) The European yellow-hammer.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

Copyright © 2011 by Mark McCracken, All Rights Reserved.