Words whose 9th letter is C

Abstinence (n.) The act or practice of abstaining; voluntary forbearance of any action, especially the refraining from an indulgence of appetite, or from customary gratifications of animal or sensual propensities. Specifically, the practice of abstaining from intoxicating beverages, -- called also total abstinence.

Abstinence (n.) The practice of self-denial by depriving one's self of certain kinds of food or drink, especially of meat.

Acephalocyst (n.) A larval entozoon in the form of a subglobular or oval vesicle, or hydatid, filled with fluid, sometimes found in the tissues of man and the lower animals; -- so called from the absence of a head or visible organs on the vesicle. These cysts are the immature stages of certain tapeworms. Also applied to similar cysts of different origin.

Alloxanic (a.) Of or pertaining to alloxan; -- applied to an acid obtained by the action of soluble alkalies on alloxan.

Aliphatic (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, fat; fatty; -- applied to compounds having an openc-hain structure. The aliphatic compounds thus include not only the fatty acids and other derivatives of the paraffin hydrocarbons, but also unsaturated compounds, as the ethylene and acetylene series.

Amphibrach (n.) A foot of three syllables, the middle one long, the first and last short (~ -- ~); as, h/b/r/. In modern prosody the accented syllable takes the place of the long and the unaccented of the short; as, pro-phet#ic.

Amphidisc (n.) A peculiar small siliceous spicule having a denticulated wheel at each end; -- found in freshwater sponges.

Anaerobic (a.) Not requiring air or oxygen for life; -- applied especially to those microbes to which free oxygen is unnecessary; anaerobiotic; -- opposed to aerobic.

Anthropocentric (a.) Assuming man as the center or ultimate end; -- applied to theories of the universe or of any part of it, as the solar system.

Antimonic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, antimony; -- said of those compounds of antimony in which this element has its highest equivalence; as, antimonic acid.

Aphanitic (a.) Resembling aphanite; having a very fine-grained structure.

Aplanatic (a.) Having two or more parts of different curvatures, so combined as to remove spherical aberration; -- said of a lens.

Apodictical (a.) Self-evident; intuitively true; evident beyond contradiction.

Apprenticeship (n.) The time an apprentice is serving (sometimes seven years, as from the age of fourteen to twenty-one).

Archchancellor (n.) A chief chancellor; -- an officer in the old German empire, who presided over the secretaries of the court.

Atheistical (a.) Pertaining to, implying, or containing, atheism; -- applied to things; as, atheistic doctrines, opinions, or books.

Atheistical (a.) Disbelieving the existence of a God; impious; godless; -- applied to persons; as, an atheistic writer.

Aurichalceous (a.) Brass-colored.

Authentics (n.) A collection of the Novels or New Constitutions of Justinian, by an anonymous author; -- so called on account of its authenticity.

Autotoxication (n.) Same as Auto-intoxication.

Autodidact (n.) One who is self-taught; an automath.

Automatical (a.) Pertaining to, or produced by, an automaton; of the nature of an automaton; self-acting or self-regulating under fixed conditions; -- esp. applied to machinery or devices in which certain things formerly or usually done by hand are done by the machine or device itself; as, the automatic feed of a lathe; automatic gas lighting; an automatic engine or switch; an automatic mouse.

Autonomic (a.) Having the power of self-government; autonomous.

Axiomatical (a.) Of or pertaining to an axiom; having the nature of an axiom; self-evident; characterized by axioms.

Badderlocks (n.) A large black seaweed (Alaria esculenta) sometimes eaten in Europe; -- also called murlins, honeyware, and henware.

Bankruptcy (n.) Complete loss; -- followed by of.

Bombastical (a.) Characterized by bombast; high-sounding; inflated.

Calicoback (n.) An hemipterous insect (Murgantia histrionica) which injures the cabbage and other garden plants; -- called also calico bug and harlequin cabbage bug.

Calorificient (a.) Having, or relating to the power of producing heat; -- applied to foods which, being rich in carbon, as the fats, are supposed to give rise to heat in the animal body by oxidation.

Canvasback (n.) A Species of duck (Aythya vallisneria), esteemed for the delicacy of its flesh. It visits the United States in autumn; particularly Chesapeake Bay and adjoining waters; -- so named from the markings of the plumage on its back.

Catoptrics (n.) That part of optics which explains the properties and phenomena of reflected light, and particularly that which is reflected from mirrors or polished bodies; -- formerly called anacamptics.

Conduplicate (a.) Folded lengthwise along the midrib, the upper face being within; -- said of leaves or petals in vernation or aestivation.

Confidence (n.) The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; -- formerly followed by of, now commonly by in.

Confidence (n.) The state of mind characterized by one's reliance on himself, or his circumstances; a feeling of self-sufficiency; such assurance as leads to a feeling of security; self-reliance; -- often with self prefixed.

Confidence (n.) Having self-reliance; bold; undaunted.

Continency (n.) Self-restraint; self-command.

Conventicle (n.) An assembly for religious worship; esp., such an assembly held privately, as in times of persecution, by Nonconformists or Dissenters in England, or by Covenanters in Scotland; -- often used opprobriously, as if those assembled were heretics or schismatics.

Crosspatch (n.) An ill-natured person.

Cysticercus (n.) The larval form of a tapeworm, having the head and neck of a tapeworm attached to a saclike body filled with fluid; -- called also bladder worm, hydatid, and measle (as, pork measle).

Deathwatch (n.) A small wingless insect, of the family Psocidae, which makes a similar but fainter sound; -- called also deathtick.

Diacritical (a.) That separates or distinguishes; -- applied to points or marks used to distinguish letters of similar form, or different sounds of the same letter, as, a, /, a, /, /, etc.

Dichromic (a.) Furnishing or giving two colors; -- said of defective vision, in which all the compound colors are resolvable into two elements instead of three.

Diffidence (n.) Distrust of one's self or one's own powers; lack of self-reliance; modesty; modest reserve; bashfulness.

Digastric (a.) Having two bellies; biventral; -- applied to muscles which are fleshy at each end and have a tendon in the middle, and esp. to the muscle which pulls down the lower jaw.

Eccentric (a.) Not having the same center; -- said of circles, ellipses, spheres, etc., which, though coinciding, either in whole or in part, as to area or volume, have not the same center; -- opposed to concentric.

Eccentricity (n.) The ratio of the distance between the center and the focus of an ellipse or hyperbola to its semi-transverse axis.

Eccentricity (n.) The ratio of the distance of the center of the orbit of a heavenly body from the center of the body round which it revolves to the semi-transverse axis of the orbit.

Effeminacy (n.) Characteristic quality of a woman, such as softness, luxuriousness, delicacy, or weakness, which is unbecoming a man; womanish delicacy or softness; -- used reproachfully of men.

Elohistic (a.) Relating to Elohim as a name of God; -- said of passages in the Old Testament.

Empaistic (a.) Having to do with inlaid work; -- especially used with reference to work of the ancient Greeks.

Episcopacy (n.) Government of the church by bishops; church government by three distinct orders of ministers -- bishops, priests, and deacons -- of whom the bishops have an authority superior and of a different kind.

Epizootic (a.) Containing fossil remains; -- said of rocks, formations, mountains, and the like.

Epizootic (a.) Of the nature of a disease which attacks many animals at the same time; -- corresponding to epidemic diseases among men.

Evangelical (a.) Earnest for the truth taught in the gospel; strict in interpreting Christian doctrine; preeminetly orthodox; -- technically applied to that party in the Church of England, and in the Protestant Episcopal Church, which holds the doctrine of "Justification by Faith alone"; the Low Church party. The term is also applied to other religion bodies not regarded as orthodox.

Excellence (n.) A title of honor or respect; -- more common in the form excellency.

Excentrical (a.) One-sided; having the normally central portion not in the true center.

Expediency (n.) The quality of being expedient or advantageous; fitness or suitableness to effect a purpose intended; adaptedness to self-interest; desirableness; advantage; advisability; -- sometimes contradistinguished from moral rectitude.

Extravascular (a.) Outside the vessels; -- said of the substance of all the tissues.

Extravascular (a.) Destitute of vessels; non-vascular.

Extrinsic (a.) Not contained in or belonging to a body; external; outward; unessential; -- opposed to intrinsic.

Extrinsic (a.) Attached partly to an organ or limb and partly to some other part/ -- said of certain groups of muscles. Opposed to intrinsic.

Fibrovascular (a.) Containing woody fiber and ducts, as the stems of all flowering plants and ferns; -- opposed to cellular.

Fieldpiece (n.) A cannon mounted on wheels, for the use of a marching army; a piece of field artillery; -- called also field gun.

Fluosilicate (n.) A double fluoride of silicon and some other (usually basic) element or radical, regarded as a salt of fluosilicic acid; -- called also silicofluoride.

Greenfinch (n.) A European finch (Ligurinus chloris); -- called also green bird, green linnet, green grosbeak, green olf, greeny, and peasweep.

Gymnastical (a.) Pertaining to athletic exercises intended for health, defense, or diversion; -- said of games or exercises, as running, leaping, wrestling, throwing the discus, the javelin, etc.; also, pertaining to disciplinary exercises for the intellect; athletic; as, gymnastic exercises, contests, etc.

Hackmatack (n.) The American larch (Larix Americana), a coniferous tree with slender deciduous leaves; also, its heavy, close-grained timber. Called also tamarack.

Hexabasic (a.) Having six hydrogen atoms or six radicals capable of being replaced or saturated by bases; -- said of acids; as, mellitic acid is hexabasic.

Hydriodic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, hydrogen and iodine; -- said of an acid produced by the combination of these elements.

Hydromancy (n.) Divination by means of water, -- practiced by the ancients.

Hyostylic (a.) Having the mandible suspended by the hyomandibular, or upper part of the hyoid arch, as in fishes, instead of directly articulated with the skull as in mammals; -- said of the skull.

Inductance (n.) Capacity for induction; the coefficient of self-induction.

Infratrochlear (a.) Below a trochlea, or pulley; -- applied esp. to one of the subdivisions of the trigeminal nerve.

Internuncial (a.) Communicating or transmitting impressions between different parts of the body; -- said of the nervous system.

Intramercurial (a.) Between the planet Mercury and the sun; -- as, the hypothetical Vulcan is intramercurial.

Intrinsic (a.) Inward; internal; hence, true; genuine; real; essential; inherent; not merely apparent or accidental; -- opposed to extrinsic; as, the intrinsic value of gold or silver; the intrinsic merit of an action; the intrinsic worth or goodness of a person.

Intrinsic (a.) Included wholly within an organ or limb, as certain groups of muscles; -- opposed to extrinsic.

Introspection (n.) A view of the inside or interior; a looking inward; specifically, the act or process of self-examination, or inspection of one's own thoughts and feelings; the cognition which the mind has of its own acts and states; self-consciousness; reflection.

Introspective (a.) Inspecting within; seeing inwardly; capable of, or exercising, inspection; self-conscious.

Introspective (a.) Involving the act or results of conscious knowledge of physical phenomena; -- contrasted with associational.

Inveteracy (n.) Firm establishment by long continuance; firmness or deep-rooted obstinacy of any quality or state acquired by time; as, the inveteracy of custom, habit, or disease; -- usually in a bad sense; as, the inveteracy of prejudice or of error.

Kamptulicon (n.) A kind of elastic floor cloth, made of India rubber, gutta-percha, linseed oil, and powdered cork.

Kinesodic (a.) Conveying motion; as; kinesodic substance; -- applied esp. to the spinal cord, because it is capable of conveying doth voluntary and reflex motor impulses, without itself being affected by motor impulses applied to it directly.

Kupfernickel (n.) Copper-nickel; niccolite. See Niccolite.

Levulinic (a.) Pertaining to, or denoting, an acid (called also acetyl-propionic acid), C5H8O3, obtained by the action of dilute acids on various sugars (as levulose).

Melanuric (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid obtained by decomposition of melam, or of urea, as a white crystalMethysticin (n.) A white, silky, crystalMonobasic (a.) Capable of being neutralized by a univalent base or basic radical; having but one acid hydrogen atom to be replaced; -- said of acids; as, acetic, nitric, and hydrochloric acids are monobasic.

Multiplication (n.) The process of repeating, or adding to itself, any given number or quantity a certain number of times; commonly, the process of ascertaining by a briefer computation the result of such repeated additions; also, the rule by which the operation is performed; -- the reverse of division.

Multiplication (n.) The art of increasing gold or silver by magic, -- attributed formerly to the alchemists.

Mycomelic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid of the alloxan group, obtained as a honey-yellow powder. Its solutions have a gelatinous consistency.

Naphthoic (a.) Pertaining to, derived from, or related to, naphthalene; -- used specifically to designate any one of a series of carboxyl derivatives, called naphthoic acids.

Neocriticism (n.) The form of Neo-Kantianism developed by French idealists, following C. Renouvier. It rejects the noumena of Kant, restricting knowledge to phenomena as constituted by a priori categories.

Nicotinic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, nicotine; nicotic; -- used specifically to designate an acid related to pyridine, obtained by the oxidation of nicotine, and called nicotinic acid.

Observance (n.) The act or practice of observing or noticing with attention; a heeding or keeping with care; performance; -- usually with a sense of strictness and fidelity; as, the observance of the Sabbath is general; the strict observance of duties.

Opodeldoc (n.) A kind of plaster, said to have been invented by Mindererus, -- used for external injuries.

Pancratic (a.) Having all or many degrees of power; having a great range of power; -- said of an eyepiece made adjustable so as to give a varying magnifying power.

Panoistic (a.) Producing ova only; -- said of the ovaries of certain insects which do not produce vitelligenous cells.

Pansophical (a.) All-wise; claiming universal knowledge; as, pansophical pretenders.

Papaveraceous (a.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a natural order of plants (Papaveraceae) of which the poppy, the celandine, and the bloodroot are well-known examples.

Parabanic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a nitrogenous acid which is obtained by the oxidation of uric acid, as a white crystalParagenic (a.) Originating in the character of the germ, or at the first commencement of an individual; -- said of peculiarities of structure, character, etc.

Paregoric (n.) A medicine that mitigates pain; an anodyne; specifically, camphorated tincture of opium; -- called also paregoric elexir.

Pentateuch (n.) The first five books of the Old Testament, collectively; -- called also the Law of Moses, Book of the Law of Moses, etc.

Perspicacious (a.) Having the power of seeing clearly; quick-sighted; sharp of sight.

Pharisaical (a.) Addicted to external forms and ceremonies; making a show of religion without the spirit of it; ceremonial; formal; hypocritical; self-righteous.

Plethoric (a.) Haeving a full habit of body; characterized by plethora or excess of blood; as, a plethoric constitution; -- used also metaphorically.

Pluperfect (a.) More than perfect; past perfect; -- said of the tense which denotes that an action or event was completed at or before the time of another past action or event.

Polybasic (a.) Capable of neutralizing, or of combining with, several molecules of a monacid base; having several hydrogen atoms capable of being replaced by basic radicals; -- said of certain acids; as, sulphuric acid is polybasic.

Polyeidic (a.) Passing through several distinct larval forms; -- having several distinct kinds of young.

Polymeric (a.) Having the same percentage composition (that is, having the same elements united in the same proportion by weight), but different molecular weights; -- often used with with; thus, cyanic acid (CNOH), fulminic acid (C2N2O2H2), and cyanuric acid (C3N3O3H3), are polymeric with each other.

Preataxic (a.) Occurring before the symptom ataxia has developed; -- applied to the early symptoms of locomotor ataxia.

Prehnitic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a tetrabasic acid of benzene obtained as a white crystalProclitic (a.) Leaning forward; -- said of certain monosyllabic words which are so closely attached to the following word as not to have a separate accent.

Proleptical (a.) Anticipating the usual time; -- applied to a periodical disease whose paroxysms return at an earlier hour at every repetition.

Prophetical (a.) Containing, or pertaining to, prophecy; foretelling events; as, prophetic writings; prophetic dreams; -- used with of before the thing foretold.

Propithecus (n.) A genus including the long-tailed, or diadem, indris. See Indris.

Puritanical (a.) Precise in observance of legal or religious requirements; strict; overscrupulous; rigid; -- often used by way of reproach or contempt.

Pyrocatechin (n.) A white crystalPyrogenic (a.) Producing heat; -- said of substances, as septic poisons, which elevate the temperature of the body and cause fever.

Pyroxylic (a.) Derived from wood by distillation; -- formerly used in designating crude wood spirit.

Reluctancy (n.) The state or quality of being reluctant; repugnance; aversion of mind; unwillingness; -- often followed by an infinitive, or by to and a noun, formerly sometimes by against.

Retrospective (a.) Looking backward; contemplating things past; -- opposed to prospective; as, a retrospective view.

Saccholactate (n.) A salt of saccholactic acid; -- formerly called also saccholate.

Saddleback (a.) Same as Saddle-backed.

Saddleback (n.) Anything saddle-backed; esp., a hill or ridge having a concave outSaddleback (n.) The larva of a bombycid moth (Empretia stimulea) which has a large, bright green, saddle-shaped patch of color on the back.

Sagenitic (a.) Resembling sagenite; -- applied to quartz when containing acicular crystals of other minerals, most commonly rutile, also tourmaline, actinolite, and the like.

Schizomycetes (n. pl.) An order of Schizophyta, including the so-called fission fungi, or bacteria. See Schizophyta, in the Supplement.

Schottische (n.) A Scotch round dance in 2-4 time, similar to the polka, only slower; also, the music for such a dance; -- not to be confounded with the Ecossaise.

Sclerotic (a.) Hard; firm; indurated; -- applied especially in anatomy to the firm outer coat of the eyeball, which is often cartilaginous and sometimes bony.

Semifloscule (n.) A floscule, or florest, with its corolla prolonged into a strap-shaped petal; -- called also semifloret.

Sphaerenchyma (n.) Vegetable tissue composed of thin-walled rounded cells, -- a modification of parenchyma.

Spitchcocked (a.) Broiled or fried after being split lengthwise; -- said of eels.

Stigmatic (n.) A person bearing the wounds on the hands and feet resembling those of Jesus Christ caused by His crucifixion; -- for true stigmantics the wounds are supposed to have been caused miraculously, as a sign of great holiness.

Subduplicate (a.) Expressed by the square root; -- said of ratios.

Sulphonic (a.) Pertaining to, or derived from, a sulphone; -- used specifically to designate any one of a series of acids (regarded as acid ethereal salts of sulphurous acid) obtained by the oxidation of the mercaptans, or by treating sulphuric acid with certain aromatic bases (as benzene); as, phenyl sulphonic acid, C6H5.SO2.OH, a stable colorless crystalSustaltic (a.) Mournful; -- said of a species of music among the ancient Greeks.

Symmetrical (a.) Having an equal number of parts in the successive circles of floral organs; -- said of flowers.

Synthetical (a.) Comprising within itself structural or other characters which are usually found only in two or more diverse groups; -- said of species, genera, and higher groups. See the Note under Comprehensive, 3.

Tartralic (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a white amorphous deliquescent substance, C8H10O11; -- called also ditartaric, tartrilic, or tartrylic acid.

Telengiscope (n.) An instrument of such focal length that it may be used as an observing telescope for objects close at hand or as a long-focused microscope.

Thalassic (a.) Of or pertaining to the sea; -- sometimes applied to rocks formed from sediments deposited upon the sea bottom.

Triatomic (a.) Having three atoms; -- said of certain elements or radicals.

Trinitrocellulose (n.) Gun cotton; -- so called because regarded as containing three nitro groups.

Trisplanchnic (a.) Of or pertaining to the three great splanchnic cavities, namely, that of the head, the chest, and the abdomen; -- applied to the sympathetic nervous system.

Whipstitch (n.) A tailor; -- so called in contempt.





About the author

Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".

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